Do breed rescues drive away adoptors?

posted at 4:01 pm on May 10, 2014 by Jazz Shaw

With the passing of Max, (and thank you again for the many messages of condolence) our thoughts have been turning to the future and how we come to meet new pets. For dogs in particular – though it’s equally true with some other species – there are three primary routes which most people follow aside from adopting from a friend or family member. These are adopting a homeless animal from a shelter, going through a specialized breed rescue, or purchasing a dog from a breeder or pet store. We’ve mostly gone the first route, feeling that it’s a huge waste of money to buy a custom dog when there are so many out there in shelters waiting for homes, but that’s up to the pet owner.

The second route, however – going through a breed rescue – was one that we had one experience with when we adopted Mr. Basset. For those who have never done this, it’s an unusual experience, and really different than going to a shelter. Dedicated groups of people collect up specific breeds of dogs who have lost their homes and match them up with new families. There’s a definite appeal to this, and it worked out well for us, but there are questions about the culture of breed rescues which Bridget Johnson brings up this week.

Do Animal Rescues Drive Adopters to Breeders?

Everyone knows that I’m an advocate of pet adoption. But lately I’ve been questioning whether many animal rescues are defeating the purpose and driving prospective pet parents into the arms of breeders.

I didn’t really think much of the motives and modus operandi of rescues until after I adopted my chihuahua, Chi-Chi aka the puppacita. I found her at one of the last old-school pounds in the area. The shelter staff handed her to me, I asked a couple of questions about her history, and a minute later signed a spay contract, waited while they microchipped her, handed over a $70 check and was on my way to PetSmart to spoil the puppa with whatever she wanted.

No counselor screening, no adoptive matchmaking, no home visits, no drama (though I fully acknowledge people can pick a dog that’s wrong for their situation without some guidance). And puppacita’s perfect. And she knows it. I did the things a rescue might do: spaying, shots, dental extractions, and house-training. Rescue groups often note that for the price you pay you get a shelter dog that’s been fixed up, so to speak, with the necessary vet work and training.

Bridget’s story goes on to describe some of the less helpful situations which prospective adopting families can run into when dealing with these rescue groups. There are certain things which it’s only sensible for such groups to know before green lighting an adoption. Do you have a big enough home to accommodate the pet? Can you afford the long term costs involved? Will you be providing good veterinary care and proper food? It’s also fair to consider whether someone is at the right place in their lives to take on such a responsibility. (Adopting an Irish Wolf Hound to a college senior living in a dorm with no idea where they are going after graduation might not be the best move for the dog.)

But I too have heard some of the troubling stories Johnson describes. Some groups will insist on multiple home inspections, even after the adoption. If you don’t have a good reference from a vet, they may turn you down. (So what happens to the person who is looking for their first pet and has never had need of a vet?) Also, the fees which sometimes run up for the adoption process may stagger the budget of a couple who will otherwise be able to afford the normal cost of care. In worst case scenarios, those who don’t read the adoption contracts closely may find that they don’t every actually own the dog, but are instead “secondary owners” with rights that can be superseded by the rescue group later. In short, some of them can get a bit carried away, perhaps to the point of leaving some dogs without homes rather than sending them to a family that isn’t 100% perfect in their profile.

We happened to get lucky. We found Rascal through All Bassets Cherished, and the adoption process was fairly straight forward. Mr. Basset was already a senior dog with a history of cancer when he joined us, but he went on to live to the age of 17 and things worked out great. But apparently, there are other groups which are more problematic. I don’t think this means rescues have no place in this process, but it’s worth thinking about if you are considering a new member for your family.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2

The ones that give you an anal probe drove me away.

El_Terrible on May 10, 2014 at 4:07 PM

Yes.

And sometimes they’re akin to breed ‘nazis’. But I guess that comes with the territory. Their love for that breed tends to bring it out in them.

Bigbullets on May 10, 2014 at 4:08 PM

Shelters are usually fine though.

El_Terrible on May 10, 2014 at 4:08 PM

I’ve always had cats. (I was nearly killed in a dog attack at age 3). Every cat I’ve ever had has been a “domestic shorthair” which is the cat equivalent of the mutt. And I’ve always been happy with them!

My limited experience with dogs has taught me that there really isn’t a difference between them and cats in this way: The kind of dog or cat you end up with is the result of how they were raised/treated by their owners.

I have seen purebred “mean” dog breeds that are as friendly and harmless as a kitten. And I’ve seen ones that were mistreated, owned by rednecks who raise a mean dog TO BE MEAN that would kill indiscriminately if off leash.

I suppose the problem with dogs in shelters is that it’s more likely that dogs from the LATTER category of owner is likely to end up there than the former… Certainly I’d sooner DIE than give up one of my cats to a shelter!

(and for the record, my cats are sort of reclusive and neurotic, matching my own personality (HA!) but they aren’t unfriendly…)

ConstantineXI on May 10, 2014 at 4:08 PM

No do-gooder will be inspecting my home to see if it’s up to specs for a dog.

Ruckus_Tom on May 10, 2014 at 4:13 PM

No do-gooder will be inspecting my home to see if it’s up to specs for a dog.

Ruckus_Tom on May 10, 2014 at 4:13 PM

Like I said, the only pets I’ve ever had have been cats, so I’ve never had to deal with shelters OR pet stores, mostly because if you WANT a cat, it’s easy to find someone who has a litter of kittens they want to get rid of!

Every cat I’ve ever had has come to me in this way.

ConstantineXI on May 10, 2014 at 4:17 PM

I lost Chancey, a beagle/cocker mix, a year ago next week. It was a quick but expected end for a 13-year-old dog whose beagle tendencies were tempered by her spaniel side. And whose cocker tendencies were enlivened by her beagle side. She was a unique personality who I still miss daily.

Of late, I’ve begun looking to adopt a new dog. I was surprised how many different organizations are out there. I quickly learned that the motives of the organization matter. The local “pound” (they call themselves an animal welfare association) has an application form that actually asks if you intend to be in your same job and residence for the next ten years. To be fair, the counselors know that it is an absurd question. Nevertheless, I do think that some of these organizations do drive away potential adopters by making the process almost as intrusive as adopting a child.

