Poll: Majority of Americans not too confident in Big Bang theory

posted at 4:41 pm on April 21, 2014 by Allahpundit

Alternate headline: “Blogger tries to liven up slow news day by starting culture-war food fight.”

See any trends in this AP data?

bb2

As you’d expect, phenomena that are personally observable, like cancer or mental illness, are more plausible to people. Global or cosmic phenomena like climate change and the Big Bang, where you’re forced to take the word of researchers, are more dubious — especially to religious believers, since claims at that scale implicate origins. Doubts spike about the Big Bang because any theory of origin is incomplete by definition; someone will always reply “but what came before that?” and the answer will always disappoint. Even so, though, The Atlantic notes a 2008 study that found skepticism of the Big Bang and evolution was higher in the U.S. than it is many other western countries despite the fact that Americans’ scientific knowledge generally is comparable to theirs. That’s probably a function of America being more religious.

There’s a partisan bias here too:

The poll highlights “the iron triangle of science, religion and politics,” said Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication…

Political and religious values were closely tied to views on science in the poll, with Democrats more apt than Republicans to express confidence in evolution, the Big Bang, the age of the Earth and climate change.

Confidence in evolution, the Big Bang, the age of the Earth and climate change decline sharply as faith in a supreme being rises, according to the poll. Likewise, those who regularly attend religious services or are evangelical Christians express much greater doubts about scientific concepts they may see as contradictory to their faith.

I can understand why religious belief would affect views of evolution, the Earth’s age, and the universe’s beginnings, but offhand not why it would affect views of climate change. That’s more a matter of correlation than causation, I take it — conservatives are more skeptical of climate change than liberals and conservatives are also more religious, so you see religion and climate skepticism overlap even though the former’s not really driving the latter.

One interesting outlier in the numbers above: Why is there so much public confidence in DNA? Granted, it’s a personal, not cosmic, phenomenon so people should be more willing to accept it, but it’s not directly observable the way the symptoms of cancer or mental illness are. I think there are two reasons for the buy-in. One: Everyone recognizes that children resemble their parents, physically and otherwise, so there are in fact observable “symptoms.” Science is always on stronger footing when it’s trying to explain something you’re seeing with your own eyes. Two: The insatiable public appetite for crime stories has made DNA familiar in a way that most biological concepts aren’t. When you see the villain of the week on “Law & Order” get life without parole because the DNA on the murder weapon could only be his in a population of seven billion, you’ll believe. Maybe that’s what global warmists should be doing with their time: “Climate Detectives” on Investigation Discovery. The polls will turn around in no time.


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Murphy9 on April 23, 2014 at 7:25 PM

I tried (and failed) to communicate the fact youself, and questionmark (and I’m sure others, present) on one side, and myself on the other, have a ‘conflicting’ interpretation of certain scripture passages within the Bible… I could have worded my 8:43 PM comment better, so I’ll accept responsibility for that. listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 3:58 PM

Your clarification is helpful, so please accept my apology for my reaction to your apparent claim that you didn’t believe the Bible.

Regarding your use of 2 Peter 3:9, note my emphasis: “The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.”

St. Peter is talking to believers. If the will of God is that everyone be saved, then the will of God in election is being thwarted wholesale.

Both “anyone” and “everyone” are included in “with you,” meaning -again- the believers he was addressing, and by extension all of the elect.

What’s “so hard to understand” is how signficant differences about the meanings of Biblical verses by different groups can be considered “adiaphora” by you when the RCC, to name one, disagrees with what you are saying.

Well, for example, there’s no biblical basis for priestly celibacy. So I am not biblically at odds with the RCC over that issue. It’s a matter of polity, and therefore, adiaphora.

I believe, with every RC, what the Apostles Creed says. So there is substantial agreement on matters of the basic, irreducible faith, which is substantive and not adiaphora.

Now to the matter of the reprobation of those not elect. 1 St. Peter 2:8, several translations:

New International Version
and, “A stone that causes people to stumble and a rock that makes them fall.” They stumble because they disobey the message–which is also what they were destined for.

New Living Translation
And, “He is the stone that makes people stumble, the rock that makes them fall.” They stumble because they do not obey God’s word, and so they meet the fate that was planned for them.

English Standard Version
and “A stone of stumbling, and a rock of offense.” They stumble because they disobey the word, as they were destined to do.

