Video: Tim Howard offers beautiful but ultimately futile metaphor for American dominance

posted at 9:51 pm on July 1, 2014 by Mary Katharine Ham

Is the nickname Nuclear Umbrella taken? American goalkeeper Tim Howard, 35, made a World Cup record 16 saves Tuesday in the U.S. team’s unlikely quarterfinals Round of 16 appearance against Belgium. But two goals for the land of many languages and breakfast beers was enough to end the American run. I listened to the “Freakonomics” podcast last week on why America does not embrace soccer and dominate the sport. One of the revelations was the U.S. has never produced a truly elite, top-flight player, unless you count goalkeepers. It makes sense. We’re America. We’re a country full of big, athletic people who are good with their hands. (Now, if only there were a sport that allowed 11 hulking Tim Howards on the field at one time. Hmm.)

“The levee is going to break at some point,” Howard said after the game. “We dreamed and we fell short of our dream.”

Really, a remarkable performance, whether you like soccer or not. Thanks, Tim!

Some called for him to take over the southern border of the U.S. Some called him the best goalkeeper in the world.

And, some went even further:

Twitchy rounds up perfectly American responses to today’s loss.

I’m being tongue-in-cheek in my headline. I don’t think he is. Performing the pro-soccer version of the Ann Coulter anti-soccer trolling column, here is Chris Hayes:

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Is the nickname Nuclear Umbrella taken? American goalkeeper Tim Howard, 35, made a World Cup record 16 saves Tuesday in the U.S. team’s unlikely quarterfinals appearance against Belgium.

It was the round of 16, not the quarterfinals.

Stoic Patriot on July 1, 2014 at 9:53 PM

Oops, thank you! I knew that. Derp.

Mary Katharine Ham on July 1, 2014 at 9:55 PM

One of the revelations was the U.S. has never produced a truly elite, top-flight player, unless you count goalkeepers. It makes sense. We’re America. We’re a country full of big, athletic people who are good with their hands.

I married me a goalkeeper. And, yes he is. ;-)

Fallon on July 1, 2014 at 9:55 PM

a World Cup record 16 saves

This only happens when you have a Little League defense.

faraway on July 1, 2014 at 9:56 PM

This only happens when you have a Little League defense.

I’m focusing on the positive.

Mary Katharine Ham on July 1, 2014 at 9:58 PM

Is it football season yet…?

JohnGalt23 on July 1, 2014 at 9:58 PM

I’m focusing on the positive.

Mary Katharine Ham on July 1, 2014 at 9:58 PM

UGA fans, next year.

faraway on July 1, 2014 at 10:00 PM

We’re a country full of big, athletic people who are good with their hands.

*sigh*

I WUVS American men!

Newtie and the Beauty on July 1, 2014 at 10:00 PM

Jesus wears a shirt that says, “Tim Howard saves”

Hillarys Cankles on July 1, 2014 at 10:01 PM

I’m focusing on the positive.

Mary Katharine Ham on July 1, 2014 at 9:58 PM

I like your attitude.

KCB on July 1, 2014 at 10:07 PM

Tim Howard’s postgame interview. He held some emotion in but you could tell it hurt him badly.

http://www.sbnation.com/lookit/2014/7/1/5862632/tim-howard-usa-16-saves-world-cup-record

Hillarys Cankles on July 1, 2014 at 10:08 PM

A fine show for a nation which has so many sports in which it excels to choose from.

Most of the nations participating have a choice of playing soccer or playing soccer.

Our world-class athletes run the gamut from football to baseball / softball to basketball to hockey and lacrosse and soccer, too… and golf and Olympic sports such as swimming

Belgium… not so much.

viking01 on July 1, 2014 at 10:09 PM

My comment is for the announcers: “The United States” is singular.

I’ve noticed even the American announcers adopting the bizarre habit of subject verb disagreement when referring to the the US team: “The United States are going to have to …”

I know Obama is divisive, but it’s not to that point yet.

forest on July 1, 2014 at 10:09 PM

Tim Howard

…I played goalie in college. Time Howard has a very big fan right now…too bad he didn’t have the quality defenders he needed.

