Rubio declines to answer whether he’s ever tried marijuana

posted at 2:41 pm on May 19, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

Did he or didn’t he? Marco Rubio isn’t saying, although he emphasizes that he opposes recreational marijuana use and wants federal enforcement of prohibitions even in states that have legalized it, so Rubio’s refusal to specify whether he smoked pot in the past isn’t a dodge on the issue. Instead, Rubio argues to ABC’s Jonathan Karl that public figures have to be careful about the example they set to others — a lesson Rubio says he learned the hard way with his memoir:

The Florida Republican, who maintains a strict stance against the legalization of marijuana, refuses to answer whether he’s ever personally smoked it. Rubio told “Politics Confidential” that his silence on the matter is based on his belief that there is no “responsible way to recreationally use marijuana.”

“If you say that you did, then suddenly there are people out there saying, ‘Well, it’s not a big deal,’” Rubio said. “On the other side of it is if you tell people that you didn’t, they won’t believe you.”

Rubio explained that his decision not to answer the question goes back to an encounter he had after publishing his memoir, “American Son.” In the book, Rubio reveals that he was not a disciplined student in his youth and had a 2.1 GPA in high school.

“Someone came up to me and said, ‘You know, I enjoyed your book, but I want you to know, my son came up to me and said he doesn’t have to get good grades in high school, because look at Marco Rubio, he didn’t do well in high school and look how successful he’s been,’” Rubio recalled.

“And that impacted me,” he said of the encounter.

I’ve never used marijuana either, although few people seem to find that difficult to believe. Sometimes, being a square has its advantages.

Rubio makes two very good points, even if one disagrees on his position on legalization and enforcement. Like it or not, the law does send a moral signal on behavior in exactly the manner that Rubio describes. Legalization will send the signal that (a) marijuana can be safely consumed, and (b) that will result in greater use over the long arc. The question is whether the negative impact of that is eclipsed by the savings in resources used in prohibition of a widely-available substance that grows practically everywhere in the US, and whether the removal of that prohibition will push back against the civil-rights abuses of the War on Drugs to an extent that it outweighs the other societal costs.

That will only be determined by studying the effects of legalization in states like Colorado and Washington — and as long as the marijuana is grown within the state and not crossing state lines, we should have a debate as to whether the federal government should have a role in it. Conservatives who wish a reversal on Wickard v Filburn should be rooting against federal intervention in those circumstances.

The second point from Rubio has to do with being a responsible role model. Perhaps that seems a little old-fashioned in an age of confessionals and trying to look hip, but I agree with Rubio on this point. In the end, what relevance does Rubio’s high-school behavior have to his ambitions for political office?


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

He looks stoned in that photo.

vlad martel on May 19, 2014 at 2:43 PM

Just admit you did, we all made mistakes in our youth and have learned from them.

rbj on May 19, 2014 at 2:44 PM

I’m glad he’s not going to tout his recreational use like Clinton and Obama!

terryannonline on May 19, 2014 at 2:44 PM

Instead of asking pol if they have ever smoke a J and ate a handful of Cheetos, maybe we should ask them the generic question “Have you ever driven a car while buzzed?”

I don’t care if they have toked up, just like I don’t care if they have ever hit up happy hour at the local tavern after a hard day.

MikeInBA on May 19, 2014 at 2:45 PM

When a simple “no” would do but is not forthcoming…

Akzed on May 19, 2014 at 2:46 PM

If only he had been so honest when asked about his position on illegal immigration.

DFCtomm on May 19, 2014 at 2:46 PM

Without chemicals, life itself would be less pleasant.

There are plenty of Libertarian reasons to legalize pot. Federalism in pot laws should be a part of the Republican platform.

ShadrachSmith on May 19, 2014 at 2:48 PM

He didn’t inhale, like Billy Clinton.

Schadenfreude on May 19, 2014 at 2:48 PM

The question is whether the negative impact of that is eclipsed by the savings in resources used in prohibition of a widely-available substance that grows practically everywhere in the US, and whether the removal of that prohibition will push back against the civil-rights abuses of the War on Drugs to an extent that it outweighs the other societal costs.