New American Standard Bible
and, “A STONE OF STUMBLING AND A ROCK OF OFFENSE”; for they stumble because they are disobedient to the word, and to this doom they were also appointed.

King James Bible
And a stone of stumbling, and a rock of offence, even to them which stumble at the word, being disobedient: whereunto also they were appointed.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
and A stone to stumble over, and a rock to trip over. They stumble because they disobey the message; they were destined for this.

International Standard Version
a stone they stumble over and a rock they trip on. They keep on stumbling because they disobey the word, as they were destined to do.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And a stone of stumbling, and a rock of scandal, to them who stumble at the word, neither do believe, whereunto also they are set.

ἐτέθησαν (etethēsan) occurs twice in the NT, here and in Acts 7:16, Douay-Rheims version: “And they were translated into Sichem, and were laid in the sepulchre, that Abraham bought for a sum of money of the sons of Hemor, the son of Sichem.”

It’s most often translated in this passages as laid, sometimes translated as placed. It’s where someone is put by someone else, in one instance a grave, in another instance among the reprobate.

If someone wants to explain this away and believe it means something that he wishes it meant, particularly in light of the passage from Ephesians cited above, that’s his prerogative. It doesn’t mean he’s a reprobate, it’s adiaphora. It’s not a part of the irreducible minimum of the faith.

Akzed on April 23, 2014 at 7:51 PM

And your point is…? thejackal on April 23, 2014 at 7:24 PM

Come on now, it’s pretty clear isn’t it?

Akzed on April 23, 2014 at 7:52 PM

To be clear, non-nonpartisan on April 23, 2014 at 3:15 PM said

What’s “so hard to understand” is how signficant differences about the meanings of Biblical verses by different groups can be considered “adiaphora” by you when the RCC, to name one, disagrees with what you are saying.

Akzed on April 23, 2014 at 8:04 PM

I tried (and failed) to communicate the fact youself, and questionmark (and I’m sure others, present) on one side, and myself on the other, have a ‘conflicting’ interpretation of certain scripture passages within the Bible… I could have worded my 8:43 PM comment better, so I’ll accept responsibility for that.

listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 3:58 PM

.
Your clarification is helpful, so please accept my apology for my reaction to your apparent claim that you didn’t believe the Bible.

Regarding your use of 2 Peter 3:9, note my emphasis: “The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.”

St. Peter is talking to believers. If the will of God is that everyone be saved, then the will of God in election is being thwarted wholesale.

Both “anyone” and “everyone” are included in “with you,” meaning -again- the believers he was addressing, and by extension all of the elect.

Akzed on April 23, 2014 at 7:51 PM

.
Apology accepted … eventually.
I’ll have to hold it against you for at least a week.
.
You’ve cut-to-the-chase with the rest of your reply. This is where I disagree with a MULTITUDE of my fellow Christian brethren, so you’re in good company.
I reject the premise that God is … (drum roll, please) … IN CONTROL … here in this earth, right now.

I believe many BAD things happen, that are not God’s will, and many GOOD things don’t happen that are His will.
I believe God is not in total control of what happens in this earth, right now. He will take control at the Second Coming.

This is the single biggest subject of debate (argument, actually) that I’ve had with other Christians from every Denomination.

For what it’s worth, I’ve also run into Christians from most Denominations, who agree with me on this subject, but they’re in the distinct minority.

.

listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 8:23 PM

Your clarification is helpful, so please accept my apology for my reaction to your apparent claim that you didn’t believe the Bible.

I am glad you said this to l2g. When you had said he didn’t believe the Bible, it was throwing me off.

Well, for example, there’s no biblical basis for priestly celibacy. So I am not biblically at odds with the RCC over that issue. It’s a matter of polity, and therefore, adiaphora.

I believe, with every RC, what the Apostles Creed says. So there is substantial agreement on matters of the basic, irreducible faith, which is substantive and not adiaphora.

If someone wants to explain this away and believe it means something that he wishes it meant, particularly in light of the passage from Ephesians cited above, that’s his prerogative. It doesn’t mean he’s a reprobate, it’s adiaphora. It’s not a part of the irreducible minimum of the faith.

Akzed on April 23, 2014 at 7:51 PM

I agree with your general sentiment here. Previously in our discussion, I was referring to some interpretational disputes that the Catholic church, to name one among many, would say are more than mere adiaphora.

non-nonpartisan on April 23, 2014 at 8:45 PM

Your clarification is helpful, so please accept my apology for my reaction to your apparent claim that you didn’t believe the Bible.

