Quotes of the day

posted at 10:41 pm on April 14, 2014 by Allahpundit

Paul was one of three potential 2016 presidential aspirants who addressed the “Freedom Summit.” But while Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee mainly dished out partisan red meat barbs and one-liners that easily catered to the audience, Paul challenged the party’s image at the same time he pledged not to dilute its core principles

“If you want to be consistent, if you want to grow the movement, we cannot be the party of fat cats, rich people and Wall Street,” he said. “There’s always a bigger working class than an owner’s class. I’m not against the owner’s class but I want to tell the workers on America that we’re on their side.”…

“Cruz is making an introduction to New Hampshire voters, Huck a reintroduction. Rand’s relationship goes deeper, he is at a different stage in the process,” said the strategist.

***

It is through this message, Paul says, that Republicans can find an opening with a constituency that has largely voted as a bloc for Democrats since the civil rights era. Some of this push is also reactive: Paul has previously come under fire for making controversial comments about the Civil Rights Act, and Democrats think he is extremely vulnerable on racial issues. But that doesn’t mean Paul’s views are insincere or will have no impact on GOP thinking longer-term.

“I truly do care about the injustice and what it’s done to voting,” Paul told me when we met Friday at a pizza place in downtown Manchester. “Everyone’s talking about voter ID. Voter ID is one-one thousandths of the problem compared to felony disenfranchisement. I think there’s 150,000 people in Kentucky who can’t vote because of a felony conviction. Probably half or more are black.”…

I asked Paul about the time Christie called his foreign policy “dangerous” and when former U.S. ambassador to the U.N John Bolton described Republicans like Paul as “unfit to serve.” (Both men, particularly Christie, harbor presidential ambitions of their own.)

“The people who are saying that are the dangerous people,” Paul said. “The people who wake up at night thinking of which new country they want to bomb, which new country they want to be involved in, they don’t like restraint. They don’t like reluctance to go to war. They really wouldn’t like Ronald Reagan if they read anything he wrote or were introduced to it.”

***

“I’ve repeatedly voted for sanctions against Iran. And I think all options should be on the table to prevent them from having nuclear weapons,” Paul said on “This Week” Sunday. But he said those who oppose the idea of containment — or living with an Iran with nuclear weapons — ignore that such an outcome has been necessary in the past.

“They said containment will never ever, ever be our policy,” Paul said of those who oppose Iran getting nuclear weapons at any cost. “We woke up one day and Pakistan had nuclear weapons. If that would have been our policy toward Pakistan, we would be at war with Pakistan. We woke up one day and China had nuclear weapons. We woke up one day and Russia had them.”

“The people who say ‘by golly, we will never stand for that,’ they are voting for war,” he added.

***

Former Rep. Ron Paul said Friday he was happy that his son, Sen. Rand Paul, opposed recent legislation that would send financial assistance to Ukraine.

“Congress just last week, they rushed to pass this guaranteed loan of a billion dollars, which is really just opening up the door for endless loans,” the Texas Republican said. “There were two senators who voted against it, and I’m very pleased my son voted against it–not that I had any doubts, I tell ya.”…

Rand Paul hasn’t been quite as strident about staying out of the Ukraine situation as his father. In fact, he argued last month that President Obama was failing to project Ronald Reagan’s “peace through strength” policy, and he called for the United States to be even more aggressive on its diplomatic efforts relating to Russia.

“It is our role as a global leader to be the strongest nation in opposing Russia’s latest aggression,” he wrote in an opinion piece.

***

If I were Adelson, and I considered it desperately important to keep one of America’s major parties closer to my hawkishly pro-Israel views, I would simply give a Ted Cruz-aligned super PAC $200 million at the start of the next election and pledge to give it $200 million more should that money be needed. Let Cruz’s money advantage make him the more attractive “populist Tea Party alternative” to the GOP’s establishment candidates. Save a few hundred million more and dangle it in front of every other GOP aspirant but Paul and watch the field unify in their opposition to the Kentucky senator and his libertarian policies. Just make it rain and watch GOP polls contort themselves…

Money can make an unflattering campaign story: “Paul lagging in funds.” And money can amplify that story: Conservatives doubting Paul can overcome money hurdles.

