Should Americans be allowed to buy and sell raw milk?

posted at 1:01 pm on April 5, 2014 by Dustin Siggins

Over the last six months, I’ve been hearing pretty much nonstop about the benefits of drinking raw milk — that is, unpasteurized milk — from a friend who also believes that eating raw meat is preferable to cooked meat.

This friend has repeatedly ignored my gag reflex when the subjects are brought up. But thanks to his insistence, this post at the Campaign for Liberty’s website caught my eye:

Freedom comes with a certain amount of risk. If you wanted to live a risk free life, then a benevolent dictatorship might be your preferred form of government. But, as Thomas Jefferson wrote,  ”I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies [sic] attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it.”

On his Facebook page, Rep. Massie at least had a sense of humor about the opposition to his bills from Big Milk, posting “The lactose lobby can be so intolerant! It’s time to legalize freedom.”

We’re glad to see Rep. Massie is in line with a great American political tradition that places personal freedom over the desire for the Nanny State to keep us safe from ourselves. This sort of strong opposition, this early, from Big Milk is actually a good sign that they’re worried about the number of original cosponsors this legislation has and the potential for momentum to swing in our direction.

Massie has introduced two bills that would create more freedom with regards to milk sales. One, with 11 cosponsors, would allow for the interstate sale of raw milk. The other, with 20 cosponsors, would allow the sale of raw milk between states that already allow raw milk sales.

Via Politico, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) reports the risk of raw milk is substantial, as compared to pasteurized milk:

  • During 1993–2006, 121 outbreaks reported to CDC were caused by dairy products where the investigators could determine if the dairy product was pasteurized or unpasteurized (raw). These outbreaks included 4,413 illnesses, 239 hospitalizations, and 3 deaths.

  • 73 outbreaks (46 from fluid milk and 27 from cheese) were caused by raw milk, and 48 outbreaks (10 from fluid milk and 38 from cheese) were caused by pasteurized milk.

  • Probably no more than 1% of the milk consumed in the United States is raw, yet more outbreaks were caused by raw milk than by pasteurized milk.

  • If you consider the number of outbreaks caused by raw milk in light of the very small amount of milk that is consumed raw, the risk of outbreaks caused by raw milk is at least 150 times greater than the risk of outbreaks caused by pasteurized milk.

And the diseases have worse effects:

  • The hospitalization rate for patients in outbreaks caused by raw milk was 13 times higher (13% vs. 1%) than the rate for people in outbreaks caused by pasteurized milk.

  • This difference is probably partly because the outbreaks caused by raw milk were all caused by bacterial infections that tend to be more severe. For example, E. coli O157:H7, a bacterium that can cause kidney failure and death, was a common cause of outbreaks due to raw milk. For outbreaks caused by pasteurized milk, relatively mild viral infections and foodborne toxins were more common causes.

  • This difference makes sense because raw milk is probably contaminated at the time of milking of the cows. The skin of cows is contaminated with huge numbers of bacteria, even if sanitary precautions are taken. Some of the bacteria, while harmless to the cows, can cause disease in people. On the other hand, if pasteurized milk is contaminated after pasteurization, it is likely to be due to improper storage or by an infected food preparer. In these situations, serious bacterial infections are less likely to happen.

However, one advocate told Politico the risk shouldn’t matter with regards to its legality:

Pete Kennedy, president of the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund, the major national group advocating for raw milk, argues that the statistics paint a misleading picture. He says there are several other products that aren’t banned that contribute to diseases, such as cigarettes, alcohol and even pasteurized milk in some cases.

“The trouble is that raw milk is the only food that is held to a standard of perfection,” he said.

I don’t drink milk due to a slight allergy, but recently I took the plunge and drank a glass of my friend’s raw milk. I didn’t end up in the hospital, and in fact felt none of the normal allergenic effects I normally associate with drinking milk (something he had said would be the case). I doubt I’ll be making raw milk a regular habit, but like how I support the right of restaurants to allow smoking despite my personal distaste for the habit, and how I wear a bike helmet and a seat belt despite my opposition to mandates for adults to use both, I am glad to see Rep. Massie and a bipartisan group work to give the right of free trade back to the American people.

As always, though, praise for this effort should be balanced with realization of how inconsequential this issue is in the grand scheme of things. Yes, it’s great to see any legislation that expands personal liberty get bipartisan support in Congress, even if it’s going nowhere fast, but let’s be honest: the ban on sales of raw milk is hardly the nation’s most pressing issue. If only these guys and gals could actually work together on issues of critical importance — say, cutting the budget where there is enormous bipartisan agreement, such as ethanol subsidies or fraud, duplication, and improper payments, or joining the majority of American people in banning late-term abortions.

 

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Comment pages: 1 2

Just label it ‘organic’ and quadruple the price: Leftists will then demand that it be on the shelves at their Whole Foods stores. Suddenly all the fears will disappear with a simple label change.

ajacksonian on April 5, 2014 at 5:12 PM

I’ll only drink raw milk from rBST cows.