Akzed on April 23, 2014 at 7:51 PM

.
I am glad you said this to l2g. When you had said he didn’t believe the Bible, it was throwing me off.

non-nonpartisan on April 23, 2014 at 8:45 PM

.
Actually, I’m an undercover Satanist, here to spy on all you Christians . . . . . . . . . and I fooled everyone !
.
(maniacal laughter, with delay-echo effect)

HA HA HA HA HA HA HAAAA,… HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA

listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 9:31 PM

listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 9:31 PM

I knew it. I just KNEW IT!

Murphy9 on April 23, 2014 at 10:03 PM

listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 9:31 PM

.
I knew it. I just KNEW IT!

Murphy9 on April 23, 2014 at 10:03 PM

.
Yes … but you’re too late . . . . . my evil plans can’t be stopped now !
.
I AM INVINCIBLE, AND FURTHER MORE . . . . . what ? … aw, crap … my wife says “time to go to bed.”

I guess I might be a little “whipped.”

listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 10:09 PM

It’s funny, I can’t perceive people arguing over the Bible any differently that I would people arguing over Lord of the Rings or Breaking Bad or something. It’s just people getting wrapped up in their personal view of their favourite story. It really is interesting to spectate when you look at it like that.

powerfactor on April 23, 2014 at 11:02 PM

You’ve cut-to-the-chase with the rest of your reply. This is where I disagree with a MULTITUDE of my fellow Christian brethren, so you’re in good company.
I reject the premise that God is … (drum roll, please) … IN CONTROL … here in this earth, right now.
I believe many BAD things happen, that are not God’s will, and many GOOD things don’t happen that are His will.
I believe God is not in total control of what happens in this earth, right now. He will take control at the Second Coming.
This is the single biggest subject of debate (argument, actually) that I’ve had with other Christians from every Denomination.
For what it’s worth, I’ve also run into Christians from most Denominations, who agree with me on this subject, but they’re in the distinct minority.
.
listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 8:23 PM

Please accept my apologies in advance if any of this comes across as contentious. I appreciate the attitude you have always displayed in your posts.

Why do you believe the things you state here, and specifically, why do you believe God will take control at the second coming?

questionmark on April 23, 2014 at 11:11 PM

You’ve cut-to-the-chase with the rest of your reply. This is where I disagree with a MULTITUDE of my fellow Christian brethren, so you’re in good company.
I reject the premise that God is … (drum roll, please) … IN CONTROL … here in this earth, right now.

I believe many BAD things happen, that are not God’s will, and many GOOD things don’t happen that are His will.
I believe God is not in total control of what happens in this earth, right now. He will take control at the Second Coming.

This is the single biggest subject of debate (argument, actually) that I’ve had with other Christians from every Denomination.

For what it’s worth, I’ve also run into Christians from most Denominations, who agree with me on this subject, but they’re in the distinct minority.

.

listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 8:23 PM

Of course you are entitled to believe whatever you want and I can see you love the Lord and are sincere in your beliefs. But I have 3 comments.

God has an ordaining Will and a permitting Will. Some things God chooses to do and some things He allows and permits. But He is in control of it all here on earth. His reasons for allowing some things we do not understand fully now, but we know that man’s sin has something to do with it. Even the suffering of innocents who are not directly related to a particular sin. We trust in God’s love and mercy and justice. Even if we do not understand it all, He is still in control on earth.

1 Corinthians: “For now we see only a reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.”

And Isaiah 55: “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways,” declares the LORD.”

Traditional Christianity (as you know) has always believed this, through Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture.

Psalm 135:6: “The LORD does whatever pleases him, in the heavens and on the earth, in the seas and all their depths.”

Matthew 10:29-30: “Are not two sparrows sold for a small coin? Yet not one of them falls to the ground without your Father’s knowledge. Even all the hairs of your head are counted.”

At the Second Coming, there will be a new heaven and a new earth. There will be a different order on earth and an end to suffering. God is in control now, but He will exercise that control more obviously at the Second Coming. His permitting Will will not be as permitting then.

