Memorial Day 2014

posted at 8:01 am on May 26, 2014 by Jazz Shaw

It is worth noting, and providing a reminder to friends and family, on this and every Memorial Day that today is not Veteran’s Day. While there is never a bad time to give a thought – and thanks – to our nation’s veterans, today is the day when we come together in reverence to commemorate the Honored Dead. We commiserate with the Gold Star families, old and new, who have paid the ultimate price to ensure that the United States of America will endure. Most any veteran you ask will echo this sentiment, as Paul Szoldra notes in a touching piece at Business Insider this morning.

Do not thank me for my service because today is not about me at all.

That’s what a number of fellow military veterans said, when I asked what they wanted people to know about Memorial Day.

“It’s not about us,” said Staff Sgt. Jay Arnold, a soldier with the Illinois Army National Guard. “It’s about those who went before us.”

I would also not discourage anyone from celebrating and relaxing on this day, firing up the barbeque grill, kicking back with friends and taking a day to rest from your normal labors. It’s good to do that now and again, and perhaps it provides an even better atmosphere where we can remember the fallen, not just with tears or mourning, but with smiles and appreciation. It would probably also help to take a moment to reacquaint ourselves with the original order which established this day of recognition, as The Lid does over at this place.

In our family, I suppose would could consider ourselves exceptionally lucky. We have only had two soldiers fall in battle out of all the men who served on both my maternal and paternal sides. But of course, two is too many. One is too many for any family in the moment of loss when they are informed that one of their own has given the last full measure of devotion. And yet for every family who experiences this, with the passage of time the healing begins. And on Memorial Day, at American Legion or VFW posts, at all the parades which may seem silly and outdated to the young who have not been touched by such a loss, at the backyard cookouts and the ceremonies at graveyards draped with flowers and flags, these families who paid such an awful price come together and realize that they are not alone. And with the healing that comes with time, the pain fades into the background and we join together with others who also sacrificed so much and remember that it was all for a reason.

And we find a way to smile.

With that, I leave you with one of the better tributes ever put to paper by the hand of man… In Flanders Fields, by John McCrae.

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

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respect and gratitude.

jaxisaneurophysicist on May 26, 2014 at 8:04 AM

In memory of Arthur Thompson, died in France in 1918, brought back to rest in peace in his hometown in 1923.

You are not forgotten, Arthur.

Wethal on May 26, 2014 at 8:11 AM

All gave some, some gave all

God Bless

cmsinaz on May 26, 2014 at 8:12 AM

To our fallen, observing Memorial Day.

hawkdriver on May 26, 2014 at 8:13 AM

God bless em all

rob verdi on May 26, 2014 at 8:22 AM

Today I remember the Uncle I never knew, Buster Geddings. KIA in 1943 while serving under Patton in the Italy campaign. He was 23 years old.

I also remember my First Cousin, Robbie Hodge, a helicopter pilot, shot down over Laos in 1971.

TarheelBen on May 26, 2014 at 8:36 AM

A letter my uncle wrote to my grandparents from England, prior to D-Day. He survived Omaha beach, and was killed about a week later. He is buried in the American cemetery at Normandy.

“Soon… I do not know how soon.. I shall have to demonstrate not only how much or how well I have learned the art of killing, but how well I have taught that abominable art to others”
“I know what’s ahead. It won’t be another pleasure trip, but though it may cost me my life, I wouldn’t want to miss it!”
“Should I be among the many who inevitably must fall, remember that I didn’t go without realizing the possibility that I might lose my life. Remember, too, that I give my life willingly, that I do so out of love for my country and all its people….even the traitors and selfish slackers”.
“If I should die on the battlefield, I beg you to leave my body there. Some day our government may provide you the opportunity to visit my grave. If so , avail yourself of that opportunity.”

exhelodrvr on May 26, 2014 at 8:38 AM

Bing has a sea of flags on their page. Google, predictably, has nothing.

crankyoldlady on May 26, 2014 at 8:42 AM

I only hope we can get a speech this year of this caliber:

On this Memorial Day, as our nation honors its unbroken line of fallen heroes — and I see many of them in the audience here today — our sense of patriotism is particularly strong.

Stoic Patriot on May 26, 2014 at 8:46 AM

Bing has a sea of flags on their page. Google, predictably, has nothing.

crankyoldlady on May 26, 2014 at 8:42 AM

Why I love Bing.

hawkdriver on May 26, 2014 at 8:52 AM

My brother didn’t die in Vietnam but he probably died because he was there. They think it was because of exposure to agent orange.

There were others in the military but only my grandmother’s cousin, Thomas McCarthy, died, shot down in WWI in France. I don’t think anybody was even injured except my SIL’s father.

crankyoldlady on May 26, 2014 at 8:52 AM

May God bless our fallen soldiers and may He protect all those still in harm’s way.

Have a special day everyone.

lynncgb on May 26, 2014 at 8:53 AM

Nice post, Jazz.

flipflop on May 26, 2014 at 9:01 AM

Ditto HD

cmsinaz on May 26, 2014 at 9:04 AM

I agree.

crankyoldlady on May 26, 2014 at 9:12 AM

My brother didn’t die in Vietnam but he probably died because he was there. They think it was because of exposure to agent orange.

crankyoldlady on May 26, 2014 at 8:52 AM

Here’s to his memory then, col. May he be in peace in Christ.

I opened the page with one thought in mind – my dear cousin xxxx. He passed two years ago apparently from the continuing effects of psychological injuries suffered in the time of Vietnam. He was my only hero and a unique man — an expert marksman, a sniper, a Marine, an unusually accomplished hunter, and blessed with a hilariously daring and jaunty fashion sense.

Adored by seemingly all who knew him, he was the guy who could get away with anything, but instead was the first to step forward with the truth. I loved and admired you and I’ll always remember you as you were in 1968.