Murphy9 on April 5, 2014 at 5:17 PM

If you’re dumb enough to suck it straight out of the cow, go right ahead.

Ronnie on April 5, 2014 at 5:26 PM

I’ve been buying and consuming ‘raw milk’ for a few months now. I had to buy a ‘share’ of a cow (so like I’m an owner of the cow and stuff) in order to A) buy the milk and B) not to be a criminal in this great land of ours.

The product is great. Total meal replacement for me (not strict, still eat a meal or two a day for the most part). Losing pounds and I believe it is helping me back to better health… and since the Affordable Care Act is hardly affordable for me at this time, it’s just what the theoretical doctor ordered.

I work in the trades with my hands and have had severe discomfort for years on the job. Since drinking the ‘raw milk’ the severe is gone. Bonus add as far as I’m concerned.

Salted Meats on April 5, 2014 at 5:26 PM

Bottom line is if folks want to buy raw milk fine…but if they get sick do Tax Payers pay for their new kidney op?

In the age of Obamacare that is likely…

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 4:56 PM

Why is it MORE likely that’ll taxpayers will pay for the consequences of (the tiny possibility that someone becomes deathly ill from drinking) raw milk than for any other reason people might get sick?

Much more reasonable to ban the sale of peanut products- I’ll guarantee more kids die from peanut allergies than from raw milk. Yet why are you not calling for reasonable restrictions on peanut butter?

Why fixate on this particular risk, among so many much more likely ones, and why is there the assumption that somehow YOU will be called upon to pay for it?

Most people still have insurance that will cover their illnesses, be it resulting from peanuts or raw milk or or water skiing or alcohol (Yeah! let’s go THERE!), so I find it disingenuous that there is all this hand-wringing over poor me, the taxpayer, on the hook for all those doctor bills.

How many people actually get sick from contaminated raw milk- not dead, not hospitalized, just sick? Maybe 100 per year. How many get sick from contaminated vegetables and fruit? Well over 2000 per year.

Quit hand wringing.

Pless1foEngrish on April 5, 2014 at 5:39 PM

I can’t deny the fact that many products and ingredients which can be legally ingested into our bodies are often bad for us, so frankly I don’t see why we should sacrifice our liberties on something as stupidly base as MILK when you can eat raw vegetables bathed in fecal matter. Or, you could drink grain alcohol, smoke tobacco, and if doing so often enough, fry your liver and lungs.

We’re so used to government regulating our choices, at this point, that it’s just about a lost cause. I don’t drink raw milk, but if I wanted to I’d want the freaking government OUT OF MY BUSINESS as I do so. On that basis alone, I’d side with those who feel the same.

xNavigator on April 5, 2014 at 5:42 PM

Adjoran on April 5, 2014 at 4:25 PM

As far as freedom goes, all our wallets are always on the hook. If we all made decisions based on other’s freedom while only looking into our own personal wallet…..we would have a lot bigger problem than trusting others to manage personal risk. The problem would be us giving all freedoms to the Government to give back to us as they please. Freedom and things like Love come with a cost. I say belly up to the bar and pay the tab.

Again, what do I know?

HonestLib on April 5, 2014 at 6:21 PM

I haven’t been through all the comments so someone may have already mentioned this, but one possible reason Dustin didn’t get his usual reaction to the milk could be the type of cow it was from. Jersey cows, among others including the Masai cattle, produce milk with a preponderance of a different beta-casein than the standard black and white American dairy cow.

I’ve found the same thing, Jersey milk from a local dairy (sold in lovely half gallon glass bottles) doesn’t upset my stomach the way uncooked regular milk does. My naturopath can’t drink cows milk, but had no trouble during the months she lived with the Masai. I’d bet it’s the type of cow the milk came from as much if not more than the fact that the milk was “raw”.

LibraryGryffon on April 5, 2014 at 6:46 PM

You can get badly injured.

crankyoldlady on April 5, 2014 at 2:42 PM

[Back ... was out detailing the cars]

So, yeah, that’s bordering on good and damn cranky, all right. I myself am more lunatic fringe when it comes to government intrusion on our liberties. It is one of the few things that really makes me angry.

Cops pulling people over because of fuc*king seat belts?! Yep…that’s one. The government barring me from buying cow’s milk from a dairy farmer? Can you go back 50 years to our recent agrarian past and even imagine something so outrageous?

We are making cigarettes illegal while we legalize pot. In a just world the emergency rooms O’Bozo frets about would be filled with politicians seeking trauma care after a meeting with constituents.

Jaibones on April 5, 2014 at 6:47 PM

I drank raw milk for 15 years. grew up on a dairy farm in MI.
If I could buy it locally I would. alas NENC not a lot of dairy farms.

conservative tarheel on April 5, 2014 at 6:49 PM

if they get sick do Tax Payers pay for their new kidney op?

