New Orleans school district shutters last remaining traditional public schools

posted at 2:41 pm on May 29, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, core services had to almost completely reinvent themselves — including public education. Governor Bobby Jindal used the opportunity to expand school choice through vouchers and charter schools, the latter being a partnership between private-sector education and public-sector school districts. That experiment has worked so well in the New Orleans Recovery School District that the last five remaining traditional public schools have closed their doors:

Benjamin Banneker Elementary closed Wednesday as New Orleans’s Recovery School District permanently shuttered its last five traditional public schools this week.

With the start of the next school year, the Recovery School District will be the first in the country made up completely of public charter schools, a milestone for New Orleans and a grand experiment in urban education for the nation. …

in New Orleans, under the Recovery School District, the Louisiana state agency that seized control of almost all public schools after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the city in 2005, the traditional system has been swept away.

The creation of the country’s first all-charter school system has improved education for many children in New Orleans, but it also has severed ties to a community institution, the neighborhood school, and amplified concerns about racial equality and loss of parental control.

An all-charter district signals the dismantling of the central school bureaucracy and a shift of power to dozens of independent school operators, who will assume all the corresponding functions: the authority to hire and fire teachers and administrators, maintain buildings, run buses and provide services to special-needs students.

It’s a little difficult to credit the concern over equality and parental control to the reliance on charter schools. The equality issue might be the case if the district shifted entirely over to vouchers and left the distribution of children to school recruiters. NORSD isn’t doing that, though; they’re using a lottery system to assign children to the charter schools that still have to operate under the authority of the school district. Any basic lottery system of all but the smallest scale should not introduce radical distribution errors that would create significant demographic imbalance in a population.

Parental control concerns seem even more absurd. The problem with public schools has been union control, and a lack of flexibility thanks to federal education mandates. Charter schools get more room to innovate by remaining outside the control of both, which allows for more parental involvement. That’s why school districts often end up holding lotteries to deal with the overwhelming demand for limited slots in the charter schools.

The results of the innovation in the NORSD speak for themselves:

Before the storm, the city’s high school graduation rate was 54.4 percent. In 2013, the rate for the Recovery School District was 77.6 percent. On average, 57 percent of students performed at grade level in math and reading in 2013, up from 23 percent in 2007, according to the state.

Not every jurisdiction has embraced innovation, choice, and parental control as has New Orleans. The Blaze‘s Will Cain has launched a terrific documentary series about the attack on charter schools in New York City under Mayor Bill DeBlasio, in which some of the best schools in the entire state are getting shut down in favor of some of the worst:


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Holder will be suing and opening an investigation any minute now.

RickB on May 29, 2014 at 2:42 PM

I like Governor Jindal – incredibly intelligent man – effective Governor.

He does while others talk.

jake-the-goose on May 29, 2014 at 2:44 PM

This is great news for the kids…

OmahaConservative on May 29, 2014 at 2:46 PM

Absolutely awesome.

BritCarGuy on May 29, 2014 at 2:47 PM

Why do republican’s hate public school teachers?

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 2:49 PM

And unions.

Why do republican’s hate unions?

Unions are people too.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 2:50 PM

Big Bullets: Rs don’t like the BEHAVIOR of tooooooo many union members and teachers.

Now for the real point: Gov. Jindal has courage others don’t have. True, Kartina damaged a lot of schools so Louisiana had no choice: find schools. They went the charter school route and almost all kids are doing better. Gov. Jindal gave people a real choice. It works!!!

MN J on May 29, 2014 at 2:54 PM

Republicans hate public school teacher UNIONS. The teachers are mostly fine, but their unions do not act in the interest of good education.

Why do the Obama daughters not attend public schools? Why did they not attend public schools when in Chicago?

Sting on May 29, 2014 at 2:54 PM

Racists

Schadenfreude on May 29, 2014 at 2:54 PM

Why do republican’s hate public school teachers?

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 2:49 PM

Your punctuation/poor use of grammar is all one needs to know.

Republicans won the college graduate vote in 2012. Your Democrats won the high school dropout vote.

BB+

Del Dolemonte on May 29, 2014 at 2:56 PM

Jindal closed schools for black kids!!!!! Racist

faraway on May 29, 2014 at 2:56 PM

Jindal thinks out of the box. He doesn’t keep doing the same things that don’t work as some others do. This is why we need a governor as president. There will be a lot to fix.

crankyoldlady on May 29, 2014 at 2:56 PM

And unions.

Why do republican’s hate unions?