JugEarsButtHurt on July 1, 2014 at 10:10 PM

I have a lot of respect for Tim Howard. He suffers from Tourette’s and has overcome it to be a world class if not the best goalie in the world. He goes about his business and is a role model for youngsters.

d1carter on July 1, 2014 at 10:11 PM

Wondo had the game on his foot but even if he had finished (which he should have) the offside flag was up. Better to finish and get punked by some linesman than to miss the net so badly. My heart is broken but my head is held high. Tim Howard showed heart, courage, skill, determination and perseverance today…

bobnox on July 1, 2014 at 10:14 PM

“The United States are going to have to …”
I know Obama is divisive, but it’s not to that point yet.
forest on July 1, 2014 at 10:09 PM

Prior to the Civil War, we referred to our country as “The United States ARE”; after the Civil War, we became “The United States IS.”

Go figure…

Newtie and the Beauty on July 1, 2014 at 10:14 PM

At this point, Tim Howard is the MVP of the World Cup–hands down. We came up short. However, I know from personal experience and knowledge of sports trends that USA will dominate in this sport eventually. I live in football and baseball heaven–Alabama. Yet, the interest in soccer by both girls and boys at the 4 to 12 age group is far exceeding American football and baseball. The problem comes when they reach the junior high and high school level. Alabama’s state rules heavily favor football and baseball when it comes to season, scholarships, Title IX considerations for colleges, etc. I believe that soccer will eventually dominate because American football is becoming the sport nobody wants their kid to go into with all the injuries, etc.

KickandSwimMom on July 1, 2014 at 10:18 PM

Don’t know much about this game, but down here in Texas you can only “sock her” if she’s about to break a beer bottle on your head or put a bullet in you. We’re gentlemanly like that.

As to this goalie, however, I did catch part of the game here and there, and saw him do some super-human stuff. To hear that his performance broke the goalie records of all time, well, that’s pretty damn impressive. Sounds to me that the rest of the team let the other guys have too many shots and he rose to the occasion.

TXUS on July 1, 2014 at 10:20 PM

As to this goalie, however, I did catch part of the game here and there, and saw him do some super-human stuff. To hear that his performance broke the goalie records of all time, well, that’s pretty damn impressive. Sounds to me that the rest of the team let the other guys have too many shots and he rose to the occasion.

TXUS on July 1, 2014 at 10:20 PM

That pretty much sums it up TXUS.

KickandSwimMom on July 1, 2014 at 10:23 PM

Is it really good to have your goalkeeper that busy, I thought the purpose was to keep the ball on the OTHER side of the field.

Bishop on July 1, 2014 at 10:23 PM

I married me a goalkeeper. And, yes he is. ;-)

Fallon on July 1, 2014 at 9:55 PM

…I played goalie in college. Time Howard has a very big fan right now…too bad he didn’t have the quality defenders he needed.

JugEarsButtHurt on July 1, 2014 at 10:10 PM

Aha!

Some things around here are starting to make sense now …

;-)

ShainS on July 1, 2014 at 10:24 PM

If this is going to be a sports blog can we get some baseball stories and some updates on the NBA and NHL free agent signings?

Flange on July 1, 2014 at 10:24 PM

My comment is for the announcers: “The United States” is singular.

I’ve noticed even the American announcers adopting the bizarre habit of subject verb disagreement when referring to the the US team: “The United States are going to have to …”

I know Obama is divisive, but it’s not to that point yet.

forest on July 1, 2014 at 10:09 PM

Are you sure? I believe, very early on, the Founders and such would refer to the country not in the singular, but as in “these united States”, with the ‘united’ *not* capitalized, and the focus on multiple States.

Midas on July 1, 2014 at 10:25 PM

We’re a country full of big, athletic people who are good with their hands

I’m not all that athletic these days but my hands are tattooed, that’s got to be worth something.

Bishop on July 1, 2014 at 10:26 PM

I thought the whole team played great, not just the goalie.

They made us proud.

bluegill on July 1, 2014 at 10:31 PM

forest on July 1, 2014 at 10:09 PM

Are you sure? I believe, very early on, the Founders and such would refer to the country not in the singular, but as in “these united States”, with the ‘united’ *not* capitalized, and the focus on multiple States.

Midas on July 1, 2014 at 10:25 PM

forest is correct. You too. But it was after The American Civil War, “The United States” became singular. As Shelby Foote stated, The Civil War made us an is.

SHELBY FOOTE: Before the war, it was said “the United States are.” Grammatically, it was spoken that way and thought of as a collection of independent states. And after the war, it was always “the United States is,” as we say today without being self-conscious at all. And that’s sums up what the war accomplished. It made us an “is.”

hawkdriver on July 1, 2014 at 10:34 PM

Aha!