Not quite.

First you have to answer whether or not the government should be in the business of telling people what they can put into their bodies if they aren’t bothering anyone.

Then, if you think it should be in that business, you have to ask if the Constitution grants it the right to do so.

If the answer to either of those is no, then you your questions don’t matter.

ChrisL on May 19, 2014 at 2:49 PM

Nowadays it is politically damaging if you haven’t… he might not want to lie by saying that he has.

mjbrooks3 on May 19, 2014 at 2:51 PM

Who cares – youth pot use is no longer an issue – with most voters

jake-the-goose on May 19, 2014 at 2:51 PM

Schadenfreude on May 19, 2014 at 2:48 PM

No mi guesta “loco weed”.

Oil Can on May 19, 2014 at 2:52 PM

Everybody did tons of drugs in college, right?
Excuse me, I’ve got to rotate my flipper babies.

Tard on May 19, 2014 at 2:53 PM

Does it matter?

We got a prez that sucked in wasted vapors in the smoked filled vehicle…

Electrongod on May 19, 2014 at 2:54 PM

That would be a yes-

bazil9 on May 19, 2014 at 2:54 PM

In the end, what relevance does Rubio’s high-school behavior have to his ambitions for political office?

It’s not relevant, but it will be to the MSM if he runs. Anything about the Rs is fair game, including what they did 40 years ago.

Remember the Romney hair cutting incident from the 60s?

cat_owner on May 19, 2014 at 2:57 PM

“If you say that you did, then suddenly there are people out there saying, ‘Well, it’s not a big deal,’” Rubio said. “On the other side of it is if you tell people that you didn’t, they won’t believe you.”

I’ve never tried pot. Never had the desire and having a career that involves security clearances and drug testing doesn’t hurt in staying away from the stuff either.

But Rubio is right. He’s a young enough generation that nobody is going believe declarations of never trying pot.

Happy Nomad on May 19, 2014 at 2:57 PM

If only he had been so honest when asked about his position on illegal immigration.

DFCtomm on May 19, 2014 at 2:46 PM

heh

bazil9 on May 19, 2014 at 2:59 PM

bazil9 on May 19, 2014 at 2:54 PM

ROFL. “Yes’ for whom? For Rubio or for B9?

lineholder on May 19, 2014 at 3:00 PM

Aqua!!

Buddha!!

Paul/Cruz 2016…

JohnGalt23 on May 19, 2014 at 3:00 PM

I’ve never used marijuana either, although few people seem to find that difficult to believe.
– Ed Morrissey

I believe you, Ed.

verbaluce on May 19, 2014 at 3:01 PM

Ed –

You may be square, but as my really square father would tell:

“I tried it once and it made me sleepy. That didn’t help late at night when I was hustling pool and throwing punches.”

Odie1941 on May 19, 2014 at 3:01 PM

He went to my Alma Mater, the University of Florida. Enough said.

eaglephin on May 19, 2014 at 3:01 PM

He won’t answer because 22% of the public is less likely to vote for someone as President if s/he has used marijuana:

http://www.people-press.org/2014/05/19/for-2016-hopefuls-washington-experience-could-do-more-harm-than-good/

jim56 on May 19, 2014 at 3:01 PM

I appreciate that he’s willing to consider the manner in which his own actions might be an example or an influence on the lives of others.

Some of our other Repubs don’t even get that much.

lineholder on May 19, 2014 at 3:02 PM

bazil9 on May 19, 2014 at 2:54 PM

ROFL. “Yes’ for whom? For Rubio or for B9?

lineholder on May 19, 2014 at 3:00 PM

Yes for Rubio….

B9 pleads the 5th! (;

bazil9 on May 19, 2014 at 3:02 PM

This is what the press grills politicians on?

will77jeff on May 19, 2014 at 3:03 PM

Just admit. just say no is so 80′s anyway.

Red Creek on May 19, 2014 at 3:04 PM

He did!!!

Walter L. Newton on May 19, 2014 at 3:06 PM

With a hat tip to Nat’s outfielder Harper.

This is the response for Conservatives when dealing with the Lame Stream Media.

