Flight 370 searchers may have had the wrong spot all along

posted at 8:41 am on May 29, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

The tragic mystery of Malaysia Air Flight 370 continues, but the current search effort will not. After two months and a search that covered 329 square miles, investigators have not found a single piece of the missing plane or its contents, and now think they mistook their own electronics for black-box pings. CNN reported on this yesterday as the search nations reached a consensus on the failure:

The four acoustic pings at the center of the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 for the past seven weeks are no longer believed to have come from the plane’s black boxes, a U.S. Navy official told CNN.

The acknowledgment came Wednesday as searchers wrapped up the first phase of their effort, having scanned 329 square miles of southern Indian Ocean floor without finding any wreckage from the Boeing 777-200.

Authorities now almost universally believe the pings did not come from the onboard data or cockpit voice recorders but instead came from some other man-made source unrelated to the jetliner that disappeared on March 8, according to Michael Dean, the Navy’s deputy director of ocean engineering.

The Washington Post confirmed it today:

Since early April, the search had focused on an area in which crews detected four deep-sea acoustic signals — presumably from the black boxes of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. Thursday, the Australian agency leading the operation said that an underwater search of that zone had concluded with “no signs of aircraft debris.”

“The search in the vicinity of the acoustic detections can now be considered complete,” Australia’s Joint Agency Coordination Centre said in a release. In the judgment of investigators, “the area can now be discounted as the final resting place of MH370.”

That determination, coming more than two and a half months after the plane’s disappearance, adds further ambiguity to what was already one of the greatest mysteries in aviation history. With the acoustic signals leading to an apparent dead end, the search now enters a more daunting stage — one in which crews will scour a broader area of the Indian Ocean without any fresh leads to pursue.

From both reports, it appears that the search is still going to focus on the southern, Indian Ocean route presumed since satellite data provided two possible arcs for Flight 370. The other would have taken the plane over land, and a rogue flight in that direction should have been picked up by military and/or civilian aviation radar. In August, private-sector firms will start scanning a much broader area of the projected range on the southern arc, but that will likely take months, if not years, to complete.

Meanwhile, the families still wait to hear what happened to their loved ones and get answers that may never come. It’s a tragedy with no end in sight for the families of the victims.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

GFC. How did they confuse the pings? Did nothing record what wavelength they were on?

Zaggs on May 29, 2014 at 8:44 AM

CNN is back to wall to wall coverage.

ConstantineXI on May 29, 2014 at 8:46 AM

CNN squirrel for the rest of the week

Aye carumba

cmsinaz on May 29, 2014 at 8:47 AM

Maybe we should upgrade the “pings” of a blackbox to something a little more obvious…

Electrongod on May 29, 2014 at 8:48 AM

I just hate being right all the time. On day 3 when the missing plane was not found I predicted that it probably never would be and if it ever were discovered it would be by complete accidental coincidence.

I still say the plane is just as likely to be in the South China Sea or even the Pacific as it in the Indian Ocean because, if both pilots were involved, it could be deliberate misdirection–a “head fake”.

MaiDee on May 29, 2014 at 8:48 AM

CNN now can continue to their in-depth coverage of this story.

Whew!! That was close. Whatever would CNN cover if the plane had been found?

Bitter Clinger on May 29, 2014 at 8:50 AM

Does this really surprise anybody.

crankyoldlady on May 29, 2014 at 8:52 AM

Does this really surprise anybody.

crankyoldlady on May 29, 2014 at 8:52 AM

Not the people who have been paying attention.

And the conspiracy nutballs.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 8:55 AM

CNN is back to wall to wall coverage.

ConstantineXI on May 29, 2014 at 8:46 AM

Zucker: Alright! Now we got our lead! Call the psychics back in, and burn the Benghazi and VA stories!

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 8:55 AM

And right on cue. “VA Scandal? Umm…How about that missing plane, huh?!”

Bastards.

a5minmajor on May 29, 2014 at 8:56 AM

Sad to say, I think CNN has it.

BobK on May 29, 2014 at 8:57 AM

The Keystone Cops could have done a better job searching for answers

Roy Rogers on May 29, 2014 at 8:58 AM

OT: Updated GDP numbers show 1% contraction for 1st quarter of this year. I’m sure Ed’s next post will be on this.

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 8:58 AM

World wide incompetence. How inspiring!

Cindy Munford on May 29, 2014 at 9:01 AM

OT: Updated GDP numbers show 1% contraction for 1st quarter of this year. I’m sure Ed’s next post will be on this.