Happy Nomad on May 10, 2014 at 4:22 PM

Based on my dealings with the rescue folks, they are very full of themselves and it really can be a hassle, not to mention expensive.

gator70 on May 10, 2014 at 4:22 PM

Living 40 minutes north of Seattle means I attempt coexistence with some of the most judgmental, passive-agressive people in the US. It only gets worse when it comes to pets.

We’ve had several mutts, ‘rescued’ from the pounds as puppies, and loved them all.
Got tired of the shedding and pointless barking and stinky fur so we researched breeds, settled on a Whippet.
Whippets are not available in pounds and nearly never as rescue. They have never been mass-bred.

So, we {gasp!} … BOUGHT! A purebred whippet puppy!
Had her for 16 years, endured the stares of the higher-minded.

Last year, ….. BOUGHT {double gasp!} yet another purebred whippet pup! Shocking!
This time, 16 years later, indignation and disgust was expressed with sideways glances and muttered comments about “…. were they out of RESCUE dogs?…”

Now, when I meet someone on a trail and we stop to let the dogs sniff, I just say “He’s a purebred Whippet from a breeder and he cost over $1,000″. Nobody has ever made eye contact after that, one even sat down and called her friend so they could talk about it while I was sure to hear.

I just retired and WE ARE MOVING!!!!! SUCK IT, SEATTLE!!

Tard on May 10, 2014 at 4:25 PM

Musch depends on the dog breed. Our family for many years had Border Collies, most of which we got from our local Humane Society, but this was before the rise of the Border Collie rescue groups here in New England.

But towards the end, the humane society was just as strict in its requirements for adoption of Border Collies as the rescue groups! All adopters had to have a completely fenced property (Border Collies are very fond of herding cars, with predictably sad results).

Del Dolemonte on May 10, 2014 at 4:27 PM

dealt with those types that want to do home inspections before, this was in 1995 or so and was with Akitas.
lets just say they did not do an inspection and they got into some legal trouble over their policies.

dmacleo on May 10, 2014 at 4:29 PM

I looked briefly into getting a puppy for my son through these morons. They sure drove us away!

ElectricPhase on May 10, 2014 at 4:29 PM

if you WANT a cat, it’s easy to find someone who has a litter of kittens they want to get rid of!

ConstantineXI on May 10, 2014 at 4:17 PM

So…….What are you saying? You can always get a pussy? ;0

Seriously, I’m not a cat person. I don’t get why people form an attachment with a creature that only cares about who is going to feed them without any real affection. Plus I’m super allergic to cats. Five minutes in a home, I can tell if there has ever been a cat there.

Happy Nomad on May 10, 2014 at 4:30 PM

I had clients with rescued greyhounds. If they can’t run fast enough or hit the age limit, they are usually put down by the industry. I don’t recall anyone complaining about adoption procedural problems. BTW, they make delightful pets. Need exercise.

butch on May 10, 2014 at 4:31 PM

Like I said, the only pets I’ve ever had have been cats, so I’ve never had to deal with shelters OR pet stores, mostly because if you WANT a cat, it’s easy to find someone who has a litter of kittens they want to get rid of!

Every cat I’ve ever had has come to me in this way.

ConstantineXI on May 10, 2014 at 4:17 PM

I’ve seen places that have full applications asking for references and detailed descriptions of ones home, how many pets they have – don’t know about inspections – for adopting a cat. Forget the fact that just starting to adopt the cat costs $70 when cats in general are free. I’m not asking anybody for a reference to adopt a cat. How stupid does that look?

So instead of encouraging people to adopt nice cats that they can know have been fixed and received rabies shots, they turn people away from that to just grabbing from the nearest litter of kittens that spring. Then those kittens are a crapshoot whether they ever get fixed since it’s impossible these days to just walk into a vet, throw down a few twentys and ask for it to be done. Those idiots won’t let you out of there without a full $300 range of tests. Poor people, aka those in Obama’s America can’t afford that crap, so no fixing, more unwanted kittens that land as grown cats in a shelter, that aren’t adopted because of the anal probe.

Corrupt through and through. At least this area has no kill shelters or at least claim it. Yet they wonder why they consistently hemorrhage money with backward invasive adoption policies like this.

Gingotts on May 10, 2014 at 4:32 PM

We have two pure-bred beagles we bought as puppies from different breeders.

Giving a kid a puppy is an awesome thing, watching them interact and grow up together is wonderful. We get the nasty comments from people when we are out walking them because they were not rescues.

Amazing how judgmental folks can be when you do something different from the socially hip norm.

JeffersonFan on May 10, 2014 at 4:34 PM

butch on May 10, 2014 at 4:31 PM

I worked for a Vet for a bit in college.
Greyhounds..the sweetest dogs! I fell in love.

bazil9 on May 10, 2014 at 4:36 PM

I am a dog trainer and see this all the time. What the rescue groups do is drive potential adopters to puppy mills since many cant afford to pay for a dog from a breeder. I hear stories of these kooky breed specific rescue groups that use Foster homes more than I hear about good rescue groups.

I have a client that was turned down because the slats on her balcony railing were too far apart and she was told that the dog could get his head stuck. “But I would never have the Dog on the balcony alone.” Sorry.

In some cases the children see pictures of the dog they didnt get online and they fall in love with the dog. The only way out for Mom and Dad is to get a Dog that looks like the one they lost. Puppy mills are much cheaper…..

A few months ago I went with a client to see a puppy she wanted to adopt. The group had been to her house once and planned on sending someone else to inspect her house. When we got to the Foster home the woman had 6 cattle dog/lab mix puppies that were six months old. Strange. I thought how did she get a litter of 6 month old puppies? The puppies were in a pen outside with four other dogs. They were errrr doing their business at will and had poop all over them. No discipline or training. So I asked her – How did you wind up with a litter of six month old puppies? She told me she got them when they were 5 weeks old and wouldnt adopt them out until they were spay or neutered and didnt trust people to get them fixed. So she held the litter until they were what she deemed old enough to be fixed. And for six months the puppies werent house trained and were in an 8×10 pen with other dogs and mess all over the place. Can you imagine adopting a dog from these conditions?

Needless to say we left without a dog. Too many of these Foster people are weirdos and they have some strange ideas of what is best for the Dog. They forbid hidden fences which is crazy enough.

