Video: Kurds seize Jalula to attack ISIS, Iraq loses border crossing with Syria

posted at 10:01 am on June 21, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

There’s more news today from Iraq, most of it bad and getting worse. ABC reports that the Kurdish Peshmerga have advanced to the south to seize Jalula in order to help relieve the Iraqi army forces in Baquba, but not with too much success. The Peshmerga have fought more effectively than the Iraqis, but they cannot blunt the momentum of ISIS on their own. As this video shows (some of which has graphic images from a BBC camera crew caught in a firefight), the Kurds can’t convince the local Sunni tribal chiefs to switch sides back to the Baghdad government:


ABC US News | ABC Celebrity News

Rawah fell to Isis overnight:

The mayor of a town northwest of Baghdad says it has fallen into the hands of Sunni militants, the second to be captured by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in the mainly Sunni Anbar province.

Mayor Hussein AIi al-Aujail said the local army and police force in Rawah pulled out when the militants took control.

ISIS also seized Qaim, a town on the Syrian border, after a lengthy battle with the Iraqi army. That gives ISIS control of a border crossing and pushes the Iraqis further into retreat. It also allows for greater flow of heavier arms into Anbar:

Sunni militants have seized an Iraqi crossing on the border with Syria after a daylong battle in which they killed some 30 Iraqi troops, security officials said Saturday.

The capture of the Qaim border crossing deals a further blow to Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s government, which has struggled to push back against Islamic extremists and allied militants who have seized large swaths of the country, including the second largest city Mosul, and who have vowed to march on Baghdad.

Police and army officials said the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant and allied militants seized the crossing near the border town of Qaim, about 200 miles west of Baghdad, after battling Iraqi troops all day Friday.

The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to media, said people were now crossing back and forth freely.

Sunni militants have carved out a large fiefdom astride the Iraqi-Syrian border and have long traveled back and forth with ease, but the control of crossings allows them to more easily move weapons and heavy equipment to different battlefields.

The Sunni-Shi’ite battle may not be the only divide in Iraq, either. Moqtada al-Sadr’s Shi’ite militia, dormant for years, held a military parade in Baghdad yesterday to show their defiance of ISIS and their Sunni allies, but also perhaps to Nouri al-Maliki. The prime minister has pleaded with the US for assistance against ISIS, but Sadr’s Jaysh al-Mahdi forces went into the streets chanting “No, no to America”:

The parade, which was called for by Sadr, began with mud-smeared trucks mounted with tubes for launching rockets. Then came rank upon rank of fighters, most dressed in camouflage uniforms but some wearing black, armed with weapons including Kalashnikov assault rifles, shotguns, Dragunov sniper rifles, light machineguns and rocket launchers.

Armed guards watched over the parade, most with assault rifles but some carrying heavier weapons. Some units shouted “Mahdi”, the name of the 12th revered Shiite imam, every four steps as a cadence as they marched. One unit chanted the full name “Jaysh al-Mahdi”, or “Mahdi Army” — Sadr’s officially inactive militia that battled American forces in past years.

Some of the fighters at the lead of units carried Iraqi flags, while others held signs with messages including “We sacrifice for you, oh Iraq,” “No, no to terrorism,” and “No, no to America”.

A Sadr lieutenant made it more explicit:

A Shia cleric loyal to anti-US cleric Moqtada al Sadr has warned that the 300 US military advisers en route to Iraq will be attacked.

In a sermon from Baghdad’s Sadr City district, Nassir al Saedi threatened what he called “the occupier”, saying: “We will be ready for you if you are back.” …

Al Saedi’s threats highlight a potentially dangerous secondary front for US forces heading to Iraq. Moqtada al Sadr’s militia fought the Americans in at least two rounds of street warfare during the eight years US troops were on the ground there.

Speaking of welcomes, Maliki’s may have expired too:

The fall of the border crossing came as al-Maliki faces mounting pressure to form an inclusive government or step aside, with both Shiite Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani and the White House strongly hinting he is in part to blame for the worst crisis since U.S. troops withdrew from the country at the end of 2011.

If al-Maliki were to relinquish his post now, according to the constitution the president, Jalal Talabani, a Kurd, would assume the job until a new prime minister is elected. But the ailing Talabani has been in Germany for treatment since 2012, so his deputy, Khudeir al-Khuzaie, a Shiite, would step in for him.

Shiite politicians familiar with the secretive efforts to remove al-Maliki said two names mentioned as replacements are former vice president Adel Abdul-Mahdi, a Shiite and French-educated economist, and Ayad Allawi, a secular Shiite who served as Iraq’s first prime minister after Saddam Hussein’s ouster. Others include Ahmad Chalabi, a one-time Washington favorite to lead Iraq, and Bayan Jabr, another Shiite who served as finance and interior minister under al-Maliki.

The return of Sadr will split the Shi’ites just as ISIS is convincing the Sunnis to unite under their banner. That does not bode well for the defense of Baghdad, which has a significant population of both. Unless the Iraqi political leadership can find a way to demonstrate real leadership and end the divisions in the capital, it may be time for everyone else to get to Basra — or Dubai, or as far away as they can get.

But there may be one bright spot today, and it comes from the New York Times. Not all is well in the Sunni alliance either:

In a sign of a split in the coalition of Sunni Muslim forces supporting the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, the militants clashed with an Iraqi Baathist faction allied with them, Iraqi security officials said on Saturday.

The clashes took place in western Kirkuk and the suburb of Hawija, a longtime stronghold of the Men of the Army of Naqshbandia, a group formed by former army officers who served under Saddam Hussein andjoined with the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, in its drive through Iraq.