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 8:58 AM

Safe booming bet. Most of that downward revision was due to writing off the pre-Christmas growth in inventories.

Steve Eggleston on May 29, 2014 at 9:02 AM

OT: Updated GDP numbers show 1% contraction for 1st quarter of this year. I’m sure Ed’s next post will be on this.

NotCoach on May 29, 2014 at 8:58 AM

1% contraction?????

Subtracting 1% from nothing is…….

Electrongod on May 29, 2014 at 9:02 AM

1% contraction?????

Subtracting 1% from nothing is…….

Electrongod on May 29, 2014 at 9:02 AM

The first quarter of a technical double-dip recession.

Steve Eggleston on May 29, 2014 at 9:04 AM

zzz

corona79 on May 29, 2014 at 9:06 AM

Well, CNN back to the black hole theory. Which will tide them over until the next episode in the Donald Sterling saga. Are sightings of bigfoot railing about school nutrition standards far behind?

The irony is that there was a time when they turned their noses up at “tabloid” journalism. Now they are the epitome of it.

Happy Nomad on May 29, 2014 at 9:07 AM

When I take a quick look at CNN’s home page, it feels like I’m looking at a TMZ wannabe.

CNN, how far you have fallen.

Mark Boabaca on May 29, 2014 at 9:08 AM

Most of that downward revision was due to writing off the pre-Christmas growth in inventories.

Steve Eggleston on May 29, 2014 at 9:02 AM

So, they’re going to blame it on sequestration and the government “shut down?”

Happy Nomad on May 29, 2014 at 9:08 AM

I’m telling you, it’s the Red Oktober.

Bishop on May 29, 2014 at 9:12 AM

1% contraction?????

Subtracting 1% from nothing is…….

Electrongod on May 29, 2014 at 9:02 AM

“A booming Obama economy!!! Eat it, nutters!!!”
/Any lefty troll

Bitter Clinger on May 29, 2014 at 9:12 AM

The search has been such a stunning display of incompetence that I am beginning to think that the Obama WH may be conducting it.

higgins1991 on May 29, 2014 at 9:12 AM

My original theory still holds true.

Murphy9 on May 29, 2014 at 9:12 AM

Maybe we should upgrade the “pings” of a blackbox to something a little more obvious…

Electrongod on May 29, 2014 at 8:48 AM

Are you Captain Obvious? ( I jest)

Conservative4Ever on May 29, 2014 at 9:13 AM

That determination, coming more than two and a half months after the plane’s disappearance, adds further ambiguity to what was already one of the greatest mysteries in aviation history.

How is the disapperance of a jet one of the greatest mysteries in aviation history? It was either hijacked or suffered mechanical failure. It disappeared in a part of the world where there are few sensors made even the more problematic by Malaysian Air’s third world mentality. IMO, the jet went down at a shallow enough angle it is buried in the sea floor somewhere. Oh and I think it safe to presume at this point that nobody survived the crash.

Not a whole lot of mystery here. And to put it in perspective, a group has been trying for years to find a commercial aircraft that went down somewhere in Lake Michigan. They’ve found some interesting wrecks but not the target of interest. How much easier is that search than finding a 757 in the Indian Ocean with nothing to go on but a random set of pings?

Happy Nomad on May 29, 2014 at 9:16 AM

Flight 370 searchers may have had the wrong spot all along

Have they determined for sure it came down yet???

Conservative4Ever on May 29, 2014 at 9:16 AM

Have they determined for sure it came down yet???

Conservative4Ever on May 29, 2014 at 9:16 AM

That black hole theory is looking better and better.

///

Bitter Clinger on May 29, 2014 at 9:21 AM

There is no way I can believe that these hi tech black boxes send unidentifiable non unique pings. For the boxes to be worth anything each box would have to send a unique ping that can be identified to that specific box on that specific plane. Just like a serial number.

They knew these pings weren’t from the 370 the second they heard them.

JoshuaH on May 29, 2014 at 9:22 AM

Whew!! That was close. Whatever would CNN cover if the plane had been found?

Bitter Clinger on May 29, 2014 at 8:50 AM

Suggestions for CNN:

Bring back Eason Jordan and have him accuse the U.S. Military of targeting airliners.

Revive Piers Morgan’s career by letting him claim it was a gun the brought down the airliner, (the two towers).

Begin a search and rescue mission report on how Nigerian Girls might be equipped with pings. (and begin the search in the Indian Ocean)

Rovin on May 29, 2014 at 9:26 AM

This is so much like the missing college student we had here in Cincinnati last week. He was on surveillance video near his home, then he just vanished. Tens of thousands of man hours were spent searching for him, it was a huge effort. My mind would race thinking of where he might be, and why couldn’t they find him. He was known to take the bus … maybe he took a midnight bus to Dayton? Turns out he went into the vacant house next door and hung himself in the basement.

