Cantor defeat means no ObamaCare replacement vote?

posted at 12:01 pm on June 12, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

So says Politico’s Jennifer Haberkorn, but the logic here is similar to that of the immigration-reform vote, only with less real meaning. On immigration reform, the only thing standing in the way of its conclusion is House Republicans, who don’t trust Barack Obama to adhere to the law and ensure border security before beginning large-scale normalization of millions of illegal immigrants. The proposed Republican replacement for ObamaCare would be going nowhere anyway:

The prospects of Republicans rallying around a replacement policy and scheduling a vote was already an uphill endeavor — one that few expected to actually happen. After all, the House GOP had been trying to agree to a plan for several years already.

But the loss of the House leader who was most closely allied with the lawmakers seeking a vote is probably an insurmountable obstacle.

The fight over an Obamacare replacement is both ideological and tactical. The House Republicans are split on what policies should be part of any legislative package. And they disagree on whether they are better off going on record in favor of specific proposals before November or sticking to less-specific health reform principles.

Cantor sided with the group wanting a vote on a replacement plan, and he promised fellow Republicans earlier this year that the House would do it. The vote was meant to quell rising concern among rank-and-file members that they were against Obamacare but not for anything else.

“He’s the guy who made the commitment,” said Rep. Phil Roe (R-Tenn.), and a strong advocate of a House floor vote. “I mean, he’s not dead. He’ll be there until the end of the year. But I think that it lessens the chances.”

The issue in this case isn’t that we’d miss an opportunity to replace ObamaCare. Some House Republicans (and probably some running for Senate seats) want a comprehensive alternative on the table so that they can attack ObamaCare and defend against a charge that they have no ideas on how to fix health insurance markets and access to providers, especially on areas where the electorate clearly wants some solutions — like pre-existing conditions, for example. Others worry that a comprehensive proposal will allow Democrats to distract from the utter failure of ObamaCare by going on the attack over the details of the Republican plan, which would have exactly zero chance of being enacted into law as long as Barack Obama remains President anyway.

Cantor’s resignation from House GOP leadership means that he won’t be able to deliver on the promise for a vote on a comprehensive plan, but … I don’t see why the next Majority Leader would be unable to take it up, if the caucus wants it. Kevin McCarthy seems set to follow in Cantor’s footsteps for the rest of this session, and if the same pressure comes on McCarthy as did Cantor, it’s not clear why this would produce any different result, especially since this is more a strategic issue than a conservative/moderate issue.

In fact, given the response Salena Zito found among Cantor’s constituents about their deep dissatisfaction with his performance, amplified confrontation might suit the next Majority Leader better:

Had he campaigned at home and spent Election Day there, instead of with lobbyists at a Capitol Hill fundraiser in Starbucks, the outcome might have been different for House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, analysts said on Wednesday as his astonishing primary loss sunk in.

Cantor, R-Va., underestimated the anti-Washington sentiment among voters in his 7th Congressional District, said Bruce Haynes, a Washington-based Republican strategist.

“What this race tells me is that people do not care about seniority as an argument for re-election, or how high up you are in leadership,” Haynes said. “They care that who they send to Washington is ‘one of us.’ ” …

White believes the disconnect began with his vote for TARP legislation, the 2008 financial bailout that authorized hundreds of billions of dollars in expenditures. But other issues were more personal for people, she explained: “He didn’t hold town halls; he didn’t keep appointments.”

The lesson, as I conclude in my column at The Fiscal Times today, is that Cantor lost touch with his constituents — and the rising disgust with big institutions, and big institutionalists:

Cantor appears to have lost touch with his constituents and their need for a champion rather than a disconnected politician climbing the ladder in nearby Washington DC. One early warning sign missed by most pundits was an action by activists in Cantor’s district to oust one of his allies  from the chair of the county Republican Party last month. The district convention signaled deep unhappiness with Cantor on the grass-roots level, and with the party establishment on both the state and federal levels.

That should have alerted Cantor that any idea of a 34-point lead in the district was fanciful and that long-term complaints about his focus might put him in danger. Dumping tons of money into negative-campaign attacks against Brat not only raised his profile, but also aggravated the problem. Cantor would have done better to spend the money on positive advertising and retail politicking, rather than taking his district for granted.