Some people that represent themselves as a rescue get the dogs from puppy mills and sell them for $400-$500. They will say that they got the dogs from kill shelters and most people fall for it. The worse the story the more people want the dog so they have a juicy story to tell.

All of my dogs are rescues. I get them from organizations not from breed specific groups that have people Foster the dog until they find a home.

iam7545 on May 10, 2014 at 4:36 PM

Those idiots won’t let you out of there without a full $300 range of tests. Poor people, aka those in Obama’s America can’t afford that crap, so no fixing, more unwanted kittens that land as grown cats in a shelter, that aren’t adopted because of the anal probe.

Corrupt through and through. At least this area has no kill shelters or at least claim it. Yet they wonder why they consistently hemorrhage money with backward invasive adoption policies like this.

Gingotts on May 10, 2014 at 4:32 PM

Last time I had a cat fixed was 1996, the first female cat I’ve ever had (I so miss her, she was a bundle of chaotic fuzzy joy). Cost me $300 to do it between vet visits to get her shots done, plus the operation itself (which is much more extensive than neutering). I’m sure it’s more than that to do this now… And it was done in only two vet visits.

ConstantineXI on May 10, 2014 at 4:37 PM

Its not only “breed rescues,” it’s all rescue organizations. They want background checks, home visits, meeting all family members and more.

My young family does not have a yard, though we are trying to find a way to get one. With this housing market in Illinois, it’s tough. But we do not meet te requirements for a large dog, because we do not have a yard living in a town home. But we do not qualify for a small dog because we have young kids with small toys that the dog could choke on.

It is absurd and they act like the Soup Nazi from Seinfeld.

h a p f a t on May 10, 2014 at 4:38 PM

I could have adopted a child with less hassle and invasion than it took with my Golden.

I mean that literally. It’s a damn dog!

Also, most of these places are composed of women. Single, older women.

Not a happy combination.

Ragspierre on May 10, 2014 at 4:38 PM

bazil9 on May 10, 2014 at 4:36 PM

Total couch-potatoes! Particularly the ones “retired” from the race tracks. Wish I had one.

Chuck Ef on May 10, 2014 at 4:40 PM

When my wife and I thought about getting a dog, I wanted a purebred and she wanted one from the pound. We found a compromise in adopting former racing greyhounds. GREAT dogs by the way. I recommend highly that anyone consider adopting one.

We went through the vetting process. Application, home visit, etc.

I don’t have a problem with someone checking to see that the environment will be good for the dog.

If someone doesn’t want to do that, not a bother. They just won’t get the dog.

The greyhound rescue group I’m now associated with has adopters fill out an application and they inspect the home and we still have problems with people either abusing the animals or just dumping them back on the group.

What I’ve had problems with is the ‘holier than thou” attitude that some groups have (and there’s plenty of them out there unfortunately). My wife and I adopted from a greyhound rescue group in Maryland. By that time, we had over 8 years of experience with homing greys and helping them to adjust to a home environment (not as easy as it would seem), and just plain loving them. The group knew all that and they still lorded over us how they knew all and we knew nothing. Once I got the dog we wanted to adopt, needless to say I cut off all ties with those clowns. We’ve adopted greys since then, but from a group which is peopled by “mensches” and not condescending douchenozzles.

Now having said that I don’t have a problem with home inspections, I would draw the line at more than one. If they can’t figure out from one visit that the home is at least safe and healthy, then they fall into the “douchenozzle” category. The group I support likes to stay in touch with adopters, but it’s not a requirement.

Check out my group’s site, http://www.greytdogs.org. There’s always greys looking for a “forever home.”

NavyMustang on May 10, 2014 at 4:40 PM

Living 40 minutes north of Seattle means I attempt coexistence with some of the most judgmental, passive-agressive people in the US. It only gets worse when it comes to pets.

Tard on May 10, 2014 at 4:25 PM

Living 40 minutes north of Seattle? Doesn’t that make you Canadian?

But I hear you about judgmental and passive-agressive people. When I was living in Southern California, I took the dog along for a ride to the grocery store (she loved riding in the car). The temperature was in the mid-50s and I was in the store for about ten minutes. When I got back to the car, some woman started yelling at me and said that she was about to call the police about animal abuse for leaving the dog in the car. I won’t relate what I told that “do-gooder” because it wouldn’t pass the HA filters.

Happy Nomad on May 10, 2014 at 4:41 PM

I went through a breed rescue for our two pupplies but they are mixed. We did have to go through a home inspection but it wasn’t too awfully rigorous since we didn’t even have a fence at the time. That said, the female pup has a seizure and the resulting vet bills totaled over $800 and the rescue reimbursed us 100%. We were not expecting that. I have been donating back to them so that they can always be so kind. Our local county animal control only charges $50 to adopt a dog. You have to decide for yourself how much you are willing to deal with and of course, all rescues aren’t the same.

Cindy Munford on May 10, 2014 at 4:42 PM

After our Golden Retriever Harry died (we put him down at 12 after he developed a systemic infection and his organs were shutting down, only time he was ever sick, the last week of his life) we went to the pound.

Lucky and her two sisters were approx. 4 mos. old when their small pack was rounded up off the streets. She’s a beagle – red heeler mix. All three adopted by three families two days before X-mas.

She’s a challenge but worth it.

I’m all for rescues…especially pound rescues.

workingclass artist on May 10, 2014 at 4:44 PM

I could have adopted a child with less hassle and invasion than it took with my Golden.

I mean that literally. It’s a damn dog!

Also, most of these places are composed of women. Single, older women.

Not a happy combination.

On The Ragspierre on May 10, 2014 at 4:38 PM

This is why rescues/pounds have a questionnaire, so the dog doesn’t end up tied to a stake in the middle of the yard with no water or even left in a house after a foreclosure for the hated bank to find. You know, because it’s just a dog.

TinFin on May 10, 2014 at 4:44 PM

Zealots. I told my wife that they are child services applicants who didn’t get hired.

BobMbx on May 10, 2014 at 4:45 PM

bazil9 on May 10, 2014 at 4:36 PM

I visited a colleague’s practice in Kansas once. In his back room lying side by side were eight big beautiful greyhounds he had just euthanized for the owner who raced them. They didn’t make the cut. Pretty hard to take.

butch on May 10, 2014 at 4:45 PM

Speaking of dog rescues. These videos of dogs being rescued are heartwarming.

