Snowden blames State Department for ending up in Russia

posted at 8:01 am on May 28, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

True enough — but only in the most literal and immediate sense. NBC’s Brian Williams went to Moscow to interview Edward Snowden, and it seems that Snowden is most defensive about criticism of where he ended up after going on the run. Telling Williams that he was “trained as a spy in sort of the traditional sense of the word,” Snowden said he had no option but to seek asylum in Russia when the US revoked his passport while traveling through Moscow:

Edward Snowden, in an exclusive interview with “Nightly News” anchor Brian Williams, blamed the State Department for stranding him in Russia, saying he “never intended” to wind up there.

“I personally am surprised that I ended up here,” Snowden said in the interview, an excerpt of which aired on TODAY on Wednesday morning.

“The reality is I never intended to end up in Russia,” he said. “I had a flight booked to Cuba onwards to Latin America and I was stopped because the United States government decided to revoke my passport and trap me in Moscow Airport.

“So when people ask why are you in Russia, I say, ‘Please ask the State Department.”

It’s true that the State Department canceled Snowden’s passport, but that didn’t happen arbitrarily. Snowden had stolen a vast amount of highly classified information — and his first two destinations on the lam were China and Russia, not exactly friends of the US. His next stop was going to be Cuba. Anyone who flees the US under these circumstances — or for more mundane evasion of criminal prosecution — will get his passport revoked. Passports come with the instruction that they are the property of the US, not the bearer, and are intended as an endorsement of the traveler for only so long as the traveler can be endorsed. In fact, the first page in US passports explicitly states that the Secretary of State requests other nations to allow the traveler to pass into or through their borders — and on page 5 makes it clear that the passport is US government property.

Snowden stole US classified material, and the first three hops on his own itinerary were China, Russia, and Cuba. Maybe those were the only flights Snowden could arrange, but it’s a mighty peculiar itinerary for a free-speech, open-information advocate … especially one who now brags that he was trained as a spy and not just a technician.

Not to be totally outdone in the morning ratings, ABC’s Good Morning America counter-programmed NBC with an appearance by John Kerry to discuss Snowden. George Stephanopoulos started off his one question about Snowden’s claim to be a spy and not a hacker, but then eclipses his own question to ask whether Kerry has evidence that Snowden has put lives in danger. Kerry insists that more people have been put in danger, but then Stephanopoulos quickly shifts to Afghanistan:

Kerry had more to say on CBS:

Was Snowden trained as a spy? Anything’s possible, and that might explain his surprisingly plenary access to the most sensitive US secrets. But if that claim is true, then it raises even more questions as to why Snowden chose China, Russia, and Cuba as the first three stops on his escape route.

Update: Edited to fix some subject/verb grammar errors.


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So,do we know if Snowden is a hero or a traitor yet? So Ed, straight up, you leaving? In that new car. Or is Allah leaving? Or is Noah just an addition?

Bmore on May 28, 2014 at 8:03 AM

“Trained as a spy.”

Okay, Snowden apologists, go.

Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:05 AM

Bmore on May 28, 2014 at 8:03 AM

I’m staying, and AP’s staying.

Ed Morrissey on May 28, 2014 at 8:05 AM

He damaged the country’s ability to spy on its citizens to such a frightening degree. That’s why administration officials are butt hurt.

bossmanham on May 28, 2014 at 8:06 AM

Ed Morrissey on May 28, 2014 at 8:05 AM

Thank you. I was worried. New car and all. ; )

Bmore on May 28, 2014 at 8:06 AM

Was Snowden trained as a spy? Anything’s possible, and that might explain his surprisingly plenary access to the most sensitive US secrets. But if that claim is true, then it raises even more questions as to why Snowden chose China, Russia, and Cuba as the first three stops on his escape route.

Who do you think trained him?

Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:07 AM

Snowden stole US classified material, and the first three hops on his own itinerary were China, Russia, and Cuba. Maybe that’s the only flights Snowden could arrange, but it’s a mighty peculiar itinerary for a free-speech, open-information advocate … especially one who now brags that he was trained as a spy and not just a technician.

China, Russia, and Cuba? Was North Korea closed for the season?