A security official, speaking on the condition of anonymity in line with official policy, said militants from the two factions fought one another Friday night after ISIS tried to disarm the Naqshbandia. However, someone in Hawija who witnessed the clash said the two factions had fought over control of gasoline and oil tanker trucks brought by the Sunni militants from the refinery at Baiji, which they have been attacking for nearly a week now. …

The Naqshbandia group was formed under the leadership of Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri, one of Hussein’s few top commanders to escape capture by the American military. The group includes Baathist party members and former military officers, and has a Sufi, nationalist philosophy that is at odds with the ISIS ideology.

Douri was one the “deck of cards” targets of the 2003 invasion that managed to slip away from US forces. He was the King of Clubs, and probably one of the more recognizable of Saddam Hussein’s leadership due to his red hair. Since 2007, he has led the banned Ba’ath Party in Iraq, and spent the last year encouraging a Sunni uprising in Anbar and Nineveh against Maliki. ISIS serves those purposes, but Douri won’t be looking to share power if he gets to Baghdad. He’ll be looking to run the show — and may already be exerting his power to take command now. If Douri ends up on top, the Sunni tribal leaders will not be easily swayed back to the government fold.


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Bishop? What is that anyway?

Toocon on June 21, 2014 at 10:03 AM

Sadr’s Jaysh al-Mahdi forces went into the streets chanting “No, no to America”

That sums it up, doesn’t it? They’d rather have sharia law, beheadings, limb amputations, summary executions, and the like than the evil Americans with their terrible democracy and peace.

They’re not salvageable. Contain the infection and let it wipe itself out.

xNavigator on June 21, 2014 at 10:08 AM

To this day I don’t understand why al Sadar wasn’t taken out 10 years ago.

ConstantineXI on June 21, 2014 at 10:08 AM

Kind of hard to keep track of all of the players in this war. What are there like 8 different groups fighting each other. I’m rooting for all of them to have great success in killing their opponents.

VegasRick on June 21, 2014 at 10:10 AM

Bishop? What is that anyway? Toocon on June 21, 2014 at 10:03 AM

An intelligence test…

Akzed on June 21, 2014 at 10:11 AM

Kind of hard to keep track of all of the players in this war. What are there like 8 different groups fighting each other. I’m rooting for all of them to have great success in killing their opponents.

VegasRick on June 21, 2014 at 10:10 AM

Yeah, once they all wake up and unite as one Islam for all – then we will really have problems…..

redguy on June 21, 2014 at 10:17 AM

I keep saying, Sunni vs Shiite. Just get out of the way and deal with the victor decisively and brutally if needed afterward. I would help the Kurds out though, only reasonably sane group there.

major dad on June 21, 2014 at 10:22 AM

Yeah, once they all wake up and unite as one Islam for all – then we will really have problems…..

redguy on June 21, 2014 at 10:17 AM

Hopefully they have eliminated 80% of themselves before that happens.

VegasRick on June 21, 2014 at 10:23 AM

Let the Shit’s and the Sun’s wipe each other out….leaving one big Kurdish State. Remember how they took out a full page add thanking us for helping them during the Iraq war. They would be a great ally.

msupertas on June 21, 2014 at 10:23 AM

Now let’s see, Iraq, VA, IRS, border invasion by illegals, government land grabs, expanded welfare state, and of course Obamacare. Are there any Obama accomplishments I’ve forgotten?

rplat on June 21, 2014 at 10:31 AM

Now let’s see, Iraq, VA, IRS, border invasion by illegals, government land grabs, expanded welfare state, and of course Obamacare. Are there any Obama accomplishments I’ve forgotten?

rplat on June 21, 2014 at 10:31 AM

Russia, China and Fast & Furious come to mind but……..FORE!

VegasRick on June 21, 2014 at 10:37 AM

Toocon on June 21, 2014 at 10:03 AM

It is the Hot Air equivalent to “First” but with a respectful nod to long time commenter Bishop, who has a contractual guarantee, so to speak, of being first on every thread whether he participates or not.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 10:39 AM

If I were to follow this mess, I’d need a scorecard consisting of all the Muslim sects, the political aims of all the groups, the local loyalties and a course in geography.

Maybe Kerry has it all figured out and will act in the best interest of the USA. s/

FOWG1 on June 21, 2014 at 10:40 AM

Akzed on June 21, 2014 at 10:11 AM

Now, now. Don’t be mean.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 10:40 AM

If these people ever get their Washington, will it be a Kurd?

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 10:41 AM

And Islam is the religion of peace.

jmtham156 on June 21, 2014 at 10:42 AM

Are the American advisors and trainers lowering their heads and going down on one knee for both Sunni and Shiite Mosques they pass on their adventure? That will delay them somewhat.

BL@KBIRD on June 21, 2014 at 10:44 AM

I’m hoping the gang puts up a bunch more “Top Picks” posts real soon. I feel like vomiting looking at that douchebag koskinin’s smug face.

VegasRick on June 21, 2014 at 10:49 AM

who has a contractual guarantee, so to speak, of being first on every thread whether he participates or not.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 10:39 AM

So to speak?

O_o

Might as well be inscribed on the Commandment tablets themselves.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 10:57 AM

Barky keeps saying he’s sending the “military advisors” that they avow to attack to assess what’s going on.

I’m just curious,, what the hell is a billion dollar embassy in Bagdad doing all day?

They don’t know? They don’t have a situation room with walls of sat images?

I gotta call bullshite on all of it.

wolly4321 on June 21, 2014 at 10:58 AM

Fat thighs just posted this

#pleasedontfight

msupertas on June 21, 2014 at 10:59 AM

But yeah, time to make a defense agreement with the Kurds and wall-off the rest of that country.