Unions are people too.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 2:50 PM

Why do Democrats hate corporations?

Corporations are people too. And many unions are established as corporations.

F-

Del Dolemonte on May 29, 2014 at 2:58 PM

Does Mooch plan the lunches for these kids?

OmahaConservative on May 29, 2014 at 2:58 PM

in New Orleans, under the Recovery School District, the Louisiana state agency that seized control of almost all public schools after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the city in 2005, the traditional system has been swept away.

Pre-Katrina schools in New Orleans were as awful as any city school system left in charge of Democrats for generations. School would be cancelled with no notice to allow teachers the opportunity to go to Baton Rouge and rally for higher wages. The system was corrupt which, among other things, led to the conviction of one of Dollar Bill Jefferson’s siblings. Anybody who cared about education sent their kid o a private school.

This IMO, was a bright spot (for New Orleans) in the aftermath of Katrina (aka as The Storm in NoLa). Houston got taxed with a significant portion of the population living off of social programs and the state was able to take over the school system.

Happy Nomad on May 29, 2014 at 3:00 PM

Your punctuation/poor use of grammar is all one needs to know.

Republicans won the college graduate vote in 2012. Your Democrats won the high school dropout vote.

BB+

Del Dolemonte on May 29, 2014 at 2:56 PM

Note to self: Del Dolemonte is unable to detect sarcasm on the internet.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:02 PM

If these parents are going to bust their ass getting their kids into a school, they are going to be damn sure the kid behaves and learns. That’s half the battle.

Blake on May 29, 2014 at 3:03 PM

Del Dolemonte on May 29, 2014 at 2:56 PM
Del Dolemonte on May 29, 2014 at 2:58 PM

He’s trying to be funny. Be patient, I think he’s, you know, slow.

Akzed on May 29, 2014 at 3:03 PM

Speaking of DeBlasio, I read about an attempt of his to restrict people’s liberties concerning knives over at the Volokh Conspiracy:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2014/05/20/vagueness-challenge-in-manhattan-das-use-of-gravity-knives/

They are classifying all folding knives as gravity knives, thus all illegal to possess.

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 3:04 PM

Not bad for a Rhodes Scholar Kenneth the Page, eh, Dumbs? Not everybody can afford Sidwell or a Southside Chicago education.

Christien on May 29, 2014 at 3:04 PM

He’s trying to be funny. Be patient, I think he’s, you know, slow.

Akzed on May 29, 2014 at 3:03 PM

Sarcasm is an acquired taste.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:09 PM

He’s trying to be funny. Be patient, I think he’s, you know, slow Bish.

Akzed on May 29, 2014 at 3:03 PM

FIFY

Christien on May 29, 2014 at 3:09 PM

The creation of the country’s first all-charter school system has improved education for many children in New Orleans, but it also has severed ties to a community institution, the neighborhood school, and amplified concerns about racial equality and loss of parental control.

Speaking of racial equality, does anyone else besides me believe that if NOLA was mainly made up of white people, and the end result still remained, that we would have stopped hearing about Katrina by the second-year anniversary?

DethMetalCookieMonst on May 29, 2014 at 3:10 PM

Jindal closed schools for black kids!!!!! Racist

faraway on May 29, 2014 at 2:56 PM

The white man keeping the black man down.

Some things never change.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:11 PM

Isn’t he about the only Governor on the radar for president that has not endorsed one type of amnesty or another?

astonerii on May 29, 2014 at 3:11 PM

Speaking of racial equality, does anyone else besides me believe that if NOLA was mainly made up of white people, and the end result still remained, that we would have stopped hearing about Katrina by the second-year anniversary?

DethMetalCookieMonst on May 29, 2014 at 3:10 PM

If it was made of mostly white people, they would have gotten out before the storm hit.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:12 PM

School choice is an excellent idea, but it should be a real choice; families should be given vouchers for the local ‘market value’ of the state’s contribution to the education of kids, to use as they see fit educationally (private, public, charter, etc.).

Also, this experiment will be extremely interesting to watch pan out. It’s tough to compare because the populations are different (pre and post Katrina), but given several years of data (a few years from now), we’ll know whether it makes a difference long term and not just temporarily. Frankly, it is my opinion that the biggest difference in terms of educational outcomes for kids is the nature of their family (intact or broken, employed or welfare, involved in their kids’ school and school work or not, etc.).

I’ve met precious few teachers who are the problem. I’ve met far too many parents who are the biggest problem their kids face, day in and day out.

