NEA Survey Shows Growing Member Opposition to Common Core

posted at 6:41 pm on May 19, 2014 by Mike Antonucci

The combined Left-Right opposition to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) has drawn considerable media attention. But the uproar has been offset by the wide coalition supporting them – from business and education reform interests to the two national teachers’ unions.

The National Education Association intensified its backing last fall with the results of a poll and focus group of 1,200 members conducted by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research. The union proudly noted that “more than 75 percent of NEA members either support the standards wholeheartedly or with some reservations.”

The breakdown of the findings was 26% in wholehearted support, 50% in support with reservations, 13% without an opinion, and only 11% opposed.

Even while NEA was touting these figures it was conducting a wider web survey, encompassing almost 17,000 members in 33 states. The results of that survey showed a worrisome trend for the union and for Common Core supporters in general.

Support for the standards fell only slightly, down to 71%. Opposition, however, solidified to almost triple the previous number. A full 29% of NEA members do not support CCSS.

NEA’s response to this will be a more expansive version of what we have already seen. Since February, the party line has been to support the standards while denouncing their implementation as “botched.” NEA took this position despite the 2013 poll also declaring that “79 percent of respondents said they were well or somewhat prepared to implement the new standards” and that “44 percent said teachers were playing a major role in the implementation of the standards. 32 percent said teachers were being consulted.”

We can expect the union to more specifically criticize an overabundance of standardized testing associated with CCSS and especially its use as a means of teacher evaluation.

NEA wants to be the Common Core champion while washing its hands of the accountability provisions established in Common Core’s name. If it were just a tricky PR problem, the union might be able to pull it off. But if the opposition continues to grow at its current pace, NEA will start abandoning CCSS, and lay the blame on the usual suspects.


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ObamaCare: Pay way more, get way .

CommonCore: Ideologued way more, learn way less.

VorDaj on May 19, 2014 at 6:46 PM

Anything the NEA is backing would have to be pretty much, by definition, bad for children.

trigon on May 19, 2014 at 6:46 PM

ObamaCare: Pay way more, get way less.

CommonCore: Ideologued way more, learn way less.

VorDaj on May 19, 2014 at 6:46 PM

Did those union scabs dare uttering dissent survive the day?

(fade out Godfather theme)

viking01 on May 19, 2014 at 6:56 PM

As a teacher’s aide, my wife is forced to be an NEA member. most of the teachers in the union want what’s best for students. Like most unions, the NEA leadership is filled with power-crazy @$$holes.

bw222 on May 19, 2014 at 6:59 PM

What is it with all of the education stories lately?

cozmo on May 19, 2014 at 7:11 PM

Common Core math is insanely stupid

I’ve read the same thing. And what I was reading reminded me of how my youngest son learned math in middle school in the 90′s. But with common core, they are teaching elementary students the “intuitive” method. And that’s what is so wrong. But doesn’t it work in their favor if kids can’t do basic math and just believe what they are told in the media?

greencalliope on May 19, 2014 at 7:11 PM

I don’t have any problems with making the student goals more rigorous, testing or teacher accountability. All are long over due. But that the math is so crazy and there being such an ideological spin on the reading is just too much. I think the number of home schoolers will continue to increase.

Cindy Munford on May 19, 2014 at 7:20 PM

While I am sure it is terribly unfair to the majority, we seem to have far too many wackazoid teachers in the news.

Cindy Munford on May 19, 2014 at 7:21 PM

Cindy Munford on May 19, 2014 at 7:20 PM

My daughter is getting ready to begin home school next year. She has it set up with the hospital where she can do her job via remote access. This let’s her have more options on education for the kids.

lineholder on May 19, 2014 at 7:37 PM

We’ve come to the point that spelling, logic and math are all ‘intuitive’. Must mean that everyone wants to be a politician.

vnvet on May 19, 2014 at 7:39 PM

Yeah, right… who’s gonna listen to union rank & file?

ExpressoBold on May 19, 2014 at 7:39 PM

When my kid can do 5000 arithmetic functions to come up with one CORRECT long multiplication answer, I’ll be a convert.