Perhaps the Paul camp would welcome such a unified opposition. After all, it would grant his us-vs-them fundraising campaigns quite a bit of legitimacy. Surely, his grassroots-savvy team could light a few money-bomb campaigns with that. But does even Paul believe that a presidential campaign can run on $100 checks sent in by hepped-up liberty advocates?

To win, Paul and his anti-interventionist cadres must develop a fundraising apparatus as well-organized, as active, and as deep-pocketed as the one he faces. Until the media is buzzing about “Paul bundlers,” “Paul angels,” and “Paul-billionaires,” I wouldn’t bet on him winning the GOP nomination.

***

That is just one example of the balancing act Mr. Paul is attempting as he prepares for a likely White House bid in 2016. Trying to leap from tea-party firebrand to GOP standard-bearer, the freshman senator is courting the party leaders and fundraisers crucial to a national campaign, while mostly keeping faith with the libertarian base that made him a Republican Party phenom.

A test comes on April 25, when Spencer Zwick, the national finance chairman for Mitt Romney’s presidential campaigns, is slated to introduce top donors in Boston to Mr. Paul. While some fundraisers say Mr. Paul’s resistance to the use of military force abroad disqualifies him from leading the GOP, others are intrigued by his efforts to grow the party by reaching out to young and minority audiences…

“We’re building a winning coalition, and we want the Republican Party to see that,” said Doug Stafford, one of Mr. Paul’s top political advisers…

His noninterventionist posture makes Mr. Paul too extreme for many GOP rainmakers. “His name doesn’t even come up in my circles,” said Florida real-estate developer Mel Sembler, a veteran fundraiser trying to draft former Gov. Jeb Bush for 2016. “Sen. Paul is pretty isolationist. We’re a leader in the world, and we shouldn’t abandon that philosophy.”

***

Cruz, who came to the Senate two years after Paul, appears to be muscling him out of first place in Tea Partiers’ hearts. Where Paul calls himself a “libertarian Republican,” Cruz touts his full-spectrum conservatism on fiscal, social, and foreign policy. Cruz aggressively championed the push to defund Obamacare that helped lead to last fall’s government shutdown (Paul also backed it, but tepidly), an act that made him a pariah in Washington but a hero to the grassroots. Paul got lots of attention for staging a 13-hour filibuster on the Obama Administration’s use of drones last March; Cruz transparently copied the tactic with an even longer speech on Obamacare in September…

Cruz, on the other hand, told the crowd only what he knew it wanted to hear. His speech, unlike Paul’s, was infused with personality, beginning with cute stories about his young daughters. Of his defiant five-year-old, Caroline, who likes to play a game she calls “attack the Daddy,” he mused that she must be taking her cues from Senate Republican leadership.

Cruz, like Paul, made a populist appeal: “The rich and powerful, those who walk the corridors of power, are getting fat and happy” under the current administration, he said. At one point, someone in the crowd yelled, “Thank you!” And when he finished with a defiant promise to “repeal every single word of Obamacare,” the crowd was on its feet.

In interviews with a dozen audience members, I could find only one who preferred Paul to Cruz.

***

Citing the work of Henry Olsen, a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, Balz wrote: “The most conservative wing generally gets the most attention, but the voters who count most in the GOP nomination process are those who say they are ‘somewhat conservative.’ This is the largest group nationally and is consistently a big presence in all the states, unlike some of the other factions. ‘They are not very vocal but they form the bedrock base of the Republican Party,’ Olsen writes. ‘They also have a significant distinction: they always back the winner.’”

These “bedrock” voters don’t show up at straw polls. They don’t wave signs or show up at rallies. They do, however, vote. And, while much has been made of the Tea Party overpowering the establishment in congressional primaries, it’s important to remember that presidential primaries bring out a much bigger and more diverse electorate. Paul’s association with his father and the libertarian movement are a likely red flag to these more traditional voters.

