Latvia defense minister accuses Russia of destabilizing through “professional provocateurs”

posted at 10:01 am on April 26, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

Almost two months ago, I wondered whether Russia’s next move after Ukraine would aim at the Baltic states rather than Moldova and its restive Transnistria region, where most other analysts presumed Vladimir Putin’s gaze would shift. Wonder no longer. Latvian defense minister Raimonds Vejonis tells Reuters that the substantial Russian-speaking minority has begun to get restive too, thanks to “professional provocateurs” from you-know-where:

Latvia’s defence minister said on Friday Russia was trying to stir unrest in the Baltic state by using “specially-trained, professional provocateurs” in the wake of its intervention in Ukraine. …

“There are risks that Russia might try to destabilise the situation in the region,” Raimonds Vejonis, Latvia’s defence minister, told Reuters in an interview.

“We see it very clearly in Ukraine’s case, where they have acted and are still trying to escalate the situation in different ways,” the minister added.

“They are trying to increase negative sentiment in society through certain specially-trained, professional provocateurs.”

Just over a quarter of Latvia’s population is ethnic Russian, about the same percentage as Estonia. Lithuania has a much smaller Russian minority, but also does not share a border with Russia — although they do with Belarus, a reliable satellite of Moscow. With Putin declaring himself the protector of all Russian speakers in the Eurasian sphere, all he needs to intervene would be a pretext, just as he did in Crimea and is preparing right now in eastern Ukraine.

Putin also appears to be moving troops in position to act in Latvia:

“There are no direct military threats to Latvia and the Baltic region, but there is increased activity of Russia’s Armed Forces near the border,” Vejonis said.

The US has just moved troops into Latvia yesterday, part of NATO’s effort to bolster confidence along what has become its eastern front:

Latvia on Friday welcomed American troops on its soil, part of a US force of 600 sent to the region to reassure the Baltic states amid concern over Russia’s actions in Ukraine.

“Today is a special day because this morning I met the heads of the armed forces at the Adazi military base and greeted the US military unit that arrived this morning for military training,” Latvian Prime Minister Laimdota Straujuma told reporters.

Some 150 troops from the 173rd Airborne Brigade will be based at the Adazi base near capital Riga until at least the end of the year, according to the Latvian defence ministry.

Another company of soldiers arrived in Poland on Wednesday, while around 150 others are each expected in Lithuania on Saturday and Estonia early next week.

The Baltics are much more attractive to Putin than a dead-end, land-locked Transnistria in Moldova. It allows greater access to the sea, and would eventually allow Russia to reconnect directly with its Kaliningrad enclave, a leftover of its post-WWII territorial footprint in Europe. Many assumed that Putin would not attempt to directly challenge NATO by fomenting unrest in its member states, but that assumption appears to be overly optimistic, at least from Latvia’s perspective. Putin wants to redraw the map in eastern Europe, and they’re likely to be the next stage of that project.

Meanwhile in Ukraine, the attempt at peacemaking is going about as well as one would expect. A group of Western observers in Slavyansk has been seized by pro-Russian forces, and the leader said he wouldn’t release his hostages except in trade:

Pro-Russian rebels holding a group of international OSCE observers in eastern Ukraine on Saturday accused them of being “NATO spies” and vowed to continue detaining them.

“Yesterday, we arrested some NATO spies… they will be exchanged for our own prisoners. I don’t see any other way they will be freed,” Denis Pushilin, the head of the insurgents’ self-declared Donetsk Republic, told reporters. …

The town’s self-styled mayor, Vyacheslav Ponomaryov, also told Russian TV news crews that the OSCE members were being considered “intelligence officers of NATO country members”.

“Military personnel from Denmark, Germany, Poland, the Czech Republic, Bulgaria I think and — from somewhere else, I can’t immediately recall — have been detained,” he said in broadcasts seen in Moscow.

“We believe an OSCE mission does not imply the participation of military personnel entering our territory unimpeded and studying our facilities.”

Kyiv pointed a finger squarely at Moscow for the abduction:

The OSCE mission in Ukraine is tasked with helping to implement an international agreement signed nine days ago, which called for illegal militia groups to disarm and leave occupied buildings, among other provisions.