“That’s a clown question Bro.”

there it is on May 19, 2014 at 3:06 PM

I’ve never used marijuana either,

However, when it comes to coke, Ed’s got his face buried in a mountain of it on his desk 24/7 just like Al Pacino in the end of Scarface.

“Say hello to my little friend…”

WhatSlushfund on May 19, 2014 at 3:06 PM

Just tell the truth: you didn’t inhale

crrr6 on May 19, 2014 at 3:09 PM

He could just say ‘Yes I did and it was a bad decision’ but then he’d have even less of a chance of being elected president of Meiguo.

DarkCurrent on May 19, 2014 at 3:11 PM

“Less than the current president, I assure you of that”, than laugh it off.

right2bright on May 19, 2014 at 3:12 PM

I am in my 60′s grew up during the drug revolution and have never smoked marijuana or used any illegal drugs.

However most of the people i grew up with did-although most do not use today.

If Rubio did so what. Obama has admitted to it.

However if Rubio is a current and continuous user-that might be a problem.

gerrym51 on May 19, 2014 at 3:13 PM

But did he put his dog on the roof of his car? Did he cut a boys hair off in HS? Binders full of Women….

sandee on May 19, 2014 at 3:13 PM

Legalization will send the signal that (a) marijuana can be safely consumed,

I think the 99% of adults who have safely smoked it already send that signal.

and (b) that will result in greater use over the long arc.

Do you think you’ll be lighting up then Ed if it’s legalized?

Do we really need studies for any of this? This all seems pretty common sensical. No one has any problems right now getting weed right now in any state where it is illegal.

This is just Rubio being his usual slimy political self. That guy will say absolutely anything to anyone to get elected.

WhatSlushfund on May 19, 2014 at 3:15 PM

Maybe we should ask more important questions, like “Are you going to sell us down the river once you get to DC like every other politician does? Why or why not?”

SirGawain on May 19, 2014 at 3:16 PM

As long as our society insists on recreational drug use, there will be a black market for them. That old supply and demand thingy. That in turn requires funding the War on Drugs and assures tremendous profits to those who wish to destroy us and use those profits toward that end. I always marvel at our own capacity for self destruction.

butch on May 19, 2014 at 3:16 PM

“If you say that you did, then suddenly there are people out there saying, ‘Well, it’s not a big deal,’” Rubio said. “On the other side of it is if you tell people that you didn’t, they won’t believe you.”

Sounds like an answer one of the a commenter here at HA would give. That’s right Moesart, talking about you.

I’ve never used marijuana either, although few people seem to find that difficult to believe.
– Ed Morrissey

Never been any doubt in my mind Ed that you did. Why the denial?/

Bmore on May 19, 2014 at 3:18 PM

In the end, what relevance does Rubio’s high-school behavior have to his ambitions for political office?

There’s a high-schooler running for office in Virginia or something like that, let’s ask her.

I was queried about smoking weed when I joined the Navy fresh out of high school, and these days as the military is being downsized, people are being denied the chance to enlist if they admit it.

Doing something when you’re 11 or 12, eh ok, but when you’re 17 or 18?

Bishop on May 19, 2014 at 3:18 PM

Sounds like an answer one of the a commenter here at HA would give. That’s right Moesart, talking about you.

Should have read.

Sounds like an answer one commenter here at HA would give. That’s right Moesart, talking about you.

Bmore on May 19, 2014 at 3:20 PM

Rubio’s word means nothing. He is “for sale.”

Jayrae on May 19, 2014 at 3:21 PM

Legalization will send the signal that (a) marijuana can be safely consumed, and (b) that will result in greater use over the long arc.

Disagree with point 1: Alcohol legalization did nothing of the sort, why does marijuana legalization do this?
Point 2: Probably true but the climate might be warming too. Since I think your first point was shaky, I don’t necessarily go along with your second point which was derived from your first point.

The question is whether the negative impact of that is eclipsed by the savings in resources used in prohibition of a widely-available substance that grows practically everywhere in the US, and whether the removal of that prohibition will push back against the civil-rights abuses of the War on Drugs to an extent that it outweighs the other societal costs.