To that point, Brat gave voters a reason to turn out and send a populist message to the state and national party. Immigration may be part of that, but it’s not the whole reason, or even the most important part. Brat offered a purpose and a moral perspective on which voters could choose, while Cantor’s engagement with the district presented more of a calculation about power and influence.

That argument might have worked in the past as voters put more trust in institutions, but as Ron Fournier argued at National Journal, those days are passing away on both side of the aisle into a more iconoclastic populism that targets the institutions and the power they wield. Cantor’s high profile as a House GOP leader, added to his lack of connection to home-district voters within a day’s drive from his Washington DC offices, combined to put the former heir apparent out of the succession altogether.

It’s not as if Cantor didn’t get some signals that he was in danger. The Washington Post highlighted one big red flag in particular:

Last month in Richmond, Eric Cantor stepped to a microphone in a hotel ballroom full of Republican activists from his home district. He was clearly ticked off.

Cantor’s wife and two of his kids were there. His mother was there. His mother-in-law was there. And right there in front of them all, a little-known professor from a little college had just called Cantor a bad conservative. The normally cool Cantor was about to strike back — showing a pique he has turned on the president but rarely shows in public.

“When I sit here and I listen to Mr. Brat speak,” Cantor started, referring to challenger Dave Brat, “I hear the inaccuracies . . .”

The crowd cut him off. After all of 24 seconds.

Then the man who expected to inherit the House of Representatives was drowned out by a bunch of booing nobodies. …

Instead, a look back at Cantor’s defeat shows that it was a real rejection by a broad swath of his district’s Republican voters. And there were warning signs that it was coming: the heckling of Cantor in that convention speech and defeats of his acolytes in low-level party elections this year.

But Cantor missed those signs for far too long — focusing on his ambition in the House while his base crumbled beneath him.

That’s the story of Cantor’s loss (that and the steak dinners). The lesson to be learned from it has little to do with leadership fights, which hardly impressed Cantor’s constituents, or even on specific policies. It’s about remaining connected to the district and acting in the interests of voters, rather than on institutional interests.


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The swine learned nothing

GOP source: “we’re going to end up with 1, maybe 2 people in (House) leadership who don’t qualify as grown-up and/or ready for primetime”

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2014 at 12:04 PM

Poor America

Poor world

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2014 at 12:05 PM

The proposed Republican replacement for ObamaCare would be going nowhere anyway:

Then it’s a non-story so why bother? Is this just banter with Politico?

Akzed on June 12, 2014 at 12:05 PM

Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.

You can quote me on this.

trigon on June 12, 2014 at 12:05 PM

Look at that strawman!

ElectricPhase on June 12, 2014 at 12:07 PM

The short unhappy ‘life’ of obama’care’

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2014 at 12:08 PM

This is just part of the post election propaganda – everyone with a special interest trying to tell everyone else “what this means”.

It’s all rubbish – one person’s opinion.

Everyone needs to stay positive.

Again – November cannot come soon enough.

jake-the-goose on June 12, 2014 at 12:10 PM

Look at that strawman!

ElectricPhase on June 12, 2014 at 12:07 PM

Exactly

jake-the-goose on June 12, 2014 at 12:10 PM

The Chamber of Commerce told him he was destined to be POTUS….he believed it.

d1carter on June 12, 2014 at 12:10 PM

Donna Brazile lied at least 20 times in this article, but the scumhag has the dates wrong too…as a political analyst on TV…Cochran wasn’t forced to the runoff on the night of Cantor’s smashing, idiot.

How come such Jeantels get to speak on TV?

She’s almost as bad as Fox’s Jamoooooo.

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2014 at 12:11 PM

The puerile pigs in the House tell the land on what constitutes “grown up”…the swill is fantastic.

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2014 at 12:12 PM

Everyone needs to stay positive.

jake-the-goose on June 12, 2014 at 12:10 PM

Hell, the euphoria over the Cantor defeat didn’t even last 12 hours for some impatient neophytes.

cozmo on June 12, 2014 at 12:12 PM

Dude’s problem was that he was a glorified lobbyist and reeked of it.