Western nations and Ukraine’s interim government in Kiev accuse Russia of coordinating and supporting the militant groups, and of seeking to destabilize the situation in Ukraine.

Acting Ukrainian President Oleksandr Turchynov on Saturday also pointed the finger at Russia for the OSCE team’s capture, saying it must have endorsed the militants’ actions, and said the Russian leadership must be held accountable for what he called its support of terrorism.

Even the observers’ international mandate did not prevent “armed criminals” from taking them hostage, he said, according to a statement from his office.

Late last night, the G7 decided to impose additional sanctions on Russia for its actions. It had better make them substantial, because the only way to slow Putin down now is to hit his economy hard.

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And we get to the real problem – it’s Obama in charge so of course any action which he seems to support must now be opposed (I say “seems” since it’s clear he won’t be going to war).

I hope you’re right about the not going to war part. But I don’t think it’s clear at all and I don’t think the White House is in control of events. They seem to be flat-footedly stomping along behind elements in the U.S. State Department, a CIA that desperately wants revenge for Snowden, the E.U., and the “progressive” billionaires who financed the putsch in Ukraine through organizations like Ukrainian Renaissance, the Maiden protesters, and the anti-Russian anti-Jewish openly fascist Right Sector, Omidyar, and Soros. Soros himself won’t shut up in giving advice about how many billions the U.S. E.U., and especially Germany should pony up to protect his newly acquired asset, the people of Ukraine. Then you have rogue generals like ironically named Breedlove announcing openly to the press about “boots on the ground in Ukraine.” It’s a freakin’ circus, yo. And Obama is right where he likes to be, leading from behind as his cabinet secretaries, advisor, and high level directors turn slow circles in the wind.

Yes, I oppose Obama. Yes, consistently. I opposed the CIA establishing a Muslim Brotherhood regime in Egypt, I opposed intervention in the now failed state of Libya where Jihadists have taken over bases (as reported right here on HA), and I opposed intervention in Syria over a alleged chemical attack that has been exposed as a false flag operation, and, yes, I oppose this latest burst of madness. We were on the wrong side all three times, yo. But how does consistency and principle argue against provoking war with a nuclear power even if it means the end of NATO as you aver?

To be honest I don’t care much about NATO. And neither does Obama, ironically. Yet you still want to support Obama because NATO!?

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 4:33 PM

Casuist is misrepresenting what was happening in Ukraine. Calling Maidan protesters “an organization” is simply an attempt to lie. Just to make sure everyone’s on the same page: Maidan is Ukrainian for “square” . This is not an “organization”. It’s people of Ukraine.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 4:40 PM


Casuist is misrepresenting what was happening in Ukraine. Calling Maidan protesters “an organization” is simply an attempt to lie. Just to make sure everyone’s on the same page: Maidan is Ukrainian for “square” . This is not an “organization”. It’s people of Ukraine.

Yes, please forgive me for being unclear and therefore misleading. I have written “the organizations that composed the Maiden protesters,” of which there were many, and many that were well intentioned. The Right Sector, however, are openly fascist.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 4:44 PM

<em

>You treating Seymour Hersh as a credible source kind of ruins your entire argument.

Here is another source for Obama-Erdogan false flag operation as rationale for war in Syria and the financing, arming of Jihadist formations. This is my favourite blog ZeroHedge: Why Turkey Was Planning A False Flag Operation In Syria.

I’m not accustomed to ad hominem reasoning where you impeach a source based not on facts but on personal grounds. But as I am a game player and not a rule maker I’ll just find other sources, of which there are many, like youtube. Erdogan tried to shut down the entire internet to stop disclosure on youtube of his false flag operation that Hersh among many others write about. Perhaps if you stayed more informed you would already know this. This same actors now try to pull us into a war with RUSSIA, a nuclear power, over Ukraine. And we want to follow them?

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 4:51 PM

I agree with that. Some Ukrainian nationalists are borderline fascists. However, this is not the issue. First, they do not form the majority. Second, Russia claims that Russian Ukrainians are in danger now. This is simply insane.

Most press in Kiev is Russian speaking. Top political shows are hosted not simply by Russian speaking hosts. They are (pro-Ukrainian) Russian citizens, well-known Russian journalists who moved to Kiev after the beginning of Putin’s crackdown on press in Russia. It’s simply a fact that a Russian Ukrainian is freer than a Russian who lives in Russia. If you disagree, then please give me some specific examples.