We tried to bring civilization to them and they paid us back with blood and death and terror, time to realize that the world’s armpit will always be thus. Short of slaughtering everyone down to the age of 6 and starting over with an untainted generation, they’re never going to change; tribal, regressive, savages.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:00 AM

If they are fighting each other over there, they aren’t attacking us here.

rbj on June 21, 2014 at 11:02 AM

We tried to bring civilization to them and they paid us back with blood and death and terror, time to realize that the world’s armpit will always be thus. Short of slaughtering everyone down to the age of 6 and starting over with an untainted generation, they’re never going to change; tribal, regressive, savages.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:00 AM

True but they do make one helluva good goat stew, so………..

VegasRick on June 21, 2014 at 11:03 AM

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 10:57 AM

Let’s look on my “so to speak” as my lack of verbal skills rather then a question to your greatness.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 11:03 AM

One SF sniper, one shot, one kill.

Good-bye, Mookie Sadr.

Shoulda happened 10 years ago.

formwiz on June 21, 2014 at 11:04 AM

It is in our national interest to elemenate ISIS. Fight them there or we will have to fight them here. Obama should not have said that boots on the ground or air strikes were off the table. In a war time situation you don’t tell your enemy what you will not do.

Reflecting on the first Gulf War, George H. W. Bush should have gone on it to Baghdad and removed Saddam. But our Arab allies during that conflict said that they would take care of Saddam. Well, they did absolutely nothing, as usual. This war against radical Muslim is going to go on for a long time. It is estimated that 15 to 30 percent of Muslims in the world could be considered to be radical, far too many.

SC.Charlie on June 21, 2014 at 11:07 AM

Let’s look on my “so to speak” as my lack of verbal skills rather then a question to your greatness.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 11:03 AM

I seek not fame, only recognition of my rightful place at the front of the line thanks to the Ohio Public Workers Union, any other questions or concerns and I’ll send a few of my union bros over to discuss the matter with you.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:07 AM

4,700,000 square foot. Of what?

Stopping this from happening would have, should have been easy. It all lays at barkys feet.

wolly4321 on June 21, 2014 at 11:08 AM

One SF sniper, one shot, one kill.

Good-bye, Mookie Sadr.

Shoulda happened 10 years ago. – formwiz on June 21, 2014 at 11:04 AM

I love the idea, but Osama bin Laden has been dead for years now and another idiot will pop up.

SC.Charlie on June 21, 2014 at 11:09 AM

Let the Shiit’s and the Suni’s wipe each other out….leaving one big Kurdish State. Remember how they took out a full page add thanking us for helping them during the Iraq war. They would be a great ally.

msupertas on June 21, 2014 at 10:23 AM

That’s right. I had forgotten about that. I’m rooting for them. Maybe we can recruit them to come and protect our border.

crankyoldlady on June 21, 2014 at 11:11 AM

If they are fighting each other over there, they aren’t attacking us here. rbj on June 21, 2014 at 11:02 AM

Right up until the caliphate is built, stretching from north africa to eastern afghanistan. All under one black flag.

wolly4321 on June 21, 2014 at 11:12 AM

That’s right. I had forgotten about that. I’m rooting for them. Maybe we can recruit them to come and protect our border.

crankyoldlady on June 21, 2014 at 11:11 AM

The Kurdish Air Force will create a no-fly zone over the Autonomous Conservative Region of the United States after our breakup.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:13 AM

Not that we would need it but it’s the thought that counts.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:13 AM

The Peshmerga can take care of themselves and Kurdistan as well. I expect the Kurds will take full advantage of the political and military vacuum to further strengthen their nascent homeland.

“Iraq’s Kurds have finally acted on their plan – sending forces to take the disputed, oil-rich city of Kirkuk, known as the “Kurdish Jerusalem,” and declaring the end of Iraq as the world now knows it. And what did Turkey do? Wish them well. “The Kurds of Iraq can decide for themselves the name and type of entity they are living in,” a spokesman for Turkey’s ruling Justice and Development Party told a Kurdish news outlet.

The transformation of Turkey from enemy to key ally of Iraqi Kurdistan is almost complete, removing a key obstacle to the dismemberment of Iraq”

http://time.com/2898883/iraq-turkey-kurd-isis/

Viator on June 21, 2014 at 11:16 AM

If the Kurds, a fighting machine, can’t hold off these bastards …then it’s over

Redford on June 21, 2014 at 11:17 AM

Might as well be inscribed on the Commandment tablets themselves.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 10:57 AM

The only thing comparable to the Bishop Prerogative.

de rigueur on June 21, 2014 at 11:18 AM

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:00 AM

According to the late Christopher Hitchens, the Kurds are the only people in Iraq who took advantage of the No Fly Zone and the war to make their area a place worth living in.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 11:20 AM

The Kurdish Air Force will create a no-fly zone over the Autonomous Conservative Region of the United States after our breakup.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:13 AM

That’ll work unless they are liberals and don’t approve of us.

crankyoldlady on June 21, 2014 at 11:21 AM

rbj on June 21, 2014 at 11:02 AM

True, but eventually one will decide to prove it isn’t a draw and go for a sign of “greatness”.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 11:22 AM

Thinning Out The Herd Of Turds, All Except The Kurds. There u go Hollywood, your title is ready to go.

hillsoftx on June 21, 2014 at 11:24 AM

Now, now. Don’t be mean. Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 10:40 AM

He started it!

Akzed on June 21, 2014 at 11:25 AM

Fat thighs just posted this

#pleasedontfight

msupertas on June 21, 2014 at 10:59 AM

Whose fat thighs, Hitlery, Moochelle or Psaki?

