Just a reminder: You’re old

posted at 4:41 pm on April 15, 2014 by Allahpundit

To cleanse the palate, a viral sensation from the Fine brothers that’s equal parts adorable and you-don’t-have-terribly-long-to-live. I admire their restraint in not pulling this stunt with a CD player, just to heighten the viewer’s mortality panic. I got my first player for Christmas as a kid; my first CD was, of course, “Slippery When Wet,” because the sound quality of cassettes simply couldn’t do justice to an intricate tune like “You Give Love a Bad Name.” Presumably these kids could figure out a CD player based on their passing acquaintance with Blu-Rays, but that won’t last much longer in an age of Netflix and iTunes. Frankly, I figure we’re maybe 15 years away from being able to replicate this video with books instead of Walkmans.

Say what you will about the lowly portable cassette player, but all it did was destroy your hearing, not melt your brain.


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Seeing these obnoxious spoiled-rotten kid makes me SO happy I got out of the class room 10 years ago.

Nasty things.

wyntre on April 15, 2014 at 7:07 PM

No kidding. TV was 3 or 4 air channels when I was a kid depending on the weather and the amount of aluminum foil you could rig over the antennae and cassettes were the size of yesterday’s vcr tapes. Audio cassettes didn’t get down to Walkman size until later.

HotAirian on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

My father was a tinkerer, Heathkit and all that, so we had a fancy roof antenna. Guess who had to climb the roof and mount it.

slickwillie2001 on April 15, 2014 at 7:12 PM

JusDreamin on April 15, 2014 at 6:52 PM

Any time your in the great land of OZ. :)

OldEnglish on April 15, 2014 at 7:13 PM

OldEnglish on April 15, 2014 at 7:13 PM

You’re, not your, you old fart!

OldEnglish on April 15, 2014 at 7:31 PM

Holy crap…!

Now I know how the Shat felt when he was asked to do a movie where his character had to acknowledge he was getting “old”. UGH.

OldEnglish on April 15, 2014 at 7:13 PM

BTW I’m a Yank living in southeast Queensland. Transplants rock ;)

Wanderlust on April 15, 2014 at 7:42 PM

Guess who had to climb the roof and mount it.

slickwillie2001 on April 15, 2014 at 7:12 PM

Your mom? :0

Seriously, do we still have that sense of exploration and tinkering? I don’t think we do.

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 7:50 PM

There used to be a phone booth at the lake. People used to bring their kids to show it to them. The phone didn’t work anymore and they finally took it out becuase it was a haven for spiders and wasps.

The most popular thing at the museum to the kids is the Edison style phonograph that plays cylinder records and has one of those bell things so you can hear it better.

When I was little we just had radio that my mother had on all day. Soap operas all day. I can remember going to sleep to the “Railroad Hour”. We got a tv when I was 10. A little late actually. I don’t think we ever thought of tinfoil. You had to fuss with the rabbit ears to get a proper picture. There was no tv during the week day. It came on at maybe 5 with maybe Howdy Doody. Saturdays it was on in the morning. Cowboy half hours. Lone Ranger and Roy Rogers. I remember seeing Sid Caesar (did he die recently) and thinking I never saw his show. It was on after I went to bed. At night there would be a late movis. Try finding a good one now. They all went off by playing the National Anthem and then you had to stare at the test patern all night.

crankyoldlady on April 15, 2014 at 7:55 PM

Wanderlust on April 15, 2014 at 7:42 PM

Built by transplants. :)

OldEnglish on April 15, 2014 at 8:15 PM

Are you sure the point isn’t that today’s children are idiots?

Kaptain Amerika on April 15, 2014 at 9:09 PM

I anticipated feeling old. I wound up feeling like those kids were stupid.

29Victor on April 15, 2014 at 6:08 PM

They all had the attention span of a gnat.

BuckeyeSam on April 15, 2014 at 9:21 PM

“I feel so judged right now.”

That’s the mentality in a nutshell.

Wigglesworth on April 15, 2014 at 9:23 PM

I anticipated feeling old. I wound up feeling like those kids were stupid.

