Latvia defense minister accuses Russia of destabilizing through “professional provocateurs”

posted at 10:01 am on April 26, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

Almost two months ago, I wondered whether Russia’s next move after Ukraine would aim at the Baltic states rather than Moldova and its restive Transnistria region, where most other analysts presumed Vladimir Putin’s gaze would shift. Wonder no longer. Latvian defense minister Raimonds Vejonis tells Reuters that the substantial Russian-speaking minority has begun to get restive too, thanks to “professional provocateurs” from you-know-where:

Latvia’s defence minister said on Friday Russia was trying to stir unrest in the Baltic state by using “specially-trained, professional provocateurs” in the wake of its intervention in Ukraine. …

“There are risks that Russia might try to destabilise the situation in the region,” Raimonds Vejonis, Latvia’s defence minister, told Reuters in an interview.

“We see it very clearly in Ukraine’s case, where they have acted and are still trying to escalate the situation in different ways,” the minister added.

“They are trying to increase negative sentiment in society through certain specially-trained, professional provocateurs.”

Just over a quarter of Latvia’s population is ethnic Russian, about the same percentage as Estonia. Lithuania has a much smaller Russian minority, but also does not share a border with Russia — although they do with Belarus, a reliable satellite of Moscow. With Putin declaring himself the protector of all Russian speakers in the Eurasian sphere, all he needs to intervene would be a pretext, just as he did in Crimea and is preparing right now in eastern Ukraine.

Putin also appears to be moving troops in position to act in Latvia:

“There are no direct military threats to Latvia and the Baltic region, but there is increased activity of Russia’s Armed Forces near the border,” Vejonis said.

The US has just moved troops into Latvia yesterday, part of NATO’s effort to bolster confidence along what has become its eastern front:

Latvia on Friday welcomed American troops on its soil, part of a US force of 600 sent to the region to reassure the Baltic states amid concern over Russia’s actions in Ukraine.

“Today is a special day because this morning I met the heads of the armed forces at the Adazi military base and greeted the US military unit that arrived this morning for military training,” Latvian Prime Minister Laimdota Straujuma told reporters.

Some 150 troops from the 173rd Airborne Brigade will be based at the Adazi base near capital Riga until at least the end of the year, according to the Latvian defence ministry.

Another company of soldiers arrived in Poland on Wednesday, while around 150 others are each expected in Lithuania on Saturday and Estonia early next week.

The Baltics are much more attractive to Putin than a dead-end, land-locked Transnistria in Moldova. It allows greater access to the sea, and would eventually allow Russia to reconnect directly with its Kaliningrad enclave, a leftover of its post-WWII territorial footprint in Europe. Many assumed that Putin would not attempt to directly challenge NATO by fomenting unrest in its member states, but that assumption appears to be overly optimistic, at least from Latvia’s perspective. Putin wants to redraw the map in eastern Europe, and they’re likely to be the next stage of that project.

Meanwhile in Ukraine, the attempt at peacemaking is going about as well as one would expect. A group of Western observers in Slavyansk has been seized by pro-Russian forces, and the leader said he wouldn’t release his hostages except in trade:

Pro-Russian rebels holding a group of international OSCE observers in eastern Ukraine on Saturday accused them of being “NATO spies” and vowed to continue detaining them.

“Yesterday, we arrested some NATO spies… they will be exchanged for our own prisoners. I don’t see any other way they will be freed,” Denis Pushilin, the head of the insurgents’ self-declared Donetsk Republic, told reporters. …

The town’s self-styled mayor, Vyacheslav Ponomaryov, also told Russian TV news crews that the OSCE members were being considered “intelligence officers of NATO country members”.

“Military personnel from Denmark, Germany, Poland, the Czech Republic, Bulgaria I think and — from somewhere else, I can’t immediately recall — have been detained,” he said in broadcasts seen in Moscow.

“We believe an OSCE mission does not imply the participation of military personnel entering our territory unimpeded and studying our facilities.”

Kyiv pointed a finger squarely at Moscow for the abduction:

The OSCE mission in Ukraine is tasked with helping to implement an international agreement signed nine days ago, which called for illegal militia groups to disarm and leave occupied buildings, among other provisions.

Western nations and Ukraine’s interim government in Kiev accuse Russia of coordinating and supporting the militant groups, and of seeking to destabilize the situation in Ukraine.

Acting Ukrainian President Oleksandr Turchynov on Saturday also pointed the finger at Russia for the OSCE team’s capture, saying it must have endorsed the militants’ actions, and said the Russian leadership must be held accountable for what he called its support of terrorism.

Even the observers’ international mandate did not prevent “armed criminals” from taking them hostage, he said, according to a statement from his office.

Late last night, the G7 decided to impose additional sanctions on Russia for its actions. It had better make them substantial, because the only way to slow Putin down now is to hit his economy hard.

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With Putin declaring himself the protector of all Russian speakers in the Eurasian sphere, all he needs to intervene would be a pretext, just as he did in Crimea and is preparing right now in eastern Ukraine.

Not to beat a dead horse, but WWII essentially started with Hitler declaring himself as the protector of all German speakers in Eurasia.
After the war, neighboring countries largely pushed their German populations into Germany.

Count to 10 on April 26, 2014 at 10:09 AM

They’re only doing jobs Latvians won’t do.

claudius on April 26, 2014 at 10:09 AM

I would send in a Delta Force rescue effort before I would give these thugs anything.

KW64 on April 26, 2014 at 10:10 AM

Glasnost is dead, the Bear is alive and Obama is on the run!

PaddyORyan on April 26, 2014 at 10:11 AM

He will not “act in Latvia”. Latvia is a NATO member. This type of analysis trivializes problems and misinforms people. In my mind, there is no doubt that Russia’s annexation of Crimea is illegal and should be confronted. That being said, it is also a fact that Russia’s move met little to no resistance from the local population. That by no means justifies Russia’s aggression. However, it is at least curious, don’t you think? I mean Putin being bad, and everywhere else being good by definition, wouldn’t you expect people being up in arms?

Latvia is another matter. They will fight as they have in the past. Latvia isn’t split into two culturally distinct parts. There is absolutely no comparison.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 10:16 AM

Isn’t it about time to approve a lot of energy projects like LNG ports that threaten Russia’s energy stranglehold on Europe?