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 4:56 PM

Really? You want to have a who-deserves-what-treatment conversation? ‘Cause raw milk is awfully far down the list of what self-induced maladies “Tax Payers” are on the hook for these days.

Jaibones on April 5, 2014 at 6:50 PM

if they get sick do Tax Payers pay for their new kidney op?

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 4:56 PM

Really? You want to have a who-deserves-what-treatment conversation? ‘Cause raw milk is awfully far down the list of what self-induced maladies “Tax Payers” are on the hook for these days.

Jaibones on April 5, 2014 at 6:50 PM

Ok I see your point and that’s not what I meant but I can see how it could be interpreted that way.

Actually I said upthread if people want to buy raw milk they should be allowed to do it…I just asked questions about it that based on some cases I’ve read might be cautionary.

I do think predictable common sense regulation is worthwhile and should be mostly at the state level…but currently we don’t live in common sensical times.

Enjoy your Raw Milk Crusade Ya’ll…I’ll stick with pasteurization…..Good Luck

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 7:06 PM

“If they get sick do Tax Payers pay for their new kidney op?”
workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 4:56 PM

I believe that type two diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease.
The second leading cause is traumatic blood loss followed by bacterial/viral infections, poisons, etc…
Somehow, I think that toxicity from raw dairy (which I believe is consumed by every country in the EU) is way down on your half-arsed attempt at logic.

kregg on April 5, 2014 at 7:11 PM

I believe that type two diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease.
The second leading cause is traumatic blood loss followed by bacterial/viral infections, poisons, etc…
Somehow, I think that toxicity from raw dairy (which I believe is consumed by every country in the EU) is way down on your half-arsed attempt at logic.

kregg on April 5, 2014 at 7:11 PM

“All of that and more happened beginning in April 2012 when the children were among 19 people – 15 of them under the age of 19 — who fell ill with E. coli O157:H7, a potentially fatal foodborne pathogen. Soon after, Oregon health officials determined that the outbreak was caused by raw milk from Foundation Farm near Wilsonville in Western Oregon — the Salyers’ family farm. Four of the sickened children were hospitalized with kidney failure…”

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2014/02/a-mom-and-a-dairymans-plea-dont-feed-children-raw-milk/#.U0CPaNy4nHh

Biteme!

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 7:20 PM

I do think predictable common sense regulation is worthwhile and should be mostly at the state level…but currently we don’t live in common sensical times.

Rewarding government for interfering in our lives (health care) by letting them interfere even more (deciding what you can eat and drink) is most definitely not a common sense position.

JSchuler on April 5, 2014 at 7:31 PM

Somehow, I think that toxicity from raw dairy (which I believe is consumed by every country in the EU) is way down on your half-arsed attempt at logic.

kregg on April 5, 2014 at 7:11 PM

Enjoy the tasty risk…

Timeline of Key Studies and Regulatory Changes for Cheeses Made from Raw Milk

1941-1944: Typhoid fever epidemics are linked to cheddar cheese made from raw milk in Canada; outbreak-related Salmonella typhi strains are recovered from 30-day-old cheese, but not from 48- or 63-day-old cheese resulting in Alberta, Canada halting the sale of raw milk cheese unless ripened for at least 90 days (Marth 1969).

1946: Brucella abortus is found to survive in cheddar cheese made from raw milk for up to 6 months depending on initial inoculation level, but the authors of the study conclude that cheddar cheese is not a proven carrier of undulant fever (the human disease caused by B. abortus). D’Amico (2008a) suggests that this study, combined with the earlier data on typhoid fever illnesses not attributed to cheese cured for more than 63 days, is the likely origin of the 60-day curing period in the US. However, subsequent reports in the 1940s show extended survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (>100 days), Salmonella typhi (3-10 months), and hemolytic Streptococcus (>160 days) in cheddar cheese (D’Amico 2008a).

1950: FDA promulgates regulations (21 CFR Section 133) requiring that cheesemakers use pasteurized milk, or cure the cheese for no less than 60 days at a temperature greater than 35°F. According to D’Amico (2008a), there are over 30 natural cheeses that can be made legally from raw milk in the US under this rule.

1960s: Additional challenge studies show survival of pathogens including Salmonella enterica subtype Typhimurium beyond the 60 day curing period; Salmonella typhi is found to survive in stirred curd granular cheddar cheese for 150-180 days when held at refrigeration temperatures (D’Amico 2008a).

1987: Numerous foodborne illnesses are linked to commercial fluid raw milk including 22 deaths from Salmonella Dublin infections from 1971-1975 (Werner 1979). This prompts a Citizen’s Petition and federal judge’s ruling that orders the FDA to ban fluid raw milk and milk products from interstate commerce (21 CFR Section 1240.61). The regulations allowing cheesemakers to sell cheese made with raw milk if cured for 60 days at a temperature greater than 35°F remain in place (21 CFR Section 133).