Yes. Even my own kids (who are above average, just like everyone else‘s), who have been one hopes reasonably educated in an educated household, are frankly shallow and have the attention spans of a lapdog. I blame it on ourselves somehow; yet, computers, cellphones, and the herky-jerky pace of television shows and advertising (time the duration of the average scene, sometime) along with the demise of the book have all served to render most of those under about 25…frankly not very bright. Even the smart ones.

I read of those who, educated 100 years ago or more had to learn Latin, history, and so forth and really KNOW the material: and weep inside. The meek will not inherit the earth: The stupid will. And they’ll have no idea how to turn it on, or off.

orangemtl on April 15, 2014 at 9:32 PM

orangemtl on April 15, 2014 at 9:32 PM

 
Would you mind re-writing that in 140 characters or less?

rogerb on April 15, 2014 at 9:38 PM

That’s a joke, btw.

rogerb on April 15, 2014 at 9:39 PM

The funny thing is their kids will be thinking the same thing about cell phones and ipods.

The Notorious G.O.P on April 15, 2014 at 9:40 PM

Say what you will about the lowly portable cassette player, but all it did was destroy your hearing, not melt your brain.

Ironically though, with all this technology there is a growing artistic void. Brand-spanking new technology to enjoy playing… dreck.

ddrintn on April 15, 2014 at 9:42 PM

I saw the video where the kids were trying to figure out rotary telephones.

That was funnier.

But yeah, I agree with what others have said that these kids don’t seem to have any sense of curiosity.

Hell, when I was a kid, I used to help my favorite aunt fix household items that broke.

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 9:43 PM

I have a Nakamichi I bought my first assignment to Okinawa in the early 80s to play my Dead concert tapes.

Sven on April 15, 2014 at 9:43 PM

And speaking of 8 tracks: not only did I have the player on my stereo [with a turntable and AM/FM radio], I had an 8 track recorder.

I remember having loads of fun calculating the length of songs so as to fit on each track to avoid that clunk sound it made when switching from one track to another.

I liked the cassette player/recorder I got several years later much better.

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 9:49 PM

Being an 80′s kid I started out with cassettes of course, but those players in that video are nothing like what I had. I had a Sony Walkman 5, which was barely larger than a cassette tape case and sounded pretty amazing. I used to use chromium dioxide tapes with recordings from a mix of records and CDs.

By the time I was 12 CDs were getting their own section, I remember the first CD I heard was Kenny Loggins Keep The Fire (This Is It). By the time I was 16, CDs were the only respectable format to have. I wouldn’t go back, though. That’s for sure. Aside from some really good music, those kids didn’t miss much.

Aodhan on April 15, 2014 at 9:54 PM

Hell, when I was a kid, I used to help my favorite aunt fix household items that broke.

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 9:43 PM

My granddaddy used to fix lawn mowers for people in their town (many times for free, along with cutting their grass, being a preacher and seeing it as an opportunity to serve his community…those days are so long gone, aren’t they?)

Anyway, he used to have me working with him when I went down to visit in the summer.

Loved it. Always had this fascination with machines. Probably contributed to my going into engineering when I was younger. (When it comes to hydraulics, I make that grunting noise like Tim the Tool Man Taylor used to make on home improvements)

Got to where I couldn’t do the grunt work any more. Females lose upper body strength younger than men do.

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 10:08 PM

If your kids don’t know how to do things it’s because you didn’t teach them. I know how to do things because I hung out with my father when I waslittle. My mother didn’t like me and was too critical.

crankyoldlady on April 15, 2014 at 10:15 PM

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 10:08 PM

What a great experience that must have been. Always wanted to learn how to fix lawnmowers. I can install a new spark plug and that’s about it. From the many that we have had over the years that no longer work, I’m sure I would have been able to salvage some of them instead of running out and buying new ones.

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 10:18 PM

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 10:18 PM

It was. I came as close to worshipping the ground that man walked on as one human being can get with another human being, so the time was (and still is)very precious to me.