Are Ukrainian nazis despicable people? Yes, they are. However, guess where this picture has been taken: http://img249.imageshack.us/img249/6454/012b52pe.jpg Who should invade that place as a punishment?

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 5:02 PM

It’s simply a fact that a Russian Ukrainian is freer than a Russian who lives in Russia. If you disagree, then please give me some specific examples.

This I concede without hedge or qualification. And I would prefer that no one invade anyone, and that Ukraine be left to itself, and, yes, I concede that Russia is ruled by thugs, and rife with thuggery. My concerns are local, even parochial in character. I do not want the U.S. to go to war with Russia. My fear is that #teamsmartpower is using events in Ukraine to distract from developments at home.

Were Obama-Kerry to simply agree in a treaty that Ukraine would never become a NATO member, I don’t think there would be much of an issue.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 5:12 PM

>You treating Seymour Hersh as a credible source kind of ruins your entire argument.

Here is another source for Obama-Erdogan false flag operation as rationale for war in Syria and the financing, arming of Jihadist formations. This is my favourite blog ZeroHedge: Why Turkey Was Planning A False Flag Operation In Syria.

I’m not accustomed to ad hominem reasoning where you impeach a source based not on facts but on personal grounds.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 4:51 PM

I impeached your choice of Hersh as a source based not on personal grounds but on facts.

Curious how responding to me was below your pay grade!

Del Dolemonte on April 26, 2014 at 5:15 PM

Casuist is misrepresenting what was happening in Ukraine. Calling Maidan protesters “an organization” is simply an attempt to lie. Just to make sure everyone’s on the same page: Maidan is Ukrainian for “square” . This is not an “organization”. It’s people of Ukraine.

Yes, please forgive me for being unclear and therefore misleading. I have written “the organizations that composed the Maiden protesters,” of which there were many, and many that were well intentioned. The Right Sector, however, are openly fascist.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 4:44 PM

Read PBH’s 3:37 PM post.

Are you claiming to be more of an expert on the region than PBH is?

Del Dolemonte on April 26, 2014 at 5:16 PM

I don’t think there is a chance of going to war with Russia. I don’t understand this fear at all. The Cold War was far more serious, and yet nobody thought of actually going to war. Right now we’re talking about serious sanctions of the sort that were implicitly present the whole time during the Cold War. I mean, seriously.. we’re talking of maybe doing 1% of what was done during the Cold War. How does this immediately become equivalent to a Nuclear Armageddon?

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 5:20 PM


I impeached your choice of Hersh as a source based not on personal grounds but on facts.

Please forgive me. Must have missed the facts part. All I read was something about Hersh having written stuff you disagreed with in the past and therefore he is a bad person or something, hence ad hominem reasoning.

Curious how responding to me was below your pay grade!

But I did respond, didn’t I? And with another source since the first failed your character test.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 5:22 PM


Are you claiming to be more of an expert on the region than PBH is?

Um, no. Not sure what you’re going on about. You accuse me of ignoring you even as you cite a post where I respond to you, and now you seem to want to imply that I claimed I was an expert on something. Maybe if we just tried to focus on the issues and not try to make this personal we could make more progress. Just a thought.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 5:25 PM

I agree. Just because I’m Russian and I speak the language doesn’t make me an authority on everything. We all speak English here and we may still disagree on what goes on in the US. However, I really wish people at least tried to study issues a bit. We cannot make decisions based on preconceived notions or Hollywood-like imaginary plots.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 5:29 PM

How does this immediately become equivalent to a Nuclear Armageddon?

The Cold War Soviet Union had a deeply conservative, institutional character. Putin, on the other hand, behaves more like a strongman, a warlord, and his rule is more personal in character, hence unpredictable. The U.S. and E.U. have similarly entered an era where rule of law, principle, or tradition means almost nothing, and where the behavior of the U.S. in particular–e.g. Egypt, Libya, Syria, and now Ukraine–has become arbitrary, capricious, short-sighted, and very nearly lawless, and by lawless I refer to drone strike assassinations, mass surveillance of U.S. citizens, the training of Jihadists and support for the Muslim Brotherhood.