Elisa on April 23, 2014 at 11:39 PM

Actually, I’m an undercover Satanist, here to spy on all you Christians . . . . . . . . . and I fooled everyone !
.
(maniacal laughter, with delay-echo effect)

HA HA HA HA HA HA HAAAA,… HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA

listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 9:31 PM

What have your observations about us taught you?

non-nonpartisan on April 24, 2014 at 12:05 AM

It’s funny, I can’t perceive people arguing over the Bible any differently that I would people arguing over Lord of the Rings or Breaking Bad or something. It’s just people getting wrapped up in their personal view of their favourite story. It really is interesting to spectate when you look at it like that.

powerfactor on April 23, 2014 at 11:02 PM

So you haven’t always spectated in such a manner?

I myself try to stick to what I know through experience, and keep my personal speculations about the nature of reality separate. My life seems less stressful this way. =)

non-nonpartisan on April 24, 2014 at 12:20 AM

50% of Americans are below the median intelligence level.

crosspatch on April 24, 2014 at 5:01 AM

listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 8:23 PM

.
Please accept my apologies in advance if any of this comes across as contentious. I appreciate the attitude you have always displayed in your posts.

questionmark on April 23, 2014 at 11:11 PM

.
( b l u s h ) . . . . . dittos what I said to Akzed at 8:23 PM (the first two lines).

listens2glenn on April 24, 2014 at 8:19 AM

Why do you believe the things you state here, and specifically, why do you believe God will take control at the second coming?

questionmark on April 23, 2014 at 11:11 PM

.
It started before I knew the LORD . . . . . all of the explanations for “why bad things happen to good people” that I’d heard throughout my childhood, just seem “right”; or more to the point, they all seemed like they were a flat-out “dodge” … or a “brush-off”.
After I accepted Jesus as Savior and LORD and began to read the Bible for myself, I concluded that all of these “explanations” I’d heard throughout childhood were vain attempts on the part Christians, to formulate or ‘conjure’ explanations that are “no-fault”.
“No-fault” explanations, just like “no-fault” insurance.

Most Christians are smart enough to know that we can’t blame God for “defaulting” (being in the wrong) on or about anything … at least, not ‘out loud’, anyway (I believe a lot of these same Christians DO blame God, in secret, for some things).
BUT . . . . . no one wants to take the blame themselves for anything “gone wrong”, either.
So, we have a quandary … can’t blame God, cant blame ourselves … what to do?
I know … we’ll just say that “it must have been ‘God’s will’ for this to have happened, for some reason that only He knows, and we’re incapable of understanding.”
There, you see? … Nobody’s at fault !
You’re not (openly) blaming God for a “fault”, and you’re not blaming yourself or anyone else for being at fault in the matter.

There you have it … “no-fault explanations” for why bad things or ‘tragedies’ happen to good people. Or why we fail to even attempt genuine evangelism.

listens2glenn on April 24, 2014 at 9:04 AM

Correction :

. . . all of the explanations for “why bad things happen to good people” that I’d heard throughout my childhood, just *DIDN’T* seem “right”;

( s i g h )

listens2glenn on April 24, 2014 at 9:08 AM

. . . . . why do you believe God will take control at the second coming?

questionmark on April 23, 2014 at 11:11 PM

.
Apologies … I missed answering this in my 9:04 comment.

The first Adam was given a ‘lease’ to the earth, after that he was created. I believe that is what the parable is describing in Matt chapter 21, Mark chapter 12, and Luke chapter 20.

That lease isn’t quite over … yet.
.
When Jesus returns, it will be.

Then we’ll have the 1000 year reign of Jesus Christ over the earth. He will be here in body, and there will be a ‘one world government’ that is an absolute Monarchy … His.

listens2glenn on April 24, 2014 at 5:10 PM

So you haven’t always spectated in such a manner?

I myself try to stick to what I know through experience, and keep my personal speculations about the nature of reality separate. My life seems less stressful this way. =)

non-nonpartisan on April 24, 2014 at 12:20 AM

It’s just that we’re kind of conditioned by society to tolerate religion, so we don’t even bat an eye when someone uses the Bible as a basis for their absolute unwavering belief in angels and demons.

But when someone uses Beowulf as a basis for their absolute and unwavering belief in trolls, they’re certifiably insane. It’s quite a lightbulb moment when you realize the two are fundamentally the exact same.