The guy cast himself as one of the GOP’s “young guns” in 2010 – a decade after hitting DC and at 50 yrs/old. No way are you going to remain grounded with that level of cynicism about people’s intelligence.

Only voters who really liked Cantor were the bourgeois.

budfox on June 12, 2014 at 12:14 PM

Hell, the euphoria over the Cantor defeat didn’t even last 12 hours for some impatient neophytes.

cozmo on June 12, 2014 at 12:12 PM

You are so correct – it is astounding to see how negative so many have become – so quickly.

Really stunning

jake-the-goose on June 12, 2014 at 12:15 PM

But, hey, at least Dave Brat talks like an actual person and engages in something resembling an actual conversation. There’s not a lot of that going on in the hallways of the U.S. Capitol. What happens to members of Congress, after they’ve been there a while, is that they spend so much of their time giving stilted talks to one delegation or another in their office lobbies, or speaking in nonsensical generalities to the reporters who stalk them in designated public spaces, that they begin to confuse obfuscation with meaning. They start to think they’re being cagey and persuasive when, really, they’re just being confounding.

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2014 at 12:16 PM

“We need to empower every single child to have the best education and the best future” is a typical Cantor tweet. Or how about: “Let’s focus on what we should be focusing on which is a better economy and #AnAmericaThatWorks.” You get the idea.

If Cantor was having an intern do his tweeting, that’s a problem right there. If he was actually writing that drivel himself, it’s just horrifying.

No different from obama, Matt Bai.

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2014 at 12:17 PM

Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.

You can quote me on this.

trigon on June 12, 2014 at 12:05 PM

An absurd comment IF we capture the Senate… lots of ways to dismantle BOcare, piece by piece. Start by attaching a sunset to the risk corridor slush fund to a debt ceiling increase.

NOT an appropriations bill, which was the Cruz-inspired disaster.

Attach it to a debt ceiling increase, which Obama CANNOT veto without upsetting the MSM, the Left AND Wall Street.

This, along with judicial appointments, is why Obama and Reid are terrified of losing the majority.

matthew8787 on June 12, 2014 at 12:18 PM

The short unhappy ‘life’ of obama’care’

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2014 at 12:08 PM

But it will have succeeded in crashing our health care system.

wifarmboy on June 12, 2014 at 12:18 PM

Even Cantor’s own ads and mailers (the $2 million-plus barrage he unleashed against this supposed fringe candidate), in which he attacked Brat as a “liberal college professor” and accused him of plotting to take away Social Security, probably reinforced this sense among primary voters that the congressman had become just another Washington dissembler. The message didn’t ring true, and it sounded like exactly the kind of rhetoric these lawmakers lob at one another all day long — a classic distillation of the political culture no one can stand.

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2014 at 12:18 PM

Everyone needs to stay positive.

jake-the-goose on June 12, 2014 at 12:10 PM

Hell, the euphoria over the Cantor defeat didn’t even last 12 hours for some impatient neophytes.

cozmo on June 12, 2014 at 12:12 PM

…isn’t that the truth!…I can’t wait for November!…when the shit hits the fan then…maybe it’ll will stay on the blades for more than 24 hours!

KOOLAID2 on June 12, 2014 at 12:19 PM

You hear this, Hillary and all the goons in DC, left to right?

But one thing they and their aides should probably take away, especially if they’re climbing their way into senior roles, is that it’s a dangerous moment in American politics to sound like the tinny voice of an institution, rather than someone with genuine conviction and the courage to defend it. It’s all fine and good to bore the rest of us with vapid soliloquies about the “real people” who struggle back in the “real America.” Just don’t be shocked if they no longer feel like standing in line to vote for you.

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2014 at 12:20 PM

Then the man who expected to inherit the House of Representatives was drowned out by a bunch of booing nobodies. …

Those “booing nobodies” were Cantor’s constituents, a/k/a the people whose interests he was supposed to be representing. But instead of representing their interests, Cantor was representing his own interests.

