I’m posting this report, not because I think anyone actually expected the Obama administration to abide by the requirements it set out for itself when devising this leviathan of a law (LOLz) — I mean, the thing is huge, and it would just be totally unreasonable to expect the administration to be able to churn out regulations and studies on time, every time, right? …Which is exactly my point. I’d just like to take this opportunity to once again highlight the practically unknowable degree to which Obama’s crowning legislative achievement is expanding our bureaucracy and its involvement in one-sixth of the United States’ economy, via the WFB:

The administration has failed to meet 44 statutory deadlines required under Obamacare, according to a new report by the Congressional Research Service (CRS).

The report, released on Monday, documents every provision with a specific deadline within the health care law and the administration’s actions taken as of April 15, 2014. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has missed more than half of the 83 deadlines mandated since March 2011. …

The secretary was one year and one month late in developing a plan to increase HHS’s Indian Health Service (IHS) by 500 positions. Due by June 21, 2010, HHS did not begin implementing a plan for a “skilled and culturally competent behavioral health workforce” for the agency until August 2011. …

The report details many lesser known provisions within Obamacare, including a required three year “Independence at Home demonstration” to test if “home-based care” can reduce hospital visits. HHS started the project four months past its deadline on Jan. 1, 2012. …

The report found six cases where it appears the administration has taken no action at all. The CRS could find “no public information” relating to a March 2012 mandate for health plans to “report on their efforts to improve health outcomes.”

And etcetera. The delays range from days to months to years, and the report isn’t even talking about the many unilaterally implemented delays to the law’s most fundamental parts like the employer mandate (the better to delay the politically inconvenient results, you know). This is just getting into the overwhelming bureaucratic weeds of ObamaCare’s regulatory minutiae — plenty of which are still being written.