So, we’ll see how this goes, but give them ALL VOUCHERS, not just a select few. Real choice, not a freaking lottery of luck.

The problem with public schools has been union control

I’m tired of this simplistic line of thinking. It’s ignorant. Half the country (essentially) is right-to-work and doesn’t have unions in the public school system. The problem with those states’ public systems isn’t unions, it’s something else…and my hypothesis is the broken state of our family structure. Take a kid from a stable family and they’ll do well, whether the school is union or not. Take a kid from a broken, welfare-dependent family and…failure more often than not.

xNavigator on May 29, 2014 at 3:13 PM

He’s trying to be funny. Be patient, I think he’s, you know, slow Bish.

Akzed on May 29, 2014 at 3:03 PM

FIFY

Christien on May 29, 2014 at 3:09 PM

I get no respect around here. You’re all homophones.

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 3:15 PM

xNavigator on May 29, 2014 at 3:13 PM

How about, instead of vouchers, we just get the government out of the education business.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:16 PM

Sarcasm is an acquired taste.
Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:09 PM

And a rare ability.

Akzed on May 29, 2014 at 3:16 PM

Take a kid from a stable family and they’ll do well, whether the school is union or not. Take a kid from a broken, welfare-dependent family and…failure more often than not.

xNavigator on May 29, 2014 at 3:13 PM

The problem is not the welfare dependency itself, but rather the factors it correlates with. Stratify the data by race and you’ll get the answer. Yeah, math and statistics are inherently racist.

Rix on May 29, 2014 at 3:17 PM

I get no respect around here. You’re all homophones.

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 3:15 PM

Who are you? ;)

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:17 PM

And a rare ability.

Akzed on May 29, 2014 at 3:16 PM

Thanks for noticing.

I don’t generally like to toot my own horn.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:18 PM

Who are you? ;)

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:17 PM

I’m a communist agitator.

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 3:18 PM

Those tests the students improved on must be racist tests, or something…

School choice is a double hit on the Dems: one, it proves that bigger gummint bureaucracies ain’t the answer (cf the VA, the NSA, the DOJ, etc.), and two, it allows minorities to see that bigger gummint ain’t the answer, that staying poor and ignorant actually is a choice in itself, and charter schools can open new paths to the future.

Nothing will damage the current Dem party and progressive’s futures like school choice. Voting blocs like the Jews and Asians do well at the current system and don’t want to change it, while blacks and Hispanics would love an alternate path to brighter possibilities. Like the gays versus the Muslims, there’s no way to keep all blocs happy.

DublOh7 on May 29, 2014 at 3:21 PM

The problem is not the welfare dependency itself, but rather the factors it correlates with. Stratify the data by race and you’ll get the answer. Yeah, math and statistics are inherently racist.

Rix on May 29, 2014 at 3:17 PM

It all boils down to a sin problem.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:23 PM

I’m very glad to see the success that school choice is having in the state of LA. There are polls that have indicated strong support for school choice across a broader spectrum of the public than we might recognize.

◾85-89 percent (depending on the state) of black voters say government should provide parents as many choices as possible to ensure their children receive a good education
◾71-80 percent of black voters supported charter schools after hearing they provide more opportunities to lower-income minority students trapped in failing schools
◾50 percent of all respondents supported charter schools and publicly funded vouchers
◾Support for school choice was strongest among younger voters (ages 18-34), people with lower incomes, and those with less formal education.

Court systems at the state level are finding that school choice is an option that provides students greater options, not less.

Here’s to hoping the base of leadership in support of school choice will grow amongst Republicans.

lineholder on May 29, 2014 at 3:25 PM

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 3:15 PM

Good answer. I like the way you think. I’m gonna be watching you.

Christien on May 29, 2014 at 3:26 PM

Who are you? ;)

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:17 PM

I’m a communist agitator.

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 3:18 PM

Ed, is that you???

oscarwilde on May 29, 2014 at 3:26 PM

Al Charlatan will be so pizzed at Jindal !!

burrata on May 29, 2014 at 3:28 PM

Half the country (essentially) is right-to-work and doesn’t have unions in the public school system.

xNavigator on May 29, 2014 at 3:13 PM

What we have in right-to-work states are organizations, such as the NEA, who more or less serve the save function as a union in their control of the decisions made pertaining to education.

lineholder on May 29, 2014 at 3:29 PM

Half the country (essentially) is right-to-work and doesn’t have unions in the public school system.

My state is right-to-work and has a very powerful teacher’s union.