I get why the media loves covering Rand Paul. He’s actively challenging GOP orthodoxy. He likes talking to reporters. He’s multi-dimensional. But, that doesn’t automatically translate into “frontrunner” status. He has some significant hurdles he’ll need to climb before then. He’s like a house with instant curb appeal, but we don’t know if the house is sturdy until we start poking around at the infrastructure. At the end of the day, Rand Paul’s biggest challenge won’t be convincing people he can expand the base of the party. It will be in convincing the traditional and establishment Republican base of the party that he is truly presidential material.

***

***


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ps..clark gable is in this movie so you should like that..
mumbles. Claudette Colbert

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 3:57 AM

“It Happened One Night”? That’s a good one.

I like the snappy dialogue in the partner movies back in them Olden Days. Tracy/Hepburn. Grant/Hepburn. Bogie/Becall

31giddyup on April 15, 2014 at 4:07 AM

31giddyup on April 15

sadly you are right.. ahh The Golden Days of Cinema..
anything b&w is better than any new first run…IMO

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 4:12 AM

Eclipse Bish..

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 4:13 AM

g2m,

I think I’ve seen maybe 5 movies at a theater in the last 10 years. Seriously. I didn’t exactly go kicking and screaming but close to it. They were action movies (hubs likes them). I like movies with substance, a bit thought provoking, with great photography. Dark or that jittery/odd angle filming, ugh.

31giddyup on April 15, 2014 at 4:24 AM

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 3:39 AM

Oh no. Not the whole thing. Just a smidgen…

I’ve done more looking up of science tonight than I did in high school. My head hurts.

31giddyup on April 15, 2014 at 3:54 AM

31giddyup: Lol, i hear ya:)

canopfor on April 15, 2014 at 4:27 AM

g2m, Canopfor, kcewa, It’s been fun. Thanks and blessings to you. {{{{hugs}}}}

31giddyup on April 15, 2014 at 4:32 AM

Eclipse Bish..

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 4:13 AM

going2mars: I wonder if they fired up the laser, during this?

Would anyone see anything:)

Homepage Research Lunar Laser Ranging
High-Precision Measurement of the Earth-Moon Distance

http://www.fesg.bv.tum.de/91872-bD1lbg-~fesg~forschung~llr.html

canopfor on April 15, 2014 at 4:33 AM

31giddyup on April 15

laffs.. last time I walked in a first run movie.. was alien
the first one..
I moved to north Hollywood in 81..two months after RR was sworn in.
quickly realized the town and its ppl were.. well to be kind, not for me.. not a drop of anything or anyone real..
so I don’t give them any money to politically club me later with..

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 4:33 AM

g2m, Canopfor, kcewa, It’s been fun. Thanks and blessings to you. {{{{hugs}}}}

31giddyup on April 15, 2014 at 4:32 AM

31giddyup: Right back at cha——-:0

canopfor on April 15, 2014 at 4:34 AM

sleep well 31giddyup..be safe

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 4:35 AM

canopfor on April 15, 2014 at 4:33 AM

I worked here for 5 years when it was still TRW…
you can see it on the optics bench.. when its small diameter
and the photons concentrated…
but after it has been apertured up.. you see nothing

http://www.northropgrumman.com/Capabilities/ChemicalHighEnergyLaser/TacticalHighEnergyLaser/Documents/pageDocuments/SPIE_Manuscript_Tactical_high-.pdf

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 4:43 AM

Okay, gotta respond to below, then I’m outta here:

31giddyup on April 15

laffs.. last time I walked in a first run movie.. was alien
the first one..
I moved to north Hollywood in 81..two months after RR was sworn in.
quickly realized the town and its ppl were.. well to be kind, not for me.. not a drop of anything or anyone real..
so I don’t give them any money to politically club me later with..

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 4:33 AM

My mom, uncle, and two cousins, worked in the San Fran theatrical union which included Opera, ice showes, tv and movies. Being conservative, we had some “fun” conversations. I let them know I won’t pay to see the libs either. One cousin worked with Tom Cruise’s production co. at one time, and the other one was a grip man for Spielburg and TV series shot in San Fran. We learned to agree to disagree and still love each other. I think of them as being more blue dog democrat compared to the liberals I’ve come across.