And that’s why he lost.

AZCoyote on June 12, 2014 at 12:20 PM

Oh the horror! How many phony repeal votes have the Republicans orchestrated? The House has the power of the purse, but they would rather surrender on everything so their corporate benefactors remain fat and happy.

Wigglesworth on June 12, 2014 at 12:20 PM

Hanover County loudly said “Throw the Bum out” because the guy cared more about inside the beltway than what was happening in the birth place of Patrick Henry…

So I say “Give me Liberty or Give me Death” and me my pitch fork!

bobnox on June 12, 2014 at 12:21 PM

Again – November cannot come soon enough.

jake-the-goose on June 12, 2014 at 12:10 PM

I hate to burst your little balloon but even if the Repubs get the Senate things will not be any different. The majority of them are still in collusion with the Dems. The only thing we want done with Obamacare is repeal. I won’t vote for anyone who doesn’t promise to do that. We don’t want another congress full of Republicans tiptoing through the tulips.

crankyoldlady on June 12, 2014 at 12:22 PM

Here’s an idea. How about Republicans collectively stop fiddling while Rome burns?

While Republicans are trying to figure out a political calculus, people are suffering under the duress of Obamacare’s many damaging changes. Is it that hard for Republicans to figure out where people are being hurt most, or should we draw it in crayon?

People want relief, and a good speech or press conference does not do it. They already feel that nobody is helping or fighting for them in Washington and this feckless meandering by Republicans cements that impression.

Real leadership runs on principle and overcomes obstacles. It is decisive and unrelenting in its pursuits. It is articulate in its explaining its goals because they are simple and unchanging.

Find me one person, group or party in Washington who fits this description. Because in my estimation, there are none.

Republicans have sat by and watched the historic destruction of our country and unprecedented erosion of the people’s power we vested in them. Now they have a historic opportunity to make a difference. But what do we get? A focus on trying to move chess pieces across the political gameboard to win the senate and attacks, more aggressive than any against the opposition, on members of their own party. Pathetic.

Marcus Traianus on June 12, 2014 at 12:23 PM

Akzed on June 12, 2014 at 12:05 PM

It’s concern-trolling that losing Cantor is hurting the conservative cause already which is laughable.

Wigglesworth on June 12, 2014 at 12:24 PM

Now that “conservatives” and “Tea Party” types have succeeding in getting Cantor’s scalp, and presuming Hensarling or Sessions will be elected the new ML, I cannot wait for all the whining and yelling when either of these men have to govern and corral tough votes just as Boehner-Cantor-McCarthy have.

Having the majority in either chamber includes the responsibility to GOVERN. The ability to exclusively obstruct is a luxury the Senate GOP has that the House GOP does not.

Tip ONeil had to routinely bend in the early 1980s when Reagan had the Senate — as Reagan stated categorically in his autobiography.

If you want to change the political dynamic, win elections.

matthew8787 on June 12, 2014 at 12:26 PM

The crowd cut him off. After all of 24 seconds.

No wonder he lost. What an a**hole. And he tried to hide behind his family. I’m sure even libree’s mom (or egg donor) loves her.

BuckeyeSam on June 12, 2014 at 12:27 PM

Anybody that thinks the Republicans have any intention whatsoever of doing anything to diminish federal power and reach, e.g. repeal or replace ACA with a program of more limited scope, has to be the dumbest sonofb***h on the planet.

M240H on June 12, 2014 at 12:28 PM

Cantor’s defeat is a huge win for Democrats. It takes immigration reform off the table and allows Obama to continue ruling by decree. The Democrats can now foment a crisis on the border and go into 2014 mid-terms carrying the “Republicans are anti-Hispanic bigots” banner.

The “conservative” Democrat wing of the Republican Party once again hands the Democrats a massive win. Nice going :/

crosspatch on June 12, 2014 at 12:28 PM

Too funny

Still not convinced Brat’s victory was about amnesty? Then tell me why The New York Times ran this headline on Wednesday: “Why Did Cantor Lose? Not Easy to Explain.”

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2014 at 12:29 PM

We don’t need a replacement.