There’s another important question too, Ed. Why is it any of your damn business?

rhombus on May 19, 2014 at 3:22 PM

Not quite.

First you have to answer whether or not the government should be in the business of telling people what they can put into their bodies if they aren’t bothering anyone.

Then, if you think it should be in that business, you have to ask if the Constitution grants it the right to do so.

If the answer to either of those is no, then you your questions don’t matter.

ChrisL on May 19, 2014 at 2:49 PM

I would actually put your second question first – does the Gov. have authority to do so under the Constitution. If “no” then you don’t waste any time pondering the other part of the issue.

Lance Corvette on May 19, 2014 at 3:24 PM

I am in my 60′s grew up during the drug revolution and have never smoked marijuana or used any illegal drugs.

However most of the people i grew up with did-although most do not use today.

If Rubio did so what. Obama has admitted to it.

However if Rubio is a current and continuous user-that might be a problem.

gerrym51 on May 19, 2014 at 3:13 PM

I would say that Obama proudly proclaimed his habitual drug use in his book, he didn’t just admit it. There is a huge difference between the two.

Johnnyreb on May 19, 2014 at 3:25 PM

Paul/Cruz 2016…

JohnGalt23 on May 19, 2014 at 3:00 PM

In my book, half correct. But not a bad start.

freedomfirst on May 19, 2014 at 3:27 PM

Although I am opposed to legalizing marijuana, I would be much more interested in a reporter asking a straightforward question regarding a politician’s knowledge of the Constitution than in hearing whether or not they ever smoked weed.

Shump on May 19, 2014 at 3:28 PM

Just answer the question knucklehead or you are going to look like a damn fool. No one cares these days.

SC.Charlie on May 19, 2014 at 3:38 PM

“At this point, what difference does it make?”
“Dude, that was like X years ago”
“It depends on what the definition of is, is”

cat-scratch on May 19, 2014 at 3:44 PM

Marco Rubio isn’t saying, although he emphasizes that he opposes recreational marijuana use and wants federal enforcement of prohibitions even in states that have legalized it, so Rubio’s refusal to specify whether he smoked pot in the past isn’t a dodge on the issue.

In other words, he’s a nanny stater and only favors federalism and the 10th amendment when it’s convenient to do so, but is willing to sh!t all over them for political expediency.

thirteen28 on May 19, 2014 at 3:45 PM

Legalization will send the signal that (a) marijuana can be safely consumed, and (b) that will result in greater use over the long arc.

Disagree with point 1: Alcohol legalization did nothing of the sort, why does marijuana legalization do this?
Point 2: Probably true but the climate might be warming too. Since I think your first point was shaky, I don’t necessarily go along with your second point which was derived from your first point.

rhombus on May 19, 2014 at 3:22 PM

Disagree all you want, neither point is shaky – both are evidenced by fact – even recent history in areas where it has been legalized.

Legalization sends an explicit signal that the authorities have decided this thing isn’t bad for you after all – at least not as bad as they were telling you it was. And it categorically, emphatically, factually does result in greater use – and not just ‘over the long arc’ – we’re already seeing it in the ‘short arc’.

Midas on May 19, 2014 at 3:46 PM

After repeal of Prohibition there were and still are counties that are dry, to this day.

There is nothing stopping counties or States from prohibiting the use of marijuana or any other drug currently on the federal list if federal enforcement goes away. That would be federalism at work: allowing States, counties and cities to each try different means of dealing with social ills without having to inflict a one-size fits all prohibition on the Nation.

Instead of using the negative power of government to punish, why not use our positive liberties to help our fellow man understand the dangers of such drugs? Is that not the burden we agree to take up for a smaller government? If we are not our brother’s keeper do we really wish to make our government the warden of us all to stop the few? The use of negative power as warning on this topic over the last century has not and cannot stop the use of these things by everyone – and by putting government bureaucracies in charge of trying to they grow ever larger and yet demonstrate ever less capacity to respect those that pay them, which is the people as a whole.

Yes lives will be lost if there is a federal deregulation of these drugs.