Capitalist Infidel on May 10, 2014 at 4:48 PM

Living 40 minutes north of Seattle means I attempt coexistence with some of the most judgmental, passive-agressive people in the US.

Tard on May 10, 2014 at 4:25 PM

Drive down to Jimmy Jacks on State Route 99 and ask for Chuck.

He’ll be found at the bar, a thin old man in a cowboy hat, with a twinkle in his eye.

He’ll tell you the most amazing tales and the secret to life.

DarkCurrent on May 10, 2014 at 4:49 PM

We have two pure-bred beagles we bought as puppies from different breeders.

Giving a kid a puppy is an awesome thing, watching them interact and grow up together is wonderful. We get the nasty comments from people when we are out walking them because they were not rescues.

Amazing how judgmental folks can be when you do something different from the socially hip norm.

JeffersonFan on May 10, 2014 at 4:34 PM

Ignore those people…they are cretins.

I got Harry, a wonderful golden retriever from a great breeder for my daughter when she was 7 for christmas. The breeder had 3 dams and this was him mum’s last litter…Harry’s sire was on the farm next door and a competitive hunting trial golden.

Goldens are very good for small children…we had him 12 years.

workingclass artist on May 10, 2014 at 4:49 PM

I could have adopted a child with less hassle and invasion than it took with my Golden.

I mean that literally. It’s a damn dog!

Also, most of these places are composed of women. Single, older women.

Not a happy combination.

Ragspierre on May 10, 2014 at 4:38 PM

Agree completely.

In one place I worked, a co-worker was looking to adopt a dog. The worker (probably single and definitely older) asked about other animals in the household. First she asked about the other dog- it was an inside dog. Then she asked about the horse they had in the barn. My co-worker assured this woman that it was an “outside horse.” Nearly derailed the adoption but was, IMO, the epic response to a stupid round of questions.

Happy Nomad on May 10, 2014 at 4:50 PM

butch on May 10, 2014 at 4:45 PM

:( You made me tear up.

I won’t tell you how I feel about racing GH’s.

bazil9 on May 10, 2014 at 4:50 PM

BTW, I also had a client who had a python. Guess what he fed it? And no one questioned him till I turned him in. Sometimes it is good to check out prospective owners. This is the public we’re talking about.

butch on May 10, 2014 at 4:52 PM

I have been through the process attempting to adopt dogs with several agencies. I am pretty sure the Rescue folks I came into contact with could best be defined as pet hoarders. However, the local Humane Society was more than happy to let me adopt – I ended up with 3 Pit / Labs, and those 3 dogs ended up with 100′s of acres to run.

khacha on May 10, 2014 at 4:53 PM

San Diego lab rescue would not let me adopt because I do not have yard. I tried to explain that my “yard” was Balboa Park and was two blocks away.
My previous lab lived 17 happy years in the city without a yard and loved having a huge park to run in till he couldn’t run any more.
The senior lab I had hoped to adopt is still there one year later.
The rescue groups are fascists.

oceansidecon on May 10, 2014 at 4:54 PM

My other story is a Dalmatian I got from my former city’s animal control. I paid a small fee and signed a spay contract. Soon afterward it was discovered that she had a severe case of heart worms. Back then, treatment for that was pretty harsh and surgery during treatment was not an option. The city bureaucracy was pretty persistent and hardcore about the missing of the deadline for spaying but they never seemed to get the phone calls and letters explaining the delay. Anyway, it all ended well with an eighteen year relation with the best dog ever, who would have been put down if I had taken her back instead of treating her for the heart worms.

Cindy Munford on May 10, 2014 at 4:57 PM

Having dealt with 3 dogs from 3 different purebreed rescues over the years, I’ll voice my dissatisfaction with them as well.

The 2nd group was fine, but he first and third were intrusive to the point of insanity. The secondary ownership was especially ridiculous- we were not supposed to take the dog out of the state according to one; as though she were a dependent child and we shared custody with the rescue outfit!

I do think many of these folks are childless people with a strong parenting drive who become a little too …focused… on the dogs.

Dolce Far Niente on May 10, 2014 at 4:59 PM

San Diego lab rescue would not let me adopt because I do not have yard. I tried to explain that my “yard” was Balboa Park and was two blocks away…
The rescue groups are fascists.

oceansidecon on May 10, 2014 at 4:54 PM

I will wholeheartedly agree that a dog that lives indoors with its people and gets appropriate daily exercise on a leash or in a dogpark is a much happier dog than one who is relegated to the backyard, where the kids might occasionally throw a ball and it gets companionship only when its owners come outside.

We lived and traveled for 4 years full-time in a 35′ motorhome with a St. Bernard and 2 cats. The cats never went outside and the dog got walked twice a day, and they (and we) were all contented.

The one-size-fits-all is indeed a cherished notion of fascisti.

Dolce Far Niente on May 10, 2014 at 5:08 PM

The amount of time, energy and money spent on the care of vulnerable animals vs. vulnerable human children is one of the great tragedies of this country.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:09 PM

The senior lab I had hoped to adopt is still there one year later.
The rescue groups are fascists.

oceansidecon on May 10, 2014 at 4:54 PM

Well Balboa Park is pretty small.

Seriously, I agree with you about some of these rescue groups. I guess the only positive is that the senior lab you had hoped to adopt is still alive.

Happy Nomad on May 10, 2014 at 5:11 PM

The amount of time, energy and money spent on the care of vulnerable animals vs. vulnerable human children is one of the great tragedies of this country.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:09 PM

You’re right. Obama has failed the children, their parents, their grandparents. And, their pets. A great liberal fueled tragedy.

TinFin on May 10, 2014 at 5:12 PM

If my choices are dog Nazis or breeders, I’m going to a breeder. Adopting a dog is not the same thing as adopting a child, although that process is probably just a little too intrusive as well.

NotCoach on May 10, 2014 at 5:14 PM

I’ve had mutts and purebreds.

Loved them all.

My purebred German Shepard was different.

No mutt came close.

He was uber smart, and protected my family.

I’ve never seen a bond like that. Ever.

It just clicked. He was family.

He would have died for us.