Happy Nomad on May 28, 2014 at 8:07 AM

He damaged the country’s ability to spy on its citizens to such a frightening degree. That’s why administration officials are butt hurt.

bossmanham on May 28, 2014 at 8:06 AM

Keep telling yourself that.

Ted the Average on May 28, 2014 at 8:10 AM

Hey Kerry – why don’t you man up and go ask for those medals back that you threw over the White House fence a little while ago.

jwehman on May 28, 2014 at 8:10 AM

NSA spies on American citizens. To that extent Snowden did good in exposing that, so we can have a debate.

Every nation worth its salt spies on everyone else. Snowden exposing what we do and how we do it is wrong. And he runs to our geopolitical foes. Sorry, but he’s a traitor and should be put up against a wall.

rbj on May 28, 2014 at 8:11 AM

Who do you think trained him?

Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:07 AM

Don’t know. Doesn’t appear that training stuck very well. Next stop shock collar?

Bmore on May 28, 2014 at 8:11 AM

Okay, Snowden apologists, go.

Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:05 AM

I probably shouldn’t post this but it seems as if there is a whole lot less vocal love of Snowden’s actions than there was at one point.

Happy Nomad on May 28, 2014 at 8:12 AM

Hero or not, Snowden did right in exposing to the People the level of CRIMINALITY at the NSA. We have a right to know that our government is in gross violation of the Constitution, impacting it’s LEGITIMACY to govern.

Given that and other blatant examples of lawlessness, I think Obama, this Congress, and the courts have lost all legitimacy to retain their positions.

ConstantineXI on May 28, 2014 at 8:12 AM

I probably shouldn’t post this but it seems as if there is a whole lot less vocal love of Snowden’s actions than there was at one point.

Happy Nomad on May 28, 2014 at 8:12 AM

There are still some people who can’t grasp the concept of a zero-win situation, which is what this is.

Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:17 AM

NSA spies on American citizens. To that extent Snowden did good in exposing that, so we can have a debate.

Every nation worth its salt spies on everyone else. Snowden exposing what we do and how we do it is wrong. And he runs to our geopolitical foes. Sorry, but he’s a traitor and should be put up against a wall.

rbj on May 28, 2014 at 8:11 AM

Comment of the Affair™.

Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:18 AM

ConstantineXI on May 28, 2014 at 8:12 AM

Hero or not,

Not. Not even a matter worth debating.

Snowden did right in exposing to the People the level of CRIMINALITY at the NSA. We have a right to know that our government is in gross violation of the Constitution, impacting it’s LEGITIMACY to govern.

You can’t be so naive to think that “exposing the level of criminality” at the NSA” is the big thing that Snowden did. That’s not even a secondary issue. Snowden’s exposure of methods and capabilities is far more important than even that.

Happy Nomad on May 28, 2014 at 8:24 AM

I am glad to have learned about the NSA spying but I believe there were ways Snowden could have revealed this information without stopping off in China and Russia. I am tired of his complaining. He chose this course of action.

bopbottle on May 28, 2014 at 8:24 AM

Will Snowden lose his US citizenship?

Bmore on May 28, 2014 at 8:25 AM

Snowden is a hero and a whistleblower. He should be given immunity so he can come back and home and testify in the treason trials of every employee of the NSA.

earlgrey on May 28, 2014 at 8:32 AM

Does anyone have a spare Irony Meter? Mine exploded when Kerry (of all people) called Snowden a traitor.

307wolverine on May 28, 2014 at 8:32 AM

Does anyone have a spare Irony Meter? Mine exploded when Kerry (of all people) called Snowden a traitor.

307wolverine on May 28, 2014 at 8:32 AM

The small print on the Irony Meter warranty says it’s void when Ketchup Boy explodes it.

Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:38 AM

snowden didn’t tell me anything about spying on citizens that I didn’t already know, all he did was put a name to the program.
BFD.
but he (and greenwald) told other countries more than he told us.
he should share cells with manning.

dmacleo on May 28, 2014 at 8:40 AM

Comment of the Affair™.

Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:18 AM

Thanks. Just because the US isn’t acting right doesn’t mean Snowden is right. Just like Syria, I don’t see any good actors here.

rbj on May 28, 2014 at 8:45 AM

Interesting coming from Kerry.