We need to get rid of it and let the free market work.

formwiz on June 12, 2014 at 12:29 PM

The “conservative” Democrat wing of the Republican Party once again hands the Democrats a massive win. Nice going :/

crosspatch on June 12, 2014 at 12:28 PM

Seriously, bl** me.

M240H on June 12, 2014 at 12:29 PM

If you want to change the political dynamic, win elections.

matthew8787 on June 12, 2014 at 12:26 PM

You think we’re more free or less free than we were when the Republicans swept congress in ’94?

gryphon202 on June 12, 2014 at 12:30 PM

Hensarling opts out of ML race. Interesting. I’m not sure Sessions can defeat McCarthy.

matthew8787 on June 12, 2014 at 12:30 PM

Cantor’s defeat is a huge win for Democrats. It takes immigration reform off the table and allows Obama to continue ruling by decree. The Democrats can now foment a crisis on the border and go into 2014 mid-terms carrying the “Republicans are anti-Hispanic bigots” banner.

The “conservative” Democrat wing of the Republican Party once again hands the Democrats a massive win. Nice going :/

crosspatch on June 12, 2014 at 12:28 PM

I got three words for you, Patch. G. F. Y.

gryphon202 on June 12, 2014 at 12:31 PM

You think we’re more free or less free than we were when the Republicans swept congress in ’94?

gryphon202 on June 12, 2014 at 12:30 PM

Less free. What is your point?

matthew8787 on June 12, 2014 at 12:31 PM

Anybody that thinks the Republicans have any intention whatsoever of doing anything to diminish federal power and reach, e.g. repeal or replace ACA with a program of more limited scope, has to be the dumbest sonofb***h on the planet.

M240H on June 12, 2014 at 12:28 PM

There are a lot of dumb Republican voters out there by that measure.

gryphon202 on June 12, 2014 at 12:31 PM

Less free. What is your point?

matthew8787 on June 12, 2014 at 12:31 PM

My point is that voting for Republicans in 1994 did nothing to make us more free. So why the fetish for Republicans?

gryphon202 on June 12, 2014 at 12:34 PM

If you lived through the Republican sweep of 1994 and STILL think that winning elections will somehow change the political dynamic, I don’t know what else to say to that. The proof is staring you right in the face that 2 + 2 = 4, and yet you still insist on saying that 2 + 2 = 5. I can’t refute that kind of stupid.

gryphon202 on June 12, 2014 at 12:36 PM

Oh the horror! How many phony repeal votes have the Republicans orchestrated? The House has the power of the purse, but they would rather surrender on everything so their corporate benefactors remain fat and happy.

Wigglesworth on June 12, 2014 at 12:20 PM

…WHY?…do people ignore that? ^

KOOLAID2 on June 12, 2014 at 12:36 PM

Are voters finally realizing these guys work for us?

southernms on June 12, 2014 at 12:37 PM

Are voters finally realizing these guys work for us?

southernms on June 12, 2014 at 12:37 PM

Yes. Now voters just have to be made to realize that threatening to vote “these guys” out of office isn’t enough.

gryphon202 on June 12, 2014 at 12:38 PM

Cantor’s defeat is a huge win for Democrats. It takes immigration reform off the table and allows Obama to continue ruling by decree.

Passing reform would stop him ruling by decree? That’s funny. The only thing that would stop him is impeachment and we know that is now going to happen.

wifarmboy on June 12, 2014 at 12:42 PM

Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.
You can quote me on this.
trigon on June 12, 2014 at 12:05 PM

Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.
Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.
Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.
Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.

HELP! I’m Stuck!

Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.
Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.

OMG!

Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.
Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.

HELP Meeeeeee!

Tard on June 12, 2014 at 12:42 PM

not going to happen

wifarmboy on June 12, 2014 at 12:44 PM

Cantor’s defeat is a huge win for Democrats. It takes immigration reform off the table and allows Obama to continue ruling by decree.