Lets see says our administration “what is more important, a free Europe allied with the US or our top enviro campaign contributors keeping the money flowing?”

The keystone pipeline decision and the failure to approve LNG export facilities and licenses tells you what the answer to the question is.

KW64 on April 26, 2014 at 10:16 AM

Russia’s envoy to the OSCE, Andrey Kelin, said Russia would do all it could to ensure the captured military experts are released, Russian state news agency RIA Novosti reported.

“We think these people need to be freed as soon as possible. Russia as a member of the OSCE will take all necessary steps to make that happen,” Kelin is quoted as saying.

“We don’t know what has happened to them or where they are at the moment. But we, along with the other members of OSCE, are very worried from what has happened.”

Oh yes, very worried, I’m sure. We need this Kelin guy to be a commenter on hotair. At least he’s more believable than most of the lefties here.

Fenris on April 26, 2014 at 10:21 AM

Putin better be careful, or Barry might tweet something about him with a really harsh #hashtag.

AZCoyote on April 26, 2014 at 10:22 AM

Isn’t it about time to approve a lot of energy projects like LNG ports that threaten Russia’s energy stranglehold on Europe?

It is a long-term solution that will do nothing to help Ukraine right now.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 10:23 AM

. That being said, it is also a fact that Russia’s move met little to no resistance from the local population.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 10:16 AM

Actually, we don’t know that. We here nothing out of of the region that Russia doesn’t want us to, so they could be systematically executing all of the ethnic Ukrainians and there would be no way for us to know.

Count to 10 on April 26, 2014 at 10:23 AM

It makes one wonder if those direct action right wing extremists in Kiev protesting the government and fighting with police at the barricades were Russian agent provocateurs.

Obama’s community organizers flooding North Africa kinda made it difficult to tell if the protesters in Kiev were Obama’s or Putin’s.

Joseph OHenry on April 26, 2014 at 10:24 AM

He will not “act in Latvia”. …

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 10:16 AM

Probably not, but he is setting up a situation to test the waters. His plans don’t have to be rigid. Plus, distractions and worries about destabilizing larger areas of Europe can be used to his advantage.

Fenris on April 26, 2014 at 10:27 AM

Latvia will not be the flashpoint. They’re too unimportant and have little to offer.

The jewel that Putin will covet is Narva, Estonia. It is a town that is 95% Russian in east Estonia. It is a quarter mile from Russia by bridge and just across the river (literally) from Russia. Putin only needs to put arms in there to try to force a NATO collapse. Given how weak NATO really is with 75% of their funding coming from America in 2013, the EU’s exhaustion of munitions and will in their defeat in Libya (where we had to finish off Ghaddafi for them), NATO is rotten and hollow.

NATO is nothing more than a nickname for America now. The EU won’t support it. Poland spends the required 2% of GDP as does France, the rest don’t. In eastern Europe, we have five NATO allies that spend virtually nothing on defense because EU ascension has left them so impoverished, serving as little more than a cheap labor pool and source of immigration to the west.

Narva is the most likely place for Putin to challenge NATO to attempt an Article 5 collapse of the Atlantic alliance.

Toocon on April 26, 2014 at 10:29 AM

Isn’t it about time to approve a lot of energy projects like LNG ports that threaten Russia’s energy stranglehold on Europe?

It is a long-term solution that will do nothing to help Ukraine right now.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 10:23 AM

I’ve heard that argument many times in the past. I’ll probably keep hearing it in the future when doing something now would have solved our future problem.

Fenris on April 26, 2014 at 10:30 AM

Lithuania has a border with Kaliningrad, which is Russian territory.

Steven Den Beste on April 26, 2014 at 10:31 AM

Before we lament our and the EU’s failure to hit Russia’s economy HARD, it might be time to reflect on Japan in 1941 where we had hit their economy hard, depriving them of oil to stop their aggression. Faced with this the Japanese felt that war via a massive surprise attack was their best option.

Actions have consequences. Be prepared for the worst of them before acting.

philw1776 on April 26, 2014 at 10:37 AM

As someone who is fully bought into the idea that we can no longer be the world’s policeman, I admit that this Putinski is certainly giving me pause. It’s not like this is unique in history (not at all) but nonetheless, it is making me think twice. But with our deficits and milquetoast “leadership” ….

It is yet another “feather” in Obamasan’s cap – the man is a weak sister, an atrocious academic, and a sympathetic Marxist-at-heart.

Chuck Ef on April 26, 2014 at 10:40 AM

Ed: “A group of Western observers in Slavyansk has been seized by pro-Russian forces, and the leader said he wouldn’t release his hostages except in trade:”

There is more to this than you’re reporting.

Russia formally requested an OSCE team of monitors to go to the Donetsk area. OSCE monitors have entered and been received previously by the self-appointed Donetsk regime and departed peacefully to report back to OSCE.

Instead of OSCE monitors, a bus marked OSCE showed up being driven by 5 Ukrainian military/intel staff. The eight “observers” all happened to be from NATO countries and was led by four Germans (not so popular in east Ukraine after what Nazis did there in WW II).

The “observers” insist they are operating under 2011 Vienna Document on military transparency. One key provision of the current Vienna Document governing military observers in conflict zones is that the host government (Kiev) is entirely responsible for their security. Not Russia, not this clownish self-styled governor of Donetsk.

Whether this team of “observers” had any prior authorization from OSCE is not clear, no documents have been produced to authorize their mission and no prior announcements were made at OSCE.

While this team has been detained, they are not being held incommunicado and are in contact via phone with OSCE.

Toocon on April 26, 2014 at 10:43 AM

OT:

On my IPhone HA app, there is menu item “Messages” that says ” 10+” but there is nothing on the message page. Am I missing something?

BobMbx on April 26, 2014 at 10:45 AM

Toocon on April 26, 2014 at 10:43 AM

Very interesting. Do you have an english language news story documenting that somewhere?

Fenris on April 26, 2014 at 10:50 AM

now is when hilary and reset buton is neede

dale1 on April 26, 2014 at 10:51 AM

With Putin declaring himself the protector of all Russian speakers in the Eurasian sphere, all he needs to intervene would be a pretext, just as he did in Crimea and is preparing right now in eastern Ukraine.