The mutts I never got that feeling.

wolly4321 on May 10, 2014 at 5:16 PM

The amount of time, energy and money spent on the care of vulnerable animals vs. vulnerable human children is one of the great tragedies of this country.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:09 PM

Discretionary dollars. Just like those spent with Kermit Gosnell.

butch on May 10, 2014 at 5:18 PM

butch on May 10, 2014 at 5:18 PM

Zing!

Cindy Munford on May 10, 2014 at 5:20 PM

I have always had a soft spot for pit bulls, and recently saw a homeless woman with a dirty, emaciated red-nose pit puppy. She was panhandling at a local gas station. I went over to talk to her and it was clear the dog had mange, fleas and probably worms.

I had $100 in my pocket and told the woman I’d give the dog a good home. She started crying and told me she knew the little guy was suffering, but she just couldn’t afford to take proper care of to him.

She took the money and I drove straight to my vet’s office. Had the little rascal wormed, flea treated, dipped and generally cleaned up.

He turned out to be the coolest, funniest, most friendly dog I’ve ever owned, so I contacted a local pit bull rescue group and ended up adopting a little black female for a companion.

They are two of the sweetest dogs, and took to each other immediately. They are inseperable. It was the best thing I’ve ever done, pet wise.

Chowderhead123 on May 10, 2014 at 5:20 PM

You’re right. Obama has failed the children, their parents, their grandparents. And, their pets. A great liberal fueled tragedy.

TinFin on May 10, 2014 at 5:12 PM

And who will you blame for childhood poverty when a Republican is President?

Either way, that isn’t a response to my point about the ridiculous amount of resources spent on vulnerable animals. Imagine if that money went towards feeding a hungry child, or offering college scholarships to working class kids who graduate near the top of their class. No, we need to make sure fido has a dignified death every single time. I have a dog, but it is gross how much we spend on animals.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:21 PM

wolly4321 on May 10, 2014 at 5:16 PM

They are one of the most loyal breeds around.

NotCoach on May 10, 2014 at 5:21 PM

I do think many of these folks are childless people with a strong parenting drive who become a little too …focused… on the dogs.

Dolce Far Niente on May 10, 2014 at 4:59 PM

I think a fairer reading would be that of passionate people, sincerely concerned about the welfare of the dogs, blinded to reality.

Happy Nomad on May 10, 2014 at 5:23 PM

And who will you blame for childhood poverty when a Republican is President?

Either way, that isn’t a response to my point about the ridiculous amount of resources spent on vulnerable animals. Imagine if that money went towards feeding a hungry child, or offering college scholarships to working class kids who graduate near the top of their class. No, we need to make sure fido has a dignified death every single time. I have a dog, but it is gross how much we spend on animals.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:21 PM

Typical progressive-Marxist thinking, and considering history you make for one dumb arse “perfesser”. Control economies only make things worse for starving children. Of course anyone who believes the following probably has a hard time understanding that.

Here’s a simple question for you. Which of the founding fathers did not subscribe to the communitarian ethos Calhoun deploys to rationalize slavery? *sets sundial*

libfreeordie on August 21, 2013 at 9:30 AM

None. They weren’t nascent Commies like John C. Calhoun, and full blown Commies like you. Don’t you think you need to provide some proof for such a ridiculous smear there Mr. Calhoun? You’re a history perfesser, right?

NotCoach on August 21, 2013 at 9:36 AM

Oh dear God….hold on, give me 10 minutes.

libfreeordie on August 21, 2013 at 9:45 AM

NotCoach on May 10, 2014 at 5:23 PM

The amount of time, energy and money spent on the care of vulnerable animals vs. vulnerable human children is one of the great tragedies of this country.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:09 PM

Whine about it to your fellow Leftists. They started the humane society movement in the US.

ASPCA was founded in NYC in 1866, and the second group, the Boston Chapter, was founded just two years later. And the Blue State of Oregon claims the highest percentages for both rescue and adoption, nearly 100% in both cases.

And please whine about it to the American Humane Association which was also founded in the mid 1800s. Their mission is to help not only animals, but also children.

Del Dolemonte on May 10, 2014 at 5:23 PM

I have always had a soft spot for pit bulls, and recently saw a homeless woman with a dirty, emaciated red-nose pit puppy. She was panhandling at a local gas station. I went over to talk to her and it was clear the dog had mange, fleas and probably worms.

I had $100 in my pocket and told the woman I’d give the dog a good home. She started crying and told me she knew the little guy was suffering, but she just couldn’t afford to take proper care of to him.

She took the money and I drove straight to my vet’s office. Had the little rascal wormed, flea treated, dipped and generally cleaned up.

He turned out to be the coolest, funniest, most friendly dog I’ve ever owned, so I contacted a local pit bull rescue group and ended up adopting a little black female for a companion.

They are two of the sweetest dogs, and took to each other immediately. They are inseperable. It was the best thing I’ve ever done, pet wise.

I also adopted a little orphan boy from Kazahkstan a long time ago. He’s pretty cool, too. Another keeper, for sure. :-)

Chowderhead123 on May 10, 2014 at 5:24 PM

And who will you blame for childhood poverty when a Republican is President?

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:21 PM

The “War on Poverty” that Democrat LBJ started to keep minorities on his Party’s Plantation began 50 years ago. Please tell us why in half a century the poverty rate is unchanged?

Del Dolemonte on May 10, 2014 at 5:25 PM

Although I have had good luck with Siamese cats, my basic policy for cats and dogs is: mongrels only. For dogs, I love lab mixes, and don’t want a pure bred.

God designed the system so dogs and cats could get the benefits of the traits developed by all their ancestors. Breeding takes that out, narrows the gene pool.

I’ve had up to 27 dogs and cats at a time, all “rescue” of one sort or another, but all adopted as pups or kittens. Except Ethyl – she was nearly a year old when the wife and stepdaughter found her at a gas station (hence the name). She had been shot with a BB or pellet gun, never got the stiffness out of the one hip, but had a long, full life and adapted well to the menagerie.

The phone co-op lineman once brought me a box of mangy little kittens abandoned at a substation 10 miles away. “I see all the cats and dogs in your yard, I figured you would know what to do.” That’s how I came by Belle, Sprint, and Thumbellina (couldn’t think of a third phone-related name at the time).

Give me mixed breeds freshly weaned, and there is no such thing as a bad one.