8 weight on June 21, 2014 at 11:25 AM

Battle of Jalula

We think in minutes, they think in centuries.

wolly4321 on June 21, 2014 at 11:32 AM

According to the late Christopher Hitchens, the Kurds are the only people in Iraq who took advantage of the No Fly Zone and the war to make their area a place worth living in. – Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 11:20 AM

I looked up the Kurdish Air Force and found that they consist of only five five F-15s and four Mil Mi-17 helicopters. Those are their only attack aircraft. The rest is a meager assortment of transport aircraft. Who is taking about a no fly zone, ISIS does not have any aircraft, whatsoever.

SC.Charlie on June 21, 2014 at 11:35 AM

Saw this on FB today. Something to ponder:

ISIS was reportedly trained by Americans in Jordan to fight Assad. Assad is the whipping boy of the New World Order, represented by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). Almost all presidents have had cabinets with ties to the CFR or were members of the CFR. Do we accept the narrative that the oligarchs were ‘inadvertently’ or ‘accidentally’ training the enemies of decent people everywhere?

You may accept it if you choose to. That is your right. You may also reject it and believe that the oligarchs knew they were training our enemies.

Fallon on June 21, 2014 at 11:37 AM

I seek not fame, only recognition of my rightful place at the front of the line thanks to the Ohio Public Workers Union, any other questions or concerns and I’ll send a few of my union bros over to discuss the matter with you.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:07 AM

I, and a couple of my goons will be there to defend her. And I’ll bring Oscar,Jr.

katy the mean old lady on June 21, 2014 at 11:38 AM

SC.Charlie on June 21, 2014 at 11:35 AM

Sorry, I wasn’t clear, I meant the No Fly Zone that was in place before the war.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 11:40 AM

Jalula is only about 150 miles or so north of Bagdad.

Right on the Iranian border.

Middle of the Country.

Interesting, Ed. Does this stop iranian guard troops from getting in to Iraq? Or at least to Bagdad.?

wolly4321 on June 21, 2014 at 11:44 AM

fallon on June 21, 2014 at 11:37 AM

John McCain took selfies with them.

No, I’m not kidding.

wolly4321 on June 21, 2014 at 11:48 AM

I, and a couple of my goons will be there to defend her. And I’ll bring Oscar,Jr.

katy the mean old lady on June 21, 2014 at 11:38 AM

If I gotta go over there I’m gonna bring my two boys with me, and if I bring my two boys with me someone is gonna get their ass whupped.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:49 AM

A security official, speaking on the condition of anonymity in line with official policy, said militants from the two factions fought one another Friday night after ISIS tried to disarm the Naqshbandia. However, someone in Hawija who witnessed the clash said the two factions had fought over control of gasoline and oil tanker trucks brought by the Sunni militants from the refinery at Baiji, which they have been attacking for nearly a week now. …

Once again….stay out! They are doing the job for us if we will just let them.

William Eaton on June 21, 2014 at 11:56 AM

katy the mean old lady on June 21, 2014 at 11:38 AM Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:49 AM

Y’all are going to scare the noobies or a moderator.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 11:57 AM

However, someone in Hawija who witnessed the clash said the two factions had fought over control of gasoline and oil tanker trucks

They’re fighting over nothing, doing it only because the other side wants whatever it is, so they go crazy. Like wars of the past where some ditch, some useless hill, some swamp became a cauldron simply to keep the other guy from controlling it.

Let them have at it, pick off the stragglers who stray.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:59 AM

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 11:57 AM

Rowdy kittens scare the noobs and moderators.

cozmo on June 21, 2014 at 11:59 AM

Y’all are going to scare the noobies or a moderator.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 11:57 AM

What is HotGas going to do, launch a Hellfire through my front d

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 12:01 PM

cozmo on June 21, 2014 at 11:59 AM

Apparently since Koolaid got axed.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 12:04 PM

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 12:01 PM

I don’t want to find out.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 12:04 PM

Eric Bolling just called the folks in Iraq cockroaches.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 12:05 PM

Y’all are going to scare the noobies or a moderator.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 11:57 AM

Then I send in Fat Alice.

katy the mean old lady on June 21, 2014 at 12:08 PM

Jalula is only about 150 miles or so north of Bagdad. Right on the Iranian border. –
wolly4321 at 11:44 AM

I can’t find it now but I read a few days back that Iran had authorized its army commanders near the border to cross into Iraq and attack ISIS without further authorization if they got closer to Iran’s border than around 40km. About 25 miles.

Jalula is almost exactly 25 miles from Iran’s border.

Toocon on June 21, 2014 at 12:09 PM

I keep saying, Sunni vs Shiite. Just get out of the way and deal with the victor decisively and brutally if needed afterward. I would help the Kurds out though, only reasonably sane group there.

major dad on June 21, 2014 at 10:22 AM

I have my fingers crossed that the Kurds come out of this as victors, controlling their own territory, free of Iraq. Turkey will have a screaming hissy fit, as will Iran since the Kurds as a whole occupy a lot of oil territory as well as just plain territory and they are terrified that a Kurdish nation will chip away at their Kurdish regions. Sykes-Picot screwed the Kurds, but with the Syles-Picot created “countries” disintegrating, the Kurds may finally get their opportunity. And, yes, major dad, the Kurds are the only reasonably sane bunch in that whole cesspit.

catsandbooks on June 21, 2014 at 12:14 PM

Al Qaim is no small matter either. You remember the sat images we had in the first gulf war of truckloads of crap heading out of iraq? Like maybe wmd’s?

Reverse it,. And Assad can roll the same material back in.

ISIS has the money to buy it, now.

Al Qaim is the gate to Homs. Few hundred miles.