He didn’t just have a “pretext”, he had a monolithically Russian population that gave Russia a 83% turnout and a 97% “yes” vote in the referendum.

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 11:00 AM

Maybe Putin should hire Al Sharpton.

alanstern on April 26, 2014 at 11:01 AM

When will the American people wake up to what Obama is doing?

claudius on April 26, 2014 at 11:02 AM

Walter Schellenberg nods.

Those “professional provocateurs”, ie Spetznaz, are only following in the footsteps of the RSD and the Brandenburgers.

Too bad Barry never took a history course wherever it was he went to school.

formwiz on April 26, 2014 at 11:02 AM

The world will be in a shambles by the time Obama leaves office.
This is what happens when a community organizer is elected to the (formerly) most powerful position on earth.

justltl on April 26, 2014 at 11:04 AM

With Putin declaring himself the protector of all Russian speakers in the Eurasian sphere, all he needs to intervene would be a pretext, just as he did in Crimea and is preparing right now in eastern Ukraine.

Not to beat a dead horse, but WWII essentially started with Hitler declaring himself as the protector of all German speakers in Eurasia.
After the war, neighboring countries largely pushed their German populations into Germany.

Count to 10 on April 26, 2014 at 10:09 AM

Putin is older than Hitler was at the same point in his career, so we have nothing to worry about.

slickwillie2001 on April 26, 2014 at 11:05 AM

It is a long-term solution that will do nothing to help Ukraine right now.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 10:23 AM

Shorter term is arming the Ukrainians but even that is late in the day now. Do you give them Stingers, TOWS, anti-tank mines? How much time do we even have to deploy them and train their would be users before the Russians are on top of them? Militarily, Ukraine and the Baltics are indefensible so there has to be a threat of another sort if they are to be saved and the obvious one is to threaten the Russian economy.

Investment in their oil and gas industry will slow down quickly if it looks like their market is declining. The Russian economy is vulnerable as it is a one trick energy pony. If the Russian economy gets damaged because investment drops, it may act as a restraint in at least the medium term if not the short term and it is not an act of war that gives Putin cover for aggression against the West. This threat is what made Putin sign an agreement to sell gas to China that had been hanging fire for years; so he does have an answer down the road but additionally, the Europeans need to know they cannot be forever blackmailed if we want them to show some spine in the meanwhile which they have been loathe to do.

KW64 on April 26, 2014 at 11:06 AM

While this team has been detained, they are not being held incommunicado and are in contact via phone with OSCE.

Toocon on April 26, 2014 at 10:43 AM

Which means locating them and attempting to rescue them could be possible. If we trade prisoners, all Westerners will be seen as having great value and put them all at risk.

KW64 on April 26, 2014 at 11:10 AM

He didn’t just have a “pretext”, he had a monolithically Russian population that gave Russia a 83% turnout and a 97% “yes” vote in the referendum.

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 11:00 AM

With NO option on the ballot to stay as part of the Ukraine. Those “yes” votes meant nothing.

Walter L. Newton on April 26, 2014 at 11:10 AM

And just a reminder: the entire mass media Cold War II narrative is a pack of lies: the Maidan massacre, with shots coming from the rioters’ own headquarters; the Russian “aggression” narrative, when what kicked off the Western-backed coup was that the democratically elected Ukrainian government took a better trade deal from Russia rather than a bad one from the European Union; that this is all about “freedom” when actually it was a foreign-sponsored junta taking over and ending an actual, legitimate democracy – all of it.

The Gulf of Tonkin resolution didn’t work out for the best. Neither will this new aggressive policy based on even bigger lies – and this time starting a cold war against a target that isn’t communist and hasn’t been for decades.

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 11:11 AM

With NO option on the ballot to stay as part of the Ukraine. Those “yes” votes meant nothing.

Walter L. Newton on April 26, 2014 at 11:10 AM

They meant a great deal. These were genuine votes, and staying out of Russia was a possibility.

As for staying in Ukraine according to the constitution – it was the coup plotters that had already destroyed the constitutional order.

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 11:13 AM

And just a reminder: the entire mass media Cold War II narrative is a pack of lies: the Maidan massacre, with shots coming from the rioters’ own headquarters; the Russian “aggression” narrative, when what kicked off the Western-backed coup was that the democratically elected Ukrainian government took a better trade deal from Russia rather than a bad one from the European Union; that this is all about “freedom” when actually it was a foreign-sponsored junta taking over and ending an actual, legitimate democracy – all of it.

The Gulf of Tonkin resolution didn’t work out for the best. Neither will this new aggressive policy based on even bigger lies – and this time starting a cold war against a target that isn’t communist and hasn’t been for decades.

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 11:11 AM

And where is your proof of all this? Or are we suppose to just take your word for it. Do you work for RT?

Walter L. Newton on April 26, 2014 at 11:13 AM

Before we lament our and the EU’s failure to hit Russia’s economy HARD, it might be time to reflect on Japan in 1941 where we had hit their economy hard, depriving them of oil to stop their aggression. Faced with this the Japanese felt that war via a massive surprise attack was their best option.

Actions have consequences. Be prepared for the worst of them before acting.

philw1776 on April 26, 2014 at 10:37 AM

–Are you sure that provoking Japan wasn’t exactly what Roosevelt wanted to do?–

Long term, Europe and North America have enough economic capability to defeat Russia if they choose to use it. Putin is best served by either a slow progression that does not alarm the West too much along the way or a sudden grab that cripples Europe fatally before it and the US can act as Japan hoped to do to the US at Pearl Harbor. I do not think Russia has the ability to conduct such a fatal quick strike; thus, I think Putin would choose the former route. But we can thwart that effort by making his economy suffer enough to make his population dissatisfied.

KW64 on April 26, 2014 at 11:19 AM

If ethnic Russians in other countries are openly displaying as fifth columnist traitors in every country they live in, they should be prepared to be viewed as such and sent to the country they’d prefer to live in.

xuyee on April 26, 2014 at 11:20 AM

I got mugged in Kaliningrad once.

Did a Baltic tour in the mid-early 90′s.

The poverty was something I had never seen before. Not on that level. So was the fear of the russian government.

I saw things that would lend truth to Eds post.

They don’t wear uniforms, but they are there. They know everything about everybody. Like a stasi presence just waiting.

wolly4321 on April 26, 2014 at 11:23 AM

And where is your proof of all this? Or are we suppose to just take your word for it. Do you work for RT?

