America the not so religiously diverse?

posted at 9:31 am on April 6, 2014 by Jazz Shaw

It’s one of the enduring traits of the United States and a source of understandable pride. Americans are, in part, defined by the freedoms they enjoy under the Constitution in general, and in our freedom of religion in particular. And this open environment has led us to be one of the most religiously diverse nations on the planet, right? As Dr. Joyner explores the topic, perhaps not so much. This comes from a new Pew Research study which breaks down the religious affiliation of Americans in one convenient graph.

Religious-Diversity

Looking at this graph, it’s easy to see that we’re considerably more diverse than a theological dictatorship such as Iran. But by the same yardstick, we’re nowhere near as diverse as the religious melting pot of Singapore. America could easily be defined as a country which is essentially Christian with a significant mix of the “unaffiliated” coming in a distant second. The only other religion which even moves the needle is the Jews, and that only rings up 2%.

But, as Joyner notes, this treats all Christians as one religion. Fair enough, but there is a lot of diversity inside that category.

This is a perfectly reasonable methodology, but certainly not the only one. It really depends on what you’re trying to get at with the rankings.

The sense in which America is religiously diverse is the sheer multitude of religions represented here. And the report acknowledges that fact:

While adherents of many world religions live in the United States – the world’s third most populous country – most of those religions each represent less than 2% of the U.S. population. That includes people who identify their religion in surveys as Judaism (1.8%), Buddhism (1.2%), Islam (0.9%), Hinduism (0.6%) and folk or traditional religions (0.2%).

But grouping all Christians into a single category, which again is perfectly reasonable depending on what one is trying to measure, points to the fact that, despite nominal diversity, we’re essentially a Christian nation. We non-believers are more numerous than any non-Christian religion–indeed, all of them put together. Outside of a handful of urban areas, then, Americans will rarely encounter people who aren’t either a Christian, a Jew, or non-religious.

Does a lack of religious diversity equate to a lack of religious tolerance? I would say no, but that answer comes from my own upbringing, I’m sure. As Rick Moran points out, you can always find somebody who disagrees. Even when it comes to an Easter Egg hunt.

Muslim Parents in Dearborn Upset About Flyer for Easter Egg Hunt

The flyers were handed out at public schools and referenced an Easter egg hunt at a nearby Christian church. So, some Muslim parents get an outrage twofer: They can claim bias against Muslims and play the old atheist trick of claiming that passing the flyer out at public schools violates the separation of church and state…

In fact, public schools are part of a larger community and have a duty to serve that community. If that means making flyers announcing a secular church party available to all students, then they are fulfilling their mandate. If public school teachers actually handed out the flyers — something that wasn’t made clear in the article — they would simply be fulfilling their mission to engage the community.

If Christians were going to be doing any proselytizing in the Muslim community, they wouldn’t use pagan symbols and secular-themed parties. But looking under the bed for Christians and pretending to be outraged by innocent gestures of community involvement seems to be the best way to get media exposure.

After all, we wouldn’t want to offend anyone, now would we?

You can please some of the people some of the time, I guess.


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Comment pages: 1 2

LOL! I have a guilt complex about something that doesn’t exist (Bible god)? That’s cute!

Then why would the world as it stands make no sense to you? Suffering makes no more sense in the context of “justice” with or without a creator. I believe in a creator precisely because that’s the only way this, meaning creation, all makes sense to me.

Is this unmoved mover you worship Bible god or not?

What difference should it make to you? If I’m wrong and you’re right, you lose nothing and I gain nothing. But if I’m right and you’re wrong, you lose eternity and I gain it. You can worship a rock for all I care. Just don’t pretend that your belief in no God makes you better somehow. It doesn’t.

Pascal’s Wager is a joke. Believing in a god just for the sake of your own well being in some afterlife we don’t know exists seems to be a bit selfish and inane. Besides, what if you choose the wrong god?

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 4:50 PM

The wager still holds. Choose “no god” as your god and you’ll be on the shit list of whatever god does rule the universe if you’re wrong. Deciding not to choose is a choice. ;)

Do you know why they call it faith? Because it’s NOT knowledge.

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 4:50 PM

I think I’m getting a better picture here. Is that what you worship? Knowledge (presumably of the scientific kind)? Because it is possible to know something without necessarily having scientific certainty of that something. If all knowledge were scientific knowledge, out entire criminal justice would be a sham, relying on eyewitness and expert testimony as it does.