Some things around here are starting to make sense now …

;-)

ShainS on July 1, 2014 at 10:24 PM

Some things around here are pretty darn funny.

Coincidence is logical.

Johan Cruijff

Fallon on July 1, 2014 at 10:42 PM

I try so hard to like Soccer…but…

It is the sports world’s version of World War I…trench warfare and really a depressing sport.

William Eaton on July 1, 2014 at 10:43 PM

In fact Germany vs. France will be like a Sporting “Verdun”…

The futility, the 0-0 score…

William Eaton on July 1, 2014 at 10:46 PM

My comment is for the announcers: “The United States” is singular.

I’ve noticed even the American announcers adopting the bizarre habit of subject verb disagreement when referring to the the US team: “The United States are going to have to …”

I know Obama is divisive, but it’s not to that point yet.

forest on July 1, 2014 at 10:09 PM
Are you sure? I believe, very early on, the Founders and such would refer to the country not in the singular, but as in “these united States”, with the ‘united’ *not* capitalized, and the focus on multiple States.

Midas on July 1, 2014 at 10:25 PM

In a way, both of you are right. In the early days, back during the founding and before and a good while after, we used the British manner of referring to organizations or governments in the plural, requiring a plural verb and possessives, as in the “King’s Army are gathered at the Delaware River, awaiting their supply.”

That is still proper grammar in England, and so I think it’s just fine to use it in soccer, or football as they call it, since this soccer thing is certainly more their game than baseball or our football or any real games.

TXUS on July 1, 2014 at 10:47 PM

A fine show for a nation which has so many sports in which it excels to choose from.

Most of the nations participating have a choice of playing soccer or playing soccer.

Our world-class athletes run the gamut from football to baseball / softball to basketball to hockey and lacrosse and soccer, too… and golf and Olympic sports such as swimming

Belgium… not so much.

viking01 on July 1, 2014 at 10:09 PM

Yep, I don’t notice this pathetic obsessiveness being dribbled out when it comes to lacrosse, a real sport with all of the alleged virtues of soccer and little to none of the stupidity and leftist adulatory idiocy.

ebrown2 on July 1, 2014 at 10:50 PM

What hurts is that even with all the domination that Belgium had, the US still had chances to win or tie. Wondolowski at the end of regulation, Bradley trying to be cute 20 yards out, Dempsey on the free kick having to put 2 touches on it.
But they made one hell of a run.

Zaggs on July 1, 2014 at 10:51 PM

I thought it was weird that the announcers referred to the US team in the plural, but they seem to do that for all the teams, like they are loose groups of players instead of unified national teams (probably true). It works against the overall socialist nature of soccer, but for some reason it seems to be the custom: “Argentiner have won in stoppage time!”

forest on July 1, 2014 at 10:56 PM

Tim Howard is awesome, and he played a great game. The rest of the team needs significant improvement. No real offensive push and a defense that doesn’t get back and can’t hold a line will get you beat by a good team.

I note the group winners went eight for eight over the runners up. Watching them play, they all struggled but it is clear they are a cut above.

This was a fun Cup to watch, but we need a lot of improvement at multiple positions in order to be truly competitive.

Blacksheep on July 1, 2014 at 10:56 PM

I Thank team USA for a fine performance in a sport in which the MNT sucks!!! They have improved but still not to the level of the world stage. I do look forward to the USWNT in a few years…where the Talent rises above the the USMNT….

hawkman on July 1, 2014 at 10:57 PM

There are many sports I’ve grown to appreciate that I had given little thought to previously. I think once you’ve learned (or attempted to learn) how difficult is it to play a sport at a high level, you gain an appreciation for it.

EdmundBurke247 on July 1, 2014 at 11:00 PM

I wonder how many people that are patting themselves on the back for this American team, realize the guy Tim Howard was the opposite of is considered the best goalkeeper in the world?

Fortitude on July 1, 2014 at 11:03 PM

Yet, the interest in soccer by both girls and boys at the 4 to 12 age group is far exceeding American football and baseball. The problem comes when they reach the junior high and high school level. Alabama’s state rules heavily favor football and baseball when it comes to season, scholarships, Title IX considerations for colleges, etc.

