Just a reminder: You’re old

posted at 4:41 pm on April 15, 2014 by Allahpundit

To cleanse the palate, a viral sensation from the Fine brothers that’s equal parts adorable and you-don’t-have-terribly-long-to-live. I admire their restraint in not pulling this stunt with a CD player, just to heighten the viewer’s mortality panic. I got my first player for Christmas as a kid; my first CD was, of course, “Slippery When Wet,” because the sound quality of cassettes simply couldn’t do justice to an intricate tune like “You Give Love a Bad Name.” Presumably these kids could figure out a CD player based on their passing acquaintance with Blu-Rays, but that won’t last much longer in an age of Netflix and iTunes. Frankly, I figure we’re maybe 15 years away from being able to replicate this video with books instead of Walkmans.

Say what you will about the lowly portable cassette player, but all it did was destroy your hearing, not melt your brain.


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I remember rotary-dial telephones and when TV networks bragged about their programs “in living color”.

Bitter Clinger on April 15, 2014 at 4:46 PM

When I was a kid our video games had 8-bits. You also had only 30 channels on cable and just one HBO. And you have to program the VCR itself if you weren’t at home. Then if you wanted to call you had to use a pay phone.

You know….it’s doesn’t sound the same like my parents did it.

Oil Can on April 15, 2014 at 4:46 PM

You should see my tape and CD collections. A whole wall.

Good Lt on April 15, 2014 at 4:47 PM

HA! My very first real tape was the Beach Boys…on 8-track, and I got it when my older sister joined the Columbia Record Club, it was the free one you get when you join so she let me choose the title.

Now I’m loading the hard drive on my truck with 5,000 songs and using a touchscreen to access them; I’m old but hanging in there.

Bishop on April 15, 2014 at 4:48 PM

Hey, I had the Discman with the anti-skip function, which meant your CD only skipped every other step.

portlandon on April 15, 2014 at 4:48 PM

When I was a kid our video games had 8-bits. Oil Can on April 15, 2014 at 4:46 PM

When I was a kid our games were made of wood and leather.

Akzed on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

When I was a kid our video games had 8-bits. You also had only 30 channels on cable and just one HBO. And you have to program the VCR itself if you weren’t at home. Then if you wanted to call you had to use a pay phone.

You know….it’s doesn’t sound the same like my parents did it.

Oil Can on April 15, 2014 at 4:46 PM

When I was a kid, “cable” was something that helped hold a bridge up. And VCR’s and microwave ovens were still science fiction items.

Bitter Clinger on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

How long before kids look at the iPad the same way???…

PatriotRider on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

Only one knew what it was, and the rest couldn’t figure it out, with things like AM. FM, Play, etc, on the outside, plus not a one got the door open? Wow, I can’t believe schools beat the inquisitiveness out of kids so early in life now.

Then again, maybe the real story is the pre-production and on the cutting room floor.

Dusty on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

Yes, I feel old, but those kids are darn cute.

SailorMark on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

Make them watch TV without a remote. That’ll learn ‘em.

Flange on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

Craig power play 8 track

Sven on April 15, 2014 at 4:51 PM

Our very first video game system, Pong and Wallbreaker, played that game for hours and hours and hours and hours.

Beep BOOP Beep Beep Beep BOOP Beep Beep BOOP BOOP

Bishop on April 15, 2014 at 4:53 PM

Still Rockin my Realistic Nova ’20 Hi-Fi Stereo Headphones.

portlandon on April 15, 2014 at 4:53 PM

These kids will do well in the age of the cell phone economy.

Murphy9 on April 15, 2014 at 4:53 PM

Still running my 1980 Yamaha amp.

Sven on April 15, 2014 at 4:55 PM

Want to see their heads explode? Give them 8 tracks.

Erich66 on April 15, 2014 at 4:55 PM

My son got a stack of my vinyl and played them at 78. When I asked what the hell he was doing. He said he was fast forwarding.

rhombus on April 15, 2014 at 4:55 PM

Hey you kids, get of my damn lawn!

rbj on April 15, 2014 at 4:56 PM

Bishop on April 15, 2014 at 4:53 PM

Yes, but nothing beat a few years later when the original arcade version of Asteroids appeared. Never cared much for Space Invaders, but ‘Stroids was far out!

