Geektastic. NSA also collecting facial images in massive database.

posted at 12:31 pm on June 1, 2014 by Jazz Shaw

I guess we can finally get past worrying about the NSA collecting all that meta-data about your phone calls, e-mails and text messages. That’s all so last decade. Now the government will just collect pictures of you and match them up to your name.

The National Security Agency intercepts “millions of images per day” for use in a previously-undisclosed facial recognition database, James Risen and Laura Poitras report in The New York Times, citing documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

In addition to using faces to track and identify targets, one top-secret PowerPoint presentation released by the Times showed efforts to use other information unique to individuals, including iris scans, fingerprints, voices, and manner of walking.

By the time I’d read that far into the article I was waiting for Tom Cruise to show up, manipulating some holographic images over a scanner and zooming in on an extracted helix from their DNA. But is this invasive to the point of being illegal and a privacy concern?

I suppose that depends where they are getting them. The default seems to be that they are snagging pictures which individuals post on social media or perhaps images captured from security cameras in public areas. If so, it might be hard to argue with this. Privacy advocates have long treated the modern, web based world of communications in terms of the the Fourth Amendment. We shall be secure in our houses, papers and effects, and in the modern era, our e-mails are just today’s version of our papers. But we also know that once we step outside our door and into the public square, our expectation of privacy goes down dramatically. So isn’t social media essentially like the public square of the web based world? If you just stick some selfies out there, do you have any right to expect them not to be collected and stored? The same goes for images collected by cameras while you’re out and about.

We’ll need more details (assuming such exist) to know precisely what’s being stored here. But until then, it may not be worth getting overly worked up over this.


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I can see them using artificial intelligence to read emotion and personality in these photos just as a person would, and then use pattern matching (like Watson in “Jeopardy!”) and analysis of the person’s written words to come up with a detailed picture of that person’s mind and attitudes. It’s just a few years off. I’m sure it’s started already.

LashRambo on June 1, 2014 at 12:39 PM

But… it’s for the Children….

oscarwilde on June 1, 2014 at 12:42 PM

So I wasn’t paranoid back when Social(ist) media became the fad by not marching off like a lemming, getting on Facebook, and posting pictures of myself/all my personal info because ITS A TRAP?

I never use my real name on the Internet.

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 12:43 PM

But… it’s for the Children….

oscarwilde on June 1, 2014 at 12:42 PM

Hitler did everything he did for the children too.

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 12:43 PM

We’ll need more details (assuming such exist) to know precisely what’s being stored here. But until then, it may not be worth getting overly worked up over this.

sure…why bother right??
we all know they always speak the truth and get warrants before doing anything to an american citizen right?

thing is, this isn’t new news to many. only difference now is we are not insulted when we speak about it.

time to burn it down and start over.

dmacleo on June 1, 2014 at 12:47 PM

People laughed when I coated my house in lead and created clothing made of tinfoil, including a sombrero which I always wear when I leave the house.

Who’s laughing now, fools, who’s laughing now.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 12:47 PM

I’m sure people who don’t have an online social network presence will be round up first for being anti-social or some such nonsense.

Murphy9 on June 1, 2014 at 12:48 PM

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 12:47 PM

Laughing and spitting coffee on my keyboard.

Aplombed on June 1, 2014 at 12:52 PM

Once again I am not against the NSA being used against foreign nations and non-U.S. citizens, hopefully mostly nations we are not on friendly terms with. However, you have to be a naive fool not to see the danger of the NSA being used by a certain political party with a love communism in a nefarious way on the American people.

This is not paranoia, this is understanding history. The NSA is going to have to be limited in scope and fast, which is why I am happy Rand Paul is causing them so much trouble. In the long run that is going to get the NSA back to doing what it was supposed to do…torment the Russians and Chinese…and not the American people.

William Eaton on June 1, 2014 at 12:52 PM

There is a way to beat this, or at least confuse the system.

Email or text or tweet (or all of them), a picture of yourself with a message which consists of only a random name. Eventually your photo will be associated with many names.