WryTrvllr on May 19, 2014 at 7:40 PM

FDA would never approve something to be used without a prospective study demonstrating effectiveness and demonstrating that it’s not harmful. Why is common core being approved without any studies showing the same thing?

blink on May 19, 2014 at 7:03 PM

Because if everyone fails, they control who wins.

WryTrvllr on May 19, 2014 at 7:42 PM

If you like the Math in Common Core, wait until you see the Science and Social Studies curricula which they are holding off until the point of no return is reached.

slickwillie2001 on May 19, 2014 at 7:43 PM

lineholder on May 19, 2014 at 7:37 PM

Its amazing the opportunities that are out there for young people nowdays.

We only hear about the bad stuff.

cozmo on May 19, 2014 at 7:47 PM

cozmo on May 19, 2014 at 7:47 PM

Lots of remote opportunities out there now!

lineholder on May 19, 2014 at 8:05 PM

Since February, the party line has been to support the standards while denouncing their implementation as “botched.”

Interesting, isn’t it, that the word “botched” is being used more and more frequently with everything this *ahem!* administration does:

Fast and Furious: botched
IRS profiling: botched
Benghazi: botched
Crap and tax Cap and Trade: botched
Shovel-ready jobs: botched
Maintaining Dem majorities in both Houses: botched
Solving unemployment: botched
Passing *ahem!* Earth-friendly legislation: botched
Passing *ahem!* common-sense gun control reforms: botched

Newtie and the Beauty on May 19, 2014 at 8:08 PM

When you get both liberal and conservative states opposed to the same thing, you know something has to be seriously wrong with it.

Common Core is a mess. Watch out for the rebranding effort, which is ongoing from BOTH GOPe AND Dems. This is a bipartisan effort to shove national control of local education right down your throats. There is big money at stake, and the folks behind Common Core want their chunk of the taxpayer pie, with a heaping helping of assistance from pols on both sides of the aisle.

Huckabee, Jeb Bush…these guys are in on this all the way. A turd is still a turd, no matter how you dress it up, but they’re trying.

xNavigator on May 19, 2014 at 8:27 PM

What is it with all of the education stories lately?

cozmo on May 19, 2014 at 7:11 PM

Common Core has been a sleeper issue for several years. How much of a sleeper? Well, Sarah Palin was the first governor to reject it back in 2009. About six months later in 2010 Rick Perry was the second governor to say no.

It slipped through in stealth mode in various ways, i.e., state ed. commissioners, and many state legislators were unaware of what was going on until this last year. They only woke up from their cluelessness when parents started getting angry.

As implementation loomed, over the last year and a half or so, grassroots knowledge and understanding has grown into increasing opposition. So now the likes of Duncan and Jeb realize they need to go into public propaganda mode.

INC on May 19, 2014 at 8:35 PM

My younger son was identified for math “Talented and Gifted” (TAG) in about 5th grade. The math they did in TAG looked the same as what this common core stuff has. After a year in TAG math – he had no clue what to do – could hardly do basic division and multiplication. They confuse the he11 out of kids with all this “creative problem solving” BS, so in the end they don’t really understand the basics.
We removed him from the TAG program for the next school year and told the school directly their math TAG program was worthless.
Our son continued to have trouble with math all the way through high school – and this is a kid who was originally supposedly “talented and gifted” with math….

dentarthurdent on May 19, 2014 at 8:44 PM

dentarthurdent on May 19, 2014 at 8:44 PM

I’ve heard the wacky theory that Common Core Math cannot be understood by parents, BY DESIGN. The progs want parents out of educating their children in order to eliminate interference (ie with AGW indoc.) and to level the playing field between caring parents and uncaring in order to drive ‘social justice’.

Wacky but these days I don’t know what to believe.

slickwillie2001 on May 19, 2014 at 8:57 PM

slickwillie2001 on May 19, 2014 at 8:57 PM

I think that is true, and it is working.

ORconservative on May 19, 2014 at 9:29 PM

D U M B
to
D U M B E R !

KOOLAID2 on May 19, 2014 at 10:42 PM

he progs want parents out of educating their children in order to eliminate interference…

This is what the common (public) school was originally created (in the mid-1800s, see Horace Mann) to do; remove parental influence. This was continued by progressives like Dewey, all the way to today.