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 4:58 PM

HonestLib on April 6, 2014 at 4:57 PM

You don’t have to choose a god, the premise that you do is specious.

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 5:00 PM

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 4:58 PM

I don’t think the god that could be would require you to believe in him… It doesn’t make any sense that he would.

The only thing in this universe that either requires or desires your faith/belief in something are con-men, frauds, and charlatans trying to deceive you with otherwise unconvincing lies.

Deceivers need believers, and that’s why religion needs faith.

That’s why it promises unimaginable rewards only for those who believe in it, and that’s why it threatens a fate worse than death to those with the temerity to try to understand it, who ask too many questions, or who dare to peek at that man behind the forbidden “holy” curtain.

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 5:05 PM

I don’t think the god that could be would require you to believe in him… It doesn’t make any sense that he would.

Like I said, every belief, and indeed every nugget of knowledge, scientific and otherwise, flows from axiomatic statements. There necessarily has to be some foundation to knowledge.

The only thing in this universe that either requires or desires your faith/belief in something are con-men, frauds, and charlatans trying to deceive you with otherwise unconvincing lies.

Which is why I don’t belong to a Christian church. The ministers seem like a bunch of concern trolls to me. But then, so where the Pharisees back in the day

Deceivers need believers, and that’s why religion needs faith.

That’s why it promises unimaginable rewards only for those who believe in it, and that’s why it threatens a fate worse than death to those with the temerity to try to understand it, who ask too many questions, or who dare to peek at that man behind the forbidden “holy” curtain.

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 5:05 PM

That’s kind of where Christianity loses me, too. Jesus wasn’t Christian. He was Jewish. And he hung out with the dregs of society, which drove the religious leaders of his day crazy, too. I distance myself from Christianity precisely because I don’t want non-believers to judge my god based on the quality of his worshippers, which I personally find sorely lacking.

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 5:09 PM

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 5:00 PM

Poor little loser is back. So void of knowledge on anything outside his pathetic attempts to prove there is no God . Laughable.

(where ya been?)
Heh. What a no nothing.

CW on April 6, 2014 at 5:22 PM

Sauer what a pathetic sad little person you are. Filled with ugliness and vitriole. You’ll die alone and empty . Count on i.

CW on April 6, 2014 at 5:23 PM

*it.

Who needs such ugliness? Sauer bathes in is. Laters freak.

CW on April 6, 2014 at 5:24 PM

I wonder if 20% of Americans are actual practicing Christians.

Kjeil on April 6, 2014 at 5:25 PM

I wonder if 20% of Americans are actual practicing Christians.

Kjeil on April 6, 2014 at 5:25 PM

As someone who believes in the existence of God and the divinity of Jesus Christ, I would advise anyone, believer or not, to be very suspicious of anyone who claims to be able to hear God. Those folks tend to be the Peter Popoffs, Jim Bakkers, and Morris Cerullos of the world.

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 5:34 PM

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 5:09 PM

Not that I think a Jesus ever existed, where the son of god claims were true, but as Mark Twain once said, if Christ were here today, there is one thing he would not be, a Christian.

“Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or by imbeciles who really mean it.” –Mark Twain

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 5:38 PM

CW on April 6, 2014 at 5:22 PM

LOL! I don’t say a god doesn’t exist you nitwit. Just your pathetic rendition of it.

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 5:41 PM

Not that I think a Jesus ever existed, where the son of god claims were true, but as Mark Twain once said, if Christ were here today, there is one thing he would not be, a Christian.

“Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or by imbeciles who really mean it.” –Mark Twain

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 5:38 PM

On that, you and I absolutely agree. Jesus Christ was born, raised, preached, died, rose, and ascended as a Jew. I dunno if this is the right forum to discuss in detail where I believe Christianity went off-track, but Christianity does God absolutely no favors with its portrayal of him.

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 5:47 PM

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 5:47 PM

No, we don’t agree. I’m not sure that a Jesus ever existed. I’m fairly certain a Jesus like character existed in the sense that somebody may have made some of the moral and ethical lessons he supposedly taught, but as for his ascension to heaven and raising from the dead… Nope, we don’t agree on that.