Passing reform would stop him ruling by decree? That’s funny. The only thing that would stop him is impeachment and we know that is now going to happen.

wifarmboy on June 12, 2014 at 12:42 PM

Taking immigration reform off the table is a feature, not a bug. Cantor and his buddies were looking for ways to loosen up immigration law without pissing off the people. It didn’t work.

gryphon202 on June 12, 2014 at 12:44 PM

Tard on June 12, 2014 at 12:42 PM

Nothing will happen on Obamacare until the states nullify it.

gryphon202 on June 12, 2014 at 12:44 PM

My point is that voting for Republicans in 1994 did nothing to make us more free. So why the fetish for Republicans?

gryphon202 on June 12, 2014 at 12:34 PM

Because they are the only party that can win elections and govern this nation by providing tepid to substantial support for free markets, a strong national defense, and constitutional liberty.

We were certainly more free when Reagan had a GOP senate and a working majority in the House. We were more free during the first term of Bush 43.

Do you think that electing Democrats will bring us more freedom, with the exception of being able to carry on like degenerates and criminals?

I’ll overlook the needless ad hominen attacks, which speak volumes in their own right.

matthew8787 on June 12, 2014 at 12:45 PM

Rumors of “business as usual” swirling since Tuesday are nothing but leaks, courtesy of the GOP itself. Even the story right here, on Hot Gas, about Dave Brat somehow biffing his MSNBC interview, is part of the orchestrated blitz of propaganda. The GOP wants to re-demoralize you, the conservative base, as quickly as possible. Why? Because they’re RINOs. They’re just big government types, just like the rest of them. They are full of cow dung. Do not be cowed.

brentspolemics on June 12, 2014 at 12:49 PM

matthew8787 on June 12, 2014 at 12:45 PM

Pretty well said.

We have to resist the temptation to become a party of cry babies and quitters.

Tuesday meant that change can happen – but you have to vote.

jake-the-goose on June 12, 2014 at 12:50 PM

Y’all can spin it like a top but when push came to shove it was Cantor’s amnesty garbage that tanked him. That he was a distant, non caring dbag was secondary.

neyney on June 12, 2014 at 12:53 PM

But Cantor missed those signs for far too long — focusing on his ambition in the House while his base crumbled beneath him.

He didn’t even win his own precinct where he lives in western Henrico County.

BacaDog on June 12, 2014 at 12:54 PM

Cantor’s defeat is a huge win for…

crosspatch on June 12, 2014 at 12:28 PM

The people of Virginia.

Fallon on June 12, 2014 at 12:56 PM

Obamacare passed via “Reconciliation” it can be repealed via Reconciliation.

One chamber pass the repeal, deem and pass by the other chamber in committee regardless of what bill they actually put forth.

50/51 votes in Senate
1 vote majority in House
President to sign & Vice President tie breaker if needed.

January 21st, 2017

If I’m not mistaken, call it a budget bill in the Senate so it cannot be filibustered, or make an exception like Dems permanently did with judges.

Perspicacious on June 12, 2014 at 12:57 PM

“If you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the problem, but the perpetual human predicament is that the answer soon poses its own problems.”
— Sydney J. Harris

Meh.

Fallon on June 12, 2014 at 1:05 PM

Nothing will happen on Obummercare until Obummer is out of office.

You can quote me on this.

trigon on June 12, 2014 at 12:05 PM

Nothing will happen, whether Obama leaves office or not, (and, on a slightly related note, I don’t care why Cantor lost, because nobody in Washington is listening.)

If the House passes Amnesty in August, which I fully expect, at that instant, we lose all our momentum for November, and the Democrats are going to sweep. Ditto for 2016. Maybe then, the Republicans will understand that they have been suckered, but by then it won’t matter.

And who knows, maybe they won’t care.

End of Story.

hachiban on June 12, 2014 at 1:06 PM

If you want to change the political dynamic, win elections.

matthew8787 on June 12, 2014 at 12:26 PM

Yeah, that’s what the base did for the GOP establishment in the early 2000s – gave them everything.

And what did the establishment give the base? TARP, No Child Left Behind, the Medicare prescription drug benefit, increased spending, Chief Justice Itsatax, a major drive for amnesty, and zero respect. People who didn’t think Harriet Miers was well-qualified for the Supreme Court were misogynists, people who doubted the Dubai Ports deal were bigots, and people who weren’t all for amnesty and mass immigration were haters who “don’t want to do the right thing for America”.