Naturally, if you’re a conservative you will find more to agree with in your local red-state public school than blue state one (usually), but when you send your children to be raised by other adults for nearly half of their waking hours, you clearly don’t see a problem with others raising your kid a third to half the time they’re conscious anyways. If you did, you wouldn’t do that.

xNavigator on May 19, 2014 at 10:45 PM

When the Unions figure out that Common Core is the mother of their destruction, expect a full court press to kill it.

rock the casbah on May 19, 2014 at 11:21 PM

FDA would never approve something to be used without a prospective study demonstrating effectiveness and demonstrating that it’s not harmful. Why is common core being approved without any studies showing the same thing?

blink on May 19, 2014 at 7:03 PM

Pilot tests for legislation — now, that’s an Amendment I could get behind!

AesopFan on May 20, 2014 at 1:37 AM

…but when you send your children to be raised by other adults for nearly half of their waking hours, you clearly don’t see a problem with others raising your kid a third to half the time they’re conscious anyways.
xNavigator on May 19, 2014 at 10:45 PM

Ah, but my parents didn’t expect the school to raise me. They expected the school to educate me. And they paid close attention to what the schools were teaching. My mom was very involved with the schools, and because of that teachers and administrators respected her input. She had a good impact. I’m pretty sure I did too. My teachers respected me because I respected them, and I was a good student. I brought ideas and arguments to class that might not otherwise have been aired. Public schooling isn’t for everyone, but it worked for me.

We have to remember that there are a lot of kids in public schools who have no other options. This country’s school systems have been failing our youth for too long. I know that it is a multi-faceted problem, and blame can be placed on many shoulders: parents, teachers, administrators, politicians, and also the students themselves. However, I can’t do anything to effect most of the links in this chain. What I can do is volunteer at my local elementary school. So many future academic problems have their roots in early education. If we can help students to overcome their obstacles sooner, maybe that will give them the motivation to keep trying and working hard.

In my opinion, the best thing that we, as private citizens, can do to combat the effects of common core is to personally invest time and effort into the education of our country’s kids.

Cheshire_Kat on May 20, 2014 at 2:10 AM

Ah, but my parents didn’t expect the school to raise me. They expected the school to educate me. And they paid close attention to what the schools were teaching.

Cheshire_Kat on May 20, 2014 at 2:10 AM

You’re talking about what was characteristic of parents, and society, from generations ago. Today?

Not so much.

xNavigator on May 20, 2014 at 7:25 AM

You’re talking about what was characteristic of parents, and society, from generations ago. Today?

Not so much.

xNavigator on May 20, 2014 at 7:25 AM

And that explains why most of the top universities’ student bodies in America are predominantly Asian. Tiger Mom’s. You might call them “helicopter parents”.

WryTrvllr on May 20, 2014 at 2:43 PM

Common Core is the ObamaCare of education: Designed to fail, so that Big Brother can come in and STANDARDIZE the entire nation to one curriculum.

And don’t think that private- or homeschooling will evade the approaching leviathan. California is already planning to revise their homeschooling statutes to require the CC testing of all students before receiving a highschool diploma. The tests are written to be very difficult to understand unless you have immersed in the program (difficult to decode even then), so that many will prefer to follow the CC curriculum just to ensure the ability to take the tests.

And as others have commented, designed to minimize or eliminate the involvement of parents. Designed specifically to make the majority of parents, upon coming in contact with Common Core content, go “Uhh, what?”, so that the student understands that “education” has gone beyond the parents’ ability to comprehend, resulting in no credibility for the parents in any scope.

Freelancer on May 20, 2014 at 7:46 PM

And that explains why most of the top universities’ student bodies in America are predominantly Asian. Tiger Mom’s. You might call them “helicopter parents”.

WryTrvllr on May 20, 2014 at 2:43 PM

We have plenty of helicopter parents (actually, it’s usually a ‘parent,’ because of the number of broken homes). The problem is they see themselves not as a tiger, roaring at their kid to work harder…harder…HARDER…but as a MASH unit for their precious snowflake, ready to swoop in to relieve him/her of facing difficulty, failure (something we all LEARN from and which helps develop some sense of humility in each of us) or facing any accountability for actions.

xNavigator on May 20, 2014 at 8:43 PM