Poll: Brazilians growing oddly dissatisfied with their leftist government, slowing economy

posted at 8:41 pm on June 4, 2014 by Erika Johnsen

As I mentioned the other day, Brazilians have been growing increasingly dissatisfied over the past couple of years as they’ve started to wonder how it is that their government is managing to spend billions upon billions on (straggling and still incomplete) infrastructure, transportation, renovation, and stadium projects, but so many of their fellow citizens are trapped in poverty without access to adequate hospitals or schools. Like so many governments that bid to host major international sporting events, the regime of their leftist, Cuba-supporting President Dilma Rousseff has promised that the juice required to host the World Cup starting next week and the Olympics in 2016 will eventually be worth the squeeze because of all of the job creation and tourism it will bring about, but the economic payoff from these sorts of events reliably falls vastly short of both the promises and “investments” the host country made on its behalf (particularly countries with markedly socialist tendencies and insanely corrupt bureaucracies).

The national frustration has recently been bubbling over in the form of both public demonstrations and political sentiments, according to Pew:

The national mood in Brazil is grim, following a year in which more than a million people have taken to the streets of major cities across the country to protest corruption, rising inflation and a lack of government investment in public services such as education, health care and public transportation, among other things. A new survey by the Pew Research Center finds that 72% of Brazilians are dissatisfied with the way things are going in their country, up from 55% just weeks before the demonstrations began in June 2013.

Opinions about the national economy have changed even more dramatically over this one-year period. Two-thirds now say Brazil’s once-booming economy is in bad shape, while just 32% say the economy is good. In 2013, the balance of opinion was reversed: a 59%-majority thought the country was in good shape economically, while 41% said the economy was bad. Economic ratings had been consistently positive since 2010, when Pew Research first conducted a nationally-representative survey of Brazil.

Inflation, Crime, Health Care and Corruption Top Concerns

What’s more, a full 61 percent of those soccer-lovin’ Brazilians think that hosting the World Cup has been bad for their country because it has taken money away from public services, while 52 percent think that President Rousseff is having a negative influence on Brazil (and for a comparison, 84 percent felt that her predecessor Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva was having a positive influence in the final year of his presidency in 2010). Rousseff is up for reelection later this year, and it looks like the World Cup she surely hoped would boost her campaign prospects is instead turning into quite the albatross.


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Polls mean nothing in Brazil.

Everyone is required by law to vote. And the old folks vote for the incumbent.

Bottom line, things aint changin’.

Bigbullets on June 4, 2014 at 8:43 PM

When they built Brasilia, the “designed capital city” back in the Fifties and Sixties, it ended up much like their modern public-works projects. In The Shock of the New, Robert Hughes described it as “Mile upon mile of jerry-built nowhere, infested with Volkswagens“. And back then, their President was also busy schmoozing with Fidel & Co.

It seems some things never change.

clear ether

eon

eon on June 4, 2014 at 8:46 PM

I think I read something the other day about 1 million prostitutes gearing up for World Cup. 1 million hookers. That’s a lot of lays.

Judge_Dredd on June 4, 2014 at 8:47 PM

Poll: Brazilians growing oddly dissatisfied with their leftist government, slowing economy

Obama phones….
Or whatever turns their crank…

Electrongod on June 4, 2014 at 8:49 PM

There’s going to be some serious dying down there…

BigWyo on June 4, 2014 at 8:49 PM

Compulsory voting, 4 hour school days and Latin passion over reason.

What could possibly go right?

Skipity on June 4, 2014 at 8:50 PM

My wife is Brazilian (she became a US citizen a few years ago) and I am a natural born American, but I lived in Brazil for a few years.
Recently they were under military rule,and then they created a new constitution and became a republic.
More recently they raised the bus fare prices a few cents, and the people set the country on fire….

It’s one of the only times I can honestly say… I wish Americans were more like Brazilians. Politically that is.

With everything going on here if we were like them we’d have thrown our socialist idiot out after the stimulus didn’t work….

:/

-Wasteland Man.