Snowden broke the law but aren’t we glad he did. Is there any evidence of his spying for the US in foreign countries? I don’t suppose they would admit it if he did. Come on investigative reporters. Oh, sorry, there aren’t any of those anymore.

crankyoldlady on May 28, 2014 at 8:46 AM

He damaged the country’s ability to spy on its citizens to such a frightening degree. That’s why administration officials are butt hurt.

bossmanham on May 28, 2014 at 8:06 AM

Bull…cr@p.

The government is butt hurt because Snowden is a traitor who betrayed his country to an unprecedented degree.

I will be extremely interested to see the names of the Americans who Greenwald claims were collected on. All the conspiracy theorists will be let down.

NavyMustang on May 28, 2014 at 8:47 AM

“I was trained as a spy in sort of the traditional sense of the word …”

Inflated sense of self. He was a programmer.

NotCoach on May 28, 2014 at 8:49 AM

Inflated sense of self. He was a programmer.

NotCoach on May 28, 2014 at 8:49 AM

We don’t really know that do we? We don’t know what he did.

crankyoldlady on May 28, 2014 at 8:52 AM

Inflated sense of self. He was a programmer.

NotCoach on May 28, 2014 at 8:49 AM

Even the word “programmer” would also imply an inflated sense of self. His exploits involved social engineering and script kiddie behavior.

Personally, I am happy he’s in Russia — he and his buddy Putin are probably getting along famously right about now.

unclesmrgol on May 28, 2014 at 8:54 AM

Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:17 AM

That’s an excellent description of this mess. I’m glad/horrified at what I found out my government was doing but sad it wasn’t handled in an internal whistle blower way. And like a good little loony right winger, I’m wondering if it could have been handled in the correct fashion in Obama USA. The man who investigates himself.

Cindy Munford on May 28, 2014 at 8:59 AM

When he said it was the state dept.’s fault he’s stuck in Russia I think he was just explaining why he’s there. Apparently he didn’t expect to stay there. I wonder where he intended to go then.

crankyoldlady on May 28, 2014 at 8:59 AM

Does anyone have a spare Irony Meter? Mine exploded when Kerry (of all people) called Snowden a traitor.

307wolverine on May 28, 2014 at 8:32 AM

As much as I detest Kerry, Snowden’s damage goes far beyond anything Kerry did. At least we won the Cold War (no thanks to Kerry), but we will be years cleaning up the damage Snowden did. If you look at the people to whom he gave the data, none are friends of the United States, and the types of data they keep leaking have nothing to do with the civil liberties of our citizens.

Snowden’s intimations that there are more revelations to come of that type if the United States doesn’t give him what he wants makes it sure that the United States will never give him what he wants. If the Guardian has it, you can be sure the Russians have it, for the Guardian has been a Communist mouthpiece for generations.

unclesmrgol on May 28, 2014 at 9:00 AM

Wouldn’t it be “funny” if the list of Americans that were spied on were predominately conservatives?

Cindy Munford on May 28, 2014 at 9:00 AM

Cindy Munford on May 28, 2014 at 8:59 AM

He was probably right to not blow the whistle while in this country considering the kind of people in our government.

crankyoldlady on May 28, 2014 at 9:04 AM

Snowden has an inflated ego and sense of worth. His itinerary does speak reams about his motivations. The good: He opened the eyes of the American public to NSA overreach. Bad: he broke many laws and placed many in sensitive situations at real risk. Ugly: He’s both an ‘anti-hero’ and traitor who has attempted to escape accountability/responsibility for his destructive actions.

vnvet on May 28, 2014 at 9:04 AM

That’s an excellent description of this mess. I’m glad/horrified at what I found out my government was doing but sad it wasn’t handled in an internal whistle blower way. And like a good little loony right winger, I’m wondering if it could have been handled in the correct fashion in Obama USA. The man who investigates himself.

Cindy Munford on May 28, 2014 at 8:59 AM

Several people before Snowden attempted to warn Congress. They were ignored or had their careers /lives destroyed.

tetriskid on May 28, 2014 at 9:05 AM

“Trained as a spy.” Okay, Snowden apologists, go. Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:05 AM

Thanks Ed, for blowing the whistle on NSA domestic spying. If you ever kicked a puppy or fudged a loan application, I don’t endorse that stuff.