Everyone wants to find the lost lamb, or rejoice at the return of the prodigal son. It’s not so uplifting to discover the lamb was eaten by wolves, or the wandering son still doesn’t feel like coming home.

LashRambo on May 29, 2014 at 9:40 AM

Everyone wants to find the lost lamb, or rejoice at the return of the prodigal son. It’s not so uplifting to discover the lamb was eaten by wolves, or the wandering son still doesn’t feel like coming home.

LashRambo on May 29, 2014 at 9:40 AM

What is the point of further searching at this point? It might be nice to know if there were a mechanical failure on the jet but until 757s start dropping out of the sky on a regular basis, it is tough to see this as a threat to aviation. Sad for the victims’ families but enough resources, time, and effort has been expended. Time to move on. Unless and until debris washes ashore somewhere.

Happy Nomad on May 29, 2014 at 9:44 AM

There is no way I can believe that these hi tech black boxes send unidentifiable non unique pings. For the boxes to be worth anything each box would have to send a unique ping that can be identified to that specific box on that specific plane. Just like a serial number.

JoshuaH on May 29, 2014 at 9:22 AM

Why would they need to be so unique? It’s not like there’s oodles of them laying around pinging madly away. Generally speaking, there’s only one of them going off at any particular time around the world.

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 9:45 AM

BREAKING on CNN:

BlackBoxgate: What did they know, and when did they know it?

BobMbx on May 29, 2014 at 9:45 AM

This is how Godzilla will be awakened. They’ll search the bottom floor of the ocean, find his sleeping body, probe it with an undersea drone, then we’ll be finished. Because, global warming causes Godzilla.

LaughterJones on May 29, 2014 at 9:46 AM

“searchers”

LOL.

This has been a very poorly executed cover-up operation.

Meanwhile, somewhere in Pakistan …

Pork-Chop on May 29, 2014 at 9:51 AM

What is the point of further searching at this point?

Happy Nomad on May 29, 2014 at 9:44 AM

Just to know. In the case of missing people, even when they’re known dead, the families talk about finding the body and “bringing our loved one home”. Personally, I never got that. Call me heartless, but mine or anyone’s “final resting place” never meant a thing to me. It’s just bones to me. But to most people, it does seem to matter a lot.

LashRambo on May 29, 2014 at 9:55 AM

Whew!! That was close. Whatever would CNN cover if the plane had been found?

[Bitter Clinger on May 29, 2014 at 8:50 AM]

Syndicate their coverage and do reruns of it. Maybe start a another channel called CNN 370. Heck, then CNN could include coverage CNN 370 and rotate that in to CNN 370 just to keep things fresh.

Dusty on May 29, 2014 at 10:01 AM

China certainly needs to look elsewhere. They need to look at the Vietnamese. The early story was that the plane failed to check in with Vietnamese air traffic control. What if the Vietnamese mistakenly downed the airliner for failure to identify itself?

RayBacliff on May 29, 2014 at 10:05 AM

Syndicate their coverage and do reruns of it.

Dusty on May 29, 2014 at 10:01 AM

“The one where Wolfe has a booger”; S1/E7

BobMbx on May 29, 2014 at 10:06 AM

Why would they need to be so unique? It’s not like there’s oodles of them laying around pinging madly away. Generally speaking, there’s only one of them going off at any particular time around the world.

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 9:45 AM

Obviously they need to be unique as we’ve just seen from this debacle. Do you actually believe couldn’t differentiate between a black box and a signal from totally different kind tech that they had lost? A black box with a unique ping would have been identified as being from the plane within seconds.

There are two boxes on just this plane. Don’t you think they’d want to know which one they’ve found if they find one. What if more than one plane goes missing next time? Wouldn’t it make sense to be able to know which plane has been found when they detect a ping?

JoshuaH on May 29, 2014 at 10:11 AM

Meanwhile, the families still wait to hear what happened to their loved ones and get answers that may never come. It’s a tragedy with no end in sight for the families of the victims.

That’s who I really feel for…the families of those lost on this flight. Without finding where the plane is, there’s no closure.

Maybe we should upgrade the “pings” of a blackbox to something a little more obvious…

Electrongod on May 29, 2014 at 8:48 AM

Planes should be equipped with some sort of mechanism that would release a brightly colored floating dye on impact…or have some sort of floating buoys that would eject from the front and rear of an aircraft on impact (like a air bag in an automobile) and perhaps a beacon locator within them…even a strobe light.