KickandSwimMom on July 1, 2014 at 10:18 PM

Klinsmann has pointed out that one of the obstacles to the US becoming a true power in international soccer is, in fact, that college system. World class players in soccer are already signing big contracts with clubs in their late teens, and they come up through a youth system for those teams (not unlike baseball “farm” system) from a very early age. Here, our players are expected to go to college, and graduate and start their careers at 23 which should be their prime in soccer.

This is all changing though, with the growth of the MLS. We have youth academies that are feeders for our professional club teams, and “homegrown player” rules that encourage teams to develop those players. Today you saw DeAndre Yedlin, who is the first big rising star that came through that program (the Seattle Sounders FC youth academy).

DaveS on July 1, 2014 at 11:06 PM

“I listened to the “Freakonomics” podcast last week on why America does not embrace soccer and dominate the sport. One of the revelations was the U.S. has never produced a truly elite, top-flight player, unless you count goalkeepers.”

So, so true. I had a rather heated argument about the effect David Beckham would have on soccer in the US. My take was that he would not have an effect. He’s not American no one cares, which was true. One Ronaldo or Balotelli from the US and America will gain interest between World Cups. Then Nike gets involved, then that player starts making headlines in the US, then athletes start looking at soccer as a legit trade. Then we become a real power in soccer. Don’t believe me? Search for Carlin Isles, he ran a 4.22 40 for Detroit and was a second tier football player because of his size, he’s 5’8″. Messi, Maradona, and David Villa put together haven’t been that athletic a day in their lives. America is littered with athletes that fell short of the NFL or NBA that could be millionaires playing soccer.

Theworldisnotenough on July 1, 2014 at 11:07 PM

I wonder how many people that are patting themselves on the back for this American team, realize the guy Tim Howard was the opposite of is considered the best goalkeeper in the world?

Fortitude on July 1, 2014 at 11:03 PM

That isn’t true. He’s good, but usually Neuer, Lloris, Buffon, Cech, Casillas come up higher on these sorts of “lists”. I would say he is probably the #1 up and coming young keeper, he’s only 21 or 22.

DaveS on July 1, 2014 at 11:11 PM

What hurts is that even with all the domination that Belgium had, the US still had chances to win or tie. Wondolowski at the end of regulation, Bradley trying to be cute 20 yards out, Dempsey on the free kick having to put 2 touches on it.
But they made one hell of a run.

Zaggs on July 1, 2014 at 10:51 PM

What really hurt us was Altidore’s injury and Klinsman not putting Eddie Johnson on the squad. Johnson could have replaced Altidore and occupied the centerbacks, and allowed us 5 men in the midfield to make up for Belgium’s talent. We would have had better possession more chances which would have decreased Belgium’s chances. Beasley might have had a little more in him, maybe enough to not fall down against Lukaku if he had repelled 6 less chances from Belgium.

Theworldisnotenough on July 1, 2014 at 11:13 PM

That isn’t true. He’s good, but usually Neuer, Lloris, Buffon, Cech, Casillas come up higher on these sorts of “lists”. I would say he is probably the #1 up and coming young keeper, he’s only 21 or 22.

DaveS on July 1, 2014 at 11:11 PM

Tim Howard is 35…

Theworldisnotenough on July 1, 2014 at 11:14 PM

I try so hard to like Soccer…but…

It is the sports world’s version of World War I…trench warfare and really a depressing sport.

William Eaton on July 1, 2014 at 10:43 PM

Yep, it sentimentally celebrates failure, as we see in this thread. Note that the hero of the game was the only player allowed to use his hands.

This is not an accident.

ebrown2 on July 1, 2014 at 11:15 PM

Carlin Isles, he ran a 4.22 40 for Detroit and was a second tier football player because of his size, he’s 5’8″. Messi, Maradona, and David Villa put together haven’t been that athletic a day in their lives. America is littered with athletes that fell short of the NFL or NBA that could be millionaires playing soccer.

Theworldisnotenough on July 1, 2014 at 11:07 PM

Is there any evidence he has the skill to excel at soccer? Speed is a good asset, but speed alone is absolutely insufficient to be good let alone great. Soccer isn’t a relatively low-skill game like football (aside from the QB role) where speed and size alone make you valuable.

DaveS on July 1, 2014 at 11:15 PM

Today you saw DeAndre Yedlin, who is the first big rising star that came through that program (the Seattle Sounders FC youth academy).