Akzed on May 28, 2014 at 9:06 AM

He damaged the country’s ability to spy on its citizens to such a frightening degree. bossmanham on May 28, 2014 at 8:06 AM

Keep telling yourself that. Ted the Average on May 28, 2014 at 8:10 AM

You’re right, domestic spying continues apace.

Akzed on May 28, 2014 at 9:08 AM

He damaged the country’s ability to spy on its citizens to such a frightening degree. That’s why administration officials are butt hurt.

bossmanham on May 28, 2014 at 8:06 AM

Keep telling yourself that.

Ted the Average on May 28, 2014 at 8:10 AM

Please do. How else would the government know which Porn Stars to “choke”

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 9:10 AM

There are still some people who can’t grasp the concept of a zero-win situation, which is what this is.

Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:17 AM

Did Snowden realize that when he released his stolen data that the terrorists would read that stolen data and, in the short term, use communications other than the telephone, disrupting the United States’ ability to track them? Did he realize that knowing which phone companies refused the United States’ requests for metadata would aid said terrorists by allowing them, in the short term, to evade scrutiny?

Did Snowden’s revelations that we had hacked into Chinese servers do anything to enhance our liberties or those of the Chinese themselves?

How about his revelations that we were spying on our allies? What good came of that revelation?

How about his revelations that we were looking at the content of data flowing overseas, and from overseas into the United States? The United States has always had a right specified under the Constitution to examine all things coming into and going out of the United States, and so — how did this enhance our civil liberties?

I’m not sure what zero-win means, but we went from win-win to it. The content of our communications within the USA remained inviolate, but whom we communicated with did not — there is no censor looking at and editing out things we say to each other like there was in WWII. — and that was a good compromise given we are at war in a way just as serious as that conflict. Traffic analysis is as good a way as any in determining what the terrorists in our midst (and everyone knows they are there, given the wake up call Ft. Hood represented) are up to.

unclesmrgol on May 28, 2014 at 9:16 AM

“Trained as a spy.”

Okay, Snowden apologists, go.

Steve Eggleston on May 28, 2014 at 8:05 AM

Ok. Here’s one. He and Greenwald must have some pretty good leverage if he’s even contemplating a trip back to the US.

And the Most Competent Administration Evah left itself wide open to this.

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 9:16 AM

And didn’t O’bozo just release the CIA station chief’s name?

Ummmmm. Where are the dead CIA foreign operatives Snowden left behind. Surely there must be some.

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 9:18 AM

In Afghanistan

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 9:18 AM

The fact is he has damaged his country very significantly. I find it sad and disgraceful. — @JohnKerry on Snowden

John Kerry making that statement is utterly indecent — or, rather, represents the indecency of “no honor among thieves.”

Lourdes on May 28, 2014 at 9:18 AM

He was probably right to not blow the whistle while in this country considering the kind of people in our government.

crankyoldlady on May 28, 2014 at 9:04 AM

Do you really think that if the Administration were Republican, that Mr. Snowden would not have been arrested and put in the slammer?

In fact, about the only people who would have rejoiced and embraced him would have been a Paulbot government, for they are so isolationist that they would have loved the damaged international relations of the United States. After all, the United States has no right being anywhere militarily than inside its own borders, according to the good Doktor.

unclesmrgol on May 28, 2014 at 9:19 AM

Ummmmm. Where are the dead CIA foreign operatives Snowden left behind. Surely there must be some.

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 9:18 AM

They exist. You will not hear of them.

unclesmrgol on May 28, 2014 at 9:20 AM

Wouldn’t it be “funny” if the list of Americans that were spied on were predominately conservatives?

Cindy Munford on May 28, 2014 at 9:00 AM

The Administration has used the IRS as a political tool, but there’s no evidence at all that they’ve used the NSA as a political tool.

Nothing Snowden has provided has shown any political use of the NSA; you would have expected that such data would be nearly the first out the chute and splashed prominently across the pages of the Guardian. Well, maybe not, given what the Guardian represents, but derSpiegel certainly would have published that stuff…

The IRS is bad enough — you get targeted for an audit if you contribute to conservative candidates or causes, and you don’t get the tax exemptions that liberals get. But such behavior is easily done with the data in the IRS’s own hands — your tax returns — and doesn’t need the NSA.

unclesmrgol on May 28, 2014 at 9:26 AM

They exist. You will not hear of them.

unclesmrgol on May 28, 2014 at 9:20 AM

If the .Gov didn’t have such an extensive domestic spying operation, Snowden would have been working for X-Box.