g’nite again

31giddyup on April 15, 2014 at 4:47 AM

canopfor on April 15, 2014 at 4:33 AM

I worked here for 5 years when it was still TRW…
you can see it on the optics bench.. when its small diameter
and the photons concentrated…
but after it has been apertured up.. you see nothing

http://www.northropgrumman.com/Capabilities/ChemicalHighEnergyLaser/TacticalHighEnergyLaser/Documents/pageDocuments/SPIE_Manuscript_Tactical_high-.pdf

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 4:43 AM

going2mars:

Interesting,..thanks, otays me heading out, its been fun, night G2M:0

canopfor on April 15, 2014 at 4:50 AM

Nite 31GiddyUP:)

canopfor on April 15, 2014 at 4:51 AM

31giddyup on April 15

I have bay area family too…laffs..
thought I doubt they are even blue dogs…
sadly just lemming progs.. (its hip to vote for BHO..)
to lazy to research the truth for themselves..
and to blind to see it when you show them..

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 4:53 AM

cheers canopfor.. sleep well

going2mars on April 15, 2014 at 4:54 AM

The Rolling Stones – Child Of The Moon

non-nonpartisan on April 15, 2014 at 4:56 AM

Good morning ladies and gentlemen. It’s cold here.

crankyoldlady on April 15, 2014 at 6:21 AM

How can you see a lunar Eclipse when the moon is hidden from view? That’s like seeing a doughnut hole. There are no doughnuts holes, just missing doughnut parts like Dires Kate Upton puzzle pieces.

SparkPlug on April 15, 2014 at 6:49 AM

Snow.

Jaibones on April 15, 2014 at 6:55 AM

Good morning ladies and gentlemen. It’s cold here.

crankyoldlady on April 15, 2014 at 6:21 AM

Woke up to 62 degrees and it will be blow freezing by midnight. Expecting 40mph winds as the cold front pushes through with bluebird skies tomorow. Wife planted her small gardern last weekend and I will cover it up with plastic to hold in the heat from the soil. She got tired of 100s of plants in the sunroom!

HonestLib on April 15, 2014 at 7:04 AM

Good Morning, Patriots! And, Trolls.

Part of the challenge [of 'fixing" Obamacare] is to clear away all the smoke and try to figure out what is working and what isn’t.. What do we need to do to try to fix this? Because it would be a great tragedy, in my opinion, to take away what has now been provided. This is going to be challenging and I don’t think we should throw the baby out with the bath.

- Hillary Clinton, 2/26/14

My take: Hillary and “Obamacare”: Past, Present, and Future

kingsjester on April 15, 2014 at 7:06 AM

My friend in Sarasota last night, and I quote:

“On the lanai, smoking a Padron and watching the blood moon rise, drinking a Belgian Leffe xxxx left here from his visit. I could get used to this.”

Yeah.

Jaibones on April 15, 2014 at 7:09 AM

Time to make the donuts…

Jaibones on April 15, 2014 at 7:12 AM

Repost for the day shift…

The Most Interesting Taxi Driver In The World…

“I don’t always post insane political screeds, but when I do, I prefer to do it at Taxicab Depressions…”

The Pig Trap

If you like it, gimme some love on Facebook and Twitter…

Oh, and hat-tip to some Hot Gas poster that compared Michelle Obama to a woodchipper a while back…. I swiped that metaphor… It was too good not to…

Oh… and language warning… but hey, it’s me… you knew that already…

PointnClick on April 15, 2014 at 7:13 AM

My friend in Sarasota last night, and I quote:

“On the lanai, smoking a Padron and watching the blood moon rise, drinking a Belgian Leffe xxxx left here from his visit. I could get used to this.”

Yeah.

Jaibones on April 15, 2014 at 7:09 AM

I grew up in Sarasota… Man, do I got stories…

PointnClick on April 15, 2014 at 7:15 AM

“I truly do care about the injustice and what it’s done to voting,” Paul told me when we met Friday at a pizza place in downtown Manchester. “Everyone’s talking about voter ID. Voter ID is one-one thousandths of the problem compared to felony disenfranchisement. I think there’s 150,000 people in Kentucky who can’t vote because of a felony conviction. Probably half or more are black.”

And the exact, same argument can be made about the right to keep and bear arms for felons. Indeed, as we are denying easy access to utilization of a positive Natural right that comes before a mere civil right as the free exercise of our positive Natural rights allow for the creation of society and civil rights.