DaveS on July 1, 2014 at 11:06 PM

Boom!

Theworldisnotenough on July 1, 2014 at 11:15 PM

Tim Howard is 35…

Theworldisnotenough on July 1, 2014 at 11:14 PM

I though you meant Courtois.

DaveS on July 1, 2014 at 11:16 PM

I don’t follow soccer and learned more about the game during the last three U.S. “matches” than I ever knew. I had the time, and all I needed to hear was the U.S. was playing. I wstched today’s game. Our guys were outgunned by a Belgian team that is undefeated so far in the tournament. Tim Howard kept us in the contest with an outstanding display of defense and my read is the Belgians were beginning to wonder how they could score on us. There was no shame in the loss.

abester on July 1, 2014 at 11:19 PM

What really hurt us was Altidore’s injury and Klinsman not putting Eddie Johnson on the squad. Johnson could have replaced Altidore …

Theworldisnotenough on July 1, 2014 at 11:13 PM

Altidore’s role is to hold the ball up and let the mids push high and play off of him. EJ is awful at that… he’s a target forward that is good in the air with his head, but he is awful at distributing the ball and his work rate is questionable, especially when things aren’t going well.

A lot of people think Boyd could slot into the Altidore role, but meh. I appreciate that Klinsmann just retooled the attack.

DaveS on July 1, 2014 at 11:19 PM

This is all changing though, with the growth of the MLS. We have youth academies that are feeders for our professional club teams, and “homegrown player” rules that encourage teams to develop those players. Today you saw DeAndre Yedlin, who is the first big rising star that came through that program (the Seattle Sounders FC youth academy).

DaveS on July 1, 2014 at 11:06 PM

Yes, both of my sons play for the Olympic Development Program and are on the Alabama state team for their respective ages. The crux of the problem though is that most kids in the U.S. want to play for a Division 1 college. However, Klinsman and most international coaches believe that they need to recruit street kids who have no ambition for college. They believe that their talent pool is there.

KickandSwimMom on July 1, 2014 at 11:21 PM

However, Klinsman and most international coaches believe that they need to recruit street kids who have no ambition for college. They believe that their talent pool is there.

KickandSwimMom on July 1, 2014 at 11:21 PM

That isn’t true… they want to have a more hands-on developmental program well before they are anywhere near ready to even think about college. College should be a thing a kid can do, not the single channel for producing soccer players. They need to grow up and be groomed from a young age–if they are good enough at 17 to sign a multimillion dollar contract with Arsenal or something, then maybe they should do that–but that doesn’t make college a non-option. Anyone can go back to college at any time; they should be starting their professional careers earlier.

In Yedlin’s case, he was playing at University of Akron (a collegiate soccer powerhouse) in parallel with his Sounders Academy and US Soccer youth stuff.

It would help if the NCAA played real soccer, too. But that’s a different conversation.

DaveS on July 1, 2014 at 11:27 PM

Ochoa and Howard sure put on a show this cup.

Christien on July 1, 2014 at 11:42 PM

His great-grandfather,Shemp,would have been proud of him.

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on July 1, 2014 at 11:46 PM

I thought it was weird that the announcers referred to the US team in the plural, but they seem to do that for all the teams, like they are loose groups of players instead of unified national teams (probably true). It works against the overall socialist nature of soccer, but for some reason it seems to be the custom: “Argentiner have won in stoppage time!”

forest on July 1, 2014 at 10:56 PM

What is the overall socialist nature of soccer? Apologies for highlighting your comment specifically, but having seen many references to Communism, socialism, Marxism et al in relation to the game, I’m curious. The fact is, most people who call the game “communist” or “socialist” know as much about it as they know about the horrors of the collectivism they attach to the game. In short, they know nothing about either and other than their literal right to comment in comment sections, have no business discussing either.

A form of the game has been around for millenia, but what we recognize as soccer (association football) was organized in England in 1863. Union Rugby split from that in 1867. Gridiron, in some form or the other, sprung from there (apologies to Oneida football the Boston game, etc). Walter Camp, the father of our real American pastime, did what he did nearly a half-century later. Personally, I love American football and its weird history.