Jaibones on May 26, 2014 at 9:13 AM

“Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.” -John 15:13

BigGator5 on May 26, 2014 at 9:13 AM

Bing has a sea of flags on their page. Google, predictably, has nothing.

crankyoldlady on May 26, 2014 at 8:42 AM

Why I love Bing.

hawkdriver on May 26, 2014 at 8:52 AM

Something so simple. Google celebrates every meaningless trope of the kook left, but this nation’s most cherished passed? Nope. Most telling.

Jaibones on May 26, 2014 at 9:15 AM

In memory of Gary (Desert Shield/Storm) and Kevin (OIF). Semper Fi.

ColBubba on May 26, 2014 at 9:23 AM

“In Flanders Fields” was written because of the author’s involvement in one of the battles near Ypres. As the war was winding down, my Grandfather wrote the following to his father as part of a longer letter in which he described his duties, as a chaplain, to do forward reconnaissance, find food for the troops, evacuate wounded soldiers from the front lines and bury the dead. Among other duties:

I saw Ypres. The region by Ypres was truly “No Man’s land”. There was not an American soldier who would have owned a foot of it for anything. Truly no grass will grow here for a thousand years.

I am happy to say that peace seems to have come. I was slightly wounded in the right arm in the offensive we took part in on the Belgian front. I felt happy to be alive and safe and I look forward to coming home. My sympathy goes out to those who will never go home and for those who expect to see friends and relatives who will never come back.

I have come to the conclusion that life is a precious gift and is worth living, no matter what the difficulty, but we are so helpless to save it or preserve it that it is not worth while to consider our health and happiness and comfort above that of others. It is worth while sometimes to die, if death will serve to help others. When we think too much of our comfort we expose ourselves to more danger by disintegration than we do when we make a brave fight and face every danger and exposure.

I hope I come home from this war more of a man then I went into it. If I don’t I’ll feel that I have not played my part. . . .

KarenT on May 26, 2014 at 9:26 AM

A blessed Memorial day to all.

22044 on May 26, 2014 at 9:33 AM

Most telling.

Jaibones on May 26, 2014 at 9:15 AM

Indeed.

hawkdriver on May 26, 2014 at 9:34 AM

Excellent post Jazz. I had my morning scroll through fb today and noted a few posts that bothered me. My step-sister made a post listing and thanking all the veterans that have served or are serving in our family. A few of my brothers and sisters in arms (USAF and Air National Guard) were posting pictures of themselves in uniform (usually done on Veteran’s Day). I know they all had good intentions but have misunderstood the meaning of Memorial Day as you pointed out above. Is this creeping failure to keep and honor tradition due to family, community, educational or societal breakdown? Is it solely because our nation has not suffered the horrendously massive losses of a World War. Are we becoming a self absorbed culture forgetting our past? Your thoughts folks.

dddave on May 26, 2014 at 9:39 AM

Hand salute….RIP Warriors……

crosshugger on May 26, 2014 at 9:42 AM

Here’s my offering on Memorial Day to Commander Cole Black. It’s amazing to me that a copper bracelet with a soldier’s name has made such an impact. I am grateful there were those who took time to document these stories. I am grateful for the service of Commander Black.

http://missourieducationwatchdog.com/remembering-my-vietnam-pow/

manateespirit on May 26, 2014 at 9:48 AM

think those of us who served and made it tend to be pretty introspective today. a day of thinking.
was peacetime service for me but my MOS made it so I was close to getting shot (as in fighting for the weapon) a few times. I got lucky.

dmacleo on May 26, 2014 at 9:49 AM

In memory of Chief Petty Officer Wade. Always remember the cost of freedom and those willing to pay that cost.

Corsair on May 26, 2014 at 9:50 AM

My family has been blessed with no war time fatalities. Here’s to my friends and comrades who have given their last full measure of devotion. May their families be comforted.

Gebirgsjager on May 26, 2014 at 9:51 AM

Your thoughts folks.

dddave on May 26, 2014 at 9:39 AM

Very much agree. I always appreciate when someone thanks a vet. I made an early Memorial Day comment a night or two ago here because I thought I’d be traveling back to a job today. The replies were great an in agreement but also thanking me for my service. It’s hard to correct a good wish like this but you’re 100 percent correct. Memorial Day is for the fallen and in my book, those who have served but ultimately passed. It’s to remember those who fought and have gone before us.

On the other hand, it’s very hard to make much of good intentioned well wishes. If this is the worst we have to critique about the manner we observe it, I’d say we were in pretty good shape on Memorial Day. As opposed to the folks who see it only as a day to BBQ or worse those who belittle it and make comments like, “They died for a bank.” I’ll take the misguided well wishes every day.

hawkdriver on May 26, 2014 at 9:51 AM

Is this creeping failure to keep and honor tradition due to family, community, educational or societal breakdown? Is it solely because our nation has not suffered the horrendously massive losses of a World War. Are we becoming a self absorbed culture forgetting our past? Your thoughts folks.

dddave on May 26, 2014 at 9:39 AM

family breakdown causing the self absorption maybe.

dmacleo on May 26, 2014 at 9:52 AM

In memory of Captain Michael J. Ohler, United States Marine Corps

Killed in action, Beirut, Lebanon – October 16, 1983

Please take the time to read, and consider.

allanbourdius on May 26, 2014 at 9:53 AM

The flags have been placed. This year an extra flag was needed. I would like to link a song one of our commenters here at HA wrote. May we all continue to be blessed.

Bmore on May 26, 2014 at 10:00 AM

I’ve never actually thought about this but I am very lucky that none of my family or friends have suffered a loss in war. But many of them that served are gone now and I thank them, cherish them and miss them. God bless them all.