SailorMark on April 15, 2014 at 4:56 PM

I still have a cassette player and cassettes too ,
IN MY CAR :O

burrata on April 15, 2014 at 4:57 PM

When I was a kid, “cable” was something that helped hold a bridge up. And VCR’s and microwave ovens were still science fiction items.

Bitter Clinger on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

You got me thinking. What is the tech divided in this country? 75? 80? 85? Above what age do the majority of people in that age group don’t know how to use a computer.

My mom is 74 and she can sort use a computer.

Oil Can on April 15, 2014 at 4:58 PM

Sorry, but these kids are idiots.

DJ Rick on April 15, 2014 at 4:59 PM

[Bitter Clinger on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM]

When I was a kid, “radio” was … something that everyone had had for decades already, and even then it was still not small enough to put in your pocket, though, it was transistor-ized by then.

Oooh, and it had an earpiece so you could try to sneak it into school to listen to the World Series in the afternoon.

Dusty on April 15, 2014 at 4:59 PM

In 1981 my older brother handed me down his old 8 track tape player. My mom took me to Licorice Pizza and I bought Van Halen 1 and AC/DC Back In Black. They weren’t stocking very many 8 tracks at that point, but they had the two I wanted. Still one of the greatest days of my life.

Mark1971 on April 15, 2014 at 5:00 PM

Am I the only one who noticed that the younger the child the more intelligent the comments were? Makes me think there is something about the dumbing down of the next generation is technology driven.

Using a Walkman is “so hard?” Really? Coming from snarky 13-year- old likely to adapt and grow an extra couple fingers to better text, that’s absurd.

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 5:00 PM

Yes, but nothing beat a few years later when the original arcade version of Asteroids appeared. Never cared much for Space Invaders, but ‘Stroids was far out!

SailorMark on April 15, 2014 at 4:56 PM

I got to be pretty good at Space Invaders. Asteroids, on the other hand, ……not so much.

Bitter Clinger on April 15, 2014 at 5:01 PM

Need to show them 8-Track!

I still have a Walkman. Use it record meetings and courses so I can walk and study at the same time.

But this is why we should be utilizing technology more in education. Go with touchscreens, animated lessons, and NLP. Cut out all the social engineering. Our kids could do it!

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 5:01 PM

Carburetors forever. \m/

Spannerhead on April 15, 2014 at 5:02 PM

dumb. while I don’t use headphones, headphones are a status symbol, at least here in DC.

WhatSlushfund on April 15, 2014 at 5:02 PM

I wonder if these kids know how to use those paper Yellow Books to lookup a phone number ?

burrata on April 15, 2014 at 5:03 PM

My mom is 74 and she can sort use a computer.

Oil Can on April 15, 2014 at 4:58 PM

My dad is 83 (late having kids) but he’s a whiz at computers.

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 5:03 PM

Sorry, but these kids are idiots.

DJ Rick on April 15, 2014 at 4:59 PM

Pretty sure they’re hamming it up a bit for the camera. (At least I hope so.)

SailorMark on April 15, 2014 at 5:03 PM

You got me thinking. What is the tech divided in this country? 75? 80? 85? Above what age do the majority of people in that age group don’t know how to use a computer.

My mom is 74 and she can sort use a computer.

Oil Can on April 15, 2014 at 4:58 PM

Not sure. My parents are 73 and 70, respectively, and have never owned a computer. One of their close friends, in the same age bracket, has one and is on Facebook every day.

Bitter Clinger on April 15, 2014 at 5:04 PM

AP I’m so old I remember when a Panasonic 8 track player was all the rage. I’m so old I remember when the entire typing class went ape because we were getting Selectric typewriters. I remember spirographs, the real clackers, water wiggles, and riding a bike without a helmet. Someday when kids of the future see this video they will laugh and the young lady in it will be old and gray. The wheel turns for all of us.

neyney on April 15, 2014 at 5:04 PM

Sorry, but these kids are idiots.

DJ Rick on April 15, 2014 at 4:59 PM

So then smart guy…shoe a horse, weave a basket, and make a stool with hand tools.

Be nice to these kids, they will be beat you in your sleep when you are in the old age home.

Oil Can on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

When I was a kid, “cable” was something that helped hold a bridge up. And VCR’s and microwave ovens were still science fiction items.

Bitter Clinger on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

No kidding. TV was 3 or 4 air channels when I was a kid depending on the weather and the amount of aluminum foil you could rig over the antennae and cassettes were the size of yesterday’s vcr tapes. Audio cassettes didn’t get down to Walkman size until later.