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 5:53 PM

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 5:09 PM

This reminds me of the ‘clients’ of the demons C.S. Lewis so cleverly described in The Screwtape Letters, particularly their ability to make budding believers look around at all the ‘losers’ in the Church next to them and run! ;)

But if you do believe in Jesus, then you know that there were instructions that He gave to be followed. Things like, “Do this as a commemoration of me.” Or His instructions to His apostles to ‘Go and teach…and that when they did, their instructions included to ‘On the Lord’s Day of the Lord come together, break bread and hold Eucharist, after confessing your transgressions that your offering may be pure; baptize…” He said, “Amen, amen I say unto you: Except you eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, you shall not have life in you….

For my flesh is meat indeed: and my blood is drink indeed.

That’s why no matter how upset I become at our shepherds or ‘catholic’ politicians, or some misrepresented quote from the Pope, or the weirdos, dissidents, homosexual child abusing priests, etc…, I will always be part of the Church; it is there I can receive Christ, Truly Present in the Most Holy Eucharist, because He promised He would be with us (sinners though we are), even unto the consummation of the world. Deo gratias.

“Upon this rock I will build my church…”

There is only One God, and He isn’t some deists’ preferred creator who doesn’t care what we do with His creation which includes us. He is involved in the affairs of men, for He so loved the world that He sent His only begotten Son. Jesus is God and He humbled Himself, to be born and to shed His precious type AB blood for us. He defeated death itself and left evidence of it for us in the Shroud of Turin, and the Sudarium of Oviedo attests to it, too, because He knew there would be doubting Thomases, but though He has the power to defeat even death, He will not force Himself on anyone. We reject Him and His commands, at our own peril.

pannw on April 6, 2014 at 5:58 PM

No, we don’t agree. I’m not sure that a Jesus ever existed. I’m fairly certain a Jesus like character existed in the sense that somebody may have made some of the moral and ethical lessons he supposedly taught, but as for his ascension to heaven and raising from the dead… Nope, we don’t agree on that.

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 5:53 PM

Hoo boy…I really don’t want to open up a can of worms, but I will say I have reasons for believing in the historicity of the New Testament that go beyond blind faith.

My problems with Christianity as an institution mainly stem from Paul’s epistles. Paul was a pharisee, which meant that as a Jew he would have been product of the Hellenistic influence that had been a part of Judaism since the Macccabees and the reconstruction of the temple. That influence is alive-and-well today in Christianity through Paul.

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 5:59 PM

On that, you and I absolutely agree. Jesus Christ was born, raised, preached, died, rose, and ascended as a Jew. I dunno if this is the right forum to discuss in detail where I believe Christianity went off-track, but Christianity does God absolutely no favors with its portrayal of him.

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 5:47 PM

Which bears some witness to the origin of the name “Christian.”

It was intended to insult those who followed Jesus, and, of course, many nasty rumors were created to go along with it: cannibalism, atheism (really!), greed, sexual immorality, and other sordid crimes against good society were some of the libels thrown at the early church.

Now we have many churches that seem to be actively trying to live down to some of those accusations, and, sadly, succeeding.

Jesus is indeed the fulfillment of Judaism, and it is not that Israel was cast away, but that many from without were grafted to the tree and made part of Israel.

questionmark on April 6, 2014 at 6:06 PM

Looking at this graph, it’s easy to see that we’re considerably more diverse than a theological dictatorship such as Iran.

Iran is not 99% Muslim.

No nation on Earth has a faster rate of growth of Evangelical Christianity than Iran. Hundreds of thousands are turning from Islam & receiving the truth of the Gospel. But they’re not going to go re-register their affiliation with the government & invite imprisonment & death.

itsnotaboutme on April 6, 2014 at 6:08 PM

Do you know why they call it faith? Because it’s NOT knowledge.

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 4:50 PM

And your point? If you have no faith there aren’t enough facts in the world that would convince you. I actually don’t care that an atheists doesn’t believe but never understand why they feel compelled to ridicule those who do.

katiejane on April 6, 2014 at 6:11 PM

ROFLMAO ol sauerkrap back to quoting Mark Twain.

HumpBot Salvation on April 6, 2014 at 6:12 PM

Looking at this graph, it’s easy to see that we’re considerably more diverse than a theological dictatorship such as Iran.

The US is not 78% Christian.