Sounds like the kurds and isis have a date in Bagdad.

wolly4321 on June 21, 2014 at 12:15 PM

can’t find it now but I read a few days back that Iran had authorized its army commanders near the border to cross into Iraq and attack ISIS without further authorization if they got closer to Iran’s border than around 40km. About 25 miles. Jalula is almost exactly 25 miles from Iran’s border. Toocon on June 21, 2014 at 12:09 PM

ISIS didn’t take Jalula,, the Kurds did. They are 1/2 way down eastern iraq. At a chokepoint on the iranian border. Meanwhile, isis took Al Qaim, a chokepoint on western iraq/syria.

Both roads lead to Bagdad.

wolly4321 on June 21, 2014 at 12:24 PM

Fitting all of you for cement galoshes as you read this.

Bmore on June 21, 2014 at 12:27 PM

Bmore on June 21, 2014 at 12:27 PM

Thanks but I’m more than covered in the shoe department.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 12:43 PM

What difference, at this point, does it make?

HopeHeFails on June 21, 2014 at 12:45 PM

the Kurds are the only reasonably sane bunch in that whole cesspit.

catsandbooks on June 21, 2014 at 12:14 PM

It would be nice if we could trust our government to help out the good guys.

crankyoldlady on June 21, 2014 at 12:55 PM

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 12:43 PM

You and Miss Lamar both. Okay, flip flops for the both of you then. ; )

Bmore on June 21, 2014 at 1:00 PM

What difference, at this point, does it make? HopeHeFails on June 21, 2014 at 12:45 PM

Probably some, since some of the guns heading to Bagdad through Al Qaim probably were run through Turkey, from Libya. Amb. Stevens last dinner date on 9/11 had something to do with it.

If you had the chance to waterboard John McCain, he’d tell you all about it. Him and hillary got together in Sedona, to share a few laughs about it all.

wolly4321 on June 21, 2014 at 1:01 PM

cozmo on June 21, 2014 at 11:59 AM

Apparently since Koolaid got axed.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 12:04 PM

I never found out why the ban hammer came out for Koolaid. Can someone direct me to the relevant thread?

Del Dolemonte on June 21, 2014 at 1:02 PM

Del Dolemonte on June 21, 2014 at 1:02 PM

If I understand correctly it was at The Gulch which also got the kaboosh.

Cindy Munford on June 21, 2014 at 1:04 PM

But yeah, time to make a defense agreement with the Kurds and wall-off the rest of that country.

We tried to bring civilization to them and they paid us back with blood and death and terror, time to realize that the world’s armpit will always be thus. Short of slaughtering everyone down to the age of 6 and starting over with an untainted generation, they’re never going to change; tribal, regressive, savages.

Bishop on June 21, 2014 at 11:00 AM

When hub’s ship was showing it’s colors off the coast of Lebanon in 1983, I wrote and asked what he thought of the ME. He too called it the the armpit of the world. Not long after the ship left the area, our Marine barracks were bombed (lost 241 of our best). Before that, Operation Eagle Claw was a bust. Enough of our young’s blood has been shed in the last 30+ years.

I agree with your opinion above.

By the way, glad you fanned the flames, got the “fire back in your belly”, and moseyed on back to HA.

31giddyup on June 21, 2014 at 1:14 PM

Bishop? What is that anyway?

Toocon on June 21, 2014 at 10:03 AM

(It’s a Ratso!)
.
.
.

Video: Kurds seize Jalula to attack ISIS, Iraq loses border crossing with Syria

More “surprises” for the White House?
I’m sure this scenario was covered in one of the daily security briefings by the crack team of intelligence officials, the smartest man evah has assembled for his administration.

JugEarsButtHurt on June 21, 2014 at 1:15 PM

(It’s a Ratso!)
JugEarsButtHurt on June 21, 2014 at 1:15 PM

Ratso, as much we like him, could never replace “The Bishop”.

Barred on June 21, 2014 at 1:44 PM

Now let’s see, Iraq, VA, IRS, border invasion by illegals, government land grabs, expanded welfare state, and of course Obamacare. Are there any Obama accomplishments I’ve forgotten?

rplat on June 21, 2014 at 10:31 AM
Russia, China and Fast & Furious come to mind but……..FORE!

VegasRick on June 21, 2014 at 10:37 AM

Obama would agree, say “Thank You for the acknoledgement and mission almost accomplished…two more years…you ain’t seen nothin’ yet”.

albill on June 21, 2014 at 1:49 PM

To this day I don’t understand why al Sadar wasn’t taken out 10 years ago.

ConstantineXI on June 21, 2014 at 10:08 AM

When we invaded Iraq in 2003, a Shia from Bahgdad that worked for me said at the very start we needed to kill Al Sadr. He reemphasized it after al khouey was assassinated shortly thereafter. He kept repeating it for the next five years.

KW64 on June 21, 2014 at 2:16 PM

And Assad can roll the same material back in.

ISIS has the money to buy it, now.

Al Qaim is the gate to Homs. Few hundred miles.

Sounds like the kurds and isis have a date in Bagdad.

wolly4321 on June 21, 2014 at 12:15 PM

I do not think Assad would give anything to ISIS as he is an Iranian ally and Iran is a Maliki backer (or visa versa) and I expect the Kurds to stick to their territory rather than venture to Baghdad.

KW64 on June 21, 2014 at 2:20 PM

do not think Assad would give anything to ISIS as he is an Iranian ally and Iran is a Maliki backer (or visa versa) and I expect the Kurds to stick to their territory rather than venture to Baghdad. KW64 on June 21, 2014 at 2:20 PM

Is Jalula kurd territory? I’m not being flippant, I don’t know.

wolly4321 on June 21, 2014 at 2:57 PM

Reflecting on the first Gulf War, George H. W. Bush should have gone on it to Baghdad and removed Saddam.