Of course I’ve always spectated, but whereas before it was with derision and frustration, now it’s with awe and fascination at the quirky irrationality of the human race and our brains that are so awesome in some ways, yet so hilariously bad in others. Myself included, of course.

powerfactor on April 24, 2014 at 5:20 PM

Aren’t Big Bang believers just creationists in white coats?

virgo on April 25, 2014 at 12:40 AM

. . . all of the explanations for “why bad things happen to good people” that I’d heard throughout my childhood, just *DIDN’T* seem “right”;
( s i g h )
listens2glenn on April 24, 2014 at 9:08 AM

listens2glenn on April 24, 2014 at 5:10 PM

Please correct me if I’m wrong, but what I read here seems to indicate at least some reliance on the veracity of scripture-and less on the way people have attempted to explain it.

If indeed that is the case, I agree with you that attempts to explain God’s work are often too simplistic.

However, that puts the onus upon us to seek better understanding of God’s word, because in it HE (not men trying to “explain”) declares over and over again that HE is fully in control of what happens, causing men to do good and allowing them to do what we call “evil.”

Elisa on April 23, 2014 at 11:39 PM

shows just a couple of the multitude of instances in scripture that God makes such claims. To deny that God is in control is, therefore, to deny scripture, which must, in turn, undermine everything you claim to believe regarding Jesus, and God.

All that said, the following is what I think I see in you, and would desire very much to encourage (not to mention what I hope will be seen and encouraged in me also):

Seek ye the Lord while he may be found,
call ye upon him while he is near:
let the wicked forsake his way,
and the unrighteous man his thoughts:
and let him return unto the Lord,
and he will have mercy upon him;
and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon.
For my thoughts are not your thoughts,
neither are your ways my ways, saith the Lord.
For as the heavens are higher than the earth,
so are my ways higher than your ways,
and my thoughts than your thoughts.

For as the rain cometh down, and the snow from heaven,
and returneth not thither, but watereth the earth,
and maketh it bring forth and bud,
that it may give seed to the sower, and bread to the eater:
so shall my word be that goeth forth out of my mouth:
it shall not return unto me void,
but it shall accomplish that which I please,
and it shall prosper in the thing whereto I sent it.
For ye shall go out with joy, and be led forth with peace:
the mountains and the hills shall break forth before you into singing,
and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands.
Instead of the thorn shall come up the fir tree,
and instead of the brier shall come up the myrtle tree:
and it shall be to the Lord for a name,
for an everlasting sign that shall not be cut off.

Isaiah 55:6-13

questionmark on April 27, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Why do you believe the things you state here, and specifically, why do you believe God will take control at the second coming?

questionmark on April 23, 2014 at 11:11 PM

.
It started before I knew the LORD . . . . . all of the explanations for “why bad things happen to good people” that I’d heard throughout my childhood, just seem “right”; or more to the point, they all seemed like they were a flat-out “dodge” … or a “brush-off”.
After I accepted Jesus as Savior and LORD and began to read the Bible for myself, I concluded that all of these “explanations” I’d heard throughout childhood were vain attempts on the part Christians, to formulate or ‘conjure’ explanations that are “no-fault”.
“No-fault” explanations, just like “no-fault” insurance.

Most Christians are smart enough to know that we can’t blame God for “defaulting” (being in the wrong) on or about anything … at least, not ‘out loud’, anyway (I believe a lot of these same Christians DO blame God, in secret, for some things).
BUT . . . . . no one wants to take the blame themselves for anything “gone wrong”, either.
So, we have a quandary … can’t blame God, cant blame ourselves … what to do?
I know … we’ll just say that “it must have been ‘God’s will’ for this to have happened, for some reason that only He knows, and we’re incapable of understanding.”
There, you see? … Nobody’s at fault !
You’re not (openly) blaming God for a “fault”, and you’re not blaming yourself or anyone else for being at fault in the matter.

There you have it … “no-fault explanations” for why bad things or ‘tragedies’ happen to good people. Or why we fail to even attempt genuine evangelism.

listens2glenn on April 24, 2014 at 9:04 AM
.

Please correct me if I’m wrong, but what I read here seems to indicate at least some reliance on the veracity of scripture-and less on the way people have attempted to explain it.

If indeed that is the case, I agree with you that attempts to explain God’s work are often too simplistic.