1973-1992: CDC reviews reported outbreaks and illnesses from raw milk (Headrick 1998) and cheeses made from raw milk (Altekreuse 1998). During this time, there were 32 reported cheese-associated outbreaks and 58 deaths, but the authors conclude that “If current Food and Drug Administration sanitary requirements for cheesemaking had been met, these outbreaks would have been preventable.” They go on to say: “Curing cheeses kill
s most bacteria present in cheeses; however, evidence from sources other than the CDC Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System suggests that curing alone may not be a sufficient pathogen control step to eliminate Salmonella, Listeria, and E. coli O157:H7 from cheese.”

1996: Researchers at South Dakota State University publish a study showing that 60-day aging is largely ineffectual in reducing levels of E. coli O157:H7 in cheddar cheese. FDA then asks the National Advisory Committee for Microbiological Criteria for Food (NACMCF) to re-examine the literature on the efficacy of 60-day aging. In a memo to FDA, the committee states: “the sixty-day aging process for hard cheese is questionable as an effective measure in support of the public’s health.”

2002: Health officials from Alberta, Canada report an outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 hemorrhagic colitis associated with Gouda cheese made from raw milk (Honish 2005). In their paper, the authors suggest that Canada re-evaluate the federal regulations for aging of hard cheeses made from raw milk.

2004: In an interview with Food Safety Magazine, FDA officials state that they are developing a “risk profile for raw milk cheeses, which will aid in the Agency’s assessment of the requirements for processing these cheeses,” based, in part, on the report by the NACMCF and other recent research suggesting that 60-day aging may be insufficient to protect the public’s health (Sheehan 2004).

2006: Schlesser and colleagues report results from a study of E. coli O157:H7 survival in cheddar cheese made from raw milk, and confirm previous reports questioning the efficacy of 60-day aging to eliminate E. coli O157:H7 during cheese ripening.

2008: D’Amico and colleages determine that the 60-day aging requirement does not ensure safety of surface-mold-ripened soft cheeses manufactured from raw or pasteurized milk when Listeria monocytogenes is introduced as a postprocessing contaminant. The authors conclude that “the safety of cheeses of this type must be achieved through control strategies other than aging, and thus revision of current federal regulations is warranted.”

2010: According to press quotes, FDA officials are conducting a nationwide survey of cheese safety with a focus on Listeria monocytogenes contamination. Notably, this survey encompasses both raw and pasteurized cheese products from large and small cheesemakers.

In November, the CDC reports 38 illnesses from Gouda cheese made from raw milk and aged for 60 days in accordance with regulations (CDC, 2010).

A study in the December 1, 2010 issue of the Journal of Food Protection documents survival of E. coli O157:H7 in aged Gouda and stirred-curd cheddar cheese (D’Amico 2010). The authors conclude that “the 60-day aging requirement is based on decades-old research indicating that Brucella abortus is eliminated in cheddar cheese alone is insufficient to completely eliminate levels of viable E. coli O157:H7 in Gouda or stirred-curd cheddar cheese manufactured from raw milk contaminated with low levels of this pathogen.”

Dairy-related Outbreaks Attributed to Raw Milk Cheese

Internationally, dairy-related outbreaks are relatively uncommon in developed countries, but an estimated 11.8 percent are attributed to cheeses made from raw milk (FSANZ 2006). Foodborne disease outbreaks have been reported in all countries that allow raw milk cheese including France where raw milk cheeses are popular (Desenclos 1996; Desenclos 1996; DeValk 2000; Dominguez 2009; Haeghebaert 2003; Ostyn 2010). The most recent published review in the US examined reported cheese-related outbreaks and illnesses from 1973 – 1992 (Altekruse 1998). Fresh Mexican-style cheeses (for example, queso fresco) were the most frequently implicated vehicle and caused 56 of the 58 deaths described in the review; the other 2 deaths were linked to improper pasteurization of Mozzarella cheese.

Bacterial Pathogens That Can Survive in Cheeses Aged for 60 Days

Brucella spa.: incubation 1-2 months or longer; duration, may relapse for years; signs and symptoms, fever, headache, joint pain, depression, weight loss. Can cause abortions in dairy animals.

Campylobacter: incubation, 2-5 days; duration, 2-7 days, some patients develop paralytic syndrome as a long-term complication; symptoms, diarrhea (sometimes bloody), cramps, fever, nausea, vomiting, muscle aches. Found in healthy dairy animals.

E. coli O157 and other pathogenic E. coli: incubation, 2-8 days; duration, 5-8 days, some patients develop kidney disease or other long-term complications; symptoms, diarrhea (often bloody), cramps, sometimes low-grade fever. Found in healthy dairy animals.