SC.Charlie on June 21, 2014 at 11:07 AM

Cheney explained in 1994 why the US didn’t take out Saddam:

“Once you got to Iraq and took it over, and took down Saddam Hussein’s government, then what are you going to put in its place? That’s a very volatile part of the world, and if you take down the central government of Iraq you can easily end up seeing pieces of Iraq fly off. Part of it the Syrians would like to have to the west. Part of eastern Iraq, the Iranians would like to claim, fought over for eight years. In the north you’ve got the Kurds, and if the Kurds spin loose and join with the Kurds in Turkey, then you threaten the territorial integrity of Turkey. It’s a quagmire.”

After the Gulf war of 1991, an uprising led to 15 out of Iraq’s 18 provinces falling out of Saddam Hussein’s control, dividing Iraq along Shia, Sunni and Kurdish lines. But with US help Saddam was able to reassert Baghdad’s authority, using helicopter gunships to wipe out the rebel factions, in one of the most brutal counterinsurgencies in the history of the Middle East.

The reason the US allowed Saddam to use the helicopter gunships so that he could retake control of Iraq was because the US felt that Saddam was a much better option than any of the Fundamentalist Muslim Islamic/rebel factions.

JustTheFacts on June 21, 2014 at 3:01 PM

What a disaster Iraq is..such a shame for this to happen when so much American blood was given…and Christianity there is on the verge of going away forever there..already over 500,000 have left there since the Iraq War began

sadsushi on June 21, 2014 at 3:30 PM

What a disaster Iraq is..such a shame for this to happen when so much American blood was given…and Christianity there is on the verge of going away forever there..already over 500,000 have left there since the Iraq War began

sadsushi on June 21, 2014 at 3:30 PM

Before the 2003 invasion Iraq was full of Christians and Christian churches, Christians & women in government, Christians & women in schools as teachers and etc.

During the Lebanese Civil War, Saddam supported the Christian Maronite Forces as opposed to Hezbollah, which were funded by Iran and most other Arab countries.

Saddam had fiercely opposed Islamists within his own country, responding with mass executions and torture whenever he felt threatened by them and usually kept Christians and secular Iraqis within his secular government.

Saddam continually and ruthlessly fought against the spread of radical Islamism by abolishing sharia courts, arresting clerics, cracking down brutishly against any Islamist movement, ordering the executions of any captured fundamentalists and liberalizing society by promoting western ideals of society and law.

JustTheFacts on June 21, 2014 at 3:45 PM

What a disaster Iraq is..such a shame for this to happen when so much American blood was given…and Christianity there is on the verge of going away forever there..already over 500,000 have left there since the Iraq War began

sadsushi on June 21, 2014 at 3:30 PM

Hopefully this time America will finally learn to think long and hard before interfering in the affairs of other nations.

DarkCurrent on June 21, 2014 at 3:58 PM

After the Gulf war of 1991, an uprising led to 15 out of Iraq’s 18 provinces falling out of Saddam Hussein’s control, dividing Iraq along Shia, Sunni and Kurdish lines. But with US help Saddam was able to reassert Baghdad’s authority, using helicopter gunships to wipe out the rebel factions, in one of the most brutal counterinsurgencies in the history of the Middle East. – JustTheFacts at 3:01 PM

A key difference emerging is that the Turks are indicating they are no longer hostile to a Kurdish state. No doubt, they are eying Kirkuk’s oil for which they stymied our invasion into Iraq by the northern Turkish route. At any rate, I’ve always believed that is why they held up our invasion for months. They later made some moves testing our resolve about defending Kirkuk from their claims of wanting to protect some local ethnic Turkmen.

Now with the modest Kurkish pipeline running and the chance to have Kirkuk (with 15% of Iraq’s known oil reserves) within a Kurdish client state of Turkey, we could see a resolution of the Kurdish question not possibly previously. The Kurds would need Turkey’s help and protection if they are to resist hostile action from Iran over their declaration of Kurdistan as a sovereign nation. And the Kurds are that rarest of beasts, moderate secular Sunni types, much as Turkey is. The Kurds have taken in a lot of Christian refugees as well and gone to some effort to protect them. This will impact ISIS and their occupation of Kurdish areas of northern Syria as well. And ISIS recently took dozens of Turks hostage.

Before anyone laughs too much at this idea, recall that the Saudis simply bought the Egyptians out from under our thumb for a $15 billion aid package. Turkey may similarly manage to take the Kurds under its wing no matter what we say due to its energy interests and its own regional security strategy.

Toocon on June 21, 2014 at 4:06 PM

Reflecting on the first Gulf War, George H. W. Bush should have gone on it to Baghdad and removed Saddam.

SC.Charlie on June 21, 2014 at 11:07 AM

Cheney explained in 1994 why the US didn’t take out Saddam:

“Once you got to Iraq and took it over, and took down Saddam Hussein’s government, then what are you going to put in its place? That’s a very volatile part of the world, and if you take down the central government of Iraq you can easily end up seeing pieces of Iraq fly off. Part of it the Syrians would like to have to the west. Part of eastern Iraq, the Iranians would like to claim, fought over for eight years. In the north you’ve got the Kurds, and if the Kurds spin loose and join with the Kurds in Turkey, then you threaten the territorial integrity of Turkey. It’s a quagmire.”

JustTheCherryPickedFacts on June 21, 2014 at 3:01 PM

Cheney on the brain, I see. In 1994 Cheney wasn’t even in the government. Who the getalife cares what he had to say then, other than you CDS-ers?

And please tell us why you’re totally ignoring the real reasons that Pappy Bush didn’t take Saddam out.

1. Many of the Gulf countries that signed on to Pappy’s Coalition did so only on the condition that it liberate Kuwait, and nothing more. They wanted no part of going on to Baghdad.