Reasonable people can disagree on this of course. But I would argue the world is far, far more dangerous place than it was in the 70s or 80s when there were two superpowers.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 5:33 PM

You loves you some one world governance.

Murphy9 on April 26, 2014 at 5:38 PM

Casuist, again, I really fail to see logic there. Response to a military intervention is not equivalent to nation-building. Do we not react to military annexations? What else do we not react to? Why do we need the State Department? I think we should at least discuss that.

I think that the situation is not as dire. Putin may not be as conservative whatever that means. However, the Russian “elite” is not like the Soviet elite in other ways that are good for us. For example, their children mostly get their education in the West, primarily in the UK. They have real estate in Europe and Miami.

Do you know a fun fact? Lots of website are now banned in Russia. You know which one is unofficially filtered by many Russian ISPs? Real estate info in Miami-Dade county, FL. Guess why. We’re not talking about North Korean fanatics who are prepared to never leave their “paradise”. We’re talking people who understand very well what West has to offer. I cannot believe there is no way to exploit that.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 5:53 PM


Do you know a fun fact? Lots of website are now banned in Russia. You know which one is unofficially filtered by many Russian ISPs? Real estate info in Miami-Dade county, FL. Guess why. We’re not talking about North Korean fanatics who are prepared to never leave their “paradise”. We’re talking people who understand very well what West has to offer. I cannot believe there is no way to exploit that.

OK. Granted. Soft power, our diplomatic corps call what you describe provided that I ready you correctly. I could support its limited use as an expression of Western disapproval in this case. What I cannot support is a rogue general–Breedlove–calling for boots on the ground in Ukraine, and Obama-Kerry-Hegal posting additional aircraft and airborne troops to e.g. Poland, or deploying Aegis class destroyers to the Black Sea as a “show of force” or something. Would prefer not that, and not for this. If the Russian oligarchs are as soft and corrupt as you imply why don’t we just offer them generous retirement packages in homes on Malibu made over to look like dachas on the Volga or something?

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 6:03 PM

To be honest I don’t care much about NATO. And neither does Obama, ironically. Yet you still want to support Obama because NATO!?

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 4:33 PM

I don’t really want to support Obama at all.

However, the people saying we have no interests in anything that happens in Europe or Asia do not understand that one of the cornerstones of the economy and prosperity we currently enjoy is due to the peace we keep in Europe and Asia. Because of our provocative posture of weakness, that is beginning to unravel. Japan is not building up their military and shifting assets into the Ryukyu Islands for fun; they’re facing a very real threat of invasion from China.

As for ZeroHedge, I read them too. They are a great economics blog and I’ve learned a lot from reading them. The problem is they have zero credibility on foreign politics. They’ve been screaming that Israel and the US are plotting an invasion of Iran for as long as I’ve read them; no such invasion has happened. They’ve also made the claim that the uprising was a long-standing plot of Obama’s to take over Ukraine; except no one eating up this propaganda ever stops to think that Obama gave up our missile shield to try to make friends with Putin.

If Putin wanted peace, he could very easily have some meaningless diplomatic summit with Obama over Ukraine, and he would instantly get to absorb Ukraine with even verbal criticism from the west.

The bottom line is that ZH is a libertarian blog and libertarians have a very simple view of foreign policy – if it’s happening outside the US borders, they’re not interested and it’s probably all America’s fault anyway. Worse, the commenters in that place are constantly spewing vile anti-semitism and insisting that every bad thing that happens in the world has been masterminded by the CIA and is a “distraction.” Don’t be fooled and don’t buy into it.

Doomberg on April 26, 2014 at 6:06 PM


If Putin wanted peace, he could very easily have some meaningless diplomatic summit with Obama over Ukraine, and he would instantly get to absorb Ukraine with even verbal criticism from the west.

If only! But didn’t we already have our meaningless summit in Geneva? All sides still staring at each like the closing scene of The Good, The Bad, and The Progressives. How many more meaningless summits do you think we will need?