Knott Buyinit on May 29, 2014 at 3:34 PM

I have relatives in New Orleans, visit their frequently. Everyone knows how, in public, we have to continually wail and loudly proclaim what a horrible “disaster” katrina was.

But privately, most everyone left there will admit that Katrina was one of the best things to ever happen to the city – it swept a huge pile of garbage away, and the kind of garbage that wasn’t going to let itself get dislodged any other way.

This bit with the schools today is just one of the many long-term payoffs.

Tom Servo on May 29, 2014 at 3:41 PM

the problem is that charter schools need public schools to dump the disruptive students off on. With no public schools left, they are going to have to deal with them.

tlynch001 on May 29, 2014 at 3:43 PM

Before the storm, the city’s high school graduation rate was 54.4 percent. In 2013, the rate for the Recovery School District was 77.6 percent. On average, 57 percent of students performed at grade level in math and reading in 2013, up from 23 percent in 2007, according to the state.

Democrats will figure out a way to make this look like bad news. Wait for it….

cajunpatriot on May 29, 2014 at 3:44 PM

Those videos are great!! They are an incredible indictment against DeBlasio and other institutions such as Teacher’s Unions who want to eliminate any opposition to their control over our educational system.

It’s inspiring to hear the story of young Alise. I hope things have improved for her and that she won’t lose sight of her goals and ambitions.

lineholder on May 29, 2014 at 3:52 PM

I get no respect around here. You’re all homophones.

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 3:15 PM

Not me! I’m a homonymph or a phonomorph. I can’t never rember witch it is.

Oldnuke on May 29, 2014 at 3:53 PM

The white man keeping the black man down.

Some things never change.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:11 PM

Bobby Jindal ain’t white.

bw222 on May 29, 2014 at 3:53 PM

Parental control concerns seem even more absurd.

Absurd, or hypocritical?

Public schools believe the children belong to them. Keep a child home because they’re feeling bad, and the schools won’t take your word that they were sick. They will demand a doctor’s excuse to prove they were sick.

If you ever have a child in a public school, you learn very quickly how little they care about what parents think.

There Goes the Neighborhood on May 29, 2014 at 3:54 PM

I don’t generally like to toot my own horn.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:18 PM

Aww, go ahead. That whole hairy palm thing is just a myth.

Oldnuke on May 29, 2014 at 3:55 PM

I’m a communist agitator.

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 3:18 PM

me too.

MarxMyWords on May 29, 2014 at 3:57 PM

Why do republican’s hate public school teachers?

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 2:49 PM

Wrong question! Why do white Democrats like DeBlasio want to prevent black kids in Harlem from getting a good education?

Steve Z on May 29, 2014 at 3:58 PM

New Orleans’s Recovery School District permanently shuttered its last five traditional public schools this week.

so much for choice. what about the parents and kids whom wished to stay in the traditional schools? dont they have any rights? they certainly dont have any options now. school ‘choice’ indeed.

ThisIsYourBrainOnKoch on May 29, 2014 at 3:59 PM

Half the country (essentially) is right-to-work and doesn’t have unions in the public school system.

xNavigator on May 29, 2014 at 3:13 PM

praise gaia this isnt true.

ThisIsYourBrainOnKoch on May 29, 2014 at 4:01 PM

Big f$&@ you to Eric Holder :)

sorrowen on May 29, 2014 at 4:08 PM

me too.

MarxMyWords on May 29, 2014 at 3:57 PM

Who should we starve/kill first, comrade?

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 4:08 PM

There is so much I love about Bobby Jindal. He also reformed the most corrupt state in the union to become our most ethical. This guy is a rockstar.

John the Libertarian on May 29, 2014 at 4:18 PM

i dont particularly LIKE public school teachers. but i’m not a republican. its a scar from my chilhood spent in numerous detentions. not sarcastic.

t8stlikchkn on May 29, 2014 at 4:19 PM

Del Dolemonte on May 29, 2014 at 2:56 PM

Note to self: Del Dolemonte is unable to detect sarcasm on the internet.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:02 PM

Sure I am. The fact that you suck at it is your failure, not mine.

F-

Del Dolemonte on May 29, 2014 at 4:19 PM

praise gaia this isnt true.

ThisIsYourBrainOnKoch on May 29, 2014 at 4:01 PM

Oh I get it, you’re supposed to be one of those comedy posters, aren’t you?

todler on May 29, 2014 at 4:22 PM

I’m not sure this is anything to celebrate.