2. The UN had already endorsed the use of force on November 29, 1990; they authorized the use of force no earlier than January 15, 1991. But their authorization was for the liberation of Kuwait only.

Discuss.

The Mouth-Breather.

Del Dolemonte on June 21, 2014 at 4:07 PM

Cheney on the brain, I see. In 1994 Cheney wasn’t even in the government. Who the getalife cares what he had to say then, other than you CDS-ers?

Del Dolemonte on June 21, 2014 at 4:07 PM

Cheney and Schwarzkopf oversaw planning for both Desert Shield & Dessert Storm. According to General Colin Powell, Cheney “had become a glutton for information, with an appetite we could barely satisfy. He spent hours in the National Military Command Center peppering my staff with questions.”

Because Cheney had intimate knowledge of the planning for both Desert Shield & Dessert Storm he was asked why the US did not take out Saddam when 15 out of Iraq’s 18 provinces had violently turned against Saddam.

Cheney answered the question by saying:

It’s a quagmire if you go that far and try to take over Iraq.

“Once you got to Iraq and took it over, and took down Saddam Hussein’s government, then what are you going to put in its place? That’s a very volatile part of the world, and if you take down the central government of Iraq you can easily end up seeing pieces of Iraq fly off. Part of it the Syrians would like to have to the west. Part of eastern Iraq, the Iranians would like to claim, fought over for eight years. In the north you’ve got the Kurds, and if the Kurds spin loose and join with the Kurds in Turkey, then you threaten the territorial integrity of Turkey. It’s a quagmire.”

The question for the president, in terms of whether or not we went on to Baghdad, took additional casualties in an effort to get Saddam Hussein, was how many additional dead Americans is Saddam worth?

Our judgment was, not very many, and I think we got it right.

JustTheFacts on June 21, 2014 at 5:31 PM

What a disaster Iraq is..such a shame for this to happen when so much American blood was given…and Christianity there is on the verge of going away forever there..already over 500,000 have left there since the Iraq War began

sadsushi on June 21, 2014 at 3:30 PM

JustTheFacts on June 21, 2014 at 3:45 PM

Still doesn’t change sadsushi’s point. Now does it????

Live in the present you tiresome pos. Really tiring.

CW on June 21, 2014 at 5:54 PM

The Kurds would need Turkey’s help and protection if they are to resist hostile action from Iran over their declaration of Kurdistan as a sovereign nation. And the Kurds are that rarest of beasts, moderate secular Sunni types, much as Turkey is.

Toocon on June 21, 2014 at 4:06 PM

Iran has a very long history of funding, supplying, training, and etc. to the Kurds.

Therefore the US and its NATO allies have officially declared and classified all three political parties of the Kurdish Regional Government (KRG) as “Tier III” terrorist organizations under the Immigration and Naturalization Act: The Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP), The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), and The Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK),.

War between Maliki’s Iraqi central government & the Kurdistan Regional Government is about to break out.

Maliki’s Iraqi central government has refused to set the final boundaries of the autonomous region of the Kurdistan Regional Government as stipulated in the Iraqi constitution!

A number of referendums were scheduled to be held before the end of 2007, as stipulated in the Iraqi constitution, but have been continually postponed which has led to several combat clashes between Baghdad and Kurdish-Irbil military units over the last 8 years.

The Kurdistan Regional Government currently has constitutionally recognised authority over the provinces of Erbil, Duhok, and Silemani, as well as “de facto” authority over parts of Diyala and Ninawa and provinces as well as Kirkuk Province including the largely Kurdish cities of Mosul and Kirkuk.

JustTheFacts on June 21, 2014 at 6:03 PM

Still doesn’t change sadsushi’s point. Now does it????

Live in the present you tiresome pos. Really tiring.

CW on June 21, 2014 at 5:54 PM

I agree with sadsushi and I agree with DarkCurrent who said:

Hopefully this time America will finally learn to think long and hard before interfering in the affairs of other nations.

The best way to to insure that Americans “think long and hard before interfering in the affairs of other nations” is to make sure that the mistakes of the past are NOT forgotten so as to NOT repeat them again.

JustTheFacts on June 21, 2014 at 6:16 PM

Leave to the BBC to report that SIX KURDS repelling an ISIS attack without suffering and deaths is bad news.

A Chair of Some Kind on June 22, 2014 at 12:04 AM

The best way to to insure that Americans “think long and hard before interfering in the affairs of other nations” is to make sure that the mistakes of the past are NOT forgotten so as to NOT repeat them again.

JustTheFacts on June 21, 2014 at 6:16 PM

No, the best way to ensure that we don’t “interfere in the affairs of other nations” is for them to not threaten us, our interests, or our allies.

A Chair of Some Kind on June 22, 2014 at 12:06 AM

Therefore the US and its NATO allies have officially declared and classified all three political parties of the Kurdish Regional Government (KRG) as “Tier III” terrorist organizations under the Immigration and Naturalization Act: The Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP), The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), and The Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK),.

JustTheFacts on June 21, 2014 at 6:03 PM

Post a link.

The Citizen and Immigration Services says this:

Tier III Organizations

Important point to remember in regard to Tier III organizations include:

There is no name required (unorganized);

There is no need for organization to endanger US national security;

The organizations are called “undesignated” terrorist organizations because they do not appear on a published list;

With broad definition of terrorist activity, armed resistance groups and guerillas fall within the Tier III terrorist organization
definition;

and There is no exception for “freedom fighters”

If there’s no list of Tier III organizations, where did you read that the US had designated the Kurdish political parties as terrorists?