Our morals are being corroded away when we do not take up our burden for our fellow man. The easy way is slowly creating a tyranny as government has gone from policing to militarizing and now inflicts itself on the innocent blithely and without repercussions via raids gone wrong in an attempt to get enough arrests to demonstrate why they need a larger budget and more people to police us with. Is not policing ourselves and teaching the good of that our responsibility so that we do not fear that government will attack the innocent just because it can, does and will do so as it grows more powerful?

Government cannot create the atmosphere for good public morals: that is up to us as a people.

Government can only create fear of it and the power we grant it.

Yes lives will be lost if the federal government steps away from enforcing this prohibition.

Our liberty as individuals in a Nation will assuredly be lost if we DON’T have them do that.

That choice is yours.

ajacksonian on May 19, 2014 at 4:03 PM

His response should have been, “No, I have never had an abortion either.”

portlandon on May 19, 2014 at 4:11 PM

The prohibitionists will fail again.
War on drugs is a liberal policy.

weedisgood on May 19, 2014 at 4:13 PM

If he did, he can always be upfront, admit it, and still stand against it much like George W. Bush did.

Stoic Patriot on May 19, 2014 at 4:16 PM

Don’t care. I’ll never vote for him anyway.

neyney on May 19, 2014 at 4:17 PM

I’d stick up for him, but then again, he lied to me about amnesty, so…meh. Go git him, liberal propagandists at ABC/CBS/NBC!

higgins1991 on May 19, 2014 at 4:18 PM

After all the stories about Barry’s choom gang you would think the liberal media would just leave it alone, but no….

slickwillie2001 on May 19, 2014 at 4:39 PM

Nice one Ed.

Let’s be the only party holding our candidates to the “Messiah Standard”

WryTrvllr on May 19, 2014 at 4:46 PM

portlandon on May 19, 2014 at 4:11 PM

Perfect! Touché

Bmore on May 19, 2014 at 4:47 PM

So Rubio’s answer to a son telling mom that “hey Rubio did it so why can’t I?” is to imply that we should lie to our kids?

Here’s what Marco should have said, “Yeah, tell your son that if he screws up as a kid he can still be a Senator…. but he’ll be a lousy one and a hypocrite later.

RockRib on May 19, 2014 at 4:50 PM

Looking at his performance since the whole Dehydration Proclaimation Rubio might still enjoy the regular doobie. Seriously, this guy is a train wreck in front of a microphone. Gimme Rand Paul, gimme Ted Cruz just don’t gimme a blabbering fool who misses every gimme putt in front of him.

RockRib on May 19, 2014 at 4:55 PM

Just go away punto.

Murphy9 on May 19, 2014 at 4:58 PM

I’ve never used marijuana either

Ed

Rubio smoked and didn’t want to admit it. I don’t know how you are infering anything different.

I am sure you believe that we should ban large sodas because we need to send a moral message that being fat is wrong.
/

The law should not be a weapon we use to send moral messages.

ArkyDore on May 19, 2014 at 4:58 PM

Here’s what Marco should have said, “Yeah, tell your son that if he screws up as a kid he can still be a Senator…. but he’ll be a lousy one and a hypocrite later.

RockRib on May 19, 2014 at 4:50 PM

Why does this seem familiar????

WryTrvllr on May 19, 2014 at 5:11 PM

Rubio smoked and didn’t want to admit it. I don’t know how you are infering anything different.
I am sure you believe that we should ban large sodas because we need to send a moral message that being fat is wrong.
/
The law should not be a weapon we use to send moral messages.
ArkyDore on May 19, 2014 at 4:58 PM

Well said. Ed’s willingness to give a pass here is lame. I’d respect Rubio more one way or the other. This is a cop out.

Irritable Pundit on May 19, 2014 at 5:11 PM

“I’ll take ‘Prevarications By Omission’ for $600, Alex.”

TimBuk3 on May 19, 2014 at 5:13 PM

Maybe that’s why he was so desperate for that glass of water — drymouth.

Neuro-conservative on May 19, 2014 at 5:22 PM

Legalization will send the signal that (a) marijuana can be safely consumed, and (b) that will result in greater use over the long arc.