If the US had that many Christ-followers…
–TV & film screens would be mostly free from the porn & profanity that now dominate.
–The words “God” & “Jesus Christ” would be used reverently the vast majority of the time. As it is, they’re used irreverently the majority of the time.
–Abortion would be illegal.
–Homosexual marriage would be a dim, almost unimaginable leftist fantasy.
–Barack Obama would be a little-known Chicago community organizer.

Most professing Christians are CINOs.

itsnotaboutme on April 6, 2014 at 6:13 PM

Do you know why they call it faith? Because it’s NOT knowledge.

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 4:50 PM

You have a lot more faith than I do.

You believe in fairy tales like “In the beginning, nothing exploded without a cause, & everything resulted from it.”

Here’s another good one: “Life spontaneously came from non-living material.”

itsnotaboutme on April 6, 2014 at 6:18 PM

Here’s another good one: “Life spontaneously came from non-living material.”

itsnotaboutme on April 6, 2014 at 6:18 PM

Tried that defense once in a paternity suite…well you can guess the outcome!

Hey, in my defense I only make bad jokes late in threads….other than QOTD.

HonestLib on April 6, 2014 at 7:17 PM

If you don’t approve of egg hunts don’t go. Plain as that.

crankyoldlady on April 6, 2014 at 7:23 PM

I’m not an atheist… LOL SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 3:10 PM

Where’d anyone get that crazy idea?

Akzed on April 6, 2014 at 7:53 PM

I’m not an atheist… LOL SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 3:10 PM

Do you have to be anything? I remember a guy I used to know said he didn’t approve of religion. Someone said, “Oh then you’re an atheist.” He said “No I’m not anything.”

crankyoldlady on April 6, 2014 at 8:01 PM

My problems with Christianity as an institution mainly stem from Paul’s epistles. Paul was a pharisee, which meant that as a Jew he would have been product of the Hellenistic influence that had been a part of Judaism since the Macccabees and the reconstruction of the temple. That influence is alive-and-well today in Christianity through Paul. gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 5:59 PM

You are exactly wrong. The Pharisees began as an anti-Hellenic sect. The name Pharisee is from the same Greek root English takes “horizon” from, it’s related to the Greek word “aorist.”

A gloss might be, “Hellenism stops here.”

Does this sound like someone holding on to his identity as a Pharisee?

“If someone else thinks he has reason to put confidence in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; in regard to the law, a Pharisee; as for zeal, persecuting the church; as for righteousness based on the law, faultless.

“But whatever were gains to me I now consider loss for the sake of Christ. What is more, I consider everything a loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whose sake I have lost all things. I consider them garbage, that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which is through faith in Christ—the righteousness that comes from God on the basis of faith.” -Phil. 3:4-9

St. Paul was familiar with Hellenic philosophy and world view generally. He even quoted well known Greek philosophers in his letters. He was, after all, the apostle to the gentiles, and therefore must have been well versed in their ways and view of life and the world. See Acts 17:16&f. But no one who has the least familiarity with NT theology would claim that he was promoting Hellenism.

Akzed on April 6, 2014 at 8:05 PM

Do you know why they call it faith? Because it’s NOT knowledge. SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 4:50 PM

I take it on faith that there’s this tower in Paris built by a M. Eiffel. Never seen it with me own peepers, but I think it’s safe to say that I know it’s there.

Akzed on April 6, 2014 at 8:07 PM

You are exactly wrong. The Pharisees began as an anti-Hellenic sect. The name Pharisee is from the same Greek root English takes “horizon” from, it’s related to the Greek word “aorist.”

A gloss might be, “Hellenism stops here.”

Does this sound like someone holding on to his identity as a Pharisee?

“If someone else thinks he has reason to put confidence in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; in regard to the law, a Pharisee; as for zeal, persecuting the church; as for righteousness based on the law, faultless.

“But whatever were gains to me I now consider loss for the sake of Christ. What is more, I consider everything a loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whose sake I have lost all things. I consider them garbage, that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which is through faith in Christ—the righteousness that comes from God on the basis of faith.” -Phil. 3:4-9

St. Paul was familiar with Hellenic philosophy and world view generally. He even quoted well known Greek philosophers in his letters. He was, after all, the apostle to the gentiles, and therefore must have been well versed in their ways and view of life and the world. See Acts 17:16&f. But no one who has the least familiarity with NT theology would claim that he was promoting Hellenism.