Walter L. Newton on April 26, 2014 at 11:13 AM

Here you go:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDPJ-ucnyPU

Are you going to deny the Victoria Nuland phone call too? Or the call where Yulia Tymoshenko raves about her hatred of Russians? Or the facts on the trade deals and the timing? All the facts on the complete pack of lies the mass media is peddling are out there.

And if you watched the videos coming out of Maidan for months leading up to the coup, you know the “protestors” are salaried thugs with weapons and gear laid on by sources about which the Western media could never summon any interest.

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 11:23 AM

This just gets better and better, that reset button is paying off handsomely.

Bishop on April 26, 2014 at 11:23 AM

Why aren’t the US, NATO and European countries doing the same thing to Russia?
Send in the “professional provocateurs” to Russia and destabilize that country against Putin.
Putin’s rule would crumble quickly.

Is Radio Free Europe still working? (Not that anyone listens to radio anymore.)
Where are the anti-Putin websites?

albill on April 26, 2014 at 11:26 AM

Why does it feel there are now lots of pro-Russian “professional provocateurs” on Hot Air sent to push the pro-Russian point of view?
Was that the purpose of the recent sign-up on Hot Air?

albill on April 26, 2014 at 11:32 AM

Professional provocateur, community organizer…potato, potahto.

Christien on April 26, 2014 at 11:34 AM

Professional provocateurs?

Sounds like a job opportunity for SEIU, Acorn, BAMN.

PattyJ on April 26, 2014 at 11:34 AM

albill on April 26, 2014 at 11:26 AM

If “somehow” the gas lines that cross Ukraine from Russia to Europe went boom, Russia would be absolutely destroyed economically.

Just sayin’.

Rebar on April 26, 2014 at 11:36 AM

Why does it feel there are now lots of pro-Russian “professional provocateurs” on Hot Air sent to push the pro-Russian point of view?
Was that the purpose of the recent sign-up on Hot Air?

albill on April 26, 2014 at 11:32 AM

Rossiya Dezinformatsiya.

slickwillie2001 on April 26, 2014 at 11:38 AM

And just a reminder: the entire mass media Cold War II narrative is a pack of lies: the Maidan massacre, with shots coming from the rioters’ own headquarters; the Russian “aggression” narrative, when what kicked off the Western-backed coup was that the democratically elected Ukrainian government took a better trade deal from Russia rather than a bad one from the European Union; that this is all about “freedom” when actually it was a foreign-sponsored junta taking over and ending an actual, legitimate democracy – all of it.

The Gulf of Tonkin resolution didn’t work out for the best. Neither will this new aggressive policy based on even bigger lies – and this time starting a cold war against a target that isn’t communist and hasn’t been for decades.

No, Russia’s just run by an authoritarian gang of gangsters and cutthroats. Maybe the chief gangster’s ambitions rest merely with retaking all the lands with sizable Russian populations, maybe not. I suppose we’ll know when he’s done. Maybe his goal is to break NATO. Shouldn’t be too hard under this Bam Bam.

The Russian apologists on the net Right amaze me. I suppose there are three sources: native Russians, still loyal first to the mother country; Paulian libertarians, who never fail to defend tyranny overseas, while denouncing tyranny here; and paleocons, who misguidedly see Putin as some sort of “Christian” leader.

BushyGreen on April 26, 2014 at 11:39 AM

Hey, I hear they have their own financing that will approve you even if you have poor credit at the Vladimir Putin Institute of Professional Agent Provocateur. So sign up now for an exciting and rewarding career as an Professional Agent Provocateur, at the Vladimir Putin Institute of Professional Agent Provocateur, placement guaranteed after graduation.
1917 Industrial Workers of the World Blvd, next to the Yuri Andropov School of Truck Driving.

Wallythedog on April 26, 2014 at 11:40 AM

“somehow” the gas lines that cross Ukraine from Russia to Europe went boom, Russia would be absolutely destroyed economically. Just sayin’. Rebar on April 26, 2014 at 11:36 AM

And also the perfect excuse to invade. They could rebuild them pretty fast. Just sayin’.

wolly4321 on April 26, 2014 at 11:44 AM

BREAKING: Jan Psaki tweets hashtag in support #StandwithLatviaandLusitania

Christien on April 26, 2014 at 11:44 AM

Putin isn’t a “Christian” leader; he actually is a Christian, and a lot less culturally Marxist than Obama.

The Soviet Union is gone. Russia is Communist no more. Cold War I was justified, because the Soviet Union really was an “Evil Empire”. But post-Communist Russia isn’t, and Cold War II is totally bogus.

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 11:45 AM

No, Russia’s just run by an authoritarian gang of gangsters and cutthroats.

BushyGreen on April 26, 2014 at 11:39 AM

That would work better as a description of the thugs of the Maidan junta.

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 11:47 AM

NATO is kaput if Putin messes with those countries and the US does not respond with force. Not necessarily saying it’s a good idea, but that’s what the result will be.

forest on April 26, 2014 at 11:50 AM


Why does it feel there are now lots of pro-Russian “professional provocateurs” on Hot Air sent to push the pro-Russian point of view?

I have been present here for about four years. And I am absolutely pro-Russian now, especially after Turkey and the U.S. State Department tried to false flag us into war in Syria (google Seymour M. Hersh, red line and the rat line for the full story in the London Review of Books). Soros and Omidyar financed the Right Sector and the current Putschist biker-gang “government” of Ukraine. Also google “Ukraine gold federal reserve.” Why did the U.S. confiscate Ukraine’s gold reserves?

Why does #TeamSmartPower (Obama Biden Kerry Brennan Dempsey Hegal) treat Iran and North Korea with the utmost deference and respect when they only have the potential of developing nuclear weapons that places the U.S. or its allies in effective range? Yet they seem hell bent on war with an established nuclear power–a nuclear power with ICBMs, nuclear submarines in every sea, and long-range bombers–by means of every provocation imaginable?

Even Israel–yes, ISRAEL–isn’t following us into this quagmire that could go nuclear, yo. We are so on the wrong side of this. Drudge, HotAir, most middle-brow analysts of the U.S. center-right are also on the wrong side of this. Obama-Kerry need to be opposed on this, NOT SUPPORTED.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 11:51 AM

Putin isn’t a “Christian” leader; he actually is a Christian, and a lot less culturally Marxist than Obama.