Cindy Munford on May 26, 2014 at 10:11 AM

In memory of Arthur Thompson, died in France in 1918, brought back to rest in peace in his hometown in 1923.

You are not forgotten, Arthur.

Wethal on May 26, 2014 at 8:11 AM

It is a disgrace that there is no official national monument in Washington for those who served or gave their lives in The Great War, where more American servicemen died than in all the wars following World War II – COMBINED! As we near the 100th anniversary of that war, this terrible slight must be corrected!

It is somewhat of a mystery to me why this is so, but I have been a passionate student of World War One for over a decade. I can’t understand why it is so unknown to most people, because it was one of the most fascinating, tragic and consequential times in human history, let alone the 20th Century!

If anyone is interested in learning more about the First World War, here are some books I recommend to get you started:

The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914
The Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of World War 1
The Guns of August
A World Undone: The Story of the Great War, 1914-1918

To whet your interest, here are some fascinating facts about the War to End All Wars:

The Ottoman Empire ordered and paid four million pounds for two dreadnoughts to be built in England. However, as war seemed likely in the summer of 1914, Great Britain seized the ships for its own navy, driving Turkey and its Empire to join the Central Powers, making it a true ‘world” war.

In the summer of 1917, there was a mass mutiny in the French Army and Germany, had they known, could have taken France easily and possibly ended the war. Information about the mutiny will be released by the French government in 2017, one hundred years after the event.

The Battle of the Somme, July 1st, 1916, was the costliest event in British military history with over 60,000 casualties – including 20,000 deaths… IN ONE DAY!

Logic on May 26, 2014 at 10:12 AM

In Flanders Fields (An Answer)

C.B. Galbreath

In Flanders Field the cannon boom,
And fitful flashes light the gloom,
While up above; like eagles, fly
The fierce destroyers in the sky;
With stains, the earth wherein you lie,
Is redder than the poppy bloom,
In Flanders Field.

Sleep on, ye brave, the shrieking shell,
The quaking trench, the startled yell,
The fury of the battle hell,
Shall wake you not, for all is well.
Sleep peacefully, for all is well.
Your flaming torch aloft we bear,
With burning heart, an oath we swear
To keep the faith, to fight it through,
To crush the foe, or sleep with you,
In Flanders Field.

bobthm3 on May 26, 2014 at 10:12 AM

…..looks like Google really outdid themselves on this Memorial Day…….

https://www.google.com/

…..as opposed to….

http://www.bing.com/

mjs28c on May 26, 2014 at 10:17 AM

May their families be comforted.

Gebirgsjager on May 26, 2014 at 9:51 AM

I count my blessings too that my family has been spared wartime losses with all of them that served.

I’ve posted this video before, but Flipper 75 is what I think about on Memorial Day; mostly because it was all men I knew well. Josh Rogers in particular. He was a new Chinook Pilot in our battalion the year we when to Iraq. Because the instructors were required to be mission pilots, it was tough to get the new pilots up. Josh spent the entire year working in operations with our S3 Flight Ops section. He was professional but saw the entire deployment pass by him when he wanted, “To be in the fight”. Only his roommate got an earful about not being able to fly. He was a dedicated to what the command asked his to do.

The next deployment was Afghanistan and he was a full up mission co-pilot and flying his butt off. He died with one of the best (and quirkiest) young Chinook pilots of all time, Chris Allgaier, doing a mission near the Kajaki Dam in the Helmand Province. Their helicopter had a frustrated internal load and it much too much time on an LZ during the first leg on a deliberate operation. After getting back on the route, they used an alternate leg to make up some time. They flew over a group of armed insurgent and they were nearly simultaneously hit with an RPG and SA16 IR missile. There was literally nothing they could have done better and yet they’re still gone.

I watched much of the operation from a TOC in Bagram on feeds. When all the first sorties were in their LZs and the battle had progressed to what you’d think was going well, I had to turn in for a mission I had the next day. I didn’t find out until I was in the TOC for my S2 briefing. It was one of those things that makes your mouth hand open.

But to Josh. Josh, was the consummate warrior. I know in my heart he died doing what he thought he was born to do and what he loved. Him and the Flipper 75 crew are Memorial Day to me.

Flipper 75

To the folks who had seen the video before, apologies for the repost.

hawkdriver on May 26, 2014 at 10:19 AM

“spent” too much time …

hawkdriver on May 26, 2014 at 10:22 AM

No matter how absurd the state’s lies are, they have always been an easy and expeditious way to dupe Boobus Americanus into supporting its wars.

There have been one or two exceptions in American history, but in general what Americans are “memorializing” on Memorial Day is wars of conquest, imperialism, mass murder of foreigners and the confiscation of their property, the abolition of civil liberties at home, and the debt, taxes, and inflation that are used to pay for it all. The state orchestrates never-ending memorials to itself and its wars because war is the health of the state.

The American Revolution was a just war. But barely thirty years later, the American state began its long imperialistic exodus by attempting to conquer Canada during the War of 1812.

Thirty years later President James Polk “justified” an invasion of Mexico by claiming that the tiny Mexican army posed an “imminent” threat to Americans. It was thus James Polk, not George W. Bush, who first used the excuse of “pre-emptive war” to invade and mass murder foreigners who had done no harm to Americans.

During his only two years in the U.S. Congress Abraham Lincoln voiced opposition to the Mexican War, but on his inauguration day (March 4, 1861) he threatened “invasion” and “bloodshed” in any state that refused to pay the federal tariff tax, which had been more than doubled two days earlier. He would not back down to South Carolina’s tariff nullifiers, as President Andrew Jackson had done three decades earlier. He called his War for Tariff Collection a war “to save the union” and said repeatedly that that was the one and only reason why he launched an invasion of his own country in a war that led to the death of as many as 850,000 Americans according to the latest research. Of course, Lincoln’s war literally destroyed the voluntary union of the founding fathers and replaced it with a Soviet-style compulsory union held together at gunpoint. All other countries of the world, including all of the Northern states of the U.S., ended slavery peacefully. Lincoln instead used the slaves as political pawns in a war that was about finally consolidating all political power in Washington, D.C., the pipe dream of the “nationalists” in American politics since the time of Hamilton, their Machiavellian inspiration.