So their own transgressions got themselves bit in the @ss. If your speculation (cause that’s what it is) is true.

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 9:27 AM

He uses the, “You can’t send me to prison for killing my parents. I’m a poor orphan”, excuse.

No hero.

As for traitor, more like whistleblower.

formwiz on May 28, 2014 at 9:35 AM

I’m not sure what zero-win means, but we went from win-win to it.

That’s a contradiction.

The content of our communications within the USA remained inviolate,

“O I wish I was in the land of cotton…”

but whom we communicated with did not — there is no censor looking at and editing out things we say to each other like there was in WWII.

Huh, but listening to reporters’ phone calls and tapping their parents’ phones is fine, so long as they don’t edit out words? How would they do that?

What are you saying, that if I sent an email to a buddy telling him I had some 30 round mags for sale, the NSA wouldn’t edit that email, they’d just record it and move on. That’s nice to know.

— and that was a good compromise given we are at war in a way just as serious as that conflict.

I fail to see the compromise, but hey, “Free speech is great and all, but we’re in a war.” -Lindsey Graham

Traffic analysis is as good a way as any in determining what the terrorists in our midst (and everyone knows they are there, given the wake up call Ft. Hood represented) are up to. unclesmrgol on May 28, 2014 at 9:16 AM

Yeah, and they sure prevented the Ft. Hood massacre.

The same govt that ran guns to the Sinaloa Cartel and lied about it is very concerned about our well being. So concerned that they are trying to put gun dealers out of business by scaring banks away from them. Guns for the Sinaloa Cartel, but not for me!

So concerned about our safety that it uses the IRS to thwart political opponents. I can trust them!

Yes, I trust such a govt to keep me safe. That’s all they’re trying to do, after all, keep us safe by shipping guns to Al Qaeda in Syria – and training them – but only the moderate ones. To keep us safe from terrorists. Because we’re at war. After all, we’ve always been at war with Eastasia.

Akzed on May 28, 2014 at 9:45 AM

The content of our communications within the USA remained inviolate, but whom we communicated with did not — there is no censor looking at and editing out things we say to each other like there was in WWII. — and that was a good compromise given we are at war in a way just as serious as that conflict. Traffic analysis is as good a way as any in determining what the terrorists in our midst (and everyone knows they are there, given the wake up call Ft. Hood represented) are up to.

unclesmrgol on May 28, 2014 at 9:16 AM

That explains how we finally stopped the Tsarnaevs. Was anyone monitoring the phone traffic from the Russian State Dept.?

This administration has been a stellar shining example of incompetence rolling down a hill. And sorry, but your loudest exhortation that the content of our communications was inviolate flies in the face of everything else we keep learning about these people. They are fascist/tyrant wannabes.

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 10:00 AM

Of course he did not go through American ally nations on the lam. If he would have, those allies would have arrested him and turned him over to the United States. The State Department revoked his passport while he was in Russia to discredit him. Plain and simple. They could have done it in China, but because China is not as demonized as Russia they did not.

astonerii on May 28, 2014 at 10:08 AM

http://www.forbes.com/sites/erikkain/2013/12/29/report-nsa-intercepting-laptops-ordered-online-installing-spyware/

This part is my favorite. Whoda thunk?

I am sure the Chinese order from Dell with only Next Business Day service.

(can you let this post go through now? I mean, what??????)

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 10:20 AM

testing

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 10:21 AM

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 10:20 AM

They’re only trying to go after the bad guys!

But don’t worry – they don’t “edit” your communications, they just store them. For posterity.

Akzed on May 28, 2014 at 10:25 AM

Traffic analysis is as good a way as any in determining what the terrorists in our midst…The Administration has used the IRS as a political tool, but there’s no evidence at all that they’ve used the NSA as a political tool…

unclesmrgol

At last, some sane comments from someone who probably has walked the walk. BTW, whoever said the NSA did nothing to stop the Tsarnevs and/or the Ft. Hood killer, seems to forget all of the information was in the hands of the FBI in both cases and also in the hands of the Army in the last case. The NSA provides information to other intelligence and counter-terrorist agencies, they do not act upon that intelligence.

rlwo2008 on May 28, 2014 at 10:30 AM

The Administration has used the IRS as a political tool, but there’s no evidence at all that they’ve used the NSA as a political tool.