The Soviet Union is gone. Russia is Communist no more. Cold War I was justified, because the Soviet Union really was an “Evil Empire”. But post-Communist Russia isn’t, and Cold War II is totally bogus.

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 11:45 AM

That’s funny. Well, I agree that Obama is culturally not a Christian, but I’d say more a mix of culturally muslim and banana republic. Just like Putin is only a ‘Christian’ for propaganda purposes. He’s KGB through and through.

Fenris on April 26, 2014 at 11:53 AM

A couple weeks ago we were all speculating whether Putin would go after a NATO member like he is Ukraine.

I think we now have the answer. While invading a NATO member DOES ACTUALLY OBLIGATE US to war, I don’t think anyone believes that the Feckless Wonder Obama would actually do so.

ConstantineXI on April 26, 2014 at 11:55 AM

Here you go:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDPJ-ucnyPU

Are you going to deny the Victoria Nuland phone call too? Or the call where Yulia Tymoshenko raves about her hatred of Russians? Or the facts on the trade deals and the timing? All the facts on the complete pack of lies the mass media is peddling are out there.

And if you watched the videos coming out of Maidan for months leading up to the coup, you know the “protestors” are salaried thugs with weapons and gear laid on by sources about which the Western media could never summon any interest.

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 11:23 AM

I watch it. Do some research. This channel (and this report) relies heavily on RT. Seen some of the same footage on RT. Just as I thought. Nice try Blue.

Walter L. Newton on April 26, 2014 at 11:56 AM


That would work better as a description of the thugs of the Maidan junta.

Oh, pish posh. The Maidan protesters and their Right Sector friend are just nice young men committed to a fair and just civil society. Why, I shall google “right sector ukraine” and click on “images” just to prove it to you OH DEAR GOD A MADMAN CREW OF FREAKED OUT NAZI BIKER GANG GOONS JUST TOOK OVER UKRAINE oops my caps lock key go stuck. I’m so proud that the U.S. State Department supports these brave fighters for freedom.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 11:57 AM

The one factor missing from this discussion is how did those Russians come to be in the Baltics and Ukraine. In the case of Ukraine and to a lesser extent the Baltics, the population was either killed or moved out and Russians moved in. In the Ukraine five to eight million were butchered. It is going to require a lot more force than a few special forces to bring those populations to heel, and Putin doesn’t have that kind of force. What is driving this issue is not the language difference. but history. Those Russian are living on barrowed time. It is going to spin out of control as thing usually do.

shelbyco on April 26, 2014 at 12:01 PM

“culturally marxist” doesn’t work for you?

How about ethnically marxist?

Whatever.. Putin is talking about protecting the german speaking volks of the Sudetenland Russian speaking people of Ukraine.

wolly4321 on April 26, 2014 at 12:03 PM

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 11:51 AM

What you said.

Also, why is no amount of confrontation with Russia too much, supposedly about Ukraine’s borders, but it’s inconceivable to confront Mexico in defense of America’s borders? How can American domination of East Ukraine be a key national interest, and who gets to live in America be a matter of indifference? Why are some of the biggest warmongers on Russia the worst immigration sellouts in America? (Of course this refers above all to John McCain.)

This all stinks to high heaven.

We are so on the wrong side of this. Drudge, HotAir, most middle-brow analysts of the U.S. center-right are also on the wrong side of this. Obama-Kerry need to be opposed on this, NOT SUPPORTED.

Quoted for emphasis.

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 12:04 PM

Very interesting. Do you have an english language news story documenting that somewhere? — Fenris on April 26, 2014 at 10:50 AM

I did write a mega-post with info from Yahoo, Reuters, and the OSCE twitter account. But HotAir gobbled it. This is a quip system, not a forum where you can make a meaty post with plenty of linked content to document it.

I’ll try a shorter post with just the links:

Reuters: Monitors head into Ukraine’s badlands – armed with a sheet of paper

Yahoo: Ukraine rebels accuse detained OSCE team of being ‘NATO spies’

OSCE tweets:

1/4 Comms with military observers in Donetsk region lost.Team not OSCE monitors but sent by States under Vienna Doc on military transparency
— OSCE (@OSCE) April 25, 2014
2/4 All members of the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission and OSCE/ODIHR election observers are safe and accounted for
— OSCE (@OSCE) April 25, 2014

Toocon on April 26, 2014 at 12:09 PM

OFA?

BKeyser on April 26, 2014 at 12:11 PM

Ukraine crisis: G7 to ‘intensify sanctions’ on Russia

The United States could unveil its new punitive measures as early as Monday, officials said.

Mr Rhodes said that the sanctions would target “cronies” of the Russian president, Vladimir Putin, and Russian firms with influence in specific sectors of the economy such as energy and banking.

In effect, many of the new measures could simply mean adding further names of Russian officials to an existing list who face visa and asset bans.

A list adding 15 people to the 55 Russians and Ukrainians already blacklisted by the EU was approved in principle on the eve of the Geneva talks on April 17, an EU diplomat said.

agmartin on April 26, 2014 at 12:24 PM

David Blue on April 26, 2014 at 12:04 PM

I’ve been here a long time. Bryan Preston vetted me in as a capella. I agree with you both on this. Swimming upstream at HA is hard sometimes.

butch on April 26, 2014 at 12:24 PM

Toocon on April 26, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Thanks. I guess Yahoo can’t be bothered to get the facts straight. Nothing new about that, I suppose.

Fenris on April 26, 2014 at 12:32 PM


I agree with you both on this. Swimming upstream at HA is hard sometimes.

I swam upstream hard against the Romney supporters, twice. So there’s that.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 12:34 PM

How soon before #Latviaunited comes out. We have the very best people armed with SMART Diplomacy Power!!!111!!!!elibinty on this. Maybe King Barky the Incompetent will send a squadron of lawyers like he did with the BP oil well blowout. Obama always the smartest guy in the room….when he is in that room alone or with any of merry band of idiots.

jukin3 on April 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM

You would’ve thought NATO expansionists gave this matter a little more thought before inviting in three tiny little countries, two with very large Russian populations, that were crammed in on Russia’s border and essentially worthless to America.