Yes, I’m a libertarian, with all that that implies, though I tend to vote Republican because reasons. Could not bring myself to vote for Romney, however.

casuist on April 26, 2014 at 6:23 PM

I am against this type of show of force as well for two reasons. One is I, like you, am against the war. The other one is: Obama is against the war and will not use those ships anyway, AND THE RUSSIANS KNOW IT. It is completely counter-productive, and literally makes the US more of a running joke. I read Russian forums, too, and one thing that has been quite disturbing is that there used to be a lot of anti-American sentiments, where people would blame the US for all sorts of crazy stuff. Now people laugh at the US and call it impotent.

The problem isn’t just with the US. Just yesterday, if I am not mistaken, Polish (wait for it) apple producers have issued a statement to the effect of “Sure, do whatever so long as it doesn’t affect apple exports. 85% of what we sell goes to Russia.” Reflect a bit on where we are right now. Sure, we’ll support freedom and resist aggressors unless it hurts our apple exports.

No, we don’t need wars. But the status-quo is not agreeable either. The US should find to lead the world to developing a reasonable response and implementing it.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 7:10 PM

Lithuania has a border with Kaliningrad, which is Russian territory.

Hey, if Russia doesn’t have to recognize the territorial integrity of other states, why should Ed recognize their exclave?

(But, yeah, seriously, pretty big miss there, especially since Kaliningrad has traditionally had one of the highest military densities in not only Russia, but in Europe in general.)

calbear on April 26, 2014 at 7:28 PM

The US has just moved troops into Latvia yesterday, part of NATO’s effort to bolster confidence

Less troops than Reid and Obama moved against Cliven Bundy.

VorDaj on April 26, 2014 at 7:33 PM

You don’t have to know a whole lot about Kaliningrad and stuff so long as you have enough clichés to throw as “analysis”.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 7:38 PM

Less troops than Reid and Obama moved against Cliven Bundy. — VorDaj on April 26, 2014 at 7:33 PM

Less than the 900+ Obama took to his last EU confab. Less than the 800+ that Xlinton used to burn the Branch Davidians at Waco.

Toocon on April 26, 2014 at 8:01 PM

Lithuania has a much smaller Russian minority, but also does not share a border with Russia —

Actually, Lithuania does share a border with Russia … little Russia, home of Kaliningrad.

MaxMBJ on April 26, 2014 at 8:26 PM

Russia today is the only news source I can trust

redyoshii on April 26, 2014 at 8:37 PM

Regardless of how many ethnic Russians these former Soviet states might have, the point here is that they are in fact independent countries. Putin is threatening to take this to a new level and I am not sure he fully appreciates the risks. Or, he does and assumes that even if he starts trouble with a NATO member, we won’t do anything about it. But if that’s the case, then NATO would cease to exist. So, Putin might be playing a dangerous game of chess when perhaps he should have learned poker.

WestVirginiaRebel on April 26, 2014 at 8:56 PM

are the professional provocateurs being directed by Victoria Nuland?

avi natan on April 26, 2014 at 9:32 PM

If if the United States Government wanted to invade Ukraine under the pretext of (insert stupid reason), it is over $17 trillion in debt with an exhausted military. In what world is it a good idea to go traipsing about flippantly causing trouble for no good reason?

Anyone who thinks its a good idea to keep sending the US Military on overseas adventures cannot claim to be “conservative”. It’s time that people who have this worldview admit that they are Progressive Leftists.

Another Libertarian on April 26, 2014 at 10:14 PM

PBH writes:

…I really fail to see logic there. Response to a military intervention is not equivalent to nation-building. Do we not react to military annexations? What else do we not react to? Why do we need the State Department? I think we should at least discuss that.

Perhaps the best response is to do nothing – that is, to implicitly accede to Russia’s takeover of Crimea, to try and soften the Russians’ stance towards the rest of Ukraine, and to get the Russian-American relationship back on an even keel.

Sanctions simply don’t work if the opposition we are trying to influence feels strongly about the issue we are trying to change, and there is every indication that Russians – not just Putin or the Russian leadership, but Russians in general – like and support the Russian takeover of Crimea. Sanctions rarely work even when a country is small like Cuba or Libya or Iraq. They’re not likely to work when the country is as large and important as Russia.

There are also too many other important issues that Russia and the U.S. need to work on for the U.S. to tie all its influence in that relationship into reversing the takeover of Crimea. We have Iran, China, the Arab Middle East. Is the U.S. really going to town over a place whose residents don’t appear that upset about their annexation? Do we really want to spend the next twenty or thirty years working to reverse this annexation by making it the centerpiece of Russian-American relations?