We didn’t tell my parents. I don’t know why. It wasn’t a secret or anything. I guess since he was doing it mostly out of the generosity of his heart, he didn’t talk about it much.

Used to work on my cars, too. Nothing major. Biggest job I ever did was to change out the U-joint in the rear axle….good times, good times!!!

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 10:26 PM

Good idea for a reality show. Show old technology to kids and have them figure out what it is and how to use it.

crankyoldlady on April 15, 2014 at 10:38 PM

What beautiful memories you have of your grandfather. I can only imagine, as my grandfathers on both sides of my family died long before I was born.

I had somewhat the same kind of relationship with my favorite aunt, though. She was not able to have children of her own, so we were very close; she was very much like a second mother to me, and I know she viewed me as the daughter she was never able to be blessed with.

Working on cars … that’s some great knowledge to have. I know how they’re supposed to work, but I have to leave the repairs to a mechanic. And that entails trust, which was shaken recently with a shop where I’d been taking my cars for decades. I got a late-model used car not too long ago; I’m going to think twice about taking to that particular shop when the warranty runs out.

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 10:38 PM

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 10:26 PM

Ooops. My comment was intended for you, if I hadn’t stupidly forgot to quote your name at the top. [sigh]

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 10:40 PM

I’m going to think twice about taking to that particular shop when the warranty runs out.

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 10:38 PM

Don’t go to the one that starts with m and ends with s. Thay aren’t the only ones but they lure you into getting things fixed that don’t need it. It’s outrageous the way they tell you if you don’t get something fixed right away you’re going to have an accident.

crankyoldlady on April 15, 2014 at 10:44 PM

And VCR’s and microwave ovens were still science fiction items.

Bitter Clinger on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

The science oven!

Eviva on April 15, 2014 at 10:48 PM

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 10:40 PM

No problem :)

Bad service? Get ripped off? Get talked into buying something you don’t need? Lots of that going around now. Hard to know who can and/or cannot be trusted these days.

Yeah, it was great to have that king of relationship in life with someone, especially when you’re young. Glad for you that you had someone, too!

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 10:49 PM

Im disapointed…Not one kid thanked Al Gore for what we have now

malkinmania on April 15, 2014 at 10:51 PM

crankyoldlady on April 15, 2014 at 10:44 PM

That’s what they call an impulse sale technique. They try to stress a sense of urgency on you hoping that it will trigger you to make a purchase on impulse.

I worked in sales part-time for a while during the last few years. (Absolutely stunk at it, from my employer’s point of view, because I wouldn’t be dishonest with customers)

Learning how to recognize the techniques helps me to keep from getting taken in by them.

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 10:54 PM

crankyoldlady on April 15, 2014 at 10:44 PM

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 10:49 PM

The repair shop I dealt with is a family-owned operation. They’ve been around for a good 40 years or so, and I never had problems with them until these last two years. I’ve since found out that my experience isn’t all that unusual. They used to try to sell me tires all the time (they’re a dealer in a particular brand), but I shut that down fairly quickly. My hubby went there once for an oil change and swore he’d never go back because of that.

I guess I’m going to be taking the new car to the dealership, which I know is going to be much more expensive, but I have at least heard some positive things about their mechanics. They are a small-town place that’s been around at least as long as the other repair shop, so I’m sure there’s a lot of community good will to uphold.

But yes, it’s hard to know who to trust these days, especially with auto mechanics.

And speaking of upselling … my dentist used to try to talk up procedures beyond the normal check-up and cleaning. Very annoying. I told him in a round about way that there are plenty of other dentists around that probably wouldn’t try to give me a sales pitch while cleaning my teeth and he shut up.

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 11:08 PM

Just to place myself on the tech timeline.
Born in 1960.
My father-in-law (*much older than Mrs. massrighty) was born before flight and lived to be 84- so he spanned the Wright Brothers and the Challenger.

Me?