HotAirian on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

I hate the expression, but if anything screams “first world problem,” this is it.

bobs1196 on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

Up until 3 years ago I had a truck with a factory cassette deck. 1998 Toyota. I had one of those cassette adapters to play my Mp3 player through the tape deck.

Mark1971 on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

Say what you will about the lowly portable cassette player, but all it did was destroy your hearing, not melt your brain.

The kids feel sorry for us old-timers.

I feel sorry for them.

itsnotaboutme on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

Opening those things was tough even when we were in the 80′s. It’s one of those products that was universally dissed, but everyone got anyways because there was nothing better. So even when those came out, everyone knew it was crap. Just happened to be the best that was available at the time.

8 tracks were cool though.

MrX on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

You got me thinking. What is the tech divided in this country? 75? 80? 85? Above what age do the majority of people in that age group don’t know how to use a computer.

My mom is 74 and she can sort use a computer.

Oil Can on April 15, 2014 at 4:58 PM

My parents, mid 70s, live in one of those independent living places. My dad was at the cutting edge of developing the technology these little brats take for granted. So, he got involved with the computer group. A lot of his neighbors have basic computer skills. Two reasons- shopping when it is harder to get around. And it is the only way they can communicate with their kids and grandkids.

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

I think this is may be a bit better video:
Kids of Today vs 1980′s Technology
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7v75QpvISUs

whatcat on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

When I was a kid………………….There were large blocks of time when there was nothing scheduled on TV
at all.

All TV stations signed off at midnight(with the national anthem)

jmtham156 on April 15, 2014 at 5:06 PM

We used to play Alice Cooper Schools out for Summer on the last day of school in my 8 track.

Sven on April 15, 2014 at 5:06 PM

rhombus on April 15, 2014 at 4:55 PM

My dad still has some 78 vinyls. Howdy Doody and Lone Ranger records.

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 5:06 PM

…my first CD was, of course, “Slippery When Wet,” because the sound quality of cassettes simply couldn’t do justice to an intricate tune like “You Give Love A Bad Name.”

Because the album cover “art” didn’t have anything to do with why you got the CD?

BigGator5 on April 15, 2014 at 5:07 PM

What is the tech divided in this country? 75? 80? 85? Above what age do the majority of people in that age group don’t know how to use a computer.

My mom is 74 and she can sort use a computer.

Oil Can on April 15, 2014 at 4:58 PM

I dunno, but I do know we were all supposed to get around using jetpacks and flying cars by 1970.
“Meet George Jetson…”

whatcat on April 15, 2014 at 5:08 PM

Cheap Trick released an 8 track version of a new album a few years ago. Took them a while, but they found a company in Texas that can still make them.

http://boingboing.net/2009/07/05/cheap-trick-releases.html

Mark1971 on April 15, 2014 at 5:09 PM

I hate the expression, but if anything screams “first world problem,” this is it.

bobs1196 on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

Yeah, for hillarity, throw what must have been the original Walkman in front of a North Korean child and ask them what it is.

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 5:09 PM

All TV stations signed off at midnight(with the national anthem)

jmtham156 on April 15, 2014 at 5:06 PM

All 3.

jmtham156 on April 15, 2014 at 5:10 PM

the real clackers

neyney on April 15, 2014 at 5:04 PM

Clackers! What a blast those were. They still sell them once in a while at Cracker Barrel.

Bell-bottom hip-hugger jeans and halter tops were hitting the rage about the time I was 8 yo.

Then came army jackets and funky headbands. Going to my first Army Supply store was a memory-maker. My granddad and dad, both vets, took me.

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 5:12 PM

Opening those things was tough even when we were in the 80′s….

Ha! How many of your favorite tapes got “eaten”? Remember trying to wind them back up using a pen in the little holes? Or opening them up, carefully “fixing” the tape, then Scotch-taping them back together for another week of listening fun? Ha!

SailorMark on April 15, 2014 at 5:12 PM

C’mon now, I get not understanding the Walkman or the cassette, but headphones are still in common use. It feels stages when the kids are like, “headphones, whaa?”

boone on April 15, 2014 at 5:12 PM

[jmtham156 on April 15, 2014 at 5:06 PM]

Yes, but do you remember when they came on the air, um, on Saturday and Sunday mornings??

Dusty on April 15, 2014 at 5:14 PM

When I was a kid my teachers all still believed in God.