The way forward is beating people like Eric Cantor.

David Blue on June 12, 2014 at 1:10 PM

Loz! Like the GOPe was going to do anything about it in the first place. Ted Cruz! 2016!!!

Bmore on June 12, 2014 at 1:10 PM

If you want to change the political dynamic, win elections.

matthew8787 on June 12, 2014 at 12:26 PM

Right-o. And Dave Brat did just that.

The GOPe can learn from this, or not. I suspect not, but they might fake it until after the election.

Missy on June 12, 2014 at 1:13 PM

to fix health insurance markets and access to providers, especially on areas where the electorate clearly wants some solutions — like pre-existing conditions, for example.

Why would the GOP provide government solutions to “fix” health insurance markets? This is not conservatism.

Just repeal Obamacare.

sauldalinsky on June 12, 2014 at 1:23 PM

crosspatch on June 12, 2014 at 12:28 PM

That’s some good sh!t your smokin’ there boy.

Wigglesworth on June 12, 2014 at 1:27 PM

Sure, Ed, anything that makes you and the other pro-GOP Establishment bloggers happy.

The new meme is: If Cantor had spent more time with his constituents, he would have won.

Try: If Cantor had not been trying to pass an AMNESTY bill for his corporate masters, he would have won.

All the claims of if Cantor had been nicer etc… don’t hold water. The same Cantor won close to 80% of the vote in 2012.

TheRightMan on June 12, 2014 at 1:52 PM

There is no leadership in the House, with or without Cantor. Any of this stuff, Immigration, CLimate change, Obamacare, any of it, could have been dealt with by the House and the fact it hasn’t been is a leadership failure.

We all know that, no matter what they did, it would languish in the Senate an go no where but, as all of this falls apart and Obama takes power into his own hands, at least they’d have something to point to.

No matter what happens in November, Boehner needs to go. What’s needed is a Newt or a close proximity, not a BOehner who has no ideas and no clue. Everyone knows the Democrats are going to attack any plan the Republicans have so why not plan for that and be ready with a rebuttal? WHo knows, but having no plan doesn’t do it for me.

bflat879 on June 12, 2014 at 1:54 PM

Just wait until ObamaCare is fully in force. People will be SCREAMING for it’s repeal.

GarandFan on June 12, 2014 at 1:59 PM

As I have been saying since Romney officially became the Presidential nominee in 2012, the GOP is just fine with PlaceboCare.

Steve Eggleston on June 12, 2014 at 2:11 PM

Just wait until ObamaCare is fully in force. People will be SCREAMING for it’s repeal.

GarandFan on June 12, 2014 at 1:59 PM

Yes and no. Obamacare will never be “fully in force” because both parties seem committed to gutting the employer mandate. That makes the Chamber of Commerce happy. And since the Chamber is the only real constituency for the Republican Party, Republicans have no incentive to repeal Obamacare.

True, Obamacare becomes incoherent without the employer mandate. Obamacare had about 100 different moving parts, all of which had to work together in order for the economics to be halfway presentable. Undoing some of these parts (such as taxes on medical device companies) makes the system wildly dysfunctional. But this dysfunction will be papered over with deficit spending. Republicans are perfectly happy to spend money they don’t have.

will77jeff on June 12, 2014 at 2:21 PM

matthew8787 on June 12, 2014 at 12:26 PM

And Crosspatch.

You are both incorrect. If Obama acts unilaterally he will hurt more democrats in 2014 and 2016 – they don’t like it either, especially the blue collar voters.

This does nothing to the notion of “governing”. That isn’t what Cantor and Boehner were doing – they were trying to make a politcal party calculation about immigration (over which they are wrong by the way). They weren’t governing. Cantor became the poster boy for get along Washington on things nobody outside of Washington wants. Stupid. He got sucked into the vortex of Washington DC and Chamber of Commerce politics. In essence he embodied what the conservative right most hates about the feds. Brat winning this doesn’t harm the GOP chances to hold the seat. SO it does no damage to the calculus of elect the most conservative possible. Cantor once was – he got star struck by being so close. He will rebound, remember retail politics and run for govenor of VA.