Disagree with point 1: Alcohol legalization did nothing of the sort, why does marijuana legalization do this?
Point 2: Probably true but the climate might be warming too. Since I think your first point was shaky, I don’t necessarily go along with your second point which was derived from your first point.

The question is whether the negative impact of that is eclipsed by the savings in resources used in prohibition of a widely-available substance that grows practically everywhere in the US, and whether the removal of that prohibition will push back against the civil-rights abuses of the War on Drugs to an extent that it outweighs the other societal costs.

There’s another important question too, Ed. Why is it any of your damn business?

rhombus on May 19, 2014 at 3:22 PM

Alcohol consumption in the United States did drop during prohibition and steadily rose after re-legalization (reaching it’s previous point in the 1970s).

Given that legalization has resulted in increased usage everywhere that something was legalized (alcohol here, pot in The Netherlands, etc) it seems fair to argue that usage will increase in the U.S. if pot is legalized (unless someone has a good argument for why things will be different this time).

The question to answer is whether that is a bad thing or a ‘bad enough thing’ which would merit the downsides of criminalizing recreational drug use (drug violence, prisons full of non-violent offenders, black markets, etc).

JadeNYU on May 19, 2014 at 5:26 PM

I believe you Ed.

I’ve never tried anything stronger than caffeinated sodas myself.

I did grow up hearing the stories of my ‘former-hippie’ parents – lots of reminiscing about staring at the walls, watching the wall paper patterns morph in front of their face (no, they weren’t just talking about pot). Always followed by “But don’t you kids try any of that!”

Their stories never seemed that cool so I was never tempted.

This was solidified in college when I’d attend parties where people would go smoke pot in a back room. They’d come out with heavy lidded eyes, talking like they were half asleep, laughing at jokes no one was telling and (in many cases) drooling. Again, no temptation there.

I have no urge to regulate what other people choose to do, but I’ve also got no interest in doing it myself.

JadeNYU on May 19, 2014 at 5:31 PM

The question to answer is whether that is a bad thing or a ‘bad enough thing’ which would merit the downsides of criminalizing recreational drug use (drug violence, prisons full of non-violent offenders, black markets, etc).

JadeNYU on May 19, 2014 at 5:26 PM

And we don’t have enough data yet? Seriously? Or is it because people who brag about never having tried marijuana have such strong opinions and not enough first-hand experience?

rhombus on May 19, 2014 at 5:38 PM

I don’t think thete’s anyone out there who didn’t try it.

jimver on May 19, 2014 at 5:49 PM

Drug bans are mostly new (created in the 20th century). For the majority of time here in America, all drugs were legal. They will be again, as they should be. Of course, they can’t be reinstated right away though. That would damage the economy too much by killing the “anti-drug” industry before a new faux-industry could be created.

ROFLMMFAO

donabernathy on May 19, 2014 at 6:02 PM

Well said. Ed’s willingness to give a pass here is lame. I’d respect Rubio more one way or the other. This is a cop out.

Irritable Pundit on May 19, 2014 at 5:11 PM

My problem with Ed’s comment is the fact that he said “either”. I believe Ed didn’t smoke, but Rubio purposefully evaded a response and gave the message that he shouldn’t set a bad example. That all points to the probable answer that he did smoke. At the very least it isn’t definitive.

As written, Ed’s statement is a lie because “either” cannot be infered from the article and deserves to be corrected.

ArkyDore on May 19, 2014 at 6:04 PM

“Rubio declines to answer whether he’s ever tried marijuana”
…In other words, that’s would be : “Si Señor.”

MicahStone on May 19, 2014 at 6:11 PM

Rubio makes two very good points, even if one disagrees on his position on legalization and enforcement. Like it or not, the law does send a moral signal on behavior in exactly the manner that Rubio describes. Legalization will send the signal that (a) marijuana can be safely consumed, and (b) that will result in greater use over the long arc.

Like it or not, punishing people for the verbal equivalent of “ugh!” in response to offensively in-your-face gayness also sends a moral signal that (a) sodomy is good for children and other living things, and (b) that will result in more of the forced, top-down homosexualization of culture over the long arc.