Listeria monocytogenes: incubation, 3-70 days (average 3 weeks); duration, variable depending on susceptibility, death rate in patients with meningitis as high as 80 percent, septicemia as high as 50 percent; symptoms, septicemia, meningitis, intra-uterine infections in pregnant women with spontaneous abortions and stillbirths. Found in healthy dairy animals and the dairy processing environment

Mycobacterium bovis: incubation, 4-12 weeks to positive tuberculin test, 1-2 years for systemic infection; duration, years, may persist lifetime as latent infection; symptoms,pulmonary and extra-pulmonary disease. Systemic illness in cattle, transmitted through milk and aerosols.

Salmonella enteric: incubation, 6 – 48 hours; duration, 2-8 days, some patients develop long-term complications including arthritic disease; symptoms, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, cramps fever. Some strains cause illness in dairy animals.

Salmonella typhi: incubation, 8-14 days; duration, variable, case fatality of 10-20 percent without antibiotic treatment; symptoms, fever, cramps, diarrhea, anorexia. Human carriers.

Staphylococcus enterotoxin: incubation, 2-4 hours; duration,1-3 days; symptoms, vomiting, nausea, cramping. Animal and human carriers; toxin produced following growth in a food.

The presence of pathogens in milk used for production of raw milk cheeses represents a risk for consumers. Oliver (2009) reviewed the literature on pathogen prevalence in US bulk tank milk and found these levels.

•Campylobacter: 2 – 9.2 percent

•E. coli O157:H7: 0 – 0.75 percent

•Listeria monocytogenes: 2.8 – 7.0 percent

•Salmonella spp: 0 – 11 percent

•Shiga-toxin E. coli: 2.4 – 3.96 percent

•Yersinia enterocolitica: 1.2 – 6.1 percent

Altekruse, S. F., B. B. Timbo, J. C. Mowbray, N. H. Bean, and M. E. Potter. 1998. Cheese-associated outbreaks of human illness in the United States, 1973 to 1992: sanitary manufacturing practices protect consumers. J Food Prot 61:1405-7.

2. Bachmann, H. P., and U. Spahr. 1995. The fate of potentially pathogenic bacteria in Swiss hard and semihard cheeses made from raw milk. J Dairy Sci 78:476-83.

3. Back, J. P., S. A. Langford, and R. G. Kroll. 1993. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes in Camembert and other soft cheeses at refrigeration temperatures. J Dairy Res 60:421-9.

4. CDC. 2000. Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection associated with eating fresh cheese curds–Wisconsin, June 1998. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 49:911-3.

5. CDC. 2001. From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Outbreak of Listeriosis associated with homemade Mexican-style cheese–North Carolina, October 2000-January 2001. JAMA 286:664-5.

6. CDC. 2008. Outbreak of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Newport infections associated with consumption of unpasteurized Mexican-style aged cheese–Illinois, March 2006-April 2007. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 57:432-5.

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/02/is-the-60-day-rule-still-valid-for-raw-milk-cheese/#.U0CTrdy4nHg

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 7:39 PM

Raw milk was banned because the milk from one sick cow couldinfect hundreds or thousands. I propose the following: First, require that every bottle be traceable to a single cow, or at most a group of four cows. Second, require that equipment be sterilized before it is used for milk from other cows. Third, require that purchasers be able to register so that they can be informed if a problem occurs. (Purchasing a known bottle with a credit or debit card would have the same effect.)

This would limit the risks at a burden that would be tolerable to most people who choose the product.

I would also lift the milkfat standards for raw milk because they are often met by mixing milk from different breeds in large batches. I wouldn’t mind requiring that the purchaser be informed by label or by notice from the dairy, as to which breed(s) produced that milk.

njcommuter on April 5, 2014 at 7:43 PM

Rewarding government for interfering in our lives (health care) by letting them interfere even more (deciding what you can eat and drink) is most definitely not a common sense position.

JSchuler on April 5, 2014 at 7:31 PM

Really?

By November 2008, China reported an estimated 300,000 victims,with six infants dying from kidney stones and other kidney damage, and an estimated 54,000 babies being hospitalised. The chemical appeared to have been added to milk to cause it to appear to have a higher protein content. In a separate incident four years before, watered-down milk had resulted in 13 infant deaths from malnutrition.

A nitrogen-rich chemical used to make plastic and sometimes as a fertilizer may have been deliberately added to an ingredient in pet food that has sickened and killed cats and dogs across the country, public and private officials say. A leading theory is that it was added to fake higher protein levels.
Melamine has been found in wheat gluten, rice protein concentrate and, in South Africa, corn gluten, all imported from China, and all meant for use in pet food, the Food and Drug Administration confirmed Thursday.

“It adds to the theory when you see other products that are labeled as protein supplements, in this case rice protein, and in South Africa corn gluten and in the previous case wheat gluten,” said Stephen Sundlof, FDA chief veterinarian. “That melamine was found in all three of those, it would certainly lend credibility to the theory that this was intentional.”

How the melamine got there is “not something we’re going to be able to determine until we actually investigate the plants in China,” he said.