Adjoran on May 10, 2014 at 5:25 PM

The amount of time, energy and money spent on the care of vulnerable animals vs. vulnerable human children is one of the great tragedies of this country.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:09 PM

Vulnerable human children? You, of course, mean the ones that were not killed by abortion. Some of us have a different definition of tragedy.

Happy Nomad on May 10, 2014 at 5:26 PM

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:21 PM

If only the government could take those discretionary dollars away from those who selfishly spend it on their animals, and use it to develop antipoverty programs. If only!

butch on May 10, 2014 at 5:27 PM

The amount of time, energy and money spent on the care of vulnerable animals vs. vulnerable human children is one of the great tragedies of this country.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:09 PM

I understand your concern that the breeding of more parasites to grow up, contribute nothing to society, suck the blood of the productive, and vote Democratic continue.

Feed ‘em yourself.

I need the animals to keep Democrats off my property.

Adjoran on May 10, 2014 at 5:28 PM

I mean, I can’t always be there to shoot the Democrats, can I?

Adjoran on May 10, 2014 at 5:29 PM

wolly4321 on May 10, 2014 at 5:16 PM

I have a Shepherd. He is special.

KCB on May 10, 2014 at 5:30 PM

Wow, so how I get my dogs is now in play.

I am a baaaad boy. I support the breeders.

WryTrvllr on May 10, 2014 at 5:30 PM

…had a pure bred Bichon Freis from some breeder. POS dog…gave it to a lady who had 3 others. (my bride wanted a little dog that would not shed)…every other animal I have had…was a hand-me-down…because they were older and nobody wanted them!…the best…most loyal animals ever!

KOOLAID2 on May 10, 2014 at 5:31 PM

I bought a Bichon years ago for my (then) wife. Worst.Dog.Ever.

KCB on May 10, 2014 at 5:36 PM

I bought a Bichon years ago for my (then) wife. Worst.Dog.Ever.

KCB on May 10, 2014 at 5:36 PM

Never buy a dog from your wife. What were you thinking?

DarkCurrent on May 10, 2014 at 5:39 PM

KOOLAID2 on May 10, 2014 at 5:31 PM

Ever have a pure bred Lab? Yes, I know they shed (wheeze, cough) but they are the definition of loyalty. Fun loving. HARD working. Easily trained. I mean WELL trained.

They just eat too many damn tennis balls.

WryTrvllr on May 10, 2014 at 5:40 PM

I have had two rescues in a month. The first rescue, the rescue told us that he was good with children and people. He was terrified of everyone except me. He hated my hubby and my children. When he growled at my 6 year old, I had to give him back.

My next rescue (a pug) we were told that he was 4 (when I saw him I knew that wasn’t true), and we were told he had no health problems according to their vet other than being overweight.

He has eyes that require chronic meds, and he needs 4 teeth pulled.

I also have 3 purebreds that I bought. I wanted to go to one of the purebred rescue groups, but they are absolutely ridiculous. A Boxer or a Boston will cost $400-$800 to adopt. A French bulldog will cost $1600, so I can completely understand why people just get puppies. If you are going to spend that much to get a rescue, might as well not go through the hassle of a rescue.

That all being said, I absolutely love my rescue pug..

melle1228 on May 10, 2014 at 5:40 PM

Which were given to me freely, I might hastily add, so that I might give more money in taxes to help with poverty.

WryTrvllr on May 10, 2014 at 5:41 PM

Adjoran on May 10, 2014 at 5:25 PM

I have gotten purebreds largely because I like certain dogs personality. I know that small dogs are nippers, but Boston Terriers are not- so a Boston bull gives me a lovely disposition and a small dog.

A Boxer is the most loving dog to children, but will tear up anything that comes after my children. I KNOW Boxers are like this. The problem with a mixed breed is you never know, so if you want a dog for a particular purpose; it may not work out.

melle1228 on May 10, 2014 at 5:43 PM

KOOLAID2 on May 10, 2014 at 5:31 PM

You just got a bad one KA2. Mine was awesome. Still miss him and he’s been gone over 10 yrs.

CoffeeLover on May 10, 2014 at 5:43 PM

You’re right. Obama has failed the children, their parents, their grandparents. And, their pets. A great liberal fueled tragedy.

TinFin on May 10, 2014 at 5:12 PM

And who will you blame for childhood poverty when a Republican is President?

Either way, that isn’t a response to my point about the ridiculous amount of resources spent on vulnerable animals. Imagine if that money went towards feeding a hungry child, or offering college scholarships to working class kids who graduate near the top of their class. No, we need to make sure fido has a dignified death every single time. I have a dog, but it is gross how much we spend on animals.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:21 PM

Obama, at least for another six years. Fair’s fair.

How I spend my money is none of your fvcking business. If I want to serve my pets bottled water and Kobe beef, it is none of your concern, Sally Struthers. But, if we are talking charity, you might want to bark up your own ilk’s tree. Conservatives are much more charitable than their whining counterparts who are always concerned about someone suffering somewhere. Obama is the one who has put more children on food stamps and their parents in the unemployment line with the liberal policies that you cheer. And, I feel sorry for your dog. Like your Mr. Potato Head, your mom probably has to tape up the back end so you will stop fiddling with it.

TinFin on May 10, 2014 at 5:44 PM

Never buy a dog from your wife. What were you thinking?

DarkCurrent on May 10, 2014 at 5:39 PM

For her, not from. :)

KCB on May 10, 2014 at 5:44 PM

KCB on May 10, 2014 at 5:36 PM

Good grief…..you and KA2 really picked badly.

CoffeeLover on May 10, 2014 at 5:45 PM

And who will you blame for childhood poverty when a Republican is President?

Either way, that isn’t a response to my point about the ridiculous amount of resources spent on vulnerable animals. Imagine if that money went towards feeding a hungry child, or offering college scholarships to working class kids who graduate near the top of their class. No, we need to make sure fido has a dignified death every single time. I have a dog, but it is gross how much we spend on animals.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:21 PM

I agree, and if we are comparing apples and apples; then do something about the DCS and adoption system. Parents who can’t take care of their children should be made to find someone who should (just like rescue pets), and adoption should be cheaper and easier than the states make it.

melle1228 on May 10, 2014 at 5:48 PM

they are one of the most loyal breeds around. NotCoach on May 10, 2014 at 5:21 PM

Fritz was my only child. My best friend. I knew my stepkids were safe in his care.