If the idea is that felons have ‘done their time’ and then deserve a second chance in life, then NO restriction is justified upon them and that goes for those who commit murder, rape individuals and abuse children, as well: no tracking of anyone and a full restitution of all exercise of positive Natural and civil rights.

And yet our legacy is that jail was never meant to ‘reform’ individuals. Often they were mere holding centers for those about to be executed or, when they were spiffy places in castle keeps, meant to hold political prisoners and captured nobles and aristocrats for ransom. When we started inventing lesser crimes and imposing jail that meant that people were put in places that used to be the ‘next in line’ for execution and then we needed larger facilities to oversee those merely ‘serving time’. Yet with felonies these people had violated the fabric of society and faced longer term restrictions on their rights because they had violated trust with their fellow man in a breach with society. Now it can be argued that we have gone way, way, way too far with handing out felonies and that we need to scale back this system. But that means addressing the top-heavy legal system, not thinking that by serving time one has atoned for their crimes.

Atonement breaks down to ‘at onement’ which is a positive activity to seek to restore one’s good faith with one’s fellow man, particularly with those who you have injured and their families via doing good works for them DIRECTLY. It shows an enlightened sense of responsibility for one’s actions and demonstrates that the individual is truly mending their ways and are seeking to be at one with the rest of society. Spending time in prison is not ‘at onement’, it is a mere penalty that does not restore good faith but serves justice.

Now if you want to argue that those who have gone above and BEYOND mere time served so as to make restitution so as to be at peace with those they injured deserve a full restitution of the free exercise of their civil rights and positive Natural rights, then you have got something there. That cannot be codified, however, as it is the individuals that were harmed who must make that judgment based on how much they have suffered subjectively, and requires a direct appeal by the felon to them for that and seeks to find out from them what good works will help him to mend the damage he has done.

Now THAT would make a great libertarian case for more than proceduralism and place the heart of liberty back with the individuals of the Nation and take it away from the hands of government and put it back into the individuals and the community to decide when a felon has done more than just ‘served their time’ but has actually atoned for their crimes. That would be a system that puts morality back into the system at the lowest level and requires that our various governments recognize that they do NOT have the last say on the civil rights of individuals who have broken with their community via their actions and that prison time is just a start of a reflection period and changing of one’s ways, not the END OF THE PROCESS in and of itself. Then justice is not merely ‘served’ but reinforced as a meaningful concept far outside the legal code.

ajacksonian on April 15, 2014 at 7:43 AM

PointnClick on April 15, 2014 at 7:13 AM

I’ve said before their apparatus is in place everywhere. The elcetion this year will just be for show and if they should happen to lose they will not accept the results. If you know any military who work in a facility that has been demilitarized warn them they need to have guns handy anyway.

crankyoldlady on April 15, 2014 at 8:28 AM

I can’t get Kevin and the pig trap out of my head, because it is a perfect metaphor for the surveillance state our government has built. It has been erected slowly over time, one piece at a time, so as to not panic the populace. And the government seems to have been wildly successful, because the American population at large seems completely unphased and unalarmed at what has been built over the last twenty or thirty years.

The government is reading and storing all of my emails? No big deal; I’m not a terrorist, so I am OK.

The government is listening to and storing all my phone calls? Whatever, I don’t talk to terrorists.

The government is tracking and storing my location? So what? I don’t go anywhere that is suspect.

The government is targeting political enemies and surveilling journalists? Who cares? I’m not an activist or a partisan, so this does not affect me…

PointnClick on April 15, 2014 at 7:13 AM

Echos of Martin Niemöller.

Fallon on April 15, 2014 at 9:03 AM

Did I turn into a werewolf last night? I woke up in a strange place. Maybe Axe is right.

tommy71 on April 15, 2014 at 9:23 AM

Naw, he’s a true believer. He’s just naive.

John the Libertarian on April 15, 2014 at 1:16 AM

I’ve heard him play too many verbal games with immigration to believe that. And with Israel as well. He is just not as convincing as Obama, and he is obviously for small govt, but he will be the end of this country if elected.

Igor R. on April 15, 2014 at 10:55 AM

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