Soccer stars tend to be known by one name and glorified – Pele, Maradona, Ronaldo, Messi, Neymar etc. That’s not the socialism I know – the idea is to quell individualism, not celebrate it. Football, American football, is the least-individualistic, most team-oriented sport in existence. One man can alter one part of the game during any given game, but no one man can dominate it like basketball, baseball, hockey or soccer. Football, which I played and which I love, is by far the most Marxist game in existence.

If poor people playing the game is your argument, that’s just sad. Of the 32 nations represented in this year’s World Cup, more than half are in the top 100 of the Index of Economic Freedom. Of those, Australia, Switzerland and Chile are freer than USA. The only categorically Oppressed nations – none of them Communist – are Iran, Ecuador and Argentina.

That said, who cares if poor people play it? What does that have to do with anything. After traditional “rich” sports like polo, Alpine skiing and F1 racing, there are fewer sports that are more per capita expensive than American football. Helmets aren’t free, nor are stadia.

These threads about the World Cup are depressing for many reasons, the main one being that people I agree with about 90% of the time regarding politics and current events adapt a Quasimodo stance when it comes to a sporting event shown on two channels for one month ever four years. Soccer isn’t a commie plot, and the absence of results commies have at the game is Exhibit A in this stupidity.

/stoplikingwhatidontlike

King B on July 1, 2014 at 11:51 PM

What really hurt us was Altidore’s injury and Klinsman not putting Eddie Johnson on the squad. Johnson could have replaced Altidore and occupied the centerbacks, and allowed us 5 men in the midfield to make up for Belgium’s talent. We would have had better possession more chances which would have decreased Belgium’s chances. Beasley might have had a little more in him, maybe enough to not fall down against Lukaku if he had repelled 6 less chances from Belgium.

Theworldisnotenough

Klinsman did make some bad calls. Not having a true replacement for Altidore was one. Taking kyle Beckerman out today was another. I also believe is he was going to sub in Wondolowski, he should have taken Jones out, not Zusi. And though I’m loathe to say it, perhaps Landon should have been there.

Zaggs on July 1, 2014 at 11:55 PM

In fact Germany vs. France will be like a Sporting “Verdun”…

The futility, the 0-0 score…

William Eaton on July 1, 2014 at 10:46 PM

One can only hope that the drumbeat of futility will trail off now that the US has (thankfully) been eliminated from the “tournament.”

ebrown2 on July 2, 2014 at 12:18 AM

Thank you for capturing the hearts of America boys. If you aren’t proud of this team, I hate you.

~Dax McCarty

Christien on July 2, 2014 at 12:19 AM

Is it football season yet…?

JohnGalt23 on July 1, 2014 at 9:58 PM

The PC attacks on the Redskins are increasing, so it’s in sight…

ebrown2 on July 2, 2014 at 12:35 AM

Chuck Norris tried to score a goal on Tim Howard …

and failed.

PackerBronco on July 2, 2014 at 12:35 AM

Tim Howard is the exception to the rule “Never trust anyone with two first names.”

Christien on July 2, 2014 at 12:40 AM

If you watch European Soccer, you know that Kompany, Lakuku, Fellini, are Belgium players who are big time names in the Elite leagues in Europe. Fellini is 6’5″ and Lakuku is bigger, stronger, faster.

There is a reason Belgium is undefeated. Other National teams in the world cup are lucky to have One super star……Tim Howard is ours, and more Americans on the USA team will get an invite because of their play in the world cup.

Jozy Altidore was MIA due to injury in the first game, but the American team left no doubt that they are competitive on the world Stage in Futbol…….especially if you find foreign born players with American dads…..LOL.

MLS will grow more stars before the next World Cup. A MLS game in Frisco Tx, is like the 1960′s NFL, you get free parking, a crowd of 8,000 or less,and more fun for kids than an NFL game. Try it, you’ll like it.

JayTee on July 2, 2014 at 12:42 AM

If this is going to be a sports blog can we get some baseball stories and some updates on the NBA and NHL free agent signings?

Flange on July 1, 2014 at 10:24 PM

You’ll have to wait until Ed & Co. open up the weekly NFL threads during football season for an actual sport to be discussed on this blog.

ebrown2 on July 2, 2014 at 12:45 AM

Carlin Isles, he ran a 4.22 40 for Detroit and was a second tier football player because of his size, he’s 5’8″. Messi, Maradona, and David Villa put together haven’t been that athletic a day in their lives. America is littered with athletes that fell short of the NFL or NBA that could be millionaires playing soccer.

