Brazilians are getting ready for a rough start to the World Cup

posted at 8:31 pm on June 9, 2014 by Erika Johnsen

The official start to the 2014 FIFA World Cup festivities is only a few days away, but as I’ve noted over the past couple of weeks, the many infrastructure projects and updates that the Brazilian government began planning back when it won the bid to host the Cup in 2007 are still languishing in various stages of incompleteness while Brazilians are increasingly losing faith in their faltering economy and their President Dilma Rousseff’s to steer it. The promises that governments make about the long-term economic benefits of these types of events are almost unfailingly overblown, and even though Rousseff’s administration took some preemptive steps to try and ward off the types of strikes and protests that could cripple Brazil’s transportation and police systems just as tourists are pouring into the country, they haven’t been able to completely quash the signs of discontent. Via the Guardian:

Less than four days before it hosts the opening game of the World Cup, São Paulo became the scene of protests, street fires and teargas on Monday as striking subway workers brought chaos to the city.

The strike – which disrupted half the metro stations and worsened traffic in South America’s most populous city – was the latest headache for organisers as national teams from the United States, Spain and Argentina flew in for the start of the tournament on Thursday.

Security is also a major concern, particularly in Rio de Janeiro – the base of the England team – following a recent flare-up of unrest in the city’s favelas. Players from Roy Hodgson‘s England squad were due to visit Roçinha, the nearest shanty town to their hotel, on Monday night as part of an outreach programme.

Excitement about the tournament is steadily building among the public – evident in the growing number of flags in windows and bunting on the streets – but many Brazilians are still uneasy about the $11bn (£6.5bn) costs of hosting the tournament and associate the World Cup with corruption, inefficiency, evictions and misplaced priorities.

The protests aren’t remotely as large as the ones that rocked the country last June, but Brazilians are increasingly worried that the country won’t be able to handle the extra stress and that the government hasn’t done enough to batten down the hatches — despite the billions of dollars it has poured into the event and, by extension, into the 2016 Olympics. As Shannon Sims writes at Foreign Policy, Brazil might be “totally screwed” for the duration:

In an attempt to avoid the perfect storm of police strikes and street protests during the World Cup, the government acceded to the threat of strikes by offering a 15.8 percent pay raise to federal police agents and calling an additional 5,300 federal troops from the military into Rio. Whether the additional cash and manpower will make an impact in preventing crime from marring the experience of the 900,000 visitors expected to descend upon the city remains to be seen. …

Imagining the Cup is an exercise in envisioning everyday inconveniences, but at a greater level, Brazilians worry about the longer-term consequences of an $11.5 billion event in a country plagued by corruption. In reality, the event is likely to cost closer to $13 billion; the $11.5 billion price tag for federal, state, and host-city preparations was last updated in September of last year, and many of the works included in the preparations are still unfinished. A recent Pew poll found that 61 percent of Brazilians “say hosting the World Cup is a bad thing for Brazil because it takes money away from schools, health care, and other public services.” And while one-third of respondents believe the tournament will create more jobs and help the economy, that hope is tempered by an overwhelmingly negative perception of how President Dilma Rousseff is handling corruption. For Brazilians, part of the World Cup package is not just a suspicion of corruption but a virtual guarantee.


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What? A South American government is proving to be incompetent? When did that start?

/

mankai on June 9, 2014 at 8:39 PM

Seattle South!

Meet the anarchists who plan to go nuts at the World Cup

The Black Bloc tactic actually has its roots as far back as the 1980s in Germany, when squatters and anti-nuclear protesters mobbed together to confront police, and were dubbed “der schwarze block.”

It was taken on by protesters around the new millennium in the anti-globalization movement that disrupted World Trade Organization (WTO) meetings such as that in Seattle.

In Brazil, Black Blocs gained steam during protests against transport price hikes in 2011. They then mushroomed during demonstrations against the mega sporting events last year, when they were at the center of a wave of clashes with police.

Many of those filling the blocs’ ranks are teenagers or in their early 20s, often from the middle and emerging lower-middle class, according to AM.

“The new generation is very radical,” the protester says. “Many have no children, serious jobs, or responsibilities and they are not scared to confront the police head on.”

Fun times!

Del Dolemonte on June 9, 2014 at 8:42 PM

Is that a picture of Obama on that fence?

Cindy Munford on June 9, 2014 at 8:43 PM

Who doesn’t like a good Brazilian before the World Cup..

faraway on June 9, 2014 at 8:43 PM

There’s gonna be people killed down there.

Not from the football, the zipperhead anarchists….

BigWyo on June 9, 2014 at 8:45 PM

Who doesn’t like a good Brazilian before the World Cup..

faraway on June 9, 2014 at 8:43 PM

obaME is madder than hell after he heard that 2 Brazilian troops were killed today. He was overheard to ask biteme “how the hell many people are a brazillion?”

VegasRick on June 9, 2014 at 8:47 PM

Fun times!