Pincher Martin on April 26, 2014 at 10:39 PM

Things appear to be moving more quickly that I imagined they would. I am not surprised Putin would want Latvia, but clearly he wants to act while the US is weak and suffering from stupid leadership. What I said more than a month ago, still applies I believe:

If Latvia is invaded by Russia to “protect Russian minorities” and connect the main of Russia to Kaliningrad, NATO — i.e., the US — is highly unlikely to respond militarily.

I remember years ago (circa 2006) on a business trip to Riga, Latvia, I asked a Latvian if he feared Russian invasion. He thought the question was ridiculous. I wonder how he’d answer now.

Nomennovum on March 10, 2014 at 10:21 AM

Our little cypher in the White House is digging us a very deep hole.

Nomennovum on April 26, 2014 at 10:58 PM

Next up Lithuania?

Nomennovum on April 26, 2014 at 11:05 PM

Pincher Martin on April 26, 2014 at 10:39 PM

I share your skepticism regarding the effect of the sanctions against Cuba. However, you should be clear about what the Us has failed to achieve. It has failed to change the government. However, this isn’t the goal. The goal is to weaken Putin and make him less capable of presenting a real threat to his neighbors. That is a perfectly achievable goal.

PBH on April 26, 2014 at 11:45 PM

If Putin’s aim is to break up NATO this looks like a good time for it (Obama time).

BushyGreen on April 27, 2014 at 1:33 AM

PBH,

I share your skepticism regarding the effect of the sanctions against Cuba. However, you should be clear about what the Us has failed to achieve. It has failed to change the government. However, this isn’t the goal. The goal is to weaken Putin and make him less capable of presenting a real threat to his neighbors. That is a perfectly achievable goal.

I thought the goal you espoused was reversing the illegal annexation of Crimea.

If your goal is more opaque then that, then perhaps you should explain exactly what you mean. The mission to weaken Russia is rather vague. What’s the more concrete goal? In what way should we weaken it? Preventing the Russian elite from purchasing Miami vacation homes is not likely to do the trick.

Do you wish to punish Russia for Crimea? Do you wish to prevent further annexations of other territories in the future? Do you wish to keep Russia out of eastern Ukraine? What sanctions would you enact?

However you define the mission, you should also be aware that Russia will not sit idly by as we seek to weaken it, and they have the means to vex other U.S. geopolitical goals, such as preventing Iran from making a nuclear arsenal, helping our allies in the Middle East, and preventing turbulence in world energy markets.

Pincher Martin on April 27, 2014 at 1:41 AM

Sanctions almost never work. And even when they do work – as in the case of South Africa – it often takes decades for a breakthrough. So while it may feel good to talk about measured responses to the annexation of Crimea, I think that’s usually mealy-mouthed talk from people who simply don’t wish to admit that they have no adequate response to what has taken place, but still wish to register a firm complaint.

Russia is much, much weaker than the Soviet Union was in the eighties, and I don’t believe Putin wishes to escalate this much further. But the Russians feel they have interests in their region which the U.S. and Europe were not respecting, and their recent reaction to the overthrow of the pro-Russian president was in many ways an extreme response to slights against them that have been building up over the last decade – indeed, since before Putin was president. The expansion of NATO, Kosovo, Bush pushing a missile system even after Russia gave considerable help after 9/11, etc.

The U.S. is not obligated to care about Russian vanity, but it is obligated to consider Russian power. And that power – while dramatically diminished since the fall of the Soviet Union – is still considerable. As the U.S. and E.U. just discovered in Ukraine, Russia can respond to what it perceives as provocations in ways we in the West haven’t considered.

In the end, if Russia wants a fight, it will get more than it bargained for and the West will be triumphant again. But with so many other more pressing concerns in the world, it’s not a battle we in the West should relish engaging in.

Pincher Martin on April 27, 2014 at 2:01 AM

Lithuania has a much smaller Russian minority, but also does not share a border with Russia

I’d like to point out that Lithuania DOES have a border with Russia. It’s the enclave of Kaliningrad (Konigsberg)

JZITA on April 27, 2014 at 2:55 AM

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