Theworldisnotenough on July 1, 2014 at 11:07 PM

Is there any evidence he has the skill to excel at soccer? Speed is a good asset, but speed alone is absolutely insufficient to be good let alone great. Soccer isn’t a relatively low-skill game like football (aside from the QB role) where speed and size alone make you valuable.

DaveS on July 1, 2014 at 11:15 PM

Jeebus… Are you being purposely obtuse? Let me rewrite that sentence for you.

America is littered with athletes that fell short of the NFL or NBA that could have been millionaires had they played soccer.

Did you really think I was suggesting that Carlin Isles could simply play soccer?

Theworldisnotenough on July 2, 2014 at 1:00 AM

Is there a Soccersaurus World Cup?

Kenosha Kid on July 2, 2014 at 1:20 AM

Jeebus… Are you being purposely obtuse? Let me rewrite that sentence for you.

America is littered with athletes that fell short of the NFL or NBA that could have been millionaires had they played soccer.

Did you really think I was suggesting that Carlin Isles could simply play soccer?

Theworldisnotenough on July 2, 2014 at 1:00 AM

Hmm… you explicitly stated that he was more “athletic” than 3 of the greatest athletes from the last 25 years–combined, no less–because he could run fast, and then immediately suggested that having fallen short of NFL he should play soccer. I’m not sure what you were suggesting.

If you’re saying that we have a lot of athletes who are naturally suited to soccer and could have done well in soccer if they chose to focus their developmental efforts on that instead of sports to which they were not well suited like football, basketball, etc., then that’s may be true. If you are suggesting that NBA or NFL players could excel at soccer, well, no. Different types of athleticism are suited to different sports.

DaveS on July 2, 2014 at 3:53 AM

US played well the last 20 minutes. But that was because they were basically all offense. If some of those breaks had gone the US way, would have been a different game. But Belgium had a lot of missed opportunities as well.

Really entertaining match regardless. As a Canadian, I was hoping for a US win. Lord knows we won’t get a team in the World Cup any time soon. We could, but the management is just too corrupt.

MrX on July 2, 2014 at 5:49 AM

Oh, this is about soccer.

Never mind.

Lolo on July 2, 2014 at 7:01 AM

My comment is for the announcers: “The United States” is singular.

I’ve noticed even the American announcers adopting the bizarre habit of subject verb disagreement when referring to the the US team: “The United States are going to have to …”

I know Obama is divisive, but it’s not to that point yet.

forest on July 1, 2014 at 10:09 PM

I loved the way they referred to it as plural. As in, a loose association of states with a weak central government. As in, the way it was supposed to be.

For where we are now in history, the correct term would be The United State, with no s at the end of state.

levi on July 2, 2014 at 7:22 AM

Howard was awesome. Where was the
defense? It looked to me as if Howard was practically playing
by himself.

Amjean on July 2, 2014 at 7:36 AM

These threads about the World Cup are depressing for many reasons, the main one being that people I agree with about 90% of the time regarding politics and current events adapt a Quasimodo stance when it comes to a sporting event shown on two channels for one month ever four years. Soccer isn’t a commie plot, and the absence of results commies have at the game is Exhibit A in this stupidity.

/stoplikingwhatidontlike

King B on July 1, 2014 at 11:51 PM

Amen. The lone bright spot about the US’s elimination from the tournament is that maybe now the conservative blogaratti will move on to a new whipping boy. I must have seen 10 posts/articles condemning soccer and ascribing alleged socialist characteristics to the game for every 1 article that tried to sell it. I’m a dyed in the wool conservative and I’m still passionate about soccer; much, much more than American football (which I grew up loving). Can the rest of you just give it a rest with trying to tell me what an awful person I must be? Honestly, this anti-soccer mania that gripped the right during the last few weeks is exactly what I’d expect to see from the left, when it attaches itself like a barnacle to the outrage de jour.

Soccer’s not an evil on the level of Islamism, abortion, or the subjugation of individual liberty by the State. It’s just a game that some people enjoy. I’ve never considered writing an online tome about the beer-soaked, brain-dead, thug-infested, hot-dogging culture that infuses football. You like it? Bully for you. Can we move on?

If we want to make vocal our disagreements, let’s do it on a topic that’s actually important.

KGB on July 2, 2014 at 7:37 AM

Really entertaining match regardless. As a Canadian, I was hoping for a US win. Lord knows we won’t get a team in the World Cup any time soon. We could, but the management is just too corrupt.