The Baltic States have no oil reserves or other essential resources; they will never be valuable economically, as they are hardly bigger than a medium-sized U.S. metropolitan city and far less productive; and two of them don’t have ethnically homogenous populations that allow for a unitary domestic stand against their much-larger neighbor.

WTF were we thinking? Conservatives used to focus on the national interest. Now many of them are so drunk with ideological fervor that they waste our money, time, and potentially the lives of our men in the armed forces defending the indefensible. Why? Something about Hitler and WW2.

Pincher Martin on April 26, 2014 at 12:44 PM

Why does it feel there are now lots of pro-Russian “professional provocateurs” on Hot Air sent to push the pro-Russian point of view?

Was that the purpose of the recent sign-up on Hot Air?

I’m not pro-Russian. Nor am I pro-Ukrainian or pro-Chinese or pro-Lithuanian or pro-Syrian or pro-Libyan.

I’m pro-American.

And so I’m as disgusted by McCain’s remarks that “We are all Ukrainians” or “We are all Georgians” or “We are all Syrians” as I am by anything Obama has ever said about foreign affairs.

I want to focus conservative attention on our domestic front, and not on this stupid WW3 c**p that some of you so-called conservatives think is in our national interest.

Pincher Martin on April 26, 2014 at 12:52 PM

Something fun to do. First google “Biden Yatsenyuk” and click images to see #teamsmartpower’s Vice President Biden arm in arm with Ukraine Acting PM Arseniy Yatsenyuk Sergei Chuzavkov.

Now take a look at this image of the same Yatsenyuk at a political rally rendering Right Sector’s straight-arm salute.

That’s right, friends. These are the coup-plotters Obama-Kerry openly support, and whom Soros-Omidyar lavishly funded to overthrow the legitimate government and bring Ukraine into the bankrupt E.U. Just as the U.S. State Department and CIA now fund, arm, train, and equip Jihadists in Syria, and attempted to install a Muslim Brotherhood state in Egypt, we are on the wrong side of this too. HotAir, Drudge, and others, are on the wrong side of this. The NeoCon premise of safety at home by supporting democracy abroad has been turned on its head. The U.S. now creates insecurity at home by supporting chaos abroad.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 12:53 PM

Ukraine halts canal water supply to Crimea

KIEV, April 26 (Itar-Tass) – Ukraine had closed sluices of the North Crimean Canal, halting water supply from the Dnieper River to the peninsula, Ukraine’s UNIAN news agency reported on Saturday.

Crimea received 85% of fresh water through the canal, which was built in 1961-1971. It streches from the Khakhovka Reservoir to Kerch.

agmartin on April 26, 2014 at 12:55 PM

The NeoCon premise of safety at home by supporting democracy abroad has been turned on its head. The U.S. now creates insecurity at home by supporting chaos abroad.

Good line.

Pincher Martin on April 26, 2014 at 12:58 PM

WTF were we thinking? Conservatives used to focus on the national interest. Now many of them are so drunk with ideological fervor that they waste our money, time, and potentially the lives of our men in the armed forces defending the indefensible.

I wish it were drunken fervor or something. I’m baffled by how suddenly slavish–uncritical, unreflective–the conservative media is on this issue. It repeats the U.S. State Department party line word for word. We don’t trust Obama on ANYTHING but we’re willing to follow him and his merry band of idiots as they attempt to provoke a nuclear power into a hot war? Seriously!? Do you trust this man as a war time president against an enemy that can actually fight back?

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM

We don’t trust Obama on ANYTHING but we’re willing to follow him and his merry band of idiots as they attempt to provoke a nuclear power into a hot war? Seriously!? Do you trust this man as a war time president against an enemy that can actually fight back?

Well, to tell you the truth, I wouldn’t have trusted McCain or Romney with that task, either.

The current foreign policy of the United States is a bipartisan mess. It was caused by both parties. The left’s dirty little secret is that Obama accepts most of what Bush did for national security, but promoted a slightly less aggressive form of it. Obama’s first term fits very well with Bush’s second term in which the more diplomatic Condi Rice got the upper hand over the more aggressive Dick Cheney.

I also don’t think Hillary Clinton disagrees in any essentials with what a President McCain would’ve done.

Our foreign policy problems are caused by the presumptions of our elites in both parties and not by the mistakes of a single party.

Pincher Martin on April 26, 2014 at 1:07 PM


Well, to tell you the truth, I wouldn’t have trusted McCain or Romney with that task, either.

I concede your point. You had me at Romney. Still, would really prefer not to go to war with Russia under #teamsmartpower, and especially not for this.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 1:11 PM

I’m baffled by how suddenly slavish–uncritical, unreflective–the conservative media is on this issue. It repeats the U.S. State Department party line word for word. We don’t trust Obama on ANYTHING but we’re willing to follow him and his merry band of idiots as they attempt to provoke a nuclear power into a hot war? — casuist on April 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM

After all the Benghazi lies, the Libya disaster and the whole Arab Spring debacle, now the Right is going to back Barky on Ukraine?

I think some people are lost in re-reading old Tom Clancy novels. Toe-to-toe with the Russky, indeed!

Toocon on April 26, 2014 at 1:18 PM

It is a long-term solution that will do nothing to help Ukraine right now.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 10:23 AM

Reality check. Ukraine is lost and so are any of the old bordering soviet satellite states. NATO is dead. Less than a paper tiger. Transition Europe to American gas now, it will take several years, and think long term strategic.

Franklin100 on April 26, 2014 at 1:29 PM

Professional provocateur, community organizer…potato, potahto.

Christien on April 26, 2014 at 11:34 AM

BREAKING: Jan Psaki tweets hashtag in support #StandwithLatviaandLusitania

Christien on April 26, 2014 at 11:44 AM

Heh. Funny stuff …

ShainS on April 26, 2014 at 1:30 PM

It’s a huge mistake to allow mass immigration from your next door neighbor. It’s very difficult to assimilate them because of the natural allegiance to your home country which is just a car drive away. The US will inevitably face the same problem. We’re running out of time, freeze immigration and assimilate the recent arrivals.

cimbri on April 26, 2014 at 1:32 PM

Before we lament our and the EU’s failure to hit Russia’s economy HARD, it might be time to reflect on Japan in 1941 where we had hit their economy hard, depriving them of oil to stop their aggression. Faced with this the Japanese felt that war via a massive surprise attack was their best option.