Having conquered the South and commenced the decade of continued plunder known as “Reconstruction,” three months after Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox, the U.S. government commenced a twenty-five-year long war of genocide against the Plains Indians, “to make way for the [government-subsidized] railroads.”

The Spanish-American War was yet another exercise in imperialistic conquest, this time using the mysterious explosion in the battleship Maine as an excuse to wage war on Cuba for four years in order to take over Cuba’s sugar and tobacco industries for the benefit of American corporations.

World War I was none of America’s business, either, but Woodrow Wilson used the excuse of the sinking of the British pleasure boat, the Lusitania, which carried 100 American tourists, to enter the war. He knew that the “pleasure boat” was secretly transporting arms to England, and refused to warn the American tourists of the danger.

One effect of Wilson’s war was to strengthen the hands of the communists in Russia and the Nazis in Germany. Without American participation in World War I, there may never have even been a World War II as the Europeans would have eventually settled their own differences as they had been doing for hundreds of years.

Americans were never threatened with being forced to speak German or Japanese, or adopt sauerkraut or sushi as their national foods during the 1940s, either. One can disagree about how FDR manipulated the Japanese into invading Pearl Harbor, just as Lincoln manipulated the South Carolinians. But one cannot deny the fact that the end result of World War II was that Russia’s international socialists (a.k.a. communists), as opposed to Germany’s national socialists (a.k.a. Nazis), got to impose totalitarian rule over Central and Eastern Europe for the next forty-five years, with the U.S. government allying itself with the former gang of totalitarian socialists for the duration of the war.

Nor were Americans ever threatened with being forced to speak Korean, Vietnamese, Iraqi, or any other language.

The only two just, defensive wars in American history were the American Revolution and the South’s side during the War to Prevent Southern Independence. Since there are no longer any “Civil War” veterans alive today, you would only be making a fool of yourself by saying “thank you for your service” to any veteran on Memorial Day — or any other day.

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 10:26 AM

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 10:26 AM

gfy

dmacleo on May 26, 2014 at 10:28 AM

Today, I remember

My Grandfather, who served in in the United States Army Air Corps WWI, The United States Air Force in WWII, Korea, and Vietnam, who passed away in 1958.

My Father, who Served in the United States Air Force, in Korea, and Vietnam, who passed away in 2001.

My Step Father who served in the United States Navy, (who served through the entire Vietnam War) from 1954 to 1981, who passed away in 1996.

And my little brother, who served in the United States Navy from 1981 to 1984, who passed away in 2006.

oscarwilde on May 26, 2014 at 10:29 AM

In memory of Pfc. Edward Patrick. 83rd, 331st infantry. KIA in St. Malo, France. August 14, 1944.

BacaDog on May 26, 2014 at 10:30 AM

In memory of my friend and fellow shooter-

Mark T. Carter
Chief Petty Officer, United States Navy
http://arlingtoncemetery.net/mtcarter.htm

And the rest of my fallen brothers-
http://www.navysealfoundation.org/about-the-seals/our-fallen-heroes/

We will never forget. God bless.

Patriot Vet on May 26, 2014 at 10:37 AM

Not sure Memorial Day could have been correctly observed without the heartfelt sentiments of a Ron Paul nut.

hawkdriver on May 26, 2014 at 10:45 AM

Eternal rest grant unto them O Lord,
And let Perpetual Light shine upon them.
May their Souls
And the Souls of all the faithful departed
Through the Mercy of God
Rest in Peace.
Amen.

And may God the Father Almighty continue to bless these United States of America.

Zorro on May 26, 2014 at 10:49 AM

May God bless our Brightest and Best. Your post was disrespectful and unwanted, abernathy.

kingsjester on May 26, 2014 at 10:53 AM

Comforter and Councilor, We turn to you in our time of grief; our help comes from the Lord, maker of heaven and earth. Since the Civil War, we have set aside a day for remembrance, and our hearts are broken for the men and women who have been lost while serving our country.

Fallen Heroes. Neither national liberty nor eternal freedom comes without a price. You paid for our eternal salvation with your own son, and you feel the suffering of parents who’ve lost their children defending America’s freedom. You have heard the cries of spouses, children, siblings and friends. You have collected their tears and will be their comfort:

Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of compassion and the God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves have received from God.
(2 Corinthians 1:3-4)

I am grateful for those who have died defending my freedom. Do not allow me to become complacent toward their sacrifice, but exercise my freedom to benefit my country and your Kingdom. Remind me daily that my freedom in both life and eternity came at a price someone else paid.

For hundreds of years, men and women have sacrificed themselves for my right to pursue happiness. They have shown the true meaning of love, for:

Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.
(John 15:13)

I am grateful to those individuals, and my heart turns toward the family members who are left behind. This day is a reminder of their sacrifice and I pray the Holy Spirit would comfort them.
AMEN.

A Prayer in Honor of Fallen Heroes
Posted by joshuajmasters on May 27, 2012

DebraChicago on May 26, 2014 at 10:56 AM

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 10:26 AM

Congratulations, you have successfully achieved the blog comment version of an Elliot Rogers rampage. Of course this also means that you are every bit the worthless piece of shite scum that Elliot was, you just haven’t murdered anyone yet. Considering how stupid, ignorant and narcissistic you are, I’m sure you’ll manage that eventually as well.

oscarwilde on May 26, 2014 at 10:56 AM

Happy memorial day. God Bless all of our military families, past and present…

OmahaConservative on May 26, 2014 at 11:03 AM

From little towns in a far land, we came
To save our honour, and a world aflame;
By little towns in a far land, we sleep
And trust those things we won, to you to keep.