JetBoy on May 29, 2014 at 10:15 AM

Christ, these kinds of things bring out the stupid people.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 10:17 AM

Next up, CNN will search for any accomplishments of Hillary Clinton while she was Secretary of State.

“Wolf, I think I got one on an island in the Indian Ocean”.
“John, that ‘ping of success’ was discounted last week”.

albill on May 29, 2014 at 10:17 AM

Flight 370 ‘nothingburger’ versus this from Breitbart:

The full extent of the {Obamacare rollout} failure, however, is reflected in the details provided by the Judicial Watch FOIA document revelations. They include:

•On October 1, there were 43,208 accounts created and 1 enrollment.

•As of October 31, 2013, there were 1,319,425 accounts created nationwide – but only 30,512 actual enrollments in Obamacare.

•On October 1, 2013, at the end of the first day (4:30), the Senior Advisor at Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Brigid M. Russell, sent out an email to her staff with a subject line celebrating “2 enrollments!” The body copy of the email read: “We have our second official FFM enrollment! The first two Form 834s sent out are to: 1) CareSource in Ohio, 2) BCBS of North Carolina.

If the media fails to do their jobs, they’re complicate in the WH not doing theirs.

socalcon on May 29, 2014 at 10:17 AM

What is the point of further searching at this point?

Happy Nomad on May 29, 2014 at 9:44 AM

To find the cause.

Ever hear of the De Havilland Comet?

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 10:19 AM

Flight 370 ‘nothingburger’ versus this from Breitbart

An airliner disappears without any obvious cause, and it’s a “nothingburger”?

JetBoy on May 29, 2014 at 10:33 AM

Obviously they need to be unique as we’ve just seen from this debacle. Do you actually believe couldn’t differentiate between a black box and a signal from totally different kind tech that they had lost?

JoshuaH on May 29, 2014 at 10:11 AM

You’re conflating two issues: black box signals that can be discerned from other electronic noise and black box signals that are unique. Black box signals do not need to be distinct from each other – it would be wasteful expense to make them so. Black box signals do need to be differentiable from background EMR – and they are, within certain paramaters.

A black box with a unique ping would have been identified as being from the plane within seconds.

What other aircraft would it have been from? BTW, making each ping unique would require complicating them in ways that would make them harder to distinguish from background EMR.

There are two boxes on just this plane. Don’t you think they’d want to know which one they’ve found if they find one.

Why do you care? Why would it matter which one it is? You know you’ve found one, and you need to find the other. They are both important to any incident investigation, and without the other can’t provide a complete picture (insofar as that’s possible at all). And, once you’ve found one, you have a much better chance of finding the other one.

What if more than one plane goes missing next time? Wouldn’t it make sense to be able to know which plane has been found when they detect a ping?

Because one jet is more important than the other? Why would you care which one it is? You are going to continue looking for the other plane, aren’t you?

The problem here is not that the black box ping isn’t unique, it’s that 1) they still don’t have a clue where to start looking, 2) it’s been almost 3 months (the black box pings don’t last that long), and 3) pings from black boxes at the sort of depth they are thought to be in the Indian Ocean have a LOT of interference to their signal.

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 10:36 AM

In 1956 a B25 went down in the Monongahela River in Pittsburgh and it was apparently never found. There are a lot of conspiracy theories attached to the story. But if they never found a plane in a river there’s much less chance of finding one in the ocean.

crankyoldlady on May 29, 2014 at 10:37 AM

crankyoldlady on May 29, 2014 at 10:37 AM

Different time, different scenario.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 10:40 AM

The search for this airplane don’t get serious until Bob Ballard dusts off his uniform and jumps back on the field.

When you see Ballard’s name taking a prominent role in the news surrounding this – you’ll know this thing’s about to be found.

I know that guy – biggest narcissist in the world – but merited – he’s the real deal. I know he is just sitting at home right now looking at maps – listening to people out there searching. When he has enough clues – he’ll launch.

HondaV65 on May 29, 2014 at 10:42 AM

I still think it crashed in some country that for whatever the reason doesn’t want to say so.

crankyoldlady on May 29, 2014 at 10:44 AM

An airliner disappears without any obvious cause, and it’s a “nothingburger”?

JetBoy on May 29, 2014 at 10:33 AM

Any ‘news’ breaking to identify a cause? other than CNN touting it’s 24/7 coverage for the past 11 weeks?