However, that puts the onus upon us to seek better understanding of God’s word, because in it HE (not men trying to “explain”) declares over and over again that HE is fully in control of what happens, causing men to do good and allowing them to do what we call “evil.”

questionmark on April 27, 2014 at 1:25 PM

.
“Reliance on the veracity of scripture” is still subject to each individual’s interpretation. Both of us claim to be “relying on the veracity of scripture.” But one, or BOTH of us must be missing it in some fashion, to arrive at two conflicting interpretations.

You have stated that you believe the Bible clearly says God “declares over and over again that HE is fully in control of what happens, causing men to do good and allowing them to do what we call ‘evil’.”
That is equivalent to saying ‘everything that happens is God’s will, because if it were not God’s will it wouldn’t have happened.’ I am rejecting that interpretation outright, as the truth of the Bible.

There are multiple scriptures that are (in my view) misinterpreted to arrive at this conclusion, but I can boil it down to three in particular that are used the most.

[Rom 8:28], [II Cor 12: 7-10], and the ENTIRE book of “Job”.

If God is in complete control, then we are little (if anything) more than puppets. If that’s all we are, then we have no … CHOICE … over whether we are saved from hell-fire or not.

Spending time trying to ‘evangelize’ people, to get them to turn (a decision, on their part) towards God and begin a relationship with Him, is a waste of time, because God has already determined who will be saved, and who won’t.

That, I believe is contrary to the whole New Testament.

listens2glenn on April 29, 2014 at 12:47 PM

Actually, I’m an undercover Satanist, here to spy on all you Christians . . . . . . . . . and I fooled everyone !
.
(maniacal laughter, with delay-echo effect)

HA HA HA HA HA HA HAAAA,… HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA

listens2glenn

on April 23, 2014 at 9:31 PM

.
What have your observations about us taught you?

non-nonpartisan on April 24, 2014 at 12:05 AM

.
That we still have a lot of “miles to maturity” ahead of us …
I coulda’ swore it was going to be before that last mile marker … : (

listens2glenn on April 29, 2014 at 4:27 PM

listens2glenn on April 23, 2014 at 8:23 PM

.
Of course you are entitled to believe whatever you want and I can see you love the Lord and are sincere in your beliefs. But I have 3 comments.

God has an ordaining Will and a permitting Will. Some things God chooses to do and some things He allows and permits. But He is in control of it all here on earth. His reasons for allowing some things we do not understand fully now, but we know that man’s sin has something to do with it. Even the suffering of innocents who are not directly related to a particular sin. We trust in God’s love and mercy and justice. Even if we do not understand it all, He is still in control on earth.

1 Corinthians: “For now we see only a reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.”

And Isaiah 55: “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways,” declares the LORD.”

Traditional Christianity (as you know) has always believed this, through Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture.

Psalm 135:6: “The LORD does whatever pleases him, in the heavens and on the earth, in the seas and all their depths.”

Matthew 10:29-30: “Are not two sparrows sold for a small coin? Yet not one of them falls to the ground without your Father’s knowledge. Even all the hairs of your head are counted.”

At the Second Coming, there will be a new heaven and a new earth. There will be a different order on earth and an end to suffering. God is in control now, but He will exercise that control more obviously at the Second Coming. His permitting Will will not be as permitting then.

Elisa on April 23, 2014 at 11:39 PM

.
What is your basis for trying to convince people to accept Jesus Christ as LORD and Savior ?

listens2glenn on April 29, 2014 at 4:54 PM

Elisa on April 23, 2014 at 11:39 PM

.
What is your basis for trying to convince people to accept Jesus Christ as LORD and Savior ?

listens2glenn on April 29, 2014 at 4:54 PM

Because it is truth. And truth is very dear to me. Jesus told Pilate He came here to “testify to the truth.”

And Scripture and oral Tradition tell us God wants us to spread His truth and evangelize. We are Christ’s hands and feet here on earth. Some He calls directly and some He calls through us. He calls all men to Himself.

And the love and faith He has placed in my heart would burst and overflow if I was silent and did not testify to His truth when called upon to do so. When it comes up in my presence, even if it’s in my internet presence. lol

I am quite sure that many other Christians here share that with me. And that is why they also speak up for His truth or pray for these conversations that all come to His truth.

I am not alone. I, like all those fellow Christians, including you, are cogs in a wheel.

Matthew 27:

“Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the holy Spirit,teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.”

That was the mission He gave to His Apostles. That was the mission and faith passed on to us from the Apostles.

Elisa on April 30, 2014 at 11:07 AM

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