Charter schools look more and more like a form of crony capitalism. We don’t need government moving any more money to the private sector, and we certainly don’t need conservatives getting excited about it.

avgjo on May 29, 2014 at 4:28 PM

Good story illustrating how one may profit from government largesse by getting into the charter school business

http://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2013/09/10/charter-school-gravy-train-runs-express-to-fat-city/

avgjo on May 29, 2014 at 4:30 PM

Charter schools look more and more like a form of crony capitalism. We don’t need government moving any more money to the private sector, and we certainly don’t need conservatives getting excited about it.

avgjo on May 29, 2014 at 4:28 PM

Good story illustrating how one may profit from government largesse by getting into the charter school business

Link

avgjo on May 29, 2014 at 4:30 PM

Honestly, I think I’d rather have some people making money off the system and still providing the students with a better graduation rate than having the public school systems dominated by unions/gov bureaucracy. I think these charters could be improved through a voucher system, although I’m not knowledgeable enough about the education system to offer good advice on how the vouchers should be run.

Effay5 on May 29, 2014 at 4:39 PM

Effay5, 4:39 pm

Problem with that thinking is that it can be extended to everything…and then you have fascism.

Also, I’d be leery of better graduation rates…it almost never means better education. I worked at a Charter school, in Louisiana no less, and the standards were a joke. Students would keep taking tests until they passed. They’d just take the tests enough times to get exposure to all the questions in the test bank, memorize the answers, and move on. This was known and even utilized. Most of those graduating kids didn’t have the sense to run a shift at McDonald’s, much less go into a skilled trade or university. Education must involve the parents, and frankly, if we’re going to have public schools, they should be fully governmental (profit often motivates the cutting of corners, somewhere), and fully local (parish or county).

avgjo on May 29, 2014 at 4:44 PM

Education must involve the parents, and frankly, if we’re going to have public schools, they should be fully governmental (profit often motivates the cutting of corners, somewhere), and fully local (parish or county).

avgjo on May 29, 2014 at 4:44 PM

Agreed, especially the parts I bolded. If there was a better way to tie the schools profit into an accurate measure of the success of their education, then charter schools would be the answer. My point above was looking more at the lesser of two evils.. the governments’ ineptitude at operating the education vs the cutting corners to turn a profit.

There always seems to be closer accountability in the private sector than the public, so the schools that turn out the poor students would eventually go out of business (lose their outside sponsors because of a poor reputation caused by lax educating methods, etc)

I guess this is all a lot more complex than I considered before. I’ll have to read up on all the options before my 1 year old is ready to enter the education system.

Effay5 on May 29, 2014 at 4:58 PM

Charter schools look more and more like a form of crony capitalism. We don’t need government moving any more money to the private sector, and we certainly don’t need conservatives getting excited about it.

avgjo on May 29, 2014 at 4:28 PM

Good story illustrating how one may profit from government largesse by getting into the charter school business

Link

avgjo on May 29, 2014 at 4:30 PM

Honestly, I think I’d rather have some people making money off the system and still providing the students with a better graduation rate than having the public school systems dominated by unions/gov bureaucracy. I think these charters could be improved through a voucher system, although I’m not knowledgeable enough about the education system to offer good advice on how the vouchers should be run.

Effay5 on May 29, 2014 at 4:39 PM

What I see charters as being able to offer is a safe environment with the ability to dismiss students who don’t want to learn. Parents want that; students who want to learn deserve this. Federal policies for public schools have ensured the failure of providing safe learning environments. Other than that, at least in Missouri, charters have to abide by Common Core state standards mandates which means charter school kids will be educated via the same system as traditional public schools. Maybe behavior will be better; the education will be the same.

But what do you do with the kids with special needs who might bring down the scores which will affect accreditation? Where is their place in charters? Why would a charter want to spend the funding necessitated by IDEA for special services?

Traditional public schools have to serve ALL children. Charters do not.

I consider myself a conservative (but not in the Jeb Bush camp) and I don’t like this. You still have the government setting mandates and accreditation benchmarks. Private schools have true autonomy in deciding what and how students will learn. Charters do not. This is not really a choice in educational development and delivery. It’s just a shift in who gets government funding for government mandates. This isn’t “local control” by a long shot. It’s just a different way to shovel taxpayer money to the private sector that has to still do what the government tells them to do. And that is not free market.

manateespirit on May 29, 2014 at 5:02 PM

Note to self: Del Dolemonte is unable to detect sarcasm on the internet.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:02 PM

Try using a “/sarc” tag appended to your comment to increase clarity when conveying your thoughts. The internet is a gargantuan landscape populated by many odd people with extremely diverse ideological backgrounds. :)

/sarc

dominigan on May 29, 2014 at 5:06 PM

Half the country (essentially) is right-to-work and doesn’t have unions in the public school system.

xNavigator on May 29, 2014 at 3:13 PM

=============================

praise gaia this isnt true.