Akzed on April 6, 2014 at 8:05 PM

Hellenism held to three doctrines that survived the post-Maccabeean reformation:

A) The inviolable nature of God’s sovereignty

…from which flowed

B) Predesination of souls for salvation

…and

C) The absolute and unerring justice of God in all things, including sickness, death, and earthly persecution

It was this Hellenistic view of God that prompted Jews to ask, when they saw a man blind from birth, “Who sinned, that this man was born blind? Him or his parents?” And Jesus rebuked them, not only in words, but by healing the man on a Sabbath. Jesus’ very ministry was always intended to have been a return to the most pure form of worship grounded in the law of Moses and the prophets.

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 8:20 PM

Hellenism held to three doctrines that survived the post-Maccabeean reformation:
A) The inviolable nature of God’s sovereignty
…from which flowed
B) Predesination of souls for salvation
…and
C) The absolute and unerring justice of God in all things, including sickness, death, and earthly persecution.

A. The Greeks were polytheists. The Pharisees were not.
B. Jonah 2:9, “Salvation is of the LORD.”
C. Deuteronomy 28.

It was this Hellenistic view of God that prompted Jews to ask, when they saw a man blind from birth, “Who sinned, that this man was born blind? Him or his parents?” And Jesus rebuked them, not only in words, but by healing the man on a Sabbath. Jesus’ very ministry was always intended to have been a return to the most pure form of worship grounded in the law of Moses and the prophets. gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 8:20 PM

What in the text leads you to that conclusion??

Akzed on April 6, 2014 at 8:28 PM

Akzed on April 6, 2014 at 8:50 PM

What in the text leads you to that conclusion??

Akzed on April 6, 2014 at 8:28 PM

The Talmud. It has the force of law in most modern Judaism, as it did back then. The Hellenist Greeks were polytheists and Jews were not, but there were aspects of Hellenism that influenced all Judaism in Jesus’ era. The pharisees were only anti-Hellenists in that the disagreed with the Sadducees on certain points of doctrine.

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 9:06 PM

Whoops. I had the Sadducees confused with the Essenes. It was the Essenes that believed in the inviolable sovereignty of God. The Sadducees, to the contrary, believed that God is incapable of committing evil.

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 9:15 PM

I cannot understand for the life of me why “diversity” is such a cherished goal.

Diversity in people is easy: any two human beings will produce diverse results. Same for diversity of ideas: any two people will suffice.

Having all religions equally accounted for is nonsense. I personally believe Christianity is the Truth because I believe Christ is Who hHe said He was. Judaism is misguided and the other religions are false. Call it what you want, I hope no other religions take root in the US.

This “diversity” babble is just more of the “lets make everything equal” mental illness that is sweeping the world.

DavidM on April 6, 2014 at 9:15 PM

DavidM on April 6, 2014 at 9:15 PM

Yeah David.. anyone who disagrees with your particular credo must be mentally ill.

It’s the only explanation.

lexhamfox on April 6, 2014 at 10:49 PM

Yeah David.. anyone who disagrees with your particular credo must be mentally ill.

It’s the only explanation.

lexhamfox on April 6, 2014 at 10:49 PM

I think the credo David was expressing was “Diversity is not a virtue.” I’m okay with that.

gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 10:51 PM

Wait, wait…didn’t BHO say we were a Muslim nation??? That we were not a Christian nation!!! how much backlash did that cause? Not much, it appears!!!!

Xango Annie on April 6, 2014 at 10:56 PM

In Christian nations, “religious diversity” is code for de-Christianization. When a “Christian” religious leader calls for more “religious diversity” in a historically Christian country (I am thinking of a specific case in Europe), she means it should be less Christian. (And in that case, more Muslim.)

David Blue on April 6, 2014 at 11:32 PM

Look at you so smug in your belief that you happen to have chosen the one true religion of god…

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 3:44 PM

Haven’t even mentioned my beliefs on the subject, but thanks for such a witty retort!

Esthier on April 6, 2014 at 11:35 PM

No, we don’t agree. I’m not sure that a Jesus ever existed. I’m fairly certain a Jesus like character existed in the sense that somebody may have made some of the moral and ethical lessons he supposedly taught

There are plenty of records pointing to the man existing and being executed. And I’m not referencing the Bible.

but as for his ascension to heaven and raising from the dead… Nope, we don’t agree on that.