Kept some old-school stuff alive – had an eight-track player, in the kitchen, till about 1994 – just to keep it alive. Had a rotary phone in my office, long enough to confound my older daughters friend, who couldn’t call her house to tell her Dad she was having dinner with us (1987-1988.) First PC was an IBM PC-XT, 10mhz, 40MB mfm Winchester HDD (for about a week, that was state-of-the-freakin’-art!)

massrighty on April 15, 2014 at 11:17 PM

massrighty on April 15, 2014 at 11:17 PM

Had a rotary phone in my office, long enough to confound my older daughters friend, who couldn’t call her house to tell her Dad she was having dinner with us (1987-1988.)

Was she one of these kids? LOL!

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 11:22 PM

If your kids don’t know how to do things it’s because you didn’t teach them. I know how to do things because I hung out with my father when I waslittle. My mother didn’t like me and was too critical.

crankyoldlady on April 15, 2014 at 10:15 PM

I have four kids; older 2 (Girl and Boy) know how to do stuff. Younger two, less, because older two were already trained.

massrighty on April 15, 2014 at 11:23 PM

Wait… did he say that was the first time music was portable?

What about transistor radios?

malclave on April 15, 2014 at 11:28 PM

As a boy, I helped my father repair lawn mowers. I still know how to work on small gas engines, after a fashion, as long as there aren’t too many electronic gadgets attached to them.

I got my first digital calculator in 1975, as a high-school student. For most complex calculations, I still use a solar-powered TI-30X dating to my college days thirty-odd years ago. And check my math with my old reliable Pickett N902-T “slipstick”.

While I certainly prefer a word processor, I keep a manual portable typewriter around, just in case.

My stereo has CD, turntable, and dual cassette decks. Plus AM and FM radio.

And BTW, as far as personal arms go, I am checked out on modern self-loading types, but my personal preference is lever-action rifles and revolvers. The “World War Two” generation of self-shuckers are the ones I’m most comfortable with in that department. I’ll take an all-steel 1911A1 or P-35, and an M1 Garand or M1 Carbine, over their modern descendants any day of the week.

So, I guess I’m if not a dinosaur, at least a wooly mammoth.

;-)

cheers

eon

eon on April 15, 2014 at 11:30 PM

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 11:22 PM

My first “real” job – the now-defunct Lafayette Radio. (Bonus points if you even know who that is….)

STOLE a phone from the office, when we were closing the store.

KEPT it in my office, at home, way past the age of “dialing” a phone.

My daughters friend could not manage to dial the phone, to call home, and tell her parents that she would be at our house.

Same kids; same age; freaked out when they found out that (3) of my older sisters were punch-card data entry clerks, back in the day…

massrighty on April 15, 2014 at 11:30 PM

I was born in the 60s, yet I know what a phonograph cylinder does. No excuse for kids this ignorant.

Ronnie on April 15, 2014 at 11:38 PM

I remember rotary-dial telephones and when TV networks bragged about their programs “in living color”.

Bitter Clinger on April 15, 2014 at 4:46 PM

Which was why the symbol for NBC was the peacock. Their programs were in COLOR!

Not only that, but I remember when I was a kid, that NBC was sometimes worth watching.

Ah, the days before Law and Order, Dateline NBC, and Big Brother. A golden age.

There Goes the Neighborhood on April 15, 2014 at 11:39 PM

Wait… did he say that was the first time music was portable?

What about transistor radios?

malclave on April 15, 2014 at 11:28 PM

Or organ grinders.

Ronnie on April 15, 2014 at 11:39 PM

Slippery When Wet was my second tape. The first was Run DMC Raisin Hell.

iwasbornwithit on April 15, 2014 at 11:40 PM

Make them watch TV without a remote. That’ll learn ‘em.

Flange on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

And make them figure out how to change channels with the pliers on top of the set?

malclave on April 15, 2014 at 11:42 PM

Heh … that must have been some experience working for Lafayette Radio. I figured it was a retail radio store, but I cheated a bit and Googled for more info and learned that while it had some retail outlets, it was mostly mail-order. Cool! They were Radio Shack’s competition.

I still have both rotary phones from my parent’s house, a black one with a metal dial and a beige one with a plastic dial. Neither are hooked up. And I still have a cabinet radio (AM only) with vacuum tubes which my uncle kept in his garage to listen to baseball games.