– Kipling

Tard on May 26, 2014 at 11:11 AM

Noted that abernathy posted the worst comment ever on HotAir, at least since the antitheist who trolled an Easter post last year.

22044 on May 26, 2014 at 11:16 AM

Logic on May 26, 2014 at 10:12 AM

You may wish to add two others to your list, both by Professor Margaret MacMillan, professor of international history at Oxford.

1) Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World

and

2) The War That Ended Peace: the Road to 1914

And thanks, Jazz. I appreciate the column.

oldleprechaun on May 26, 2014 at 11:21 AM

Noted that abernathy posted the worst comment ever on HotAir, at least since the antitheist who trolled an Easter post last year.

22044 on May 26, 2014 at 11:16 AM

Everytime you answer this guy you’re giving him more advertising.

crankyoldlady on May 26, 2014 at 11:25 AM

Noted that abernathy posted the worst comment ever on HotAir, at least since the antitheist who trolled an Easter post last year.

22044 on May 26, 2014 at 11:16 AM

funny how retards like that never seem to understand we went where the people they voted into office sent us.
funny how retards like it will never accept responsibility for that.
sounds a lot like that idiot dante that used to post here, it was a real winner also…

dmacleo on May 26, 2014 at 11:29 AM

Congratulations, you have successfully achieved the blog comment version of an Elliot Rogers rampage. Of course this also means that you are every bit the worthless piece of shite scum that Elliot was, you just haven’t murdered anyone yet. Considering how stupid, ignorant and narcissistic you are, I’m sure you’ll manage that eventually as well.

oscarwilde on May 26, 2014 at 10:56 AM

Bwahahahahahaha

Guess Me B’n a Paid killer in the jungles of Vietnam don’t count… huh… sport

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 11:30 AM

Bwahahahahahaha

Guess Me B’n a Paid killer in the jungles of Vietnam don’t count… huh… sport

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 11:30 AM

proof the VA system fails people with mental issues.

dmacleo on May 26, 2014 at 11:36 AM

Guess Me B’n a Paid killer in the jungles of Vietnam don’t count… huh… sport

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 11:30 AM

No, it doesn’t, in fact, it doesn’t count for anything… at all

oscarwilde on May 26, 2014 at 11:38 AM

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 10:26 AM

You puerile puddle of pig poop!

Even a moronic extreme loon libertarian such as yourself should have the decency to keep your asinine lunatic beliefs to yourself on a day like today.

Then you wonder why your fantasy old man lover, Ron Paul never stood a chance.

GFY!!!

ZeusGoose on May 26, 2014 at 11:40 AM

Some vintage “Decoration Day” from 2006:

http://www.captainsquartersblog.com/mt/archives/007083.php

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:

Sergeant First Class Paul R. Smith distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with an armed enemy near Baghdad International Airport, Baghdad, Iraq on 4 April 2003. On that day, Sergeant First Class Smith was engaged in the construction of a prisoner of war holding area when his Task Force was violently attacked by a company-sized enemy force. Realizing the vulnerability of over 100 fellow soldiers, Sergeant First Class Smith quickly organized a hasty defense consisting of two platoons of soldiers, one Bradley Fighting Vehicle and three armored personnel carriers. As the fight developed, Sergeant First Class Smith braved hostile enemy fire to personally engage the enemy with hand grenades and anti-tank weapons, and organized the evacuation of three wounded soldiers from an armored personnel carrier struck by a rocket propelled grenade and a 60mm mortar round. Fearing the enemy would overrun their defenses, Sergeant First Class Smith moved under withering enemy fire to man a .50 caliber machine gun mounted on a damaged armored personnel carrier. In total disregard for his own life, he maintained his exposed position in order to engage the attacking enemy force. During this action, he was mortally wounded. His courageous actions helped defeat the enemy attack, and resulted in as many as 50 enemy soldiers killed, while allowing the safe withdrawal of numerous wounded soldiers. Sergeant First Class Smith’s extraordinary heroism and uncommon valor are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Third Infantry Division “Rock of the Marne,” and the United States Army.

unclesmrgol on May 26, 2014 at 11:50 AM

My everlasting gratitude to those who have died for this nation. My heart goes out to their families.

31giddyup on May 26, 2014 at 11:51 AM

We remember…

annoyinglittletwerp on May 26, 2014 at 11:53 AM

Bwahahahahahaha

Guess Me B’n a Paid killer in the jungles of Vietnam don’t count… huh… sport

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 11:30 AM

Based on your total stupidity, I’m guessing all you did in Nam was stay high on Thai sticks, and harass underage prostitutes. Chances are the only ‘killing’ you did was stepping on insects.

The only sad apart is you made it back alive. You’re one fallen fool no one would have to waste time memorializing, ever.

ZeusGoose on May 26, 2014 at 11:53 AM

Based on your total stupidity, I’m guessing all you did in Nam was stay high on Thai sticks, and harass underage prostitutes. Chances are the only ‘killing’ you did was stepping on insects.

The only sad apart is you made it back alive. You’re one fallen fool no one would have to waste time memorializing, ever.

ZeusGoose on May 26, 2014 at 11:53 AM

Personally, given the vitriol in his diatribe, I profoundly doubt that he ever got any closer to Vietnam than a college anti-Vietnam War protest.

oscarwilde on May 26, 2014 at 11:58 AM

Obama…turning the Arlington National Cemetery Memorial Day ceremony into a Wellstone funeral/campaign speech, via his designated “guest” widow” and his ever-profuse anecdotes.

He has no shame, nor any respect for propriety. Disgusting.