BobMbx on June 1, 2014 at 1:00 PM

We’ll need more details (assuming such exist) to know precisely what’s being stored here. But until then, it may not be worth getting overly worked up over this.

Without Snowden, you would never have written that comment. Who do you suppose will be supplying those details?

BobMbx on June 1, 2014 at 1:01 PM

Still there will be the idiots who’ll say “It’s good, I ain’t got nothing to hide.”.

’bout time to disband the NSA.

whatcat on June 1, 2014 at 1:03 PM

Never look up, ever. I have created a special brace you can screw to your skull which will prevent you from moving your face further up than straight ahead, cost is a mere $400. Isn’t your privacy worth $400?

I accept gold, silver, ammunition, and EBT cards.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 1:05 PM

There is a way to beat this, or at least confuse the system.

Email or text or tweet (or all of them), a picture of yourself with a message which consists of only a random name. Eventually your photo will be associated with many names.

BobMbx on June 1, 2014 at 1:00 PM

Or upload a bunch of pictures around the net of people of all races, races and both sexes and append your name to each one.

whatcat on June 1, 2014 at 1:06 PM

Define “overly worked up”. Can we at least say that this is alarming as hell? It’s not like we have systematic collaboration at all levels of government against those who lean right, or sell guns.

However I am, like Bishop, ahead of the game. I already suspected them of trying to measure my gait, which is why I skip gaily every where I go. And the clown nose is de rigueur anyway. Just wish I had a sombrero (kicks sand).

TexasDan on June 1, 2014 at 1:07 PM

People laughed when I coated my house in lead and created clothing made of tinfoil, including a sombrero which I always wear when I leave the house.

Who’s laughing now, fools, who’s laughing now.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 12:47 PM

.
Laughing and spitting coffee on my keyboard.

Aplombed on June 1, 2014 at 12:52 PM

.
Aw yeah … Bishop’s the clear winner.

listens2glenn on June 1, 2014 at 1:07 PM

Never look up, ever. I have created a special brace you can screw to your skull which will prevent you from moving your face further up than straight ahead, cost is a mere $400. Isn’t your privacy worth $400?

I accept gold, silver, ammunition, and EBT cards.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 1:05 PM

.
Hold the phone … Bishop may have outdone his first comment.

listens2glenn on June 1, 2014 at 1:09 PM

Eventually your photo will be associated with many names.

BobMbx on June 1, 2014 at 1:00 PM

In the day of no-knock raids, do you really want your address/picture/ name associated with 1000 other random profiles?

I accept gold, silver, ammunition, and EBT cards.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 1:05 PM

I have a bunch of chicken bones and bitcoin. Can we make a deal?

TexasDan on June 1, 2014 at 1:10 PM

So, I guess we all need to start living like the Gene Hackman character in Enemy Of The State

listens2glenn on June 1, 2014 at 1:13 PM

BobMbx on June 1, 2014 at 1:00 PM

should read:
Or upload a bunch of pictures around the net of people of all races, ages and both sexes and append your name to each one.
whatcat on June 1, 2014 at 1:06 PM

whatcat on June 1, 2014 at 1:16 PM

The issue isn’t how they get the images, it’s how they use them.

I’m sure we can trust our government not to do anything wrong or illegal with these images. (cough)

The Rogue Tomato on June 1, 2014 at 1:21 PM

“I suppose that depends where they are getting them. The default seems to be that they are snagging pictures which individuals post on social media or perhaps images captured from security cameras in public areas. If so, it might be hard to argue with this.”

Whoa! It’s one thing to say that that you voluntarily give up your privacy by openly posting your photo on the Internet. It’s something else to you give it up by walking down the street.

NCC on June 1, 2014 at 1:23 PM

NSA = Largest single collection of every type of porn in the world.

tjexcite on June 1, 2014 at 1:24 PM

………..undisclosed facial recognition database…

…so buy stock?…in Botox?

KOOLAID2 on June 1, 2014 at 1:24 PM

Hey, NSA, it’s Tuttle, not Buttle.