You could put a baby in his lap, and we did.

But you pizz him off?

He knew family.

I’d take him hunting. He helped me track deer.

Spend the night on the ground with him in the sleeping bag next to a fire.

I’d tell him to stay at daybreak, and he did.
I had a whistle. He could hear it miles away.

I’d trade him for ten humans.

wolly4321 on May 10, 2014 at 5:48 PM

For her, not from. :)

KCB on May 10, 2014 at 5:44 PM

Wait, you bought a dog for your wife???

I thought this was a pet thread?

WryTrvllr on May 10, 2014 at 5:50 PM

CoffeeLover on May 10, 2014 at 5:45 PM

I don’t think it was the breed. It was the dog.

KCB on May 10, 2014 at 5:50 PM

The amount of time, energy and money spent on the care of vulnerable animals vs. vulnerable human children is one of the great tragedies of this country.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:09 PM

Just a quick question, dear.

Do you tithe every month? Do your friends tithe? Is your tithe directed to organizations which support vulnerable human children? Liberals as a group are really tight with the charitable donations, so I’m just wondering.

I would venture to say that a great many HA readers are also faithful to our Lord’s command to tithe; one of my personal recipients is the local crisis pregnancy center, which helps poor moms avoid the abortion mills by donating food, layettes, rent money, help with adoption, comfort and love.

They do herculean work among woman and babies who are the most vulnerable- why not consider writing YOUR local crisis pregnancy center a big fat check every month? After all, money>>mouth, right?

(P.S.- what I spend on the fur babies is far, far less than the 10% of my income I tithe. What about you?)

Dolce Far Niente on May 10, 2014 at 5:51 PM

kids who graduate near the top of their class.

Not needed anymore libfree, common core. Didn’t you get the memo?

WryTrvllr on May 10, 2014 at 5:52 PM

The amount of time, energy and money spent on the care of vulnerable animals vs. vulnerable human children is one of the great tragedies of this country.

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:09 PM

Well when you devalue the worth of human life through abortion and over elevate animal life via the animal rights movement, what do you expect?

I’ve had dogs from the shelter (a long haired German Shepherd and a Brittney Spaniel/Coon Hound Cross), a dog from an “accidential” litter (my darling Pug), a dog from a rescue (our amazing Border Collie) and now two pure bred Mini Australian Shepherds. It really depends on what you are looking for. The last pound dog (the Coon Hound cross) and the rescue, turned my husband off of the adoption process with their spay neuter contracts and the application process. Granted he was also not thrilled with the breeder were got our first Mini Aussie from and all she had us sign was a contract giving them right of first refusal if we ever were to give the dog up. I understand (to a point) why the questions, but given that I have put more into a dog that most other trainers would have given up on (my frightened of the whole world Mini Aussie Jack), I do bristle at the insinuations that I am not adequate to take care of someone’s rescue….

LL

Lady Logician on May 10, 2014 at 5:55 PM

I don’t think it was the breed. It was the dog.

KCB on May 10, 2014 at 5:50 PM

sorry. Mine was a gem. And I had a lot of other types of dogs to compare him too.

But I do agree with what a lot of others are saying, the one time I inquired in a breed dog rescue…they wanted you to jump through hoops, pay them a lot of money and the application process was bear.

CoffeeLover on May 10, 2014 at 6:08 PM

They do herculean work among woman and babies who are the most vulnerable- why not consider writing YOUR local crisis pregnancy center a big fat check every month? After all, money>>mouth, right?

(P.S.- what I spend on the fur babies is far, far less than the 10% of my income I tithe. What about you?)

Dolce Far Niente on May 10, 2014 at 5:51 PM

libfree will probably ignore this one. Kind of a hot potato and he doesn’t like those.

butch on May 10, 2014 at 6:13 PM

If anyone here ever gets a dog that spends all of its time chasing its own tail. I have a name suggestion. libfreeordie

Bmore on May 10, 2014 at 6:19 PM

If you don’t have a good reference from a vet, they may turn you down.

LOL. Then keep the mutt, morons. Maybe Barky will have a hunger twinge and you can send the pooch to the White House dinner table …

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on May 10, 2014 at 6:24 PM

It isn’t just the rescue guys, it can be the breeders also. We almost bought an Akita from a respected breeder when we lived in New England. We never finalized the deal because of the conditions she placed on us and the dog.

#1 All dogs purchased form her must be spayed/neutered at six months. Proof must be sent back to the breeder or she could re-claim the dog in a contract violation. Basically she didn’t want anyone in the local area breeding Akitas but herself, and certainly not with her show dogs.

#2 A minimum of four visits to her house to ensure you and the puppy bonded after the puppies birth. I was sort of OK with this as we treat our dogs as our children so I could see where she was coming from. We did visit her place when the mom was pregnant and got along great with her three Akitas, so she let us go to step #3 on this part.

#3 A $100 non-refundable deposit no matter what happened to reserve a puppy, I think it was $500 if we wanted first male/first female born. That was a deal breaker as whoever was last in line could actually not get a puppy due to stillbirth or just not enough puppies. She would only take 6 reservations IIRC. We didn’t go with her.

My point is, it is not just the rescue people putting excessive restrictions on adoptions.

Johnnyreb on May 10, 2014 at 6:33 PM

TinFin on May 10, 2014 at 4:44 PM

Wow. The enormous self-righteousness you so cheaply buy by simply assuming you are better than others.

I got your all day sucker here, darlin’.

Ragspierre on May 10, 2014 at 6:41 PM

Living 40 minutes north of Seattle? Doesn’t that make you Canadian?

Happy Nomad on May 10, 2014 at 4:41 PM

No, the traffic is so bad, it’s only halfway to British Columbia… That’s why travel is expressed in minutes instead of miles up here.

(Happy dance!) I’m Moving!! Away! Hee hee!!

Tard on May 10, 2014 at 6:52 PM

TinFin on May 10, 2014 at 4:44 PM

Wow. The enormous self-righteousness you so cheaply buy by simply assuming you are better than others.

I got your all day sucker here, darlin’.