Cleombrotus on April 15, 2014 at 5:14 PM

Ha! How many of your favorite tapes got “eaten”? Remember trying to wind them back up using a pen in the little holes? Or opening them up, carefully “fixing” the tape, then Scotch-taping them back together for another week of listening fun? Ha!

SailorMark on April 15, 2014 at 5:12 PM

Or the neighborhood trees festooned with the tape when the fix didn’t work.

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 5:15 PM

All TV stations signed off at midnight(with the national anthem)

jmtham156 on April 15, 2014 at 5:06 PM

All 3.

jmtham156 on April 15, 2014 at 5:10 PM

We had one station that stayed on till 1 am on Saturday nights and and the last program was…..”Roller Derby”!!

Bitter Clinger on April 15, 2014 at 5:16 PM

I had a radio one inch square and less than half an inch thick. Two chords came out of it, one was the ear bud and the other was an alligator clip. There was a one dial and no batteries. You clamped the alligator to a piece of metal and music came into your ear.

Where is your god of modern science now?

BL@KBIRD on April 15, 2014 at 5:16 PM

Wait until the kids play the same cassette 100 times and the tape gets jammed between the roller and the “play” head, and 10 feet of 1/8-inch wide tape hangs out of the cassette. A smart kid might figure out that it can be rewound into the cassette using a pencil through the sprocket, but most millenials will toss it into the recycling bin.

Steve Z on April 15, 2014 at 5:16 PM

Yes, but do you remember when they came on the air, um, on Saturday and Sunday mornings??

Dusty on April 15, 2014 at 5:14 PM

Gosh, no I don’t-maybe 8:00am

By the way, we had prayer in school up until 5th grade.
It went something like: Thank you God for our school and our teacher and help us learn today-very offensive.

jmtham156 on April 15, 2014 at 5:20 PM

All TV stations signed off at midnight(with the national anthem)

jmtham156 on April 15, 2014 at 5:06 PM

All 3.

jmtham156 on April 15, 2014 at 5:10 PM

Three national networks, actually. Though the local channels usually signed off at midnight or before also. But there were a few late, late shows on weekends that sometimes would run til 1/1:30 AM. Then maybe a minute sermonette, “HIGH FLIGHT” and then the Anthem. And then – TV noise until the farm report signed on the next morn.

whatcat on April 15, 2014 at 5:21 PM

I have 400 or 500 vinyl albums in my basement. No way these kids would be allowed near my turntable.

flataffect on April 15, 2014 at 5:22 PM

Someday when kids of the future see this video they will laugh and the young lady in it will be old and gray. The wheel turns for all of us.

neyney on April 15, 2014 at 5:04 PM

No kidding. My first cell phone was a brick. Really. A unit about the size of a loaf of bread. My first computer had two slots- one was for the disk containing MS-DOS (the monitor was awesome you could go either green screen or amber screen) And IMO the greatest generation is those of us who had to deal with AOL’s dial-up service even with the first 1000 hours for free!

Seriously, Here’s hoping that kids of the future are watching this video and laughing and not foraging for food in some sort of Post-Obama reality.

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 5:23 PM

I have 400 or 500 vinyl albums in my basement. No way these kids would be allowed near my turntable.

flataffect on April 15, 2014 at 5:22 PM

No worries, those kids wouldn’t know what a turntable was.

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 5:24 PM

Is little Krischelle in the yellow top actually Michelle Malkin about 30 years ago?

BuckeyeSam on April 15, 2014 at 5:29 PM

When I was a kid, all of my toys were made by Whammo! and hadn’t been banned by the federal government yet.

Timothy S. Carlson on April 15, 2014 at 5:30 PM

When I was a kid our games were made of wood and leather.

Akzed on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

When I was a kid games hadn’t been invented yet. We used to stare at rocks for fun.

whatcat on April 15, 2014 at 5:33 PM

Hey, forget about Walkmans and crap.

When I was a kid, my folks gave me one of them there transistor radios!

It was maybe a little smaller than a Walkman, it was white with a faux wood grain inlay, we got one station on the dial, it was AM static, and we liked it!

Pilgrimsarbour on April 15, 2014 at 5:37 PM

Now I want to go bust out my recording 8-track player to show to our tween-age kids. Maybe even get really wild and fire up the turn-table. Can you still get a needle at radio shack these days?

Finish the night off with some pong, and listen to a baseball game on an old transitor.

If nothing else, I’m pretty sure that would get the kids to bed early for once!