Yeah, they aren’t that bad, they’ll stop at something.

Good grief, man.

Shay on May 28, 2014 at 10:34 AM

rlwo2008 on May 28, 2014 at 10:30 AM

So they’re absolved??? Now we have to be thanking God for incompetence? Ugh.

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 10:37 AM

They’re only trying to go after the bad guys!

But don’t worry – they don’t “edit” your communications, they just store them. For posterity.

Akzed on May 28, 2014 at 10:25 AM

Ahh nuts. Only an A-

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 10:40 AM

Will Snowden lose his US citizenship?

Bmore on May 28, 2014 at 8:25 AM

Only if he repudiates it. I seriously doubt he will go to the US Embassy to do that as he would then be subject to arrest.

Does anyone have a spare Irony Meter? Mine exploded when Kerry (of all people) called Snowden a traitor.

307wolverine on May 28, 2014 at 8:32 AM

Kerry committed treason when he went to Paris and met with the North Vietnamese. He also did it before he was released by the Navy. Just because we won the Cold War doesn’t lessen the damage he did. We have no idea what the extent of that damage was so we can’t make any comparison to what Snowden did in that regard.

Quartermaster on May 28, 2014 at 10:42 AM

Do you really think that if the Administration were Republican, that Mr. Snowden would not have been arrested and put in the slammer?

Yeah, he would have been arrested. But he wouldn’t have been killed or disappeared.

crankyoldlady on May 28, 2014 at 11:01 AM

Sigh, he was a trained Russian Spy and its been documented he was working with them before he even took the Booze Allen job.

When he fled to Hong Kong he was staying in a Russian embassy for crying out loud.

jp on May 28, 2014 at 11:45 AM

testing

WryTrvllr on May 28, 2014 at 10:21 AM

Your posts are being screened by the NSA, that’s why the added delay.

slickwillie2001 on May 28, 2014 at 11:47 AM

If Snowden wants to live, he better stay in Russia.

Don’t trust any deal. obama wants you dead, dead, dead.

Schadenfreude on May 28, 2014 at 12:27 PM

jp on May 28, 2014 at 11:45 AM

No link…?

Akzed on May 28, 2014 at 1:00 PM

He was a spy like John Wayne was a ballerina.

faol on May 28, 2014 at 1:55 PM

Was Snowden trained as a spy? Anything’s possible, and that might explain his surprisingly plenary access to the most sensitive US secrets. But if that claim is true, then it raises even more questions as to why Snowden chose China, Russia, and Cuba as the first three stops on his escape route.

What???

Perhaps, and I’m only spitballing here, he picked those stops because….they don’t extradite to the US, which he was running from for good reason. They wanted him dead for revealing that our own govt was spying on us. Otherwise reliable conservatives in this thread have demaded the very same thing that john friggin kerry is demanding!

Imagine if this had been revealed by a whistleblower (which Snowden is, by ANY definition) during the Bush years. We’d hear nothing but praise for him, from BOTH sides of the aisle, and you all know it.

runawayyyy on May 28, 2014 at 2:52 PM

Imagine if this had been revealed by a whistleblower (which Snowden is, by ANY definition) during the Bush years. We’d hear nothing but praise for him, from BOTH sides of the aisle, and you all know it. runawayyyy on May 28, 2014 at 2:52 PM

A female reporter (I forget which publication) won a Pulitzer for exposing a financial tracking system that was supposedly following money to and from terrorists, whatever, anyhow, she won a prize and was feted in all the right places by all the right people etc.

Akzed on May 28, 2014 at 3:11 PM

The devil (ya know, the Great Satan) made him do it!

thebrokenrattle on May 28, 2014 at 4:36 PM

YA he was a naught naught spy, just like Jethro Bodine ..

dugbru on May 28, 2014 at 6:10 PM

Statist cheerleader Morrissey on the same side as Clinton, Obama and John Kerry. What a conservative leader!

iwasbornwithit on May 30, 2014 at 12:52 PM