Del Dolemonte on June 9, 2014 at 8:42 PM

I’m hoping some of the mental giants from OWS and the G8 protesters go down there..expecting to get handcuffed or maybe pepper sprayed…

Good times….

BigWyo on June 9, 2014 at 8:49 PM

http://www.breakingnews.com/topic/2014-world-cup/

2014 World Cup
Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, BR

9m
Sao Paulo subway workers vote suspend strike ahead of World Cup – @AFP
Read more on yahoo.com
======================

Brazil anti-government protests 2014
14h
Brazilian riot police use tear gas to disperse protesters in Sao Paulo 3 days ahead of World Cup opening game – @BBCBreaking
End of alert
=============

Brazil anti-government protests 2014
1d
Metro workers in Sao Paulo vote to continue strike, threatening disruption to World Cup opener on Thursday – @BBCNews
Read more on http://www.bbc.com

canopfor on June 9, 2014 at 8:54 PM

HamBurglar HighWay Robbery:

$17 Burger? World Cup Tourists Should Prepare for Price Shock
****************************************************************

World Cup visitors, welcome to Brazil, land of soccer, sun and sky-high prices.

Unlike nearby Latin American nations where a tourist’s U.S. dollar or European Union euro seemingly stretches forever, Brazil is astoundingly expensive.

If one’s budget isn’t immediately busted by the flight or the hotel, it will soon be done in by the $10 caipirinha cocktail, the $17 cheeseburger or the $35 pepperoni pizza. And those are the prices city-dwelling Brazilians saw even before the World Cup set off a new standard of sticker shock.

“Prices in Rio are absurd,” Maria Anda, a Norwegian artist who has lived in Brazil for a year, said while enjoying the sunset on Ipanema beach.
(More….)
===========

http://www.nbcnews.com/business/travel/17-burger-world-cup-tourists-should-prepare-price-shock-n124026

canopfor on June 9, 2014 at 8:59 PM

HighWay Robbery Part Deux:

World Cup tourists, get ready for price shock
By LUIS ANDRES HENAO
— Jun. 5, 2014 9:02 AM EDT
**************************

If one’s budget isn’t immediately busted by the flight or the hotel, it will soon be done in by the $10 caipirinha cocktail, the $17 cheeseburger or the $35 pepperoni pizza. And those are the prices city-dwelling Brazilians saw even before the World Cup set off a new standard of sticker shock.

Hotel rates in many of the World Cup host cities more than doubled ahead of the tournament. Massachusetts-based TripAdvisor reports visitors to Rio will face the highest prices, with hotel rates averaging $445 per night. Add in food, a ticket and other expenses, and a solo traveler to Rio should prepare to spend $682 each day.

Next costliest are Fortaleza and Manaus, where average daily expenses are estimated at $602 and $554, respectively. Even the more affordable host cities will set travelers back a good amount: $457 per day in Cuiaba and $477 in Sao Paulo.

The examples go on. Levi 501 jeans start at $80. The $6.28 Big Mac is among the most expensive in the world. Shaving cream, soap, tissues, aspirin — all are double to triple the prices found elsewhere.
(More…)
===========

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/world-cup-tourists-get-ready-price-shock

canopfor on June 9, 2014 at 9:02 PM

Take a good look kids, this is America’s future under continued radical leftist rule.

Whitey Ford on June 9, 2014 at 9:18 PM

Take a good look kids, this is America’s future under continued radical leftist rule.

But at least we will have soccer!
/s

Bertram Cabot Jr. on June 9, 2014 at 9:23 PM

Ever notice it’s now standard for unionized municipal transportation ‘workers’ to STRIKE right before a huge event that fills the city with tourists?

Wanna know what Ronnie would have done?

Oh yeahhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!

Tard on June 9, 2014 at 9:26 PM

Like I care. I’ll be watching it on TV at the local pub with a bunch of friends in Dallas. I think my idea is far superior as far as I can tell. It’s hard to feel sorry for these people. I’m supposed to feel sorry for them right? Right?

TexasJack on June 9, 2014 at 9:28 PM

Got Coffee?

Del Dolemonte on June 9, 2014 at 9:51 PM

Like I care. I’ll be watching it on TV at the local pub with a bunch of friends in Dallas.

It’s soccer Jack. I had no clue that anybody in Texas gave a rip about soccer other than the bazillion illegals overrunning your state. I can count today as a learning experience.

HatfieldMcCoy on June 9, 2014 at 9:56 PM

Can’t say that I get real excited watching a bunch of skinny guys in shorts kick around a basketball for a couple of hours and once in a while it accidentally squirts into a goal that’s 60 feet wide. A halfway decent baseball or football game has more drama than every soccer match ever played put together.

FOAF on June 10, 2014 at 4:00 AM

TexasJack – we will be doing the same thing in the midwest. The beer is cold, and fresh, and reasonably priced. And the view off of a big screen is far superior to being in Rio. That is going to be a he!!hole.

Zomcon JEM on June 10, 2014 at 8:13 AM