MrX on July 2, 2014 at 5:49 AM

Don’t feel bad, your national sport is infinitely superior to soccer in both ethos and practice.

ebrown2 on July 2, 2014 at 7:59 AM

KGB on July 2, 2014 at 7:37 AM

I think once people saw how much attention Ann Coulters troll column gave her attention for the first time in God knows how long, everyone else has been eager to follow suit.

wearyexclusive on July 2, 2014 at 8:11 AM

The U.S. lost because they were essentially playing with only 10 men. I watched and followed Bradley all game long and he was not trying to play at all at both offense and defense sides. He was always putting himself in a position of non-involvement and for a few times he touched the ball, he lost it most of the time. He was more like a referee in the game than a player. What a shame.

poxoma on July 2, 2014 at 8:29 AM

BTW, I just hope that Howard’s strong performance yesterday doesn’t lead to his getting more time behind the mic during next season’s EPL broadcasts. The guy is as dull as dishwater and shouldn’t be allowed anywhere near the broadcast booth.

KGB on July 2, 2014 at 9:26 AM

Most of the nations participating have a choice of playing soccer or playing soccer.

viking01 on July 1, 2014 at 10:09 PM

Or … cricket! Which is like a combination baseball/croquet with rules written by the Supreme Court Justice Kennedy and the EPA while on a choom bender.

Is it really good to have your goalkeeper that busy, I thought the purpose was to keep the ball on the OTHER side of the field.

Bishop on July 1, 2014 at 10:23 PM

Very true.

My comment is for the announcers: “The United States” is singular.

forest on July 1, 2014 at 10:09 PM

I disagree. Our founding documents refer to these United States several times. The concepts embodied in our Constitution would also argue for the plural when referencing the US. I think “pluralising” the US when speaking might be a good way to re-insinuate the idea of state sovereignty into the culture.

GWB on July 2, 2014 at 10:01 AM

Don’t feel bad, your national sport is infinitely superior to soccer in both ethos and practice.

ebrown2 on July 2, 2014 at 7:59 AM

Curling? Shuffleboard-on-ice? The Housekeeping game? (because of the sweeping) But, yes, in ethos and practice it is better than international soccer, and much more ‘Canadian’.

GWB on July 2, 2014 at 10:04 AM

A very good game, played with heart and soul. Tim Howard’s performance was brilliant, although it highlights the abyssmally porous US defence.

The soccer haters out there have no interest or capacity to to learn about how the game is played, its strategies and tactics, the athleticism and skill of the players. They don’t get that the game is designed to make it very difficult to score goals, which turns off a lot of Americans who are used to the triple digit scores of the NBA, the 30-40 points routinely scored by a side in the NFL. If they did they would come to see it as the rest of the world does…the “beauiful game”.

Trafalgar on July 2, 2014 at 10:07 AM

Mind you, I actually like soccer. I enjoyed playing as a kid, and I sometimes enjoy watching as an adult. (“Poetry in motion” would be an accurate description of Pele; egad I enjoyed watching his physical virtuosity back in the day.) If it were left on its own it would be moderately popular. (Much like it is already with kids.)
It’s that progressive Europhilic nanny-bullying insistence that we must like it that’s the real buzz-kill, though. I eat salads sometimes, too, and I enjoy them at times – but if you’re going to insist that I eat one every day because it’s good for me, I will probably avoid them like e. coli. If you insist that I must eat my spinach, guess what will likely never end up in my grocery cart?

GWB on July 2, 2014 at 10:27 AM

Lynden Gooch. Pay attention and learn.

Arnold Yabenson on July 2, 2014 at 11:33 AM

Captain of the under21s

Arnold Yabenson on July 2, 2014 at 11:34 AM

Curling? Shuffleboard-on-ice? The Housekeeping game? (because of the sweeping) But, yes, in ethos and practice it is better than international soccer, and much more ‘Canadian’.

GWB on July 2, 2014 at 10:04 AM

“Lacrosse in Canada was first declared the National Game of Canada in 1859. In 1994 Parliament passed the Canada’s National Sport Act which declared lacrosse to be “Canada’s National Summer Sport”, with hockey as the national winter sport.[1]”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lacrosse_in_Canada

ebrown2 on July 2, 2014 at 1:55 PM