Zomcon JEM on June 12, 2014 at 2:48 PM

BTW Ed – pre-existing conditions are one of the larger problems in Obamacare – insurance must charge for increased risk. So the GOP solution for that is also stupid and unworkable. The incentive – take care of yourself so you don’t end up with an uncontrolled chronic condition.

SOme sort of high risk pool on a federal level will no doubt be bandied about. But it has its own risks. It will have to be very tightly defined and monitored.

Zomcon JEM on June 12, 2014 at 2:50 PM

So when a GOP source says that we will end up with 1 or 2 in leadership that are not grown up, he/she are really saying that we will have two people that haven’t been so entrenched in the beltway and may actually have some balls. (sorry ladies)

crosshugger on June 12, 2014 at 3:51 PM

Why the teaparty can’t have nice things:

you can throw a tantrum and break things, sure, but that doesn’t actually help you get what you want because in representative democracy you have to convince, and acting like a brat only convinces others you should shut up.

You managed to run Cantor, a man who just a few years ago was thugh a great conservative, out of leadership and out of congress. Result? A more liberal rep takes his place in leadeship, ‘reform conservativism’ which might have helped you actually accomplish something takes a big hit, and the establishment goes from complacent to scorched earth.

How was that worth it?

At some point if you want to actually effect policy changes you need to learn the art of coalition building. Otherwise the big business concerns in the GOP will neuter you.

Tlaloc on June 12, 2014 at 4:24 PM

So when a GOP source says that we will end up with 1 or 2 in leadership that are not grown up, he/she are really saying that we will have two people that haven’t been so entrenched in the beltway and may actually have some balls. (sorry ladies)

crosshugger on June 12, 2014 at 3:51 PM

balls without brains, great combination that.

And anyway as usual the tea types have been incompetent to an extent that they failed to capitalize on taking out cantor and lost the leadership race to McCarthy.

Tlaloc on June 12, 2014 at 4:27 PM

Here’s an idea. How about Republicans collectively stop fiddling while Rome burns?

While Republicans are trying to figure out a political calculus, people are suffering under the duress of Obamacare’s many damaging changes. Is it that hard for Republicans to figure out where people are being hurt most, or should we draw it in crayon?

People want relief, and a good speech or press conference does not do it. They already feel that nobody is helping or fighting for them in Washington and this feckless meandering by Republicans cements that impression.

Real leadership runs on principle and overcomes obstacles. It is decisive and unrelenting in its pursuits. It is articulate in its explaining its goals because they are simple and unchanging.

Find me one person, group or party in Washington who fits this description. Because in my estimation, there are none.

Republicans have sat by and watched the historic destruction of our country and unprecedented erosion of the people’s power we vested in them. Now they have a historic opportunity to make a difference. But what do we get? A focus on trying to move chess pieces across the political gameboard to win the senate and attacks, more aggressive than any against the opposition, on members of their own party. Pathetic.

Marcus Traianus on June 12, 2014 at 12:23 PM

Most excellent

cthemfly on June 12, 2014 at 4:40 PM

The voters are clearly skeptical of any “comprehensive” reform by Congress. After Obamacare(tm) we know that they are neither capable of comprehensive reform of immigration, healthcare, finance, IRS, VA, or , in addition, comprehensive repeal of the above.

As Obamacare(tm) is imploding, piece by piece, all Congress really needs to do is to ease the dissolution, by removing penalties and disincentives so that business can get back to normal.

It will leave a lot of Obamacare(tm) subscribers temporarily without coverage, but then they are pretty much there now. Even they will soon conclude they have nothing to lose by not paying the fees or penalties. They will then have to migrate to private solutions.

Congress could help by removing the stranglehold of insurance companies on healthcare regulation.

Everytime a politician says “comprehensive”, the voter now thinks of healthcare.gov and is rightly alarmed at the prospect of more federal incompetence.

virgo on June 13, 2014 at 2:06 AM