Get back to me when there is something, anything, to report. Otherwise protect our Republic…It’s the public’s sacred “Right To Know”.

socalcon on May 29, 2014 at 10:45 AM

Planes should be equipped with some sort of mechanism that …

JetBoy on May 29, 2014 at 10:15 AM

Really, though, they generally haven’t needed them. Normally, you know when and where the plane went down within a very short time of it doing so. Getting the Air France black boxes took so long just because they were really deep – they knew where to look. This sort of thing doesn’t happen much in the modern era.

Might it be handy to have an ELT go off when certain conditions happen, and have it tracked by satellite? Yeah, it might be *very* handy. Hmmmmm, I can see the 24 plot now…… ;)

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 10:48 AM

I had a strong hunch that this search area was BS because the numbers just didn’t add up. It was fairly obvious to anyone paying close attention to the specifics that were given out at the time that these four pings, while not from natural sources, were unlikely to be from the box(es).

DisneyFan on May 29, 2014 at 10:51 AM

Getting the Air France black boxes took so long just because they were really deep – they knew where to look.

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 10:48 AM

They didn’t know where to look, they had a smaller search area and it still took more than two tries and a couple of years to do so.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 10:53 AM

I had a strong hunch that this search area was BS because the numbers just didn’t add up.

DisneyFan on May 29, 2014 at 10:51 AM

Why not?

IIRC, this is the third south Pacific search area and the one closest to the satellite information with the least distance to travel.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 10:55 AM

I was going to say Don Lemon hardest hit, but in reality it is job security for another month.

cat-scratch on May 29, 2014 at 11:07 AM

They didn’t know where to look, they had a smaller search area and it still took more than two tries and a couple of years to do so.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 10:53 AM

Their search area was pretty small compared to the Malaysian Airlines incident. That was my point – they actually had a box to start with, based on its flight path and when contact was lost. A dye pack wouldn’t have helped any, since it would have been dispersed by the time they got there. Bouys might have helped, assuming they lasted long enough for the searchers to find them. Even so, it would have merely reduced the area to search, not pinpointed the wreckage.

I’m open to aircraft manufacturers putting something like that on board. It should not be mandated. (If the industry wants to produce their own standard, then fine.)

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 11:08 AM

IIRC, this is the third south Pacific search area and the one closest to the satellite information with the least distance to travel.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 10:55 AM

I saw a decent article on how to interpret the numbers from the satellite pings much differently. (I wish I could remember where it was.) It makes more sense to have the aircraft on the northern arc. The problem is everyone insists that it can’t possibly have flown over land, because someone’s radar would have picked it up. I think that’s an unwarranted assumption.

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 11:10 AM

Not the people who have been paying attention.

And the conspiracy nutballs.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 8:55 AM

.
I have been following the discussion on PPrune.net since the beginning:

Conspiracy “theories” defined by people who keep bringing them up even after they’ve been shredded multiple times (if you think black holes are “out there”, some folks committment to the physically impossible is FAR greater):

1) Catastrophic failure in the cabin which instantly killed the pilots with subgroupings:

a)massive electrical failure – but somehow a fly-by-wire plane kept flying?

b)massive oxygen fire in the cabin with both pilots instantly fried to a crisp – who set the waypoints and flew the plane with a destroyed cabin, etc for 7 hours?

c) windscreen failure which instantly killed the pilots – hasn’t happened EVER on a Boeing plane and doesn’t answer items from b) above.

2) Lithium ion battery fire in the hold disabled only select electrical systems – Shipped in specialized containers with their own fire suppression/containment capabilities and NO explanation how a fire has the “intelligence” to target separate, redundant wiring systems.

The mods on the site keep wiping the redundant theorizing on a daily, sometimes even hourly basis, or the thread would be TWICE the size of the nearly 11,000 comments and 584 pages it currently is showing.

Me? I still hold with my original theory …

PolAgnostic on May 29, 2014 at 11:13 AM

You guys know that CNN has the plane, right? October Surprise.

de rigueur on May 29, 2014 at 11:20 AM

Me? I still hold with my original theory …

PolAgnostic on May 29, 2014 at 11:13 AM

I don’t remember your original theory.

I don’t have enough information to even have a theory.

Could have been a suicide, a hijacking or catastrophic failure. What I am sure of though, it wasn’t a state sponsored act and a terrorist organization doesn’t have the skillsets needed to hijack and hide a 777 for more than two months.

What I would like to know is if there are enough seismographs along the northern route to have detected an impact of more than a quarter million pounds of airplane.