WastelandMan on June 4, 2014 at 9:01 PM

Aw, c’mon Brazilians . . . . . what’s not to like ?

listens2glenn on June 4, 2014 at 9:06 PM

…they need to release some prisoners!

KOOLAID2 on June 4, 2014 at 9:07 PM

Gee, people finding out socialism doesn’t work.

rbj on June 4, 2014 at 9:08 PM

Yeah, that’s a common theme throughout the entire world.

Leftist government = stagnant, drowning economy.

Anyone not get it yet?

Meople on June 4, 2014 at 9:15 PM

Sadly, much of the dissatisfaction comes from the left of the current crypto-Marxist (and former bank robber and terrorist) presidenta (who invented this term for herself upon assuming office, rather than use the traditional, gender-neutral Portuguese word presidente).

The protests in Brazil these past few months have been fueled in large part by those demanding saúde (even more generous government-funded healthcare) and educaçao (again, government-funded through the university level). In many important ways, they resemble Occupy Wall Street.

Of course, the anger at corrupçao runs across the political spectrum, and some more-rightwing types have joined the protests complaining about the rampant graft and government waste endemic to Brazil, while a small minority have pushed libertarian-ish issues.

The Brazilian Right as a whole is largely a joke, with its major party, the PSDB (“SD” standing for “social democracy”), residing to the left of the British Tories. The PSDB in recent years has had a penchant similar to that of the GOP, putting up bland, washed-up, ideologically non-threatening candidates who stand no chance of being elected.

Aécio Neves, Governor of the state of Minas Gerais, their candidate this year, may be an improvement over perennial candidates like José Serra (who came scarily close to getting the nomination despite two failed presidential bids), but will still have a hard time getting elected given the “gimme, gimme” nature of the electorate outside of the wealthier South and Southeast of the country. A few recent polls have shown him closing the gap slightly, but these surveys were conducted by pollsters who generally exaggerate support for tucano (PSDB) candidates (Datafolha in particular, which is affiliated with a PSDB-friendly São Paulo newspaper).

As a soccer fan I hate to wish for this, but part of me is hoping the World Cup will be such an unmitigated disaster that Dilma is inundated with enough bad press to last through October, pushing some of her more left-leaning supporters toward Eduardo Campos, the Socialist Party’s candidate, and many, many more toward Aécio. To paraphrase Rush Limbaugh, espero que ela falhe.

steebo77 on June 4, 2014 at 9:18 PM

More recently they raised the bus fare prices a few cents, and the people set the country on fire….

WastelandMan on June 4, 2014 at 9:01 PM

Oh yeah. I had forgotten about the 20-cent increase in São Paulo bus fares being the spark that lit this fuse.

steebo77 on June 4, 2014 at 9:20 PM

Brazilians have been growing increasingly dissatisfied over the past couple of years as they’ve started to wonder how it is that their government is managing to spend billions upon billions on (straggling and still incomplete) infrastructure, transportation, renovation, and stadium projects, but so many of their fellow citizens are trapped in poverty…

Dang, I thought Erika meant Americans for a minute…

Newtie and the Beauty on June 4, 2014 at 9:22 PM

Their president was a marxist terrorist robbing banks and killing cops.

Blake on June 4, 2014 at 9:26 PM

I’m beginning to think that this socialism thing doesn’t work.

307wolverine on June 4, 2014 at 9:29 PM

Why Brazil’s economy is hurting without a worldwide commodities bubble to prop it up:

O Custo Brasil.

steebo77 on June 4, 2014 at 9:40 PM

The performance of more market-based economies gives a constant stark contrast to the centrally planned.

It does happen, as with Ireland, that market-friendly policies succeed and make the people think they can afford to go back to socialism. But there are enough examples of that, too.

Poland or Chile perform better than their neighbors who have more riches and resources for good reasons. You might think some would have figured it out by now.

Adjoran on June 5, 2014 at 1:13 AM

Elections have consequences. Brazil is seeing those consequences.

We in the US will have our own to pay in time.

s1im on June 5, 2014 at 12:37 PM