Actions have consequences. Be prepared for the worst of them before acting.

philw1776 on April 26, 2014 at 10:37 AM

–Are you sure that provoking Japan wasn’t exactly what Roosevelt wanted to do?–

KW64 on April 26, 2014 at 11:19 AM

I have always wondered if Ol’Rosie finally realized that the mishmash of anti-Depression programs (some great, most a waste) was going absolutely nowhere and the nation needed something a great big kick in the pants to truly get on the road to recovery. If he did, then I really do applaud his actions because if we hadn’t gotten totally involved half the world would speak German and we’d still be in the semi-agrarian doldrums.

LawfulGood on April 26, 2014 at 1:34 PM

We don’t trust Obama on ANYTHING but we’re willing to follow him and his merry band of idiots as they attempt to provoke a nuclear power into a hot war? Seriously!? Do you trust this man as a war time president against an enemy that can actually fight back?

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM

CANNOT BE SAID ENOUGH.

LawfulGood on April 26, 2014 at 1:35 PM

Putin isn’t a “Christian” leader; he actually is a Christian, and a lot less culturally Marxist than Obama.

He’s a murderous, authoritarian thug. Anyone who sees him in him a true Christian is not very perceptive. Whatever one thinks should be done about Putin, he’s an evil man with blood on his hands and he will remain one. If there is a Heaven, he surely won’t sully it.

BushyGreen on April 26, 2014 at 1:39 PM

It will be an interesting and historic struggle. These kerfuffles along the Russian border are a sign of a much larger cultural struggle which is just beginning. Putin has decided to become the leader of a pan Slavic revival and center of opposition to modern western cultural Marxism. I expect the future of Pussy Riot and their ilk will be very dim east of the Dnieper River. Putin has already identified NGOs and their money, such as Soros, as one influence towards post modernism and is moving to curtail them.

Russian has tremendous influence in Europe because it is the dominnent source of European energy and has deep post soviet roots that have been developed in cities like London. As a leader of a cultural and religious revival Russia might become even more dominant.

Then there is the turn towards China. If the Peking-Moscow high speed rail project is actually built over the next ten years it will signal a tremendous increase in trans Asian trade and wealth creation.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/markadomanis/2014/04/11/dying-russias-birth-rate-is-now-higher-than-americas/

The orthodox revival:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XddLDufkaig

Viator on April 26, 2014 at 1:39 PM

Obama’s first term fits very well with Bush’s second term in which the more diplomatic Condi Rice got the upper hand over the more aggressive Dick Cheney.

Our foreign policy problems are caused by the presumptions of our elites in both parties and not by the mistakes of a single party.

Pincher Martin on April 26, 2014 at 1:07 PM

The results of which you saw just play out recently as Hamas absorbed the remnents of the old Fatah organization. She pushed the original elections which led to the split and gave Hamas freedom to become totally radicalized. dubya’s foreign policy revolved around his belief that elections will fix everything. Our whole system of selecting people top do foreign policy is wrong headed. We need cold eyed professionals, who have our interests as their main goal, not dreamers.

butch on April 26, 2014 at 1:41 PM

The NeoCon premise of safety at home by supporting democracy abroad has been turned on its head. The U.S. now creates insecurity at home by supporting chaos abroad.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 12:53 PM

You and David Blue have won me over in this thread.

Great, persuasive facts and arguments …

ShainS on April 26, 2014 at 1:41 PM

And so the trolls rule the roost. Why bother commenting on anything? Some of us have real lives and real jobs and don’t have the time to devote to posting an endless stream of drivel.

Viljams on April 26, 2014 at 1:57 PM


And so the trolls rule the roost. Why bother commenting on anything? Some of us have real lives and real jobs and don’t have the time to devote to posting an endless stream of drivel.

U mad, bro?

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 2:24 PM

I have been present here for about four years. And I am absolutely pro-Russian now, especially after Turkey and the U.S. State Department tried to false flag us into war in Syria (google Seymour M. Hersh, red line and the rat line for the full story in the London Review of Books). Soros and Omidyar financed the Right Sector and the current Putschist biker-gang “government” of Ukraine. Also google “Ukraine gold federal reserve.” Why did the U.S. confiscate Ukraine’s gold reserves?

You treating Seymour Hersh as a credible source kind of ruins your entire argument.

Even Israel–yes, ISRAEL–isn’t following us into this quagmire that could go nuclear, yo. We are so on the wrong side of this. Drudge, HotAir, most middle-brow analysts of the U.S. center-right are also on the wrong side of this. Obama-Kerry need to be opposed on this, NOT SUPPORTED.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 11:51 AM

And we get to the real problem – it’s Obama in charge so of course any action which he seems to support must now be opposed (I say “seems” since it’s clear he won’t be going to war). I despise what he’s done to the country too, but you guys are just wrong in this, and cheerleading the hollowing out and destruction of NATO, and the coming collapse of the post-WW2 order is insanity.

You’re no different than the “antiwar” movement which opposed Bush in Iraq, and evaporated the moment a leftist got into power.

Doomberg on April 26, 2014 at 2:47 PM

As a leader of a cultural and religious revival Russia might become even more dominant.

Russia has a sick and corrupt society presided over by a criminal, authortarian godfather. Can’t see anything good coming out of this “revival.”

BushyGreen on April 26, 2014 at 3:02 PM

I have been present here for about four years. And I am absolutely pro-Russian now, especially after Turkey and the U.S. State Department tried to false flag us into war in Syria (google Seymour M. Hersh, red line and the rat line for the full story in the London Review of Books). Soros and Omidyar financed the Right Sector and the current Putschist biker-gang “government” of Ukraine. Also google “Ukraine gold federal reserve.” Why did the U.S. confiscate Ukraine’s gold reserves?

You treating Seymour Hersh as a credible source kind of ruins your entire argument.

Doomberg on April 26, 2014 at 2:47 PM

LOL, I noticed that reference immediately too.

Hersh has, in the past, made up claims out of thin air and cited them as Facts, and also is famous for using anonymous sources in his “reporting”. He also Lied in a speech during the Iraq War, claiming (falsely) that US soldiers engaged in pedophilia against Iraqi boys. He also claimed that O’bama and the US never killed bin Laden!