The Rogue Tomato on June 1, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Yes, I do accept chicken bones as payment. I figure I can entwine them in my hair after society collapses and use my new look to scare everyone around me into compliance, they’ll believe I’m some sort of god with terrible powers.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 1:28 PM

I never use my real name on the Internet.

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 12:43 PM

Yep, and I also never post photos of myself, and I don’t use FB, Instagram, Twitter, etc.

Come and get me, NSA. But first . . . are you sure it’s really me?

AZCoyote on June 1, 2014 at 1:31 PM

they’ll believe I’m some sort of god with terrible powers.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 1:28 PM

Or a cannibal looking for lunch…

oscarwilde on June 1, 2014 at 1:32 PM

But first . . . are you sure it’s really me?

AZCoyote on June 1, 2014 at 1:31 PM

Has that ever stopped them from kicking in doors and shooting people in their beds?

oscarwilde on June 1, 2014 at 1:34 PM

Yes, I do accept chicken bones as payment. I figure I can entwine them in my hair after society collapses and use my new look to scare everyone around me into compliance, they’ll believe I’m some sort of god with terrible powers.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 1:28 PM

I was going to rely on simply not bathing to affect that result, until someone pointed out to me that everyone else would be doing that too.

Freaky is a high bar anymore.

TexasDan on June 1, 2014 at 1:34 PM

They’re not capturing and storing this information for nothing. That they feel the need to gather, store, cross-match, etc – is reason enough to be concerned.

Midas on June 1, 2014 at 1:36 PM

We’ll need more details (assuming such exist) to know precisely what’s being stored here. But until then, it may not be worth getting overly worked up over this.

sure…why bother right??
we all know they always speak the truth and get warrants before doing anything to an american citizen right?

thing is, this isn’t new news to many. only difference now is we are not insulted when we speak about it.

time to burn it down and start over.

dmacleo on June 1, 2014 at 12:47 PM

If we are doing nothing wrong, we have nothing to worry about, right?

slickwillie2001 on June 1, 2014 at 1:37 PM

Mission

The National Security Agency/Central Security Service (NSA/CSS) leads the U.S. Government in cryptology that encompasses both Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) and Information Assurance (IA) products and services, and enables Computer Network Operations (CNO) in order to gain a decision advantage for the Nation and our allies under all circumstances.

The Information Assurance mission confronts the formidable challenge of preventing foreign adversaries from gaining access to sensitive or classified national security information. The Signals Intelligence mission collects, processes, and disseminates intelligence information from foreign signals for intelligence and counterintelligence purposes and to support military operations. This Agency also enables Network Warfare operations to defeat terrorists and their organizations at home and abroad, consistent with U.S. laws and the protection of privacy and civil liberties.

Executive Order 12333, originally issued 4 December 1981, delineates the NSA/CSS roles and responsibilities. In part, the Director, NSA/Chief, CSS is charged to:

* Collect (including through clandestine means), process, analyze, produce, and disseminate signals intelligence information and data for foreign intelligence and counterintelligence purposes to support national and departmental missions;

* Act as the National Manager for National Security Systems as established in law and policy, and in this capacity be responsible to the Secretary of Defense and to the Director, National Intelligence;

* Prescribe security regulations covering operating practices, including the transmission, handling, and distribution of signals intelligence and communications security material within and among the elements under control of the Director of the National Security Agency, and exercise the necessary supervisory control to ensure compliance with the regulations.

EO 12333 was amended on 31 July 2008 in order to:

* Align EO12333 with the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004;

* Implement additional recommendations of the 9/11 and WMD Commissions;

* Further integrate the Intelligence Community and clarify and strengthen the role of the DNI as the head of the Community;

* Maintain or strengthen privacy and civil liberties protections.