And somewhere, tucked in a book in my attic, I have a lone keypunch card that I used as a bookmark, left over from my lone computer class that I took in college (late70s). We didn’t learn either BASIC or COBOL — our prof made us use a language specific to our class, so that when the systems clerks saw us coming, they would groan in unison.

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 11:46 PM

Are you sure the point isn’t that today’s children are idiots?

Kaptain Amerika on April 15, 2014 at 9:09 PM

Yeah, the thought of actually reading the words (play, stop, open/close, etc.) on the gadget never occurred to them. Where are the images and pictures so I don’t have to engage my brain??!!!!

conservative pilgrim on April 16, 2014 at 12:03 AM

And speaking of upselling … my dentist used to try to talk up procedures beyond the normal check-up and cleaning. Very annoying. I told him in a round about way that there are plenty of other dentists around that probably wouldn’t try to give me a sales pitch while cleaning my teeth and he shut up.

PatriotGal2257 on April 15, 2014 at 11:08 PM

My dentist office has started that too, upselling. The dental hygienists all do it, I think they must all be on commission now. It’s annoying.

slickwillie2001 on April 16, 2014 at 12:06 AM

My granddaddy used to fix lawn mowers for people in their town (many times for free, along with cutting their grass, being a preacher and seeing it as an opportunity to serve his community…those days are so long gone, aren’t they?)

Anyway, he used to have me working with him when I went down to visit in the summer.

Loved it. Always had this fascination with machines. Probably contributed to my going into engineering when I was younger. (When it comes to hydraulics, I make that grunting noise like Tim the Tool Man Taylor used to make on home improvements)

Got to where I couldn’t do the grunt work any more. Females lose upper body strength younger than men do.

lineholder on April 15, 2014 at 10:08 PM

A preacher AND lawn mower repair man? Cool. I wonder if he ever swore when he couldn’t get the blade off because that big nut was too tight.

slickwillie2001 on April 16, 2014 at 12:09 AM

Well, in all fairness, this is how the world is. I was born in 1984 and couldn’t work an 8-track to save my life. When these kids are older, their kids will laugh at the idea of a iPhone or whatever.

He Who Some Call A Traitor on April 16, 2014 at 1:00 AM

Seeing these obnoxious spoiled-rotten kid makes me SO happy I got out of the class room 10 years ago.

MEH. I got out of high school 47 years ago, so I guess that makes me a fossilized defunct old fossil. Oy Vey!

soghornetgunner on April 16, 2014 at 7:52 AM

Up until 3 years ago I had a truck with a factory cassette deck. 1998 Toyota. I had one of those cassette adapters to play my Mp3 player through the tape deck.

Mark1971 on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

I have a 2005 Ford. If I want to listen to my MP3 player while driving that’s how I do it!

22044 on April 16, 2014 at 8:21 AM

I feel so judged right now…

Said the twelve year old girl at 1:17. Wonder where she learned that thought process from…

Big John on April 16, 2014 at 9:13 AM

Just a quick search finds a lot of places to buy chem and electronic sets for kids. Can’t buy the safe neighborhoods, though.

whatcat on April 15, 2014 at 6:14 PM

I’d disagree on this point. There is no way the chemistry sets of my youth are still available. I’m sure you can still do fun things with litmus paper but in a more non-toxic way than with chemistry sets of past.

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 6:24 PM

Yup, that’s true. A kit that one of my bros had in the early 60s came with some kind of radioactive material. I doubt uranium – maybe radium? I don’t remember what – but ya won’t wont find it in science lab kits these days!

whatcat on April 16, 2014 at 9:40 AM

Said the twelve year old girl at 1:17. Wonder where she learned that thought process from…

Big John on April 16, 2014 at 9:13 AM

Out of the whole video that line was what smacked me in the face the most.

Eviva on April 16, 2014 at 10:00 AM

A preacher AND lawn mower repair man? Cool. I wonder if he ever swore when he couldn’t get the blade off because that big nut was too tight.

slickwillie2001 on April 16, 2014 at 12:09 AM

Heh! I couldn’t say. If he did, it was silently.