GGMac on May 26, 2014 at 11:58 AM

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 10:26 AM

My great great grandfather beat your great great grandfather. But we celebrate both on this Decoration Day, because it was originally constructed to remember the fallen of both sides in the Civil War.

As I relax today, and post on the internet, I’m thankful of those who gave their lives so I can do this without worrying about offending the powers that be. I am thankful especially to my Uncle Gordon Peter Campbell, 26th Marines, killed at Iwo Jima on March 6, 1945.

http://gravelocator.cem.va.gov/NGLMap?ID=3849970

unclesmrgol on May 26, 2014 at 12:05 PM

…..looks like Google really outdid themselves on this Memorial Day…….

https://www.google.com/

…..as opposed to….

http://www.bing.com/

mjs28c on May 26, 2014 at 10:17 AM

Wow. Pick my jaw off the floor.

unclesmrgol on May 26, 2014 at 12:09 PM

mjs28c on May 26, 2014 at 10:17 AM

Wow. Pick my jaw off the floor.

unclesmrgol on May 26, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Google has the official Motto of, “Don’t Be Evil”. Unfortunately, nobody at Google seems to know what the word “Evil” actually means.

oscarwilde on May 26, 2014 at 12:14 PM

mjs28c on May 26, 2014 at 10:17 AM

Wow. Pick my jaw off the floor.

unclesmrgol on May 26, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Google has the official Motto of, “Don’t Be Evil”. Unfortunately, nobody at Google seems to know what the word “Evil” actually means.

oscarwilde on May 26, 2014 at 12:14 PM

On the positive side though, duckduckgo seems to have discovered where google hides their lunches…

oscarwilde on May 26, 2014 at 12:20 PM

Nearly a decade and a half into the War on Terror, it has to be asked: What are we still fighting for?

Clearly not our freedom. Between testicle-groping TSA brutes and the NSA cataloging everyone’s Internet search history in their Utah desert basement, what freedom is left in America? If you don’t pay property taxes, you lose your home. If you don’t pay income taxes, you are thrown in a cage. If you don’t buy health insurance, the goons at the IRS will hound you.

“War is never pretty. And the price paid is almost always dear. But there used to be limits to the atrocities men unleashed on one another.”
Are 22 veterans committing suicide every day just so you have the luxury of being forced to pay for some moocher’s Obamaphone? Is that really freedom?

The argument that we’re valiantly fighting al Qaeda before they invade America and massacre all of us in a glorious jihad is totally nonsensical.

Congress already voted to fund rebels in Syria with taxpayer dollars. It’s widely known that many of these “freedom fighters” are radical Islamists affiliated with al Qaeda.

Uncle Sam is waging war across the globe for a different interest: himself. It’s gotten to the point where basic custom is eschewed for the sake of victory. War is never pretty. And the price paid is almost always dear. But there used to be limits to the atrocities men unleashed on one another. In an era of drone strikes on the Prince of Peace’s birthday,

https://www.commondreams.org/headline/2013/12/26-2

it’s hard to remember the great Christmas Truce of World War I. On Christmas Eve in 1914, the Western Front was no longer a desolate stretch of land fit for men with a death wish. British and German soldiers sang carols to each other across the trenches. As daylight appeared, men emerged from their pits of death and shook hands on the battlefield. They collected the bodies of the deceased. They exchanged gifts.

And on that day, when the world’s leading powers fought the war to end all wars, compassion and love emerged from the slime of imperial conquest. It was almost, as Damon Linker puts it, “a fleeting glimpse of God.” The cause of governments was put aside to honor the cause of man. It was short-lived, and no event like it occurred after.

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM

I have always felt humbled by Memorial Day. Nobody in my family died in an American uniform. We are dp’s who have become citizens due to the fact that American soldiers fought in Europe during WWII and saved our lives.

I will never forget and I will always be grateful and my tears are pouring down my elderly face as I write this.

Thank you, America.

Mariadee on May 26, 2014 at 12:50 PM

Personally, given the vitriol in his diatribe, I profoundly doubt that he ever got any closer to Vietnam than a college anti-Vietnam War protest.

oscarwilde on May 26, 2014 at 11:58 AM

You’re probably correct. I was just trying to kind ;)

Or maybe he plays a Vietnam war game on his Commodore 64, while living in his van down by the river!

At any rate, he’s the type of hyper libertarian that makes me cringe. Although I’m sympathetic to some libertarian views, and a strong supporter of the U.S. Constitution, nut jobs like him really give me pause.

ZeusGoose on May 26, 2014 at 12:50 PM

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 10:26 AM

F-

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM

Common Dreams.org?

Z-

Del Dolemonte on May 26, 2014 at 12:56 PM

Gone but not forgotten! Thank you all for your service.

1. My maternal grandfather, who lied about his age so he could fight in World War I.

2. My one and only maternal uncle, who served on a Navy destroyer in the Pacific in World War II.

3. My second uncle, who flew Osprey recon planes off the back of a battleship in World War II.

4. My Dad, who was a career officer in the US Coast Guard. His ship was one of the vessels blockading Cuba in October of 1962.

5. And not yet gone-assorted cousins; one of them also served in the Coast Guard, another is currently in the Navy, and her husband recently retired as an Air Force JAG.

Salute!

Del Dolemonte on May 26, 2014 at 1:06 PM

On this day, I honor Navy Corpsman Mark Cannon, my Marine son’s friend and protector in his first combat tour in Afghanistan. (Mark awarded Silver Star posthumously, second tour). I think Mark was my sons inspiration for becoming a paramedic after leaving the Corps after 8 years and 2 combat tours.

BigAlSouth on May 26, 2014 at 1:10 PM

At any rate, he’s the type of hyper libertarian that makes me cringe. Although I’m sympathetic to some libertarian views, and a strong supporter of the U.S. Constitution, nut jobs like him really give me pause.