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/industries/2007-04-19-pet-food-usat_N.htm

Here’s the deal: Complaints started rolling in to the FDA in 2007 about these treats, around the same time as the massive, deadly recall of pet foods containing melamine from China. Then, in 2009 and 2010, there were fewer complaints about the chicken jerky treats. Now again, in 2011 and especially in 2012, as dogs are being sickened yet again by the questionable treats, the FDA has finally begun to take action.

http://www.petsadviser.com/food/chinese-pet-food-ingredients/

According to a report from Food Safety News Thursday, the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has issued a recall for 58,000 pounds of ground beef from California’s Central Valley Meat Company this week after the meat was found to possible contain plastic. According to the report, the potentially defective meat was distributed to four states across the U.S. with intentions of serving it to children that utilize the National School Lunch Program.

The recall, which was reportedly issued after receiving customer complaints that the products contained “forgein materials” following shipments to Arkansas, California, Montana and Texas, has resulted in two case codes of “Fine Ground Beef.” The recalled products, “40-lb. cases containing 10-lb. chubs” with the establishment number “Est. 6063A” and case codes 6063A3091A and 6063A3091B, are included.

http://www.ibtimes.com/beef-recall-2013-58000-pounds-ground-beef-recalled-after-plastic-found-national-school-lunch-program

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 7:51 PM

Michigan allows consumers to buy cowshares in individual cows.

The risk is limited to their own cow

I think people should be allowed that informed risk, with the understanding they are solely responsible

When milk is sold to dairies, and product from multiple cows combined, the risk is multiplied

This is the risk people face everyday eating cooked hamburger. The average fast food hamburger may contain the meat of a thousand cows, so the outbreaks can be devastating, even if the meat is cooked, due to Heat stable enterotoxins excreted by bacteria like certain e coli strains. These beef bacteria also cause organ shut down and death

Superbugs are now everywhere, and heating does not kill all toxins

Meanwhile there is no limit on the number of unprotected sex partners a person may have, despite the AIDs and hepatitis viruses. Obamacare requires we pick up the medical bill. We even have to pay for sex change operations, with no refund to us, if the newly changed person has unprotected sex leading to disease

If we allow people to choose to have multiple unprotected sex partners, they should certainly be allowed to have informed unpasteurized cow sampling. I may try this (meaning cow) one day myself. See the Weston A Price Foundation which does great work in this field.

I also believe people should be allowed to smoke, should be allowed have clubs and other assemblies where they smoke, and should be allowed to have businesses where smoking is permitted. And I do not smoke

entagor on April 5, 2014 at 8:14 PM

Really?

Yes, really. I’d quote something else from your post, but none of it had anything to do with that statement.

JSchuler on April 5, 2014 at 8:17 PM

JSchuler on April 5, 2014 at 8:17 PM

Enjoy your raw milk crusade…I’ll stick to pasteurization…Good Luck

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 8:22 PM

Enjoy the tasty risk…
workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 7:39 PM

Life is a tasty risk … the loss of freedom leaves me with a sour taste.

kregg on April 5, 2014 at 8:37 PM

Actually I said upthread if people want to buy raw milk they should be allowed to do it…

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 7:06 PM

This is and was my main point. Who TF is the government to tell me what to eat?

Jaibones on April 5, 2014 at 8:51 PM

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 7:39 PM

And now that I have read your long piece on the history of food-borne illnesses associated with contaminated raw milk – thank you. Quite a compelling list for concern. Know your dairy supplier.

Jaibones on April 5, 2014 at 9:04 PM

Know your dairy supplier.

Jaibones on April 5, 2014 at 9:04 PM

That makes sense.

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 9:23 PM

Food safety news seems to be a reliable news link on all sorts of issues related to the food industry…They do regular updates and link to legal blogs so folks understand the regulation angle etc.

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 9:25 PM

I’ve purchased raw milk a few times from Whole Foods and quite enjoyed it.

I think it’s good to challenge my preservatives-laden digestive system with natural foods.

For years now I only buy organic eggs, butter, milk and cheese and feel much better for it.

The Ugly American on April 5, 2014 at 9:44 PM

I’ve purchased raw milk a few times from Whole Foods and quite enjoyed it.

I think it’s good to challenge my preservatives-laden digestive system with natural foods.

For years now I only buy organic eggs, butter, milk and cheese and feel much better for it.

The Ugly American on April 5, 2014 at 9:44 PM

The denial of choice because it’s “good for you” or “a good idea” has long been a progressive prerogative. If it doesn’t harm me, I don’t get bent out of shape about it. The law isn’t supposed to save us from ourselves.

gryphon202 on April 5, 2014 at 9:57 PM

Raw milk is only dangerous from major dairies. From small to medium sized dairies its totally safe because they don’t abuse their cows.

If you treat them terribly then they bleed into the milk… and it gets worse… puss… bacteria.

You don’t need to homogenize or pasteurize raw milk if you don’t abuse the cows.

Abuse the cows and you need to do all that stuff.