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 5:53 PM

So it’s foolish to claim we know something without proof but perfectly logical for you to completely dismiss the same belief with even less indications you’re correct?

I don’t claim to have proof, but I will say that it is remarkable that 12 men were able to live and travel with Jesus as disciples for years, clearly forming a significant bond and a tremendous amount of respect for the man. But before Jesus was executed in a horrific manor, his disciples fell asleep when he needed them most, one betrayed him for a little money, and a third, supposedly one of his closest supporters, fearfully denied even knowing Jesus repeatedly the night his Savior was being torn to pieces. Three days later, a woman was the one to supposedly find the opened tomb (which was also placed over the grave because the Romans feared the body would be stolen to fake it), while the men were hiding out in fear. There are nonbiblical stories about Jesus coming back. According to the Bible, he was on Earth for awhile, not simply days and went out in public. Later we learn how each remaining disciple, and even the newest recruit were executed in unimaginable ways with the possible exception of John who was exiled.

The Jesus written of in the Bible was far from the first to claim to be Savior, nor the first to have a fervent group of followers. There are many records of people claiming to be God, just as there are today. For some reason, this one stuck, despite persecution in one of the most violent times in history, when Christians were used as torch lights and given to lions, stoned and crucified.

Something resonated with people with Jesus, something that has rarely occurred in human history despite the number of charlatans who crop up repeatedly. It’s foolish to dismiss outright any of the religions that have survived in such circumstances.

Also, you talk about people being punished for not believing, but that’s not Christian theology. The Bible says that all know of God. Therefore, hell is not a threat but a choice, the only one that allows you to reject God as ruler. This itself is hell, not the fire and brimstone, because the Bible also teaches that God is love, not that he lies or promotes it, but physically is it, such that separation from all love is itself hell. But again, a choice.

You speak a lot about what Christians believe yet only expresses the most shallow representation of a rich philosophy you’ve ignored rather than studied. What’s the point in that exactly? How does it edify you, anyone else or society at large? I mean, it’s cool if you just like insulting people for the sake of insulting people, but people who do so are trolls, cartoonish, trite characters, hence my earlier comments.

Esthier on April 7, 2014 at 12:10 AM

This graph is pointless. The question of diversity can never be proven by distribution. It is ludicrous to assume that a “perfect” nation is one where all religions would be equally represented in number across the population.

Diversity is NOT the proper question to start with. The only useful question is religious liberty, not religious diversity.

Do not accept the tactics of the enemy. They would persecute Christianity using that graph by claiming an attempted theocracy, an accusation which flies in the face of the nation’s entire purpose for being, and history of action.

The thing which must be known, is that ONLY in a nation assembled under Christian principles, can there ever be true religious freedom. Bible believers know that you cannot mandate another man’s faith.

Freelancer on April 7, 2014 at 1:52 AM

What in the text leads you to that conclusion?? Akzed on April 6, 2014 at 8:28 PM

The Talmud. gryphon202 on April 6, 2014 at 9:06 PM

The Talmud was not the text in question. You obviously have no idea what you’re talking about.

Akzed on April 7, 2014 at 9:06 AM

The very soul of the United States, everything it stands for – Freedom and tolerance – is under attack by those very much like Islamic Extremists. Islamic Extremists TALK a great ‘game’ regarding ‘tolerance’ while seeking to destroy ALL that differs from what THEY believe. The current LIBERAL threat in our country TALKS a great ‘game’ about diversity, freedom and tolerance yet seeks to destroy every aspect of Christianity, first seeking to drive it out of the public eye – undergroud – to appease those very same Islamic Extremists as well as their own inner intolerance.

Socialism seeks to destroy everyhting people depend on other than the government. During this current administration our economy has been strategicly been undermined, eroded, and destroyed. People’s own independence has been targeted and wiped out. Over 6 million people who already owned health care insurance that met their needs and ability to pay LOST that insurance – many their jobs as well – because of a government that forced an edict upon an opposing people declaring they MUST by a one-size-fits-all agenda-driven government-defined policy that drives the cost of these inadequate policies so high that Americans would become dependent on government subsidies just to be abe to pay for them. Another piece of independence and freedom destroyed….