ThisIsYourBrainOnKoch on May 29, 2014 at 4:01 PM

That is your brain on progressivism. Progs don’t do reality well.

“HALF THE COUNTRY (ESSENTIALLY): 24 states are RIGHT TO WORK states.

Praise God from whom all blessings flow!

xNavigator on May 29, 2014 at 5:08 PM

This is an example of Republican policies ACTUALLY improving the lives of urban poor and minorities. 50% increase in graduation rate is stunning. Over 100% increase in number of students at grade level performance is a MASSIVE improvement.

crosspatch on May 29, 2014 at 5:12 PM

And a rare ability.

Akzed on May 29, 2014 at 3:16 PM

I saw it for what it was.

What’s everyone’s problem today?

Play nice.

CurtZHP on May 29, 2014 at 5:47 PM

I saw it for what it was.

What’s everyone’s problem today?

Play nice.

CurtZHP on May 29, 2014 at 5:47 PM

It’s not just today.

I forget that some folks can’t recognize sarcasm, no matter how blatant.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 5:53 PM

Your punctuation/poor use of grammar is all one needs to know.

Republicans won the college graduate vote in 2012. Your Democrats won the high school dropout vote.

BB+

Del Dolemonte on May 29, 2014 at 2:56 PM

Not true. Romney won the Grade School vote (which would be the High School Dropouts). And Romney won the College only vote, but Obama won the Grad School Vote. It’s not clear who wins if you combine the College Grad and Post-Grad School Vote.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/139880/election-polls-presidential-vote-groups.aspx

jim56 on May 29, 2014 at 5:55 PM

Try using a “/sarc” tag appended to your comment to increase clarity when conveying your thoughts. The internet is a gargantuan landscape populated by many odd people with extremely diverse ideological backgrounds. :)

/sarc

dominigan on May 29, 2014 at 5:06 PM

LOL.

If people can tell it’s sarcasm, that’s great.

If not, that’s kinda funny too.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 6:00 PM

Sure I am. The fact that you suck at it is your failure, not mine.

F-

Del Dolemonte on May 29, 2014 at 4:19 PM

So, you recognize it when someone put’s the /sarc tag in the post?

Good to know.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 6:02 PM

so much for choice. what about the parents and kids whom wished to stay in the traditional schools? dont they have any rights? they certainly dont have any options now. school ‘choice’ indeed.

ThisIsYourBrainOnKoch on May 29, 2014 at 3:59 PM

Why do Republican’s hate educated children, right?

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 6:04 PM

Bobby Jindal ain’t white.

bw222 on May 29, 2014 at 3:53 PM

How to respond to this?

Too funny.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 6:06 PM

The state took over New Orleans public schools just prior to Katrina. They were deeply in debt and had about 15,000 people no longer employed by the district that were still on the payroll. It was a huge mess.

Katrina, as bad as it was gave New Orleans a rebirth.

roux on May 29, 2014 at 10:21 PM

The white man keeping the black man down.

Some things never change.

Bigbullets on May 29, 2014 at 3:11 PM

Yeah!!

We need them black folk dumb and stupid to pick that cotton and tend the plantations and sing spirituals in the evening while we sip on mint juleps and flirt with young lasses.

Wait . . . Jindal’s not no honkey cracker!!

Damn Yankees!!!

Bubba Redneck on May 30, 2014 at 12:31 AM

I get no respect around here. You’re all homophones.

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 3:15 PM

Not me! I’m a homonymph or a phonomorph. I can’t never rember witch it is.

Oldnuke on May 29, 2014 at 3:53 PM

Oldnuke: We are lesbians trapped in a man’s body.

Bubba Redneck on May 30, 2014 at 12:34 AM

I like Governor Jindal – incredibly intelligent man – effective Governor.

He does while others talk.

jake-the-goose on May 29, 2014 at 2:44 PM

I had the honor of voting for this man for Governor the first time that he ran. He is great. :)

Theophile on May 30, 2014 at 2:46 AM

This is an example of Republican policies ACTUALLY improving the lives of urban poor and minorities.

crosspatch on May 29, 2014 at 5:12 PM

Vastly. The before-and-after is something out of a political fiction novel.

LawfulGood on May 30, 2014 at 10:19 AM