A Chair of Some Kind on June 22, 2014 at 12:24 AM

Let the U.S. take care of the Rio Grande border and let the Iraqis and Kurds take care of their own borders.

Moron Labe on June 22, 2014 at 2:48 AM

No, the best way to ensure that we don’t “interfere in the affairs of other nations” is for them to not threaten us, our interests, or our allies.

A Chair of Some Kind on June 22, 2014 at 12:06 AM

In 2002 Saddam Hussein, in a letter to the UN invited UN weapons inspectors to come into Iraq to prove to Bush that the Iraq government had no WMD’s and was not a threat to the US. Saddam repeatedly stated in his public speeches and on international news that Iraq did not have the ability or the specialized facilities needed to manufacture and maintain chemical or nuclear weapons and he repeatedly said Iraq was not a threat to any country, especially America, unless Iraq is attacked and must defend its national borders.

The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence, or vice versa.

The UN inspectors said Iraq was cooperating fully and that they had not found any WMD’s but Bush advised them to leave Iraq when he gave Saddam a 48 hr deadline.

Post a link. If there’s no list of Tier III organizations, where did you read that the US had designated the Kurdish political parties as terrorists?

A Chair of Some Kind on June 22, 2014 at 12:24 AM

The political parties that jointly rule Iraq’s three Kurdish provinces continue to operate armed militia which act almost as a law unto themselves and have been permitted to commit human rights abuses with impunity.

The Kurdistan People’s Congress (KGK), The Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP), The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), and The Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), are designated as Foreign Terrorist Organizations by the US State Department and as Proscribed Groups by the UK Home Office which lists their crimes as;

Assassination, Bombing Attacks, Chemical Warfare, Drug Trafficking, Extortion, Human Trafficking, Kidnapping, Sabotage, Suicide Bombings.

Additionally, France, Australia, Austria, Canada, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, and dozens of other countries have listed them as terrorist groups.

Furthermore all of the permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, (except Russia & China), treat them as Terrorist Organizations and the military alliance NATO has declared them to be terrorist groups, the European Union officially lists them as having “been involved in terrorist acts” and proscribes them as part of its Common Foreign and Security Policy.

They have been heavily criticized by Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, and the Committee to Protect Journalists for corruption, nepotism, and violence against dissidents.

JustTheFacts on June 22, 2014 at 3:51 AM

They’re not salvageable. Contain the infection and let it wipe itself out.

xNavigator on June 21, 2014 at 10:08 AM

Nuke it in its homelands and deport all Muslims in the Western democracies. If they won’t go, kill them. Do it now or risk being too weak to do it later.

The Thin Man Returns on June 22, 2014 at 3:56 AM

With broad definition of terrorist activity, armed resistance groups and guerillas fall within the Tier III terrorist organization definition; and There is no exception for “freedom fighters”

John Adams – lawyer, Massachusetts
Samuel Adams – political writer, tax collector/fire warden, Boston
Benedict Arnold – businessman, later General, Norwich
Benjamin Edes – journalist/publisher Boston Gazette, Boston
Christopher Gadsden – merchant, Charleston, South Carolina
John Hancock – merchant/smuggler/fire warden, Boston
Patrick Henry – lawyer/fire warden Virginia
John Holt, colonial publisher for 3 American colonies
John Lamb – trader, New York City
Alexander McDougall – captain of privateers, NYC
James Otis – lawyer, Massachusetts
Charles Willson Peale – Painter and saddle maker, Annapolis
Paul Revere – silversmith/fire warden, Boston
Benjamin Rush – physician, Philadelphia
Isaac Sears – captain of privateers, New York City
Haym Solomon – financial broker, New York and Philadelphia
James Swan – American patriot and financier, Boston
Charles Thomson – tutor/secretary, Philadelphia
Joseph Warren – doctor/soldier, Boston
Thomas Young – doctor, Boston
Marinus Willett – cabinetmaker/soldier, New York
Oliver Wolcott – lawyer, Connecticut

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sons_of_Liberty

Moron Labe on June 22, 2014 at 3:59 AM

To this day I don’t understand why al Sadar wasn’t taken out 10 years ago.
ConstantineXI on June 21, 2014 at 10:08 AM

And all of his kinfolk to wipe out the al sadr name. Harsh but necessary if we were serious about pacification. Kinder, gentler and compassionate war only harms more in the long run.

AH_C on June 22, 2014 at 4:10 AM

To this day I don’t understand why al Sadar wasn’t taken out 10 years ago.

Geez, maybe we shoulda left Saddam in charge; he seemed to be on track to doing exactly that.

“Mohammed Sadeq al-Sadr, Muqtada al-Sadr’s father, was a respected figure throughout the Shi’a Islamic world. He was murdered, along with two of his sons, allegedly by the government of Saddam Hussein.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muqtada_al-Sadr

Moron Labe on June 22, 2014 at 5:38 AM

Geez, maybe we shoulda left Saddam in charge; he seemed to be on track to doing exactly that. – Moron Labe at 5:38 AM

This is why Spook Daddy Bush and James Baker III (and their coalition) refused to remove Saddam after GW I. And they were right.

Well, Bush Junior’s numbers are back over 50%. Why wouldn’t Saddam’s or Khaddafi’s or Mubarek’s? For all their harshness and corruption, they provided a lot more stability and security for their countries than what has come since the Arab Spring so beloved by the internationalists in both parties and particularly by the neocons at the big think tanks and at NYSlimes/WaPo.

Just what has this giddy neocon Arab Spring binge done to improve the economies, the employment or the security of these countries? They are all far worse off by any measure unless you want to count the rise of lawlessness and extremist militias and, recently, a full-fledged terrorist ISIL army in Syria/Iraq.

Toocon on June 22, 2014 at 11:31 AM

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