Karmashock on April 5, 2014 at 10:05 PM

The key passage from the pro-raw-milk piece I posted at the top:

Before we do that, however, let’s put the current discussion of unpasteurized milk safety into a wider context. Foodborne illness is a concern for many types of food. According to the most recent review of foodborne disease outbreaks in the U.S. in 2008 by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), seafood, produce and poultry were associated with the most outbreaks. Produce is responsible for the greatest number of illnesses each year (2,062), with nearly twice as many illnesses as poultry (1,112). Dairy products are at the bottom of the list. They cause the fewest outbreaks and illnesses of all the major food categories – beef, eggs, poultry, produce and seafood.

According to the CDC, during the period from 1990 − 2006, there were 24,000 foodborne illnesses reported each year on average. Of those, 315 per year are from dairy products. This means dairy products account for about 1.3% of foodborne illnesses each year. That’s not exactly an alarming number, considering that more than 75% of the population consumes dairy products regularly.

Jaibones on April 5, 2014 at 11:21 PM

You know where the original immunization for smallpox came from, right?

WryTrvllr on April 5, 2014 at 11:48 PM

http://multiple-sclerosis-research.blogspot.com/2013/01/what-is-hygiene-hypothesis.html

just in case this wasn’t brought up already.

WryTrvllr on April 5, 2014 at 11:58 PM

Yeah, two thumbs up for raw milk. No benefits and many risks have been demonstrated by scientists, but we all know that’s thanks to the powerful milk industry’s terrible influence on the world. Who cares about that silly germ theory anyway? It’s just fake science pushed by the crapitalists to make the natural commune lifestyle seem undesirable. In fact, a Koch (Robert, to be exact) played a significant role in spreading lies about these so-called “bacteria”. (A word that means staff or rod. Patriarchy, anyone?)

DisneyFan on April 6, 2014 at 6:49 AM

Food contamination comes from several sources even when the farm pasteurizes their milk and processing facilities pass health inspections.
I grew up in Michigan and like several residents of the State more than likely consumed products contaminated with PBB (polybrominated biphenyl) after the chemical was accidentally fed to 1.5 million chickens, 30,000 cattle, 5,900 pigs, and 1,470 sheep. Ron Howard starred in a movie about the debacle.
At the time my kid brother had a mysterious illnesses that lowered his autoimmune system, which led to testing for leukemia. Thankfully, he tested negative, but, he developed sensitivity to dairy products and hormonal imbalance.
A few years back my father was the first relative we’ve ever known in our family who was diagnosed and later died of cancer.
I’m not saying straight out that PBB was the culprit, however, my father never smoked and was what most of us would have considered low risk.

kregg on April 6, 2014 at 6:53 AM

If it doesn’t harm me, I don’t get bent out of shape about it. The law isn’t supposed to save us from ourselves.

gryphon202 on April 5, 2014 at 9:57 PM

And how does the requirement that milk be pasteurized harm you?

This sounds a lot like an attempt to put the ‘dumb’ back in freedom.

Stoic Patriot on April 6, 2014 at 7:42 AM

Edsel Ford, Henry Ford’s son supposedly died from Brucellosis from drinking raw milk. Smart people learn from other peoples hard lessons.

V7_Sport on April 6, 2014 at 7:49 AM

The denial of choice because it’s “good for you” or “a good idea” has long been a progressive prerogative. If it doesn’t harm me, I don’t get bent out of shape about it. The law isn’t supposed to save us from ourselves.

gryphon202 on April 5, 2014 at 9:57 PM

And how does the requirement that milk be pasteurized harm you?

This sounds a lot like an attempt to put the ‘dumb’ back in freedom.

Stoic Patriot on April 6, 2014 at 7:42 AM

He already told you. You put the c8ck in c8cksucker.

CW on April 6, 2014 at 8:10 AM

He already told you. You put the c8ck in c8cksucker.

CW on April 6, 2014 at 8:10 AM

Actually, he didn’t tell me how pasteurizing milk harms him. But you certainly put the ass in asinine.

Stoic Patriot on April 6, 2014 at 9:02 AM

Are the risks higher? Perhaps. But do the benefits outweigh that risk is the more appropriate question. That includes the risk to individual liberty. See Wickard v. Filburn as one of the greatest abominations to our Constitution in history.

Notwithstanding the misinformation on both sides, the market and citizens should decide (in full knowledge of the details) if selling raw milk from small farm producers is permissible or even desirable. Ultimately it should be about the quality and benefits of the product which in the end determine its availability- not some nanny state action under the guise of protection. See the armed raids on raw milk producing farms as one example of excessive application of force.

The primary issue is of course the grotesque overreach of government into peoples everyday lives today. In those endeavors they’ve lost all credibility and even if there is a legitimate point- it’s lost on most people.

Now I will say of consumed both raw and pasteurized milk from family farms. Nobody that I can recall over the years ever became sick from it. That’s not to say there isn’t a risk of contamination- there is. But it is, and should be a matter of preference and ensuring quality.