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 11:08 AM

A more constant transponder that cannot be turned off (like those on the engines) is the most likely outcome of this and probably already in the works.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 11:34 AM

I know that guy – biggest narcissist in the world – but merited – he’s the real deal. I know he is just sitting at home right now looking at maps – listening to people out there searching. When he has enough clues – he’ll launch.

HondaV65 on May 29, 2014 at 10:42 AM

My gut feeling is that you’re right. It may take years, but they’ll use Bayesian stats and other methods, and send Ballard or someone similar to find it. Granted, though, this disappearance has more difficult elements than others. The clown car response thus far has not helped either.

juliesa on May 29, 2014 at 11:36 AM

Lloyd Bridges would have found it by now.

formwiz on May 29, 2014 at 11:40 AM

Let’s face it:

Muzzy pilot wanted to end it all either for personal problems or because of jihad-let’s-kill-mostly-other-muslims and nosedived the plane into the middle of the Indian Ocean.

Reason #4567 not to share Western technology.

Bubba Redneck on May 29, 2014 at 11:50 AM

I am in the supernatural camp. Or rather something natural that we have rarely encountered.

K. Hobbit on May 29, 2014 at 11:58 AM

Maybe we should upgrade the “pings” of a blackbox to something a little more obvious…

Electrongod on May 29, 2014 at 8:48 AM

“Help, I’ve fallen, and I can’t get up.”

Ward Cleaver on May 29, 2014 at 12:23 PM

I think the plane is in pieces in a hangar on the Diego Garcia base. I have no idea why or what for, I can only imagine, but this idiot of a president we have has some really effed up ideas for this country and the world.

At this point I cannot put it past him and his liberal progressive lemmings to do something like this. I know it sounds uber conspiritorial and all that and I didn’t think so at first. The thing that makes me think so now is the plane going to 45k feet (to kill off the passengers) then turning in the direction of Diego Garcia before dropping off the radar.

It’d be REAL easy to shoot this down once and for all just by having another country without a stake in the game to tour the hangars at Diego TODAY, before they have a chance to finish cleaning up the mess.

If obama is responsible I’d want to see him on trial and under lock and key until his sentencing, which should be a pay-per-view event I’d gladly purchase.

Diluculo on May 29, 2014 at 12:29 PM

LOST. Don’t worry, some of the passengers will show up in a couple years after Locke makes the island move or some such.

AH_C on May 29, 2014 at 12:37 PM

Diluculo on May 29, 2014 at 12:29 PM

Um, you do realize that Diego Garcia is owned by the British and has access. Along with many civilians. Is the entire island in on the conspiracy? There is only limited hanger space available.

0bama would have to be a genius to keep this secret.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 12:40 PM

I don’t remember your original theory.

I don’t have enough information to even have a theory.

Could have been a suicide, a hijacking or catastrophic failure. What I am sure of though, it wasn’t a state sponsored act and a terrorist organization doesn’t have the skillsets needed to hijack and hide a 777 for more than two months.

What I would like to know is if there are enough seismographs along the northern route to have detected an impact of more than a quarter million pounds of airplane.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 11:34 AM

.
Interestingly enough, the general consensus of seismoligists is the impact of a fully loaded 777 would NOT register as a distinct event discernible from all the other low level seismic events that occur non-stop on a world wide basis – unless it crashed really close to a seismometer.

A “Navy guy” who is respected over there made the case it wouldn’t show up on any of the sonar networks the U.S. operates unless it was in the immediate vicinity of one of the detectors.

My original theory is included directly after this link (there are others, as well) documenting Boeing’s 2006 patent allowing control of the 777 and other planes to be taken away from ALL cockpit and onboard controls and landed by a remote pilot.

OK … coming late to the party but …

Boeing was warned that the 777 was hackable

I posted this the other day in AP’s “irresponsible speculation” post:

I don’t think this plane was “hijacked” in any of the traditional meanings. My response was to your scenario #4 re: cargo on the plane.

There is no way trained pilots DIDN’T know the plane had been turned around. The First Officer was “new” enough” (~ 2,000+ flight hours) that he would be a likely “inside job” candidate.

Military radars are routinely recorded so someone has had time to rerun the plane track enough times to be confident (or forced) to admit the new location.

The two Iranians traveling under false passports probably don’t have terror connections … but they could be mules carrying special electronic packages courtesy of Iranian scientists.

Interesting test case – remotely hack the computers on a quarter billion dollar plane and turn it into the world’s largest drone … with the convenience of a rated pilot to go “hands on” if things get glitchy.