Unusual man. 1/2 Cherokee who had a full head of white hair by the time he was 40. Pentecostal Holiness preacher. Loved people like he loved life itself.

lineholder on April 16, 2014 at 10:30 AM

Happy Nomad on April 15, 2014 at 7:50 PM

ABSOLUTLEY we do!

It’s just moved onto other areas beyond audio technology. It’s software and robotics mostly now.

I’m in my 40′s now, and I spend lots of time with flying RC models “FPV” style. (That’s “drones” to you regular folk) You would not believe how many young teens are FASCINATED by this stuff! RC flying is taking off again in a big way because of it. Along the way, the kids learn all sorts of other awesome skills, like soldering and electrical power principles and aerodynamics.

The tinkering spirit is still there in kids. It may hit a bit later than it used to, because there are more and easier distractions for home-bound young teens with helicopter parents. But once they have a bit of autonomy, many of them will quickly branch out into other areas, and FPV flying and the related robotics field snag quite a few of them.

wearyman on April 16, 2014 at 10:45 AM

Remember trying to put the tape back into the cassette after it got stuck in the player?…

Pest on April 16, 2014 at 10:51 AM

Umm…these kids act like it’s just awful that you can’t hear the music from the Walkman with headphones. So, are they unfamiliar with the Ipod? Don’t they routinely use earbuds?

Anyway: Estes rockets! Revell models! Tower records!

Galtian on April 16, 2014 at 10:51 AM

Make them watch TV without a remote. That’ll learn ‘em.

Flange on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

A friend of mine built his own remote control. It was a string attached to the power button. He was able to turn the tv on from his couch. That’s it. He had to cross the room to turn to one of five available channels or to change volume or turn it off.

I remember the signoffs. All channels played the national anthem at sign off and sign on. I also remember the farm report at 5am even though we didn’t live near the country/farm.

freedomfirst on April 16, 2014 at 11:24 AM

Well, in all fairness, this is how the world is. I was born in 1984 and couldn’t work an 8-track to save my life. When these kids are older, their kids will laugh at the idea of a iPhone or whatever.

He Who Some Call A Traitor on April 16, 2014 at 1:00 AM

The beauty of 8 track was that you simply pushed the cassette into the opening and it started itself. VERY easy.

If you want a challenge, then try threading a reel-to-reel. Also not too difficult unless you have no curiosity.

freedomfirst on April 16, 2014 at 11:35 AM

Make them watch TV without a remote. That’ll learn ‘em.

Flange on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 PM

Meh, make them play 78s on a hand cranked Victrola and listen to what comes out of the speaker. THAT’LL really learn ‘em.

hawkeye54 on April 16, 2014 at 12:21 PM

The beauty of 8 track was that you simply pushed the cassette into the opening and it started itself. VERY easy.

If you want a challenge, then try threading a reel-to-reel. Also not too difficult unless you have no curiosity.

The other beauty of 8 track is that it would play over again with no need to rewind. The drawback was that if the tape was pulled out there was really no way of getting it back in the cassette. Total loss.

hawkeye54 on April 16, 2014 at 12:23 PM

A kit that one of my bros had in the early 60s came with some kind of radioactive material. I doubt uranium – maybe radium? I don’t remember what – but ya won’t wont find it in science lab kits these days!

I’m sure there were contents of those chemistry sets that we bought at hobby shops to resupply them that, if available now, would require an adult to buy them.

IIRC, there was a time when you could get bits of uranium ore as souvenirs from the Grand Canyon. Remnants of the once active mine near the south rim.

hawkeye54 on April 16, 2014 at 12:28 PM

My dentist office has started that too, upselling. The dental hygienists all do it, I think they must all be on commission now. It’s annoying.

slickwillie2001 on April 16, 2014 at 12:06 AM

My dentist must be hell to work for, because in the six month gap between my appointments, there’s always a new receptionist/hygenist at the front desk. As a doctor, he’s OK. This has been going on for years now, and if I have to call to reschedule, for example, they have to scramble to find my name, etc. They are too busy with scheduling and other tasks to sell me anything. That’s a good thing.