~

EO 12333: Background . 1981 Presidential Order defined goals, directions, duties, and responsibilities with regard to U.S. intelligence efforts Part 1

2. EO 12333: Background 1981 Presidential Order defined goals, directions, duties, and responsibilities with regard to U.S. intelligence efforts Part 1 � Established strategic goals for intelligence, defined roles and responsibilities for DNI, Department heads, and Intelligence Community elements Part 2 – Privacy and civil liberties protections Part 3 � Definitions Modifications in 2003, 2004

3. EO 12333 Revision: Why Now? Align with 2004 Intelligence Reform legislation Respond to direction that the President issue guidelines to ensure the DNI effectively executes responsibilities Further respond to the 9/11 and WMD Commission recommendations Take advantage of lessons learned from 3 years implementing intelligence reform, and unique IC experience of current agency and department heads Establish an effective and durable framework for intelligence activities

4. Executive Order 12333 Revision Objectives Align EO12333 with the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (IRTPA) Implement additional recommendations of the 9/11 and WMD Commissions Clarify and strengthen the role of the DNI as head of the Intelligence Community Maintain or strengthen privacy and civil liberties protections

5. EO 12333 Revision Major Structural Changes 1. Access to �National Intelligence� New definition of �National Intelligence� in IRTPA DNI given authority to determine if information �pertains to more than one agency� in accordance w/ definition DNI will develop Attorney General-approved guidelines for access to information held in other US Government Agencies 2. Selection & Removal of IC Element Heads DNI concurrence or consultation role DNI role will not interfere with DoD chain of command DNI consultation role for USD(I)

6. EO 12333 Revision Major Structural Changes 3. IRTPA Section 1018 Community implements DNI directives Procedures for Department heads to raise concerns if they see abrogation 4. Ensure Coordination of IC Intelligence Activities Gives DNI the responsibility to issue overarching policies and procedures to ensure coordination of intelligence activities Establish coordination thresholds; define types of activities to be coordinated; etc. Specific roles for FBI, CIA; DNI may assign additional roles 5. Acquisition: DNI, in coordination with Department Head, shall develop procedures to govern acquisitions if majority funded by National Intelligence Program (NIP)

7. EO 12333 Revision Major Structural Changes 6. Foreign Intelligence Relationships DNI formulates IC policy for engagement with foreign intelligence and security services, and aligns efforts across the IC to achieve national security and intelligence objectives CIA coordinates implementation 7. Functional Managers Set training and tradecraft standards Advise on resources, policies, collection gaps, etc. Designated for SIGINT, HUMINT, GEOINT DNI may designate others

8. EO 12333 Revision Major Structural Changes Civil Liberties and Privacy Protection Revised EO retains the civil liberties and privacy protections No change to restrictions on human experimentation, or the ban on assassinations

~

Somewhere in all that you probably will find NSA’s empowerment to keep your photos on file and match them with any personal info it can gather on you, including your obesity rating, what meds you take, what web sites you visit…

Akzed on June 1, 2014 at 1:39 PM

If we are doing nothing wrong, we have nothing to worry about, right? slickwillie2001 on June 1, 2014 at 1:37 PM

“That depends on what the meaning of the word “wrong” is.

Akzed on June 1, 2014 at 1:41 PM

I was going to rely on simply not bathing to affect that result, until someone pointed out to me that everyone else would be doing that too.

Freaky is a high bar anymore.

TexasDan on June 1, 2014 at 1:34 PM

By not bathing you might get pegged as a former member of OWS, and I believe such people will be food after the fall, you don’t want to be food.

Chicken bones in the hair, a long leather coat with the sleeves hacked off, and a smiley-face shirt; guaranteed to scare the ever lovin’ shiznatch out of those who might try to do you harm.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 1:41 PM

I accept gold, silver, ammunition, and EBT cards.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 1:05 PM

I have a bunch of chicken bones and bitcoin. Can we make a deal?

TexasDan on June 1, 2014 at 1:10 PM

…Bishop used to barter!

KOOLAID2 on June 1, 2014 at 1:41 PM

The NSA’s p*nis and *ss photo database is what worries me (especially the limp and not so limp departments…).