ZeusGoose on May 26, 2014 at 12:50 PM

I honestly doubt that he is a libertarian either, sounds far more like your average Bill Ayer’s progressive liberal.

oscarwilde on May 26, 2014 at 1:14 PM

They gave their all for a land full of morons, in the majority.

Schadenfreude on May 26, 2014 at 1:18 PM

Organizers estimated around 750,000 bikers and spectators had descended on the US capital for the annual eve-of-Memorial Day rally in support of American prisoners of war and those missing in action, as they have each year since 1988.

The awe-inspiring show of motorcycle might includes many US military veterans on bikes, clearly identifiable in leather jackets emblazoned with military badges and medals.

Schadenfreude on May 26, 2014 at 1:26 PM

If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep…

That, in a nutshell, is why I have been browbeating the let it burn crowd.

My father had a room downstairs in the house I grew up in, it was a place he went to basically get away from Mom. Next to that room was a laundry room and the wall that separated them had an unfinished electrical outlet that went through both walls. An obnoxious child could crawl under the table with the sewing machine and, if the “HiFi” wasn’t on, listen to what was being said in the next room. It was the only place I heard Dad talk about the war. Had I been found out I still wouldn’t be able to sit down.
On a Memorial day decades ago, when I was evesdropping under the sewing table, I heard my fathers friend “Ray C” , who was a CDR of a PT boat at the end of the war talk about what he went through at the battle of Savo Island, ( “the worst licking the US Navy ever took in a fair fight”) It was a night fight and the Japanese had torpedoes that actually worked, Rey found himself in oily, burning water at night. He told of how he was haunted by the image of a Sailor firing away at the Jap searchlights until the black water closed in around him, the gun barrel made a squelching noise as the sea swallowed it up.
“Arite S” was on USS Franklin and did damage control when she was hit by Japanese dive bombers, killing 800 sailors. He met my father after the war, out of work. When dad heard he was on Franklin on the long trip back to the USA after she was gutted he tried to get him hired where he was working, They objected to hiring Artie because he was a Jew but Dad threatened to walk out and start his own company with him so they took him on. A few years later they started their own company together anyway. At my fathers funeral Artie told me this in tears, In 1945 it wasn’t commonplace for a Texan to stick his neck out for a New York Jew, but he was a Sailor and he’d been there and that was my dad..
My father talked about the battle of the Philippine sea and the “goony birds” at Midway and Leyte Gulf, where they had to launch so far away from the enemy (because “Bulls**t Halsey” was out chasing a decoy fleet) that there was almost no chance of getting back to “the boat”. He fancied himself a good pilot, but a par navigator (apple/tree) but he remembered the mixed emotions of relief and sorrow as he navigated back to the carrier by the distress lights of his friends who had run out of fuel on the way back. Seeing the little signal light bobbing up and down in the Pacific ocean was for some of them the last time anyone would lay eyes on them. He landed on fumes.
Near the end of the war dad had an engine failure and spent a couple of days in the Ocean, close enough to see the Japanese (or maybe Okanawan) coast “dog paddling toward Alaska” because he thought his neck stood a better chance in the water then “on the wrong end of a jap sword”. A PBY Catalina picked him up, a black sailor came out on a raft and hauled him into it and said something to the effect of “I’m the only one dumb enough to come out here and get you”. Dad, dehydrated and exhausted said thought he might have called him “momma”.

All this should signify something above and beyond a memory that will die when I do as all the millions of other stories that are gone should. Lives, Fortunes and sacred Honor have been sacrificed on our behalf and the way I see it, that leaves an obligation to keep faith and at least try to be a strong link in the chain. Self interests and common sense aside: That’s why I can’t let it burn and why I think those who are working for it to go up in flames are dead wrong for doing so.

V7_Sport on May 26, 2014 at 1:36 PM

From little towns in a far land, we came
To save our honour, and a world aflame;
By little towns in a far land, we sleep
And trust those things we won, to you to keep.

– Kipling

Tard on May 26, 2014 at 11:11 AM

Kipling lost his only son in the First World War. (There’s a BBC movie about him called My Boy Jack.) Kipling wrote this poem about his son and all the young men who died during the war.

You may wish to add two others to your list, both by Professor Margaret MacMillan, professor of international history at Oxford.

1) Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World

and

2) The War That Ended Peace: the Road to 1914

And thanks, Jazz. I appreciate the column.

oldleprechaun on May 26, 2014 at 11:21 AM

I have those in my World War One wishlist on amazon.com. Thanks!

Logic on May 26, 2014 at 2:05 PM

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM

I’ve read Hot Air for some time. I don’t think I’ve read a more despicable series of inappropriate comments than yours today. I struggled to not write in response considering the subject, but you seriously don’t know when to stop. I know the vast majority of socks you post under and not a one of them deserves a bit of respect after this.

You’re vile that you would do this to people simply paying honor to men and women who have died for their freedoms. Reading the comments above, quite a few are talking about their families.

You don’t believe it? That’s fine. But a man with any schread of class would have said nothing.

Okay Red Leg. Your turn. Post another piece of your misguided opinion and then roflymfao again.

hawkdriver on May 26, 2014 at 2:06 PM

Bwahahahahahaha

Guess Me B’n a Paid killer in the jungles of Vietnam don’t count… huh… sport

roflmmfao

donabernathy

When I served, there was still many VietNam veterans on active duty, and NONE of them, not a one, ever referred to themselves as a ‘paid killer.’

The only people that refer to themselves as a ‘paid killer’ are the ones that seek attention, or were stateside their entire military career, or were REMFs in the rear with the gear, or those that never served but want to impress people.

Either way, you are an a**hole, so GFY.