Goody2Shoes on April 15, 2014 at 5:39 PM

My mom is 74 and she can sort use a computer.

Oil Can on April 15, 2014 at 4:58 PM

I’m 71 and I helped invent the personal computer industry.

landlines on April 15, 2014 at 5:40 PM

When I was a kid, my folks gave me one of them there transistor radios!
Pilgrimsarbour on April 15, 2014 at 5:37 PM

I got one for my 13th birthday, I was a pretty cool kid after that.

whatcat on April 15, 2014 at 5:40 PM

When I was a kid our games were made of wood and leather.
Akzed on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

There might be one lucky kid in the neighborhood who actually had a toy gun. The rest of were just hoping for a tree branch of proper size to function as a rifle!

Goody2Shoes on April 15, 2014 at 5:45 PM

I lost two cousins to lawn darts and one eye to clackers.

rogerb on April 15, 2014 at 5:46 PM

PS –

Modern kids are REALLY handicapped by:

* lack of real sandlots which you can play pickup baseball/softball/football games…and where you can invent your own neighborhood rules as needed.

* no chemistry sets: these were apparently banned by anti-scientific nanny government actions and lawyers

* no real build-it-yourself electronic kits from Radio Shack (which used to really sell radios and lots of electronic parts)

* lack of safe, self-policing neighborhoods

landlines on April 15, 2014 at 5:48 PM

LP’s and 45′s as a kid… and then as a swingin’ single bachelor, I upgraded to a TEAC reel-to-reel… very high tech… It really impressed the babes…

PointnClick on April 15, 2014 at 5:48 PM

I lost two cousins to lawn darts and one eye to clackers.

rogerb on April 15, 2014 at 5:46 PM

ROFLLLL!

PointnClick on April 15, 2014 at 5:49 PM

I’m so old my prayers begin “Listen, Kid….”

PersonFromPorlock on April 15, 2014 at 5:49 PM

Never had cassettes, I went straight from reel-to-reel to CDs. The sound from cassettes sucked only slightly less than 8-track.

I wonder how the kids would react to a turntable? Exposure to DJs might actually make vinyl more recognizable than cassettes.

Socratease on April 15, 2014 at 5:52 PM

This didn’t make me feel old so much as it made me concerned that our kids are idiots. Being unfamiliar with a particular piece of technology happens all the time, but most of them made no effort to try to puzzle it out, like they even lacked the basic tools to do so. I hope they were playacting, because it reminded me of the scene from 2001 where the monkeys are enraged at the unknowable obelisk that appears in their midst.

JeremiahJohnson on April 15, 2014 at 5:58 PM

I’d love to know what these kids think about a waterbed.

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 5:58 PM

Being unfamiliar with a particular piece of technology happens all the time, but most of them made no effort to try to puzzle it out, like they even lacked the basic tools to do so.

JeremiahJohnson on April 15, 2014 at 5:58 PM

Excellent point.

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 6:00 PM

Either fake or the kids are morons.
Buttons labeled AM FM stop play rewind forward and they have no clue.
Uh huh.
And they have no clue what headphones are.

Ronnie on April 15, 2014 at 6:04 PM

I anticipated feeling old. I wound up feeling like those kids were stupid.

29Victor on April 15, 2014 at 6:08 PM

I remember when MTV played music videos, and David Letterman was funny.

Get off my lawn.

Hayabusa on April 15, 2014 at 6:12 PM

3 local stations broadcasting network and local programming much of which, before I was six, was in black and white format …rabbit ears. One local channel had a rather dodgy signal, eventually there was UHS which was also not the strongest signal.

Sure I has a mattel show n Tell for my 45s. Mom and dad barely let us touch the RCA Orthophonic But you could stack records and it would automatically retract the playing arm at the end of playing and drop any new record.

CAMELOOOOOOTTTT. Da dooda do deeded de dee.

SarahW on April 15, 2014 at 6:14 PM

* no chemistry sets: these were apparently banned by anti-scientific nanny government actions and lawyers

* no real build-it-yourself electronic kits from Radio Shack (which used to really sell radios and lots of electronic parts)

* lack of safe, self-policing neighborhoods

landlines on April 15, 2014 at 5:48 PM

Just a quick search finds a lot of places to buy chem and electronic sets for kids. Can’t buy the safe neighborhoods, though.

whatcat on April 15, 2014 at 6:14 PM

On the other hand, we hand moon landings and stuff. Kinda miss those.