And you know the NSA has got to have the most comprehensive b**bs photo data base in the world!

albill on June 1, 2014 at 1:48 PM

Come and get me, NSA. But first . . . are you sure it’s really me? AZCoyote on June 1, 2014 at 1:31 PM

Well, the NSA is not doing home invasions yet, but I’m sure that the officials kicking in your door using the intelligence it supplies will be extra mega careful, as usual.

Akzed on June 1, 2014 at 1:48 PM

People laughed when I coated my house in lead and created clothing made of tinfoil, including a sombrero which I always wear when I leave the house.

Who’s laughing now, fools, who’s laughing now.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 12:47 PM

Tears of hilarity streaming out of my eyes …

ShainS on June 1, 2014 at 1:49 PM

If so, it might be hard to argue with this.

No, it’s easy to argue with this. Just because the government CAN do something, doesn’t mean they SHOULD. They have no business wholesale harvesting huge amounts of personal information on US citizens – neither does the FBI, the DEA or the IRS. They don’t need that sort of power, and I don’t want my tax dollars paying for it. So we need to elect people who scale down and defund and delimit our out-of-control bureaucracy.

But, but, but … Google can! Facebook can! So what? Google can’t fine me, jail me, or harass me, beyond trying to target advertising at me.

notropis on June 1, 2014 at 1:52 PM

But, but, but … Google can! Facebook can! So what? Google can’t fine me, jail me, or harass me, beyond trying to target advertising at me.

notropis on June 1, 2014 at 1:52 PM

Unless they give their information to the NSA. The people who run these things are marxists.

crankyoldlady on June 1, 2014 at 1:54 PM

Start using Barack HUSSEIN Obama as your avatar in all online activities.

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 1:55 PM

they’ll believe I’m some sort of god with terrible powers.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 1:28 PM

.
Or a cannibal looking for lunch…

oscarwilde on June 1, 2014 at 1:32 PM

.
I gotta concur with oscar’, on that on.

listens2glenn on June 1, 2014 at 1:55 PM

By not bathing you might get pegged as a former member of OWS, and I believe such people will be food after the fall, you don’t want to be food.

Chicken bones in the hair, a long leather coat with the sleeves hacked off, and a smiley-face shirt; guaranteed to scare the ever lovin’ shiznatch out of those who might try to do you harm.

Bishop on June 1, 2014 at 1:41 PM

I have an investment in a potential business I’d like to sell you:

Gunpowder-scented cologne and deodorant.

IE: smell like you’ve recently been doing some shooting. A LOT of shooting…

That should be a deterrent should it not?

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 1:57 PM

Google can’t fine me, jail me, or harass me, beyond trying to target advertising at me.

notropis on June 1, 2014 at 1:52 PM

.
Google is in bed with the government, notrop’.

listens2glenn on June 1, 2014 at 1:57 PM

Google is in bed with the government, notrop’.

listens2glenn on June 1, 2014 at 1:57 PM

Eric Schmidt will be amongst those lined up against the wall when the Revolution comes.

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 1:58 PM

Correction:

. . . . . on that one.

listens2glenn on June 1, 2014 at 1:55 PM

.
* S i g h *

listens2glenn on June 1, 2014 at 2:00 PM

Somewhere in all that you probably will find NSA’s empowerment to keep your photos on file and match them with any personal info it can gather on you, including your obesity rating, what meds you take, what web sites you visit…

Akzed on June 1, 2014 at 1:39 PM

..what you read, what you watch on TV, what political candidates and causes you donate time and/or money to, how many guns you own, who you associate with in real life, …

Gator Country on June 1, 2014 at 2:02 PM

Google is in bed with the government, notrop’.

listens2glenn on June 1, 2014 at 1:57 PM

.
Eric Schmidt will be amongst those lined up against the wall when the Revolution comes.

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 1:58 PM

.
I’m still hoping it doesn’t come to that. But even if it does, we need a “Revolution” of Christian believers, praying long and hard, FIRST … before we start “fixing bayonets”.

listens2glenn on June 1, 2014 at 2:04 PM

I’m still hoping it doesn’t come to that. But even if it does, we need a “Revolution” of Christian believers, praying long and hard, FIRST … before we start “fixing bayonets”.

listens2glenn on June 1, 2014 at 2:04 PM

If we don’t fix it via Article V, it will fall to fixing it via Amendment II.