Gothguy on May 26, 2014 at 2:10 PM

My grandfather lost both of his brothers in Europe in WWII. He was too young to enlist then but went on to serve in Korea. He died two years ago. We miss you.

exitus on May 26, 2014 at 2:12 PM

You’re vile that you would do this to people simply paying honor to men and women who have died for their freedoms..

hawkdriver on May 26, 2014 at 2:06 PM

Friend, the people we remember are beyond caring what this idiot thinks, probably a good policy.

V7_Sport on May 26, 2014 at 2:17 PM

I have had many relatives that served in World War I, World War II, Korea, Viet Nam, Persian Gulf, and Afghanistan. I salute their service.

On this Memorial Day, I wish to pay homage to my Grandfather, Sgt. Andrew Hovanec, Company D, 80th Infantry Division, 317th Infantry, killed in action in France, October 10, 1944, age 34.

I never knew you, Grandpa, but I always think of you.

Gothguy on May 26, 2014 at 2:18 PM

…Okay Red Leg. Your turn. Post another piece of your misguided opinion and then roflymfao again.

hawkdriver

Red Leg…I see what you did there!

Kudos, hawkdriver!

Gothguy on May 26, 2014 at 2:20 PM

My forebear’s service and sacrifice goes back to serving under General Washington in 1776, a several-greats grandfather I know little about beyond the name we share, but who paid the ultimate price to help found this nation. To him and all those who came after I owe a debt that cannot be repaid, and I am eternally grateful.

Rest in peace, sir, and thank you.

alchemist19 on May 26, 2014 at 2:29 PM

Either way, you are an a**hole, so GFY.

Gothguy on May 26, 2014 at 2:10 PM

Bwahahahahahahahahahaha

I am certainly am not proud of the killing of a number of other human beings based on the lies I was fed by my Government and believed without question. But shame on me for not using my own brain. Just because I found myself on the battlefield didn’t mean Americans had any right or reason to be there. But that never occured to me. I was trained well to accept authority. The North Vietnamese certainly knew what the score was. They were fierce defenders of their own country from foreign invaders. First the Chinese, then the French and finally Us. The Vietnamese people and their governments were never a threat to this country or American citizens or our individual freedoms in any sense.

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 2:41 PM

Logic on May 26, 2014 at 10:12 AM

Thank you for posting the list of books on WWI. I will plan to look them up and read them.

WWI history is very fascinating. I taped a PBS series in the 90s called “The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century” Not knowing much about it then, I was intrigued by all the overlapping events, both political and cultural, that happened during that time.

I’m sure when I read the books, they will challenge the usual PBS slant, and they will provide a more detailed and better examination.

PatriotGal2257 on May 26, 2014 at 2:43 PM

roflmmfao

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 2:41 PM

You sure do roll on the floor a lot. Maybe you need a break from blog commenting.

TarheelBen on May 26, 2014 at 2:51 PM

V7_Sport on May 26, 2014 at 1:36 PM

It won’t die with you. You just wrote it down.

crankyoldlady on May 26, 2014 at 2:55 PM

My brother was in the Navy from 1963 to 69. My uncle was in the Navy during WWII. We aren’t sure what he did but I keep meaning to try to find out. He was an inventor. My great uncle was an engineer and they didn’t want him to go into the army in WWI but he finally got to go. He was in for one month until the Armistice. My father kept getting a pass but he was really too old for WWII and he had a heart murmur.

crankyoldlady on May 26, 2014 at 3:04 PM

While I understand the point of Jazz’s post, and while I can certainly agree with the expressed sentiment that the day is not about Veterans (at least about those who returned,) I’ll add my two cents; not to argue, but to add a counter opinion.

Yesterday, at church, we were honored to have local vets join us for Memorial Day worship. We build a service based on 16 verses of the Navy Hymn (Eternal Father, Strong to Save,) which cover all of the branches, and all of the disciplines, of the service.

In this way, we try, in our paltry way, to both honor the dead (including a reading of names, and the playing of Taps,) and to show gratitude for their living comrades.

Today, at the cemetery, remarks included a remembrance that the Veterans of Vietnam did not receive a heroes welcome, but were, rather, reviled and insulted, verbally and physically. Again, an attempt to both honor the dead, and thank those whom we can thank.

Not a mixed message at all, as some have expressed. Not confusion, I think, but an understanding that our duty to the dead compels our actions toward the living.

I’ll close by thanking all our vets (even those whose posts on this thread disappoint) for their service.

God bless our fallen, keep safe those who serve, and uphold those who are no longer in their country’s service!

massrighty on May 26, 2014 at 3:05 PM

Let’s not forget this dude. Late in life he moved here to New Hampshire, and the graves of he and his wife are just a few miles north of Lake Winnipesaukee.

Claude Rains served in the First World War in the London Scottish Regiment alongside fellow actors Basil Rathbone, Ronald Colman and Herbert Marshall. At one time, he was involved in a gas attack that left him nearly blind in one eye for the rest of his life. By the end of the war, he had risen from the rank of Private to that of Captain.

Del Dolemonte on May 26, 2014 at 3:06 PM

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 2:41 PM

The only thing you ever killed, were your own children you worthless sack of shite.

oscarwilde on May 26, 2014 at 3:08 PM

First Veterans day without him…

http://m.legacy.com/obituaries/baltimoresun/obituary.aspx?n=&pid=169886347&referrer=0&preview=True.

He was Red Arrow Brigage in New Guinea, Phillipines.

Born in 1921, he went through hell young.

He is missed this year. He always spent Veterans day at some Cemetary,, honoring lost friends.

My grandfather.

wolly4321 on May 26, 2014 at 3:09 PM

But shame on me for not using my own brain.

donabernathy on May 26, 2014 at 2:41 PM

Sorry, but you’ve already killed off your remaining brain cells with all of that rolling around you do on the floor…is it indigestion, or rabies, or both?

Del Dolemonte on May 26, 2014 at 3:09 PM

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