It’s probably a self-perpetuating problem for him — no one does the job correctly (according to him) because they’re thrown into it, overwhelmed, and they quit in frustration.

PatriotGal2257 on April 16, 2014 at 12:32 PM

Remember the frogman that would dive in the bathtub if you put in the right amount of baking soda? I think I got him in a box of cereal.

Cottonpony on April 16, 2014 at 12:36 PM

Seriously, do we still have that sense of exploration and tinkering? I don’t think we do.

Happy Nomad

You have to instill it in the next generation. Pass down all the “old time” knowledge that you can. When my middle son blew the engine out of his Toyota Celica, I showed him where to buy a new one and we swapped it out together. He seemed pretty proud to have gotten his hands dirty for a change.

8thAirForce on April 16, 2014 at 1:19 PM

…cassettes were the size of yesterday’s vcr tapes. Audio cassettes didn’t get down to Walkman size until later.

HotAirian on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

Don’t know where you get that from. VCR cassettes are larger than 8-track cassettes. And the smaller recordable cassettes have always been the same size.

earlgrey on April 16, 2014 at 3:14 PM

And make them figure out how to change channels with the pliers on top of the set?

Ahaha! You made me remember that! If you are talking about using the pliers when the dial cover got broken . . . I would never have thought of that in a million years if you hadn’t reminded me.

Alana on April 16, 2014 at 4:07 PM

cassettes were the size of yesterday’s vcr tapes. Audio cassettes didn’t get down to Walkman size until later.

HotAirian on April 15, 2014 at 5:05 PM

Don’t know where you get that from. VCR cassettes are larger than 8-track cassettes. And the smaller recordable cassettes have always been the same size.

earlgrey on April 16, 2014 at 3:14 PM

Yeah, don’t know he got that idea. I had a (audio) cassette recorder/player in the late 60s – my dad worked for a corp that made them – but they were always the same size thru the years.

whatcat on April 16, 2014 at 4:23 PM

Yeah, don’t know he got that idea. I had a (audio) cassette recorder/player in the late 60s – my dad worked for a corp that made them – but they were always the same size thru the years.

whatcat on April 16, 2014 at 4:23 PM

Guy is right. I had a set up with a Dolby 220 noise reduction; a Dolby 3BX to “expand” from 60 db to 90 db…..from vinyl to tape. The tape recorder was a B&O if I remember correctly and used a regular VCR tape instead of a cassette tape. Not very popular and not many units sold. My amp, preamp and turner were all McIntosh tube (aka the heater and still have ‘em). Speakers were Dhalquist DQ10’s and Acoustats.

Built my own DH500’s ran them in mono through Cerwin Vegas when time to play loud. Had to put the turntable (Mitsubishi Model LT 55 linear tracking turntable) in another room to stop flutter. Good times…good times. Still have all the junk set up in the basement as an oddity and the kids just laugh. Moving magnet anyone? Yes, I am old.

HonestLib on April 16, 2014 at 8:05 PM

I’m a little taken aback by some of these negative comments towards the kids. They are not dumb because of their inability to comprehend what a walkman is. If they’ve never encountered one before then these are legitimate reactions.

Also, I don’t find their demeanors to be nasty or obnoxious. I’m a high school teacher. I deal with my fair share of entitled, nasty and obnoxious kids. In my opinion, these kids seem very sweet and genuine in comparison to what I deal with on a daily basis.

Utica681 on April 16, 2014 at 8:48 PM

Anyway: Estes rockets! Revell models! Tower records!

Galtian on April 16, 2014 at 10:51 AM

Yes!

But these kids will be fine, just like we are. Until the Net goes down, and all thier stuff is in the Cloud, nothing stored locally.