Keep the plane … or ditch it somewhere far away from where it is supposed to be?

Ditch it … you’ve sent the message to the folks you wanted to get it.

PolAgnostic on March 11, 2014 at 11:25 PM

PolAgnostic on May 29, 2014 at 12:46 PM

What I am sure of though, it wasn’t a state sponsored act and a terrorist organization doesn’t have the skillsets needed to hijack and hide a 777 for more than two months.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 11:34 AM

Given the incompetence (initially, and ongoing, since the Malaysian government redacted the satellite ping data finally released) on display throughout this incident, I wouldn’t say that an organization would have to have too many skillsets to hide a 777. It might be parked behind a billboard on the highway next to the Kualah Lampur airport.

A more constant transponder that cannot be turned off (like those on the engines) is the most likely outcome of this and probably already in the works.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 11:34 AM

Technically speaking, the one on the engines was turned off. The pings sure aren’t helping us with much data. I tend to think you’re right, though. Which system will get axed the first time a bunch of weight-on-wheels squat switches fail and the system is flooded with data for aircraft on the ground. Then we’ll go ’round the mulberry bush all over again.

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 12:57 PM

PolAgnostic on May 29, 2014 at 12:46 PM

Seismometers detected the United 93 impact (but not the Pentagon impact)and since then have detected impacts from smaller aircraft. I didn’t mention sonar detection of an impact because I doubt there was anything sensitive enough any where close to the area. Even though China claimed to have data from an event near the original location the flight disappeared. It mainly depends on the geology, impact type and location of seismometers.

If the plane nosedived into the ground there would be a small footprint but large seismic shock. If the plane glided in there would be a larger footprint.

As for your theory, it isn’t as far fetched as most. But it couldn’t happen in a vacuum. Somebody out there would know. And he/them would have to be as quiet as the guy on the grassy knoll.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 1:18 PM

Meanwhile, the families still wait to hear what happened to their loved ones and get answers that may never come. It’s a tragedy with no end in sight for the families of the victims.

This type of nonsense incites my bile. The passengers on Flight 370 are dead. This means dead like my grandmother. She died of natural causes and we knew it right a way. Why the passenger’s families experience is any different than mine with my grandmother is insane media talk.

thuja on May 29, 2014 at 1:26 PM

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 12:57 PM

No doubt the Malaysian government has a bunch of incompetent boobs on the case. The Chinese may be playing games and the other local governments don’t have the assets. But don’t discount the Americans, British and Australians involved in the search. They will defer to flag of the carrier when dealing with the public, but they aren’t following their orders.

Remember, the Australians, followed by the US shifted their search areas days before any announcement was made to the public by Malaysia.

I am not concerned now with new location devices. Better to wait on those gripes until after something is proposed. By engineers, not armchair plane crash conspiracy nutballs. Me and Occam will be watching the show with an adult beverage.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 1:29 PM

After two months and a search that covered 329 square miles

Ed, are you sure that is right? 329 square miles seems like an absurdly small area to search. That’s a square measuring a little more than 18 miles by 18 miles. No wonder they can’t find anything. They ain’t even trying.

Nomennovum on May 29, 2014 at 1:44 PM

I am not concerned now with new location devices. Better to wait on those gripes until after something is proposed. By engineers, not armchair plane crash conspiracy nutballs. Me and Occam will be watching the show with an adult beverage.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 1:29 PM

Heh. Concur. Occam sure is a boring guy to hang out with, though. ;)

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 1:49 PM

Nomennovum on May 29, 2014 at 1:44 PM

Dude, its a single small autonomous submarine looking around two miles down.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 1:50 PM

Dude, its a single small autonomous submarine looking around two miles down.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 1:50 PM

Thanks, dude. Can’t say that’s clear from the text of the article; however, I’ll take your word for it, since I know that reporters generally suck at their jobs. Still, I suppose I am greatly relieved this is so clearly not a case of a drunk man looking for his keys under a parking lot light because it’s the only place with enough light so he can see.

Nomennovum on May 29, 2014 at 2:07 PM

Lloyd Bridges would have found it by now.

formwiz on May 29, 2014 at 11:40 AM

Surely you can’t be serious?

fortcoins on May 29, 2014 at 2:13 PM

65% chance of catastrophic failure; 20% of suicide by pilot; 10% hijacking followed by intentional crash; 1% chance of hijacking and landing; 4% other. I originally thought the suicide by pilot was the most likely explanation, so maybe I’m underestimating it now.

Nomennovum on May 29, 2014 at 2:17 PM

The Bluefin-21 was not able to look at one area in the northernmost ping area because of the depth of the water there, Dean said.