It’s not going to happen at the ballot box. Support for our initial Revolution wasn’t ever close to a majority, btw…

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 2:07 PM

I have an investment in a potential business I’d like to sell you:

Gunpowder-scented cologne and deodorant.

IE: smell like you’ve recently been doing some shooting. A LOT of shooting…

That should be a deterrent should it not?

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 1:57 PM

Should give the TSA goons fits.

slickwillie2001 on June 1, 2014 at 2:10 PM

They scanned my fingerprints at Disney World this weekend. I’m sure the NSA already has them.

joekenha on June 1, 2014 at 2:11 PM

Still can’t locate which Enumerated Power this falls under.

chimney sweep on June 1, 2014 at 2:12 PM

Still can’t locate which Enumerated Power this falls under.

chimney sweep on June 1, 2014 at 2:12 PM

The “Good N Plenty Clause” of course.

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 2:13 PM

They scanned my fingerprints at Disney World this weekend. I’m sure the NSA already has them.

joekenha on June 1, 2014 at 2:11 PM

Why did you let them do that? They have no right unless you have committed a crime or are working for them. Mine are on rcord because I was a teacher and again because I once worked briefly for the state of PA.

crankyoldlady on June 1, 2014 at 2:25 PM

We’ll need more details (assuming such exist) to know precisely what’s being stored here. But until then, it may not be worth getting overly worked up over this.

So, no alarm till the authorities give us the full story on what they are doing, and it’s alarming?

The whole point of what Snowden did is that the authorities have no intention, ever, of telling us how they are destroying privacy.

David Blue on June 1, 2014 at 2:47 PM

Damn! They got me. I hope my middle finger was in play at that instant they got my photo.

koolbob on June 1, 2014 at 2:51 PM

They scanned my fingerprints at Disney World this weekend. I’m sure the NSA already has them.

joekenha on June 1, 2014 at 2:11 PM

Why did you let them do that? They have no right unless you have committed a crime or are working for them. Mine are on rcord because I was a teacher and again because I once worked briefly for the state of PA.

crankyoldlady on June 1, 2014 at 2:25 PM

I would NEVER allow my fingerprints to be taken in such fashion. I guarantee they would NEVER DARE DO SUCH A THING when they have “islamist day” at Disney World.

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 2:53 PM

The Founding Fathers would have declared war on anything like the NSA by now.

VorDaj on June 1, 2014 at 2:55 PM

[BobMbx on June 1, 2014 at 1:00 PM]

Better yet, start 10 different Facebook pages with completely different lives.

Dusty on June 1, 2014 at 3:01 PM

Better yet, start 10 different Facebook pages with completely different lives.

Dusty on June 1, 2014 at 3:01 PM

Not a bad idea.

And use several different avatars/pictures of oneself, such as Barack Obama, Moochelle Obama, Alfred E. Neuman, Richard Nixon, etc…

Anytime I’m required to fill out anything online I use as blatantly inaccurate information as possible.

ConstantineXI on June 1, 2014 at 3:17 PM

I’m not posting anything negative about Jazz……

God Bless you, Jazz………

williamg on June 1, 2014 at 3:23 PM

Google’s ‘Picasa’ image management software has facial recognition built in, and this was exactly what I thought it was for, building a national database of faces with names attached. I thought the same thing with Facebook and ‘tagging’ photos.

(not having read the comments, and presuming no one else has mention this.)

Joseph OHenry on June 1, 2014 at 4:04 PM

I can see them using artificial intelligence to read emotion and personality in these photos just as a person would, and then use pattern matching (like Watson in “Jeopardy!”) and analysis of the person’s written words to come up with a detailed picture of that person’s mind and attitudes.

Oh great, another reason for Botox – an additional layer of defense against being selected for the five o’clock SWAT raid.

Reuben Hick on June 1, 2014 at 4:35 PM

Yep, and I also never post photos of myself, and I don’t use FB, Instagram, Twitter, etc.