Who is John Galt on April 16, 2014 at 10:22 PM

Part of me doesn’t really buy this video. In their effort to figure out how it worked, they weren’t looking at or for the symbols that they should have been able to recognize: the arrow that signifies “play”; the square that signifies “stop”; the double arrows for rewind and fast-forward. Those symbols are still universally used by most video players and would have been a tipoff that the device was a player of some sort. Plus the earphone jack looks exactly the same on a Walkman as it does on an iPhone. Why didn’t they notice that? IMHO, these kids weren’t trying to succeed; they were trying to fail and say cute/stupid stuff in the process. Either kids have an affinity for technology or they don’t. My personal experience is that they generally do, although I acknowledge that that ability increases sharply when high motivation is a factor. Ability to figure out the iPhone 7 would always beat their ability to figure out a Walkman. None of them were really looking at it closely, either, like you would if you were really trying. Plus, they all looked like models or actors, not real kids. Too cute by half. I call bogus.

smellthecoffee on April 16, 2014 at 11:55 PM

Those kids are adorable.

OxyCon on April 17, 2014 at 12:25 AM

Those kids are adorable.

OxyCon on April 17, 2014 at 12:25 AM

Agreed they are adorable. :)

As far as the sony walkman goes, I think the camera filming the kids made them more self conscious than usual. Most kids in the 70s and 80s growing up had no problem figuring out how to make a tape machine work in seconds. Computers and calculators were easily welcomed in the 80s generation, with video games and vcrs coming on line too.
When I got my first video camera it took me less than 5 minutes
to operate it and start shooting. My first ipad less than 30 seconds. Technology for our generation is very easy to use and figure out if you are really into gadgets. Kids today day are no different than we were. Most of the kids by themselves IMO, without cameras videoing them, would have figured out how to use the walkman on their own quicker.

dec5 on April 17, 2014 at 1:52 AM

smellthecoffee on April 16, 2014 at 11:55 PM

Agreed. And when you realize the video is part of an ongoing series, it becomes obvious that the kids are acting – not necessarily reading from a script, but intentionally pretending to be confused and amazed. That’s their job.

sauropod on April 17, 2014 at 2:44 AM

Had they included the headphones the video would have been very different.

The girl in the yellow top is clever and funny.

More alarming than the old/new technology gap is the self-esteem nonsense coming from the 13 year old: ‘I feel so judged right now’…along with the give-up factor among most of them.

A boy named Maxim? Was dad looking at his favorite magazine when you were born?

jangle12 on April 17, 2014 at 8:17 AM

I used to own a copy of Led Zeppelin’s Houses of the Holy on 8-Track tape.

I remember the tape “broke” during the song The Crunge.

Yup. Seriously old.

thejackal on April 17, 2014 at 10:33 AM

And….the battery on a smart phone lasts how long?

3 days without power an the Walkman’s still rockin’ out.

Suckas.

MichaelGabriel on April 17, 2014 at 9:23 PM

I don’t feel old. I do feel these kids are pretty dense. Only one can figure out a mechanical device. Save up for retirement, folks; these kids are going to inherit the world during our lifetimes. That is, if they can figure out how to operate a doorknob and leave the house.

Philly on April 17, 2014 at 9:28 PM

I thought that that might be a picture of the Boss when she was a little girl. It looks like it could be Michelle. Yes, familiar with the archaic use of The Boss title.

thegreatbeast on April 18, 2014 at 12:11 PM

These kids need a couple of months at some remote wilderness area learning to live off the land and improvise.

If they don’t learn some survival skills they will be totally unprepared for the zombie apocalypse.

s1im on April 18, 2014 at 8:06 PM

After watching this, I unconsciously began humming Hank Williams, Jr. , ‘A Country Boy Can (Survive)’. These kids didn’t have an ounce of common sense, curiosity or appreciation for what came before and all seemed as if they were imitating child commercial actors. Judging from the young kids I observe today, this seems to be the new normal. When the SHTF event occurs, these kids and their parents won’t last but a few weeks, if that. The herd must be culled and the weak and stupid will be first. Hey, I saw a what appeared to be a bi-racial kid but no “authentic” descendant of the “Dark Continent”. What’s up with that in our brave new world of Obama? Maybe the DOJ and IRS need to look into the Fine brothers.

SpiderMike on April 19, 2014 at 9:34 AM

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