Ahem. As I was saying …

I suppose I am greatly relieved this is so clearly not a case of a drunk man looking for his keys under a parking lot light because it’s the only place with enough light so he can see.

They 90% chance they never find it.

Nomennovum on May 29, 2014 at 2:22 PM

Lloyd Bridges would have found it by now.

formwiz on May 29, 2014 at 11:40 AM

Surely you can’t be serious?

fortcoins on May 29, 2014 at 2:13 PM

Maybe they couldn’t find a stewardess willing to inflate the autopilot when the captain got up to take a leak.

Nomennovum on May 29, 2014 at 2:27 PM

In 1956 a B25 went down in the Monongahela River in Pittsburgh and it was apparently never found. There are a lot of conspiracy theories attached to the story. But if they never found a plane in a river there’s much less chance of finding one in the ocean.

crankyoldlady on May 29, 2014 at 10:37 AM

But back then you could toss a match into the river and the conflagration would race down to the Ohio. The B25 probably just dissolved in the “water” a few minutes after impact.

(The Mitchell Ghost Bomber is an interesting story: the crew survived the crash (2 died later of exposure), the water was shallow… and they’re still looking for it.)

de rigueur on May 29, 2014 at 2:32 PM

He never said that they should be distinct from each other. It was clear that he meant that they should be distinct from other acoustics.

blink on May 29, 2014 at 1:47 PM

His context was “distinct from other sources”, his words were “distinct from each other”. It’s why I made the distinction clear – then he responded with more confusion.

The acoustical signature of the pinger is very unique and distinct.

The problem being that it could be distorted in all sorts of ways by the underwater environment. That’s why the searchers jumped on this ping: it was all they had, and it might have been a black box. I agree on the incompetence (though it isn’t the only factor).

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 3:35 PM

Surely you can’t be serious?

fortcoins on May 29, 2014 at 2:13 PM

I think he might be. And don’t call him Shirley.

GWB on May 29, 2014 at 3:36 PM

My conspiracy theory on this one might turn out to be true. That was that the Chinese dropped a linger down there to throw off the bloodhounds because they shot the plane down when it was getting too close to a valuable Chinese target.

Buddahpundit on May 29, 2014 at 4:44 PM

I really hate Google auto correct spell checker.

Buddahpundit on May 29, 2014 at 4:47 PM

…global warming causes Godzilla.

LaughterJones on May 29, 2014 at 9:46 AM

I would buy that t-shirt

Spiders from Mars on May 29, 2014 at 4:54 PM

Has anyone considered the possibility that the plane and all its contents has been miniaturized and is currently in some alien kid’s toy box?

Wait, no, Atlantis International Air/Sea port runway 9 Left.

The Truth is out there…..

44Magnum on May 29, 2014 at 5:23 PM

As for your theory, it isn’t as far fetched as most. But it couldn’t happen in a vacuum. Somebody out there would know. And he/them would have to be as quiet as the guy on the grassy knoll.

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 1:18 PM

.
My theory is based on the empirical evidence:

1) Obama is a pusilanimous piss-ant who wouldn’t stand up to a blind, unarmed, one-legged mugger … much less any of our enemies who push him, and thereby this country, around daily. Even the NYT and the WaPo felt the need to relieve their bladders on his “foreign policy” speech at West Point.

2) Iran “remotely hijacked” one of the better American drones and forced it to land in their country over a year ago. They make MH370 disappear without a trace but provide proof that they “took it” to the SCOAMF’s administration with the statement, “If we had wanted to attack America, we could have done this with a 777 departing JFK and flown into your brand new skyscraper before you could have started to react. A nuclear bomb is just a means for us to deter OUR enemies. You WILL allow us to become a nuclear power or will we have to pursue these types of opportunities to ‘level’ the playing field.”

3) There are 1,100 Boeing 777′s in service with a combined value of over $ 300 billion USD. Letting HOW MH370 was “hijacked” become public knowledge will cause ALL of those planes (and potentially many others) to be grounded until they can be made “hacker proof”. This gives everyone who knows the true story incentive to keep this secret VERY tightly held.

Side note: The easiest way to prove your capability – a Iranian ship standing buy to shoot HD video of MH370 being ditched with no survivors.

PolAgnostic on May 29, 2014 at 6:34 PM

PolAgnostic on May 29, 2014 at 6:34 PM

1) empirical? possibly, I’ll give you that one.

2) not empirical

3) not empirical

cozmo on May 29, 2014 at 8:15 PM