Obama does not ‘serve the people’ – he is following the teachings of his self-professed tutor Communist Frank Marshall Davis and hate-spewing, racist, Anti-American Mentor ‘ pastor’ Jeremiah Wright in waging this war to destroy everything on which this nation was built, the exceptionalism of its people and history, and to drive its people to their knees in submission to an all-powerful government.

easyt65 on April 7, 2014 at 9:32 AM

Muslim Brotherhood Launches Own U.S. Political Party

Islamofascism: With an eye toward the 2016 election, the radical Muslim Brotherhood has built the framework for a political party in America that seeks to turn Muslims into an Islamist voting bloc.

‘Muslim voters have the potential to be swing voters in 2016,” said Nihad Awad in launching the benign-sounding U.S. Council of Muslim Organizations, whose membership reads like a Who’s Who of Brotherhood front groups.

“We are aiming to bring more participation from the Muslim community.”

USCMO also aims to elect Islamists in Washington, with the ultimate objective of “institutionalizing policies” favorable to Islamists — that is, Shariah law.

This development bears careful monitoring in light of the U.S. Brotherhood’s recently exposed goal to wage a “civilization jihad” against America that explicitly calls for infiltrating the U.S. political system and “destroying (it) from within.”

The subversive plan was spelled out in hundreds of pages of founding archives that the FBI confiscated from a Brotherhood leader’s home in the Washington suburbs after 9/11.

Translated from Arabic, the secret documents listed a number of Brotherhood front organizations — some of which just happen to make up the newly formed USCMO.

Front and center is the Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations, the catalyst behind this Trojan horse jihadist political party.

CAIR is linked in federal criminal court documents to the terrorist group Hamas, the Brotherhood’s Palestinian branch. CAIR’s chief Awad, who announced the USCMO at the National Press Club, is so radioactive, the FBI refuses to do outreach with him and his so-called Muslim-rights group until it can “resolve whether there continues to be a connection between its executives and Hamas.”

Equally troubling is the Muslim American Society, another founding member of the USCMO. MAS was formed as “the overt arm of the Muslim Brotherhood in the United States,” a 2007 Justice Department court filing states. A 2011 MAS press release praised Osama bin Laden as “a visionary who believed in an Islamic state in Afghanistan.”

The list of bad actors doesn’t end there. The chairman of America’s new Islamist party is none other than Oussama Jammal, who once headed the notorious Bridgeview Mosque in Chicago.

One of that mosque’s leaders was arrested and jailed for funneling millions to Hamas. And one of its most honored guests was bin Laden’s spiritual mentor, the late Palestinian cleric Abdullah Azzam. Some of Azzam’s relatives are Bridgeview members.

“The walls were covered with Hamas posters and recruiting literature showing masked gunmen brandishing automatic weapons. . . . You could see daggers plunged into Jewish hearts wrapped up in American flags,” said Steve Emerson, describing the mosque in his book “American Jihad.” “They even had a library filled with terrorist videos.”

Akzed on April 7, 2014 at 10:30 AM

Do you know why they call it faith? Because it’s NOT knowledge.

SauerKraut537 on April 6, 2014 at 4:50 PM

Nonsense. BLIND faith may be that… but Christian faith is not blind faith. I have faith in my wife because I know her, I know her characteristics, and I put my faith in her. It is the same with my faith in God. I know God through His Word, and I have seen it with my own eyes in ways I never could have expected.

I have FAITH because of my KNOWLEDGE in God through His Word and my experiences living out my life for Him.

It would be easier to say that you have no faith in Him because you do not KNOW him. Lack of knowledge is your stumbling block.

dominigan on April 7, 2014 at 11:59 AM

+1 for the ‘Diversity is not an inherent virtue’ crowd. If there is one truth and a handful of un-truths, what’s the virtue in having them equally represented? And I’m not speaking specifically of religion but anything.

Regarding the actual complaint, it’s nonsense. I have experience distributing fliers to schools, and for the SAKE of diversity as long as I get it pre-approved for distribution. I haven’t ever seen anything advertising local private schools or specific church services, but through our kids at school we’ve gotten fliers for businesses, Bible studies, clubs, lessons, local events, and school break camps from a variety of institutions. The flier I distributed was a halloween event co-sponsored by a local private school.

I’m pretty sure their screening criteria is illegal and inappropriate content such as drugs, alcohol, gambling, etc. If Muslims have a problem they should have their mosque put on an event and invite the school children. That’s how it works: it’s open to everyone.

MC88 on April 7, 2014 at 1:34 PM

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