I’ve got to give Ed some points for consistency. When people are being fined and subjected to other penalties to “send a moral message” Ed is in favor of it, whether the “moral message” is “don’t do marijuana” or “do engage in homosexual acts”.

David Blue on May 19, 2014 at 6:14 PM

“At this point what difference does it make?”

He’s a freaking RINO without a cause, or chance of winning as far as I’m concerned. He can smoke all the pot he likes, I don’t really care. 99% of those scrotes in washington drink themselves silly, and have of them probably drive right afterward, so really…..

who cares.

Diluculo on May 19, 2014 at 6:25 PM

I really couldnt care less if he smoked when he was younger, frankly I would prefer someone who did and was open about it.

Now his position on cracking down on how states are legalizing it is pretty much a “no-go” for me. It really does look like 2016 is becoming a “Paul or Bust” for me. No way can I support any candidate who wants to crack down on Marijuana. No way at all.

Blu3Yeti on May 19, 2014 at 7:45 PM

What difference, at this point, does it make?

This should be a Republicans response whenever questioned about ancient history from their past.

Ibanez Lotus on May 19, 2014 at 8:39 PM

He should have said yes. It would make him qualified for President then.

Frank T.J Mackey on May 19, 2014 at 8:43 PM

“At this point, what difference does it make?”
“Dude, that was like X years ago”
“It depends on what the definition of is, is”

cat-scratch on May 19, 2014 at 3:44 PM

Just saw this. Why don’t Republicans throw these democrat mantras right back at the reporters. It would be interesting to see how the msm responds.

Ibanez Lotus on May 19, 2014 at 8:47 PM

Reason has a great post on this.

This sounds like an all-purpose excuse for sanitizing your biography and refusing to answer questions about touchy subjects: I can’t tell you whether I was fired for embezzling, because I don’t want kids to think it’s OK to steal from your employer. I can’t tell you whether I was arrested for DUI, because I don’t want kids to think that driving when you’re drunk is no big deal. And so on.

http://reason.com/blog/2014/05/19/marco-rubio-stonewalls-on-his-pot-smokin

I don’t want to set a bad example so I won’t admit that I am a hypocrite who is taking politically easy positions instead of standing on principle. What a joke. Reminds me a lot of his immigration views.

ArkyDore on May 19, 2014 at 11:00 PM

…smoked it a few times…didn’t like how I felt.

KOOLAID2 on May 20, 2014 at 1:05 AM

I don’t want to set a bad example so I won’t admit that I am a hypocrite who is taking politically easy positions instead of standing on principle. What a joke. Reminds me a lot of his immigration views.

ArkyDore on May 19, 2014 at 11:00 PM

Perfect.

“I don’t want kids to think that lying is OK, so I won’t admit that I was deceiving people when I ran as a border hawk to get elected.”

David Blue on May 20, 2014 at 1:07 AM

In other words, I smoked but you go to jail if you smoke. Same old routine.

cimbri on May 20, 2014 at 1:47 AM

It’s a NON-story…It’s none of people’s business…It’s nothing the American people need to know.

The media declared to the world that Obama admittedly being tutored by Frank Marshall Davis was no factor / nothing to report.

The media declared to the world Obama studying – and even quoting during his inaugural addrerss – Socialist Saul Alynski was no factor / nothing to report.

The media declared to the world Obama admittedly being mentored by racist, hate-spewing, anti-American ‘pastor’ Jeremiah Wright for over a decade was no factor / nothing to report.

The media has just declared that Hillary’s fall / concussion that required special glasses for double-vision and 6 months of care was no factor / nothing to report.

Obama’s pot and extensive drug use in college was treated as ‘normal’ / ‘acceptable without question’ and was even used as a springboard to promote the legalization and use of this brain-altering, formerly illegal drug. It IS legal now in certain states.

So if all of THIS, according to precedence, is now a ‘non-story’, nothing to report, and none of anyone’s business then that should apply accross the board….however, we are all adults and know the hypocrisy of Liberals is driving this ‘witch hunt’ against Rubio.

easyt65 on May 20, 2014 at 10:47 AM