Ragspierre on May 10, 2014 at 6:41 PM

Better than you, darlin’. You betcha. And, that owl called. Your sucker doesn’t even measure up to those mini pops.

TinFin on May 10, 2014 at 6:54 PM

Oh, and Libfree?? re: expenses of owning a pet??

It’s your side of the equation pushing the pet health insurance thing.

I’ll just help keep the price of a vet visit down.

WryTrvllr on May 10, 2014 at 7:00 PM

I got my first pitbull from a breeder… and my second/current pitbull from a rescue… both wonderful dogs. If I could I’d adopt 10 more – of any breed or mix – they’re a gift.

dpduq on May 10, 2014 at 7:09 PM

Better than you, darlin’.

Oh, I’m not even in the running, nor would I want to be. Ever.

One thing…I’m not such a moron that I can’t keep species clear in my mind.

My dog is a dog. He’s very content being a dog. I never confuse him with a human, and that keeps us both MUCH more sane than some asphole who thinks of dogs as something other than…you know…dogs.

Ragspierre on May 10, 2014 at 7:17 PM

ConstantineXI, NO!!!! You said: “My limited experience with dogs has taught me that there really isn’t a difference between them and cats in this way: The kind of dog or cat you end up with is the result of how they were raised/treated by their owners.” That simply isn’t true.

My cat (Patches) is a female short-hair calico mutt about six years old. She had a VERY rough life for 2 1/2 years before she came to my home. She had not borne kittens — a miracle in itself — but she had been abused and neglected, and malnourished to the point of her teeth literally rotting out of her head. When I had her fixed a few months after she became part of the household, the vet pulled ten rotten teeth out of her jaws. A cat only has 30 teeth. She is now healthy and happy and gentle and loving, just about the sweetest animal you could ask for. She usually curls up in the bed with me sometime every night. Her “smile” is a bit lopsided, but that’ll happen when somebody yanks some of your best teeth.

Patches was clearly someone’s housecat before she came here — for one thing, she was perfectly litterbox trained. But those same people mistreated her to the point of malnourishment and deterioration of her teeth, as well as neglecting her shots. The fact that she showed up on my front porch is testimony to their abandonment of the cat. She was on the edge of starvation and shivering in the cold.

It was her face and eyes and personality that led me to take her in. If you don’t know what that’s like, you really don’t know what you’re talking about. I wouldn’t pay a nickel for another like Patches — but I wouldn’t take a million bucks for the real thing! I’ve seen sneaky, slinky cats slumming around here, wanting in and wanting food and just… wanting. They’re predators, mouse-munchers, squirrel assassins, rabbit-eaters. They prowl the world outside my house. Patches is so far from that world that last year she brought a perfectly healthy mouse from the yard into the house and turned it loose. Since that episode, I haven’t seen her and a mouse in close proximity at all.

Your assessment of pet personalities is just simply wrong.

Humphrey on May 10, 2014 at 7:21 PM

I have a purebred borzoi, and she is worth every penny.

Prettiest, most pampered, pedicured, popular, princess pooch in all Nebraska.

And everybody knows it.

Even her daycare staff loves her and calls her ‘covergirl’.

And..her BFF at daycare is a little female french bulldog who I believe was rescue but I think was still purebred but without papers.

With breeders, your chances of getting a dog that exhibits the breed traits you are looking for is higher, but getting one from the pound is cheaper especially if you can find one with a reasonable disposition.

KirknBurker on May 10, 2014 at 7:25 PM

My vet calls Kip ‘the little prince’ because he’s, uh, indulged.

Tard on May 10, 2014 at 7:43 PM

Have had nothing but cats here, since I got married over thirty years ago. Out of the nine cats we’ve had/have:four were strays; one was born in a barn (he kept leaving the doors open…wonder why?); two were from breed rescue (Siamese Rescue); and two were from the pound. We’ve had four Siamese, one Snowshoe, one possible Siamese mix and three mutts. Our favorite breed is our Snowshoe, who was a pound kitty; secondly we like the meezers–they’re the traditional kind, not the wedgie faced ones. The mutts have been sweet and good natured too.

Our experience with the rescue group has been good, as well as with the pound. I can’t say it’s been good taking in a stray, though. One of the strays we took in only lived three years before developing Feline Leukemia and having to be put to sleep–then three years later, Feline Leukemia took another of our cats. It’s made me pretty gun-shy of taking in strays. We loved that little kitty and it tore my heart to lose him after only three years–and our other kitty that succumbed should have lived to a ripe old age, instead of having to be put to sleep at only eight years.

The three we have now–two Siamese and the Snowshoe–are treasures. The meezers are geezers now and I’m not looking forward to losing them. The Snowshoe is still hale and hearty, so he will continue to be a joy for several more years to come.

theotherone on May 10, 2014 at 8:08 PM

libfreeordie on May 10, 2014 at 5:21 PM

If only the government could take those discretionary dollars away from those who selfishly spend it on their animals, and use it to develop antipoverty programs. If only!

butch on May 10, 2014 at 5:27 PM

The governments (fed, state, and local) seem hell-bent on taking all of our discretionary dollars anyway, so they might as well use this excuse. Who knows, they might actually sort of keep this one.

Kevin K. on May 10, 2014 at 8:21 PM

No, the traffic is so bad, it’s only halfway to British Columbia… That’s why travel is expressed in minutes instead of miles up here.

(Happy dance!) I’m Moving!! Away! Hee hee!!

Tard on May 10, 2014 at 6:52 PM

I’m about to go on my third tour of Europe from a guru based in the Seattle area. Most of the folks on these tours are from your area. I mostly have to bite my tongue when politics come up.

Happy Nomad on May 10, 2014 at 8:42 PM

A friend recently had to give up her cat (long sad story) and I drove her to the local animal shelter. Cat was several years old, trained, spayed, chipped, the whole 9 yards — the shelter wanted us to pay $40 to leave her there.

Fortunately, another lady coming in just behind us heard the exchange and took the cat home with her to use at the nursing home where she worked, because lots of elderly respond well to pets. Makes ‘em happy (who wooda thunk it?)

Win-win.

AesopFan on May 10, 2014 at 9:22 PM

Labradors, there is no substitute

WryTrvllr on May 10, 2014 at 9:33 PM

Comment pages: 1 2