SarahW on April 15, 2014 at 6:15 PM

This didn’t make me feel old so much as it made me concerned that our kids are idiots. Being unfamiliar with a particular piece of technology happens all the time, but most of them made no effort to try to puzzle it out, like they even lacked the basic tools to do so. I hope they were playacting, because it reminded me of the scene from 2001 where the monkeys are enraged at the unknowable obelisk that appears in their midst.

JeremiahJohnson on April 15, 2014 at 5:58 PM

Yeah, I don’t think it’s that the kids are stupid. It’s that they lack problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. They’ve been raised by “helicopter parents”, and they are used to having everything served up to them on a platter and presented to them on touch-screen interfaces, so when they encounter something they’re not familiar with it doesn’t even occur to them to use the old trial-and-error technique.

Hayabusa on April 15, 2014 at 6:15 PM

My older brother and I saved up our weed-pulling money for what seemed like forever to buy “Introducing the Beatles!” as our first LP purchase.

(Mother let us play it on her hi-fi, but only on Saturdays after we came home from the early matinee at the local theater – 25 cents: 4 cartoons, a serial and a movie- usually monsters or cowboys).

I still have my family’s Sing Along With Mitch albums, and I still know all the words without looking at the album cover.

I’d like to see those kids follow that bouncing ball, yes I would (and get off my lawn!)

Pless1foEngrish on April 15, 2014 at 6:15 PM

One of those kids was cassette savvy, though….

SarahW on April 15, 2014 at 6:16 PM

Still…with the best state of the art components: cartridge pickup, turntable, phono preamp and power amp (vacuum tube amps preferred), speakers…most current audiophiles (such as myself) prefer the sound of analog music reproduction as more natural and realistic than the best current digital music reproduction. If you haven’t heard analog/phono music reproduction from a high quality music system, you may not believe how great it can sound.

The world is analog, digital is just a simulation made of re-stitched samples of it.

otlset on April 15, 2014 at 6:21 PM

My introduction to the wonderful world of technology was having to replace burnt-out valves in my grandmother’s cabinet radio.

OldEnglish on April 15, 2014 at 6:23 PM

Yeah, I don’t think it’s that the kids are stupid. It’s that they lack problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. They’ve been raised by “helicopter parents”, and they are used to having everything served up to them on a platter and presented to them on touch-screen interfaces, so when they encounter something they’re not familiar with it doesn’t even occur to them to use the old trial-and-error technique.

Hayabusa on April 15, 2014 at 6:15 PM

The upside is that civilization will be ruled by the (at least) over 30s, what with the 90s and Mil-kids being dumber than a box of hyena fur.

whatcat on April 15, 2014 at 6:23 PM

Just a quick search finds a lot of places to buy chem and electronic sets for kids. Can’t buy the safe neighborhoods, though.

whatcat on April 15, 2014 at 6:14 PM

I’d disagree on this point. There is no way the chemistry sets of my youth are still available. I’m sure you can still do fun things with litmus paper but in a more non-toxic way than with chemistry sets of past.

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 6:24 PM

When I was a kid, “cable” was something that helped hold a bridge up. And VCR’s and microwave ovens were still science fiction items.

Bitter Clinger on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

I remember getting our first Color TV like it was yesterday, it was amazing, and all three VHF channels had at least one or two color programs.

And in school, building, from scratch, a crystal radio. You would have thought I had just split the atom.

Yep, now that you mention it, I am old.
Nice of you to bring it up AP.

JusDreamin on April 15, 2014 at 6:32 PM

I had one of those early Walkmans-you know, they were the ‘radio only’ ones.

annoyinglittletwerp on April 15, 2014 at 6:39 PM

JusDreamin on April 15, 2014 at 6:32 PM

Spent much of WWII building crystal sets, desperately trying to latch on to fighter chatter, etc.

OldEnglish on April 15, 2014 at 6:39 PM

Spent much of WWII building crystal sets, desperately trying to latch on to fighter chatter, etc.

OldEnglish on April 15, 2014 at 6:39 PM

Well I’d love to buy you a pint and hear more OE!

JusDreamin on April 15, 2014 at 6:52 PM

Say what you will about the lowly portable cassette player, but all it did was destroy your hearing, not melt your brain.

Obviously not a collector of GD bootlegs…

JohnGalt23 on April 15, 2014 at 6:58 PM

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