Come and get me, NSA. But first . . . are you sure it’s really me?

Its all in the pixels. If there are too few pixels, or pixels in bad light, then the reco is no good.

Personally, I think this NSA as an omniscient demi-god is a hoax. Remember, this is the exact same government that can’t get a website working for under a billion dollars, and a simple google search would reveal that they can’t even write sophisticated software without hundreds of millions dollars spent over a decade to produce thousands of defects.

Have we seen any evidence anywhere that this panopticon agency has actually used any of this biometric/behavioral data to any positive effect?

I think the email scanning scam has far more to do with corporate espionage and the sale of data to politicians, their wealthy benefactors and foreign states than it has to do with national security. Why would Congress have to beg and plead with the IRS, EPA, [in]justice department, et al when they could simply subpoena the email data from the NSA? Answer: Because the NSA doesn’t have it either.

For millennia, keeping the population in check often required selling the idea that God was watching them and was aware of their thoughts and deeds – even in private. Now since our culture has regressed into a post-Christian phase, that reminder has no value so the government has replaced God with itself, and it has replaced God’s values with theirs.

As long as you are terrified that the government will send SWAT teams to execute you in your home for alleged transgressions intercepted by various surveillance means, then they have won and you are now under their control.

Reuben Hick on June 1, 2014 at 4:59 PM

Better yet, start 10 different Facebook pages with completely different lives.

Dusty on June 1, 2014 at 3:01 PM

Nice try – as if no one has ever thought about that.

A company called beehiveid has a product that sniffs out fraudulent FB accounts, quickly and reliably.

I would imagine it would be an awesome product for dating websites.

Reuben Hick on June 1, 2014 at 5:02 PM

Nice try – as if no one has ever thought about that.

A company called beehiveid has a product that sniffs out fraudulent FB accounts, quickly and reliably.

I would imagine it would be an awesome product for dating websites.

Reuben Hick on June 1, 2014 at 5:02 PM

Could it sniff out trolls sneaking back into HA from banland?

slickwillie2001 on June 1, 2014 at 6:39 PM

We’re being subjugated by the unpatriotic, globalist, crony oligarchy.

FloatingRock on June 1, 2014 at 7:34 PM

Guy Fawkes Mask – never leave home without it.

Woody

woodcdi on June 1, 2014 at 10:50 PM

They’re not capturing and storing this information for nothing. That they feel the need to gather, store, cross-match, etc – is reason enough to be concerned.

Midas on June 1, 2014 at 1:36 PM

Government databases exist only to have something to nab you on after they decide to go after you, not to do anything useful, like, actually investigating a psycho after they’ve been warned he is dangerous.

With the toughest gun-control regulations in the country, California has a unique, centralized database of gun purchases that law enforcement can easily search. It offers precious intelligence about a suspect or other people officers may encounter when responding to a call…

Before a half-dozen sheriff’s deputies knocked on Elliot Rodger’s door last month in response to concerns raised by his mother about his well-being, they could have checked the database and discovered he had bought three 9mm semiautomatic handguns. Several law enforcement officials and legal experts on gun policy said this might have given deputies greater insight into Rodger’s intentions and his capability for doing harm.

The deputies did not check the database. They left his apartment after finding him to be “shy, timid, polite and well-spoken,” in the words of Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown. The deputies saw no evidence that Rodger was an immediate threat to others or to himself.

AesopFan on June 1, 2014 at 11:13 PM

why?

clandestine on June 2, 2014 at 8:00 AM

But is this invasive to the point of being illegal and a privacy concern?

Hell, yes!

I suppose that depends where they are getting them.

No, it doesn’t, because our government should not be forming a giant identity database of its citizens. That’s the sort of thing a king might do of his subjects, but citizens should never allow it.

GWB on June 2, 2014 at 9:47 AM

Everyone should have just been instructed to hold a placard beneath their high school yearbook which provide a full face and profile picture for the price of one.

MSGTAS on June 2, 2014 at 10:18 AM