But the Left still treat him as a God, solely because of something he published 45 years ago (My Lai Massacre).

Del Dolemonte on April 26, 2014 at 3:08 PM

Seems like we have a lot of Russian operatives commenting on Hot Air now.

Count to 10 on April 26, 2014 at 3:13 PM

I have been present here for about four years. And I am absolutely pro-Russian now

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 11:51 AM

Your problem, our problem, the problem of America is a simple one. We have elected Barack Obama president and the Uniparty controls both houses of congress, the judiciary, and the bureaucracy. Taking the country back for the people is going to take a long time and will be a hard fight. If you love America, the Declaration, and the Constitution strap ‘em on and step up. We need your help.

Franklin100 on April 26, 2014 at 3:15 PM

a. Somebody mentioned that only Poland spends the required 2% in addition to US. It actually doesn’t, but is close and much better than most. Estonia does though.

b. While it is true that the entire population of Narva was transplanted by Stalin and it is now 95% Russian it is not a very good place to stage a new Crimea. Most of the Russians there know full well that they are doing much better than people across the river and would definitely not want to lose what they have (Crimea is poor and corrupt even by Ukrainian standards). Narva is also separated from Russia by river and not at all separated from rest of Estonia. There are thousands of armed volunteer defense league members within an hours drive more than willing to carry out the standing orders to immediately start resistance regardless of orders, aka shoot uninvited foreign soldiers first ask questions later.

c. I find the idea that our country is worthless and should not be defended short sighted. If not Narva river where should the border for freedom be? Oder? Rhein? Atlantic? I want to live and raise my kids here. But I will not and I will not let my kids be Putin’s subjects. Sure, we must do our part and we are. We did our part in Iraq and Afganistan too. But it is fairly obvious that one million cannot beat 150 if nobody has our back. So if my country isn’t worth it, I need to know what is worth it, because obviously I should move there.

US, like us and everyone else participating in free markets all over the world does benefit from it. We may not have oil, but we do have skype, e-voting and lots more coming. Having a smaller free world is to no one’s benefit, except Putin’s.

Oh and we’ve come a long way since the occupation. While we may not be rich yet, we’re no longer poor either.

kittysaidwoof on April 26, 2014 at 3:18 PM

Russia has a sick and corrupt society presided over by a criminal, authortarian godfather. Can’t see anything good coming out of this “revival.”

BushyGreen on April 26, 2014 at 3:02 PM

Oddly, Russia right now very closely matches Marx’s “Financiers of Capital” stage or governance, where the elite push the country to militaristicly expand to capture resources in order to enrich themselves.

Count to 10 on April 26, 2014 at 3:18 PM

kittysaidwoof on April 26, 2014 at 3:18 PM

It’s good to have someone with a local perspective.

Count to 10 on April 26, 2014 at 3:21 PM

You’re no different than the “antiwar” movement which opposed Bush in Iraq, and evaporated the moment a leftist got into power. Except they were a haven of traitors, lunatics, and paid operatives from Day 1 and you merely don’t want the stupidest, most mentally inferior president ever in the nation’s history to get into a shooting war with Russia. Especially not when he’s simultaneously downsizing the military.

Doomberg on April 26, 2014 at 2:47 PM

Fixed.

LawfulGood on April 26, 2014 at 3:22 PM

I’ve heard that argument many times in the past. I’ll probably keep hearing it in the future when doing something now would have solved our future problem.

Fenris on April 26, 2014 at 10:30 AM

You misunderstood me. I’m not one of those who keeps using time frame as an excuse to do nothing. We absolutely must do what you want to do. You are preaching to the choir with me. However, I’m saying this is not a solution to the current crisis in Ukraine.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 3:23 PM

That being said, it is also a fact that Russia’s move met little to no resistance from the local population.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 10:16 AM

Actually, we don’t know that. We here nothing out of of the region that Russia doesn’t want us to, so they could be systematically executing all of the ethnic Ukrainians and there would be no way for us to know.

Count to 10 on April 26, 2014 at 10:23 AM

I do. I am originally from Russia, and I read Russian and Ukrainian. I have plenty of friends form Ukraine all of whom support Ukraine against Russia now.

I think lots of people here are having trouble sorting truth from junk. People like David Blue simply recite propaganda by RT, which is easily refuted. But just because there’s Russian propaganda doesn’t mean the world is black and white where Russian=black and Ukrainian=white.

Ukraine is a deeply divided country. VKontakte (a Russian equivalent of Facebook) has had an interesting map http://tjournal.ru/paper/vk-ukranian-russian where they show what language people have set as native in their profile (Red = Ukrainian, Blue = Russian. This hasn’t been done by Putin.

Now look at the map of last presidential elections: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukrainian_presidential_election,_2010 See it?

You can ask all sorts of questions like: how come? does it have to do with Russian propaganda? Does it have to do with fairly recent Soviet history? I think that blaming Russia for everything is like blaming Jews for everything. Moral issues aside, this implies that you’re a bunch of sheep who can be fully controlled by people of another ethnicity. Very strange view for a nationalist, for example.

Anyway… My view is that Ukraine can be a mess, and it still doesn’t justify a military invasion. And when the US says something like “Well, we will support such and such”, we better mean something by that or shut up. Right now it’s not clear what we mean.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 3:37 PM

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 3:37 PM

As far as I can tell, Ukraine doesn’t have interior problems so much as it has a Russian interference problem, with Putin routinely stealing elections for crony politicians.

Count to 10 on April 26, 2014 at 4:20 PM

More than half the country voted for pro-Russian Yanukovich in what everyone agrees was a reasonably conducted election. The election was not stolen in any meaningful sense. Again, you can blame Putin for lies and propaganda but at some point you have to acknowledge that you have a problem with ~50% population, and that’s a sign of a serious trouble.

Some of my friends tell me that Russian Ukrainians are lied to, which I agree with. However, unlike Russia, Ukraine has total freedom of press; you don’t have to watch Russian news if you live in Ukraine. Yet many people do. How come?

My point here is that this isn’t something that the US should try to resolve. Our position should be simpler and firmer. Let the Ukrainians sort out their mess. Say what you want about what happens there. But you can’t militarily interfere with their political process, AND if you do there will be consequences. So far there have been none.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 4:30 PM

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