Marcus Traianus on April 6, 2014 at 9:19 AM

Should Americans be allowed…?” That says it all. Who does the ‘allowing’ and who’s business is it to tell us what we can or cannot eat? Next thing you know they will not ‘allow’ us to order our fried eggs sunny side up. Get off my lawn, feds…

bimmcorp on April 6, 2014 at 9:27 AM

In states where raw milk remains banned, black and “gray” markets have emerged for enthusiasts seeking “moonshine milk” in the belief that bacteria-killing heat from pasteurization also kills powerful enzymes and eliminates other properties that can cure allergies, asthma and even autism.

There you go. When your kid gets autism because you drank the socialist kool aid and got him vaccinated, get him drinking raw milk and he’ll be cured. And if the kid subsequently croaks from measles or listeria, at least he died free!

Joseph K on April 6, 2014 at 9:56 AM

Okay, I’ll re-post because the filters ate my last post.

I apply the Opiate Test when it comes to regulation. There are useful opiate-based drugs out there, but I won’t name them, because, filters. If we de-regulated opiate narcotics, legal producers would get their socks sued off because of Stupid Addict Tricks. This would have the effect of making opiates *less* available due to the costs of doing business raising to an unacceptable level.

Dairies don’t *have* to have raw milk available for sale in order to sell pasteurized milk. Opiate painkillers will always have an opiate. Lawsuits against raw milk producers will not drive the dairy business out of business. Furthermore, especially in the era of liquor labels, liquor companies have not been successfully sued over cases of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. I say we label raw milk as being potentially unsafe, but allow it to be sold.

Sekhmet on April 6, 2014 at 10:02 AM

Like most regulations, rules requiring pasteurization of milk have the effect of favoring larger businesses over smaller ones, and in this case, factory farms over traditional family farms. The danger from raw milk comes from the way most dairies manage their cows. If they heat the milk, they then can ignore most of the precautions farmers traditionally took to keep milk safe before pasteurization was available. None of the raw-milk bills I’ve seen absolve milk producers from liability for their product, and that remains the most effective incentive for them to take proper care with what they sell.

tomwinfl on April 6, 2014 at 10:05 AM

I guess we now know the real reason the dinosaurs died out.

Their milk wasn’t pasteurized.

This would also explain why all my ancestors who had their own milk cows and did not pasteurize their milk are now dead. Yeah, that’s it.

In fact, isn’t everyone dead now who lived in the time before pasteurization? There’s your proof!

Hey, this logic works for global warming, climate change, and most of the popular science presented in the MSM these days, so why not here as well?

LOL

s1im on April 6, 2014 at 10:10 AM

Joseph K on April 6, 2014 at 9:56 AM

You would never last a week living in the country, boy.

bimmcorp on April 6, 2014 at 10:19 AM

My neighbor’s a dairy farmer. He and his family drink raw milk and they haven’t died.

vityas on April 5, 2014 at 1:23 PM

That’s not the same thing as transporting the raw milk to a store and then selling it to consumers. It’s a risky proposition, and I don’t agree with the “let the consumer beware” premise. Pasteurization was invented for a good reason.

JannyMae on April 6, 2014 at 10:20 AM

I was raised on raw milk but no longer drink any milk; milk products okay but not the milk.

mixplix on April 6, 2014 at 10:28 AM

If cows are raised properly and fed uncontaminated grains and other feed, the milk they produce is fine. Have been drinking raw milk for years and feel just fine, thank you. Have a share in a farmer’s cow, and that’s just been a blessing.

chai on April 6, 2014 at 10:35 AM

Apparently farm families who have milk cows have been able to drink raw milk for decades.

katiejane on April 6, 2014 at 10:45 AM

We dont need milk regulation.

TX-96 on April 6, 2014 at 10:53 AM

Ridiculous. Drank raw milk all my childhood, never once got sick. Just like other raw foods, the safety of the product is determined by the quality of source.

Besides, since when did conservatives argue for more goverment control of the marketplace? Shame on HotGas for publishing such rubbish.

Norwegian on April 6, 2014 at 10:58 AM

Edsel Ford, Henry Ford’s son supposedly died from Brucellosis from drinking raw milk. Smart people learn from other peoples hard lessons.

V7_Sport on April 6, 2014 at 7:49 AM

Liberace died from HIV

WryTrvllr on April 6, 2014 at 11:16 AM

Sashimi tonight!!!

WryTrvllr on April 6, 2014 at 11:17 AM

You would never last a week living in the country, boy.

bimmcorp on April 6, 2014 at 10:19 AM

Most folks don’t live in the country, old man. If I lived in the country, on a farm , and was sure of the source, I’d drink raw milk no problem.

As JannyMae correctly points out, the issue is not about drinking raw milk, it is about selling it.

State officials and university researchers…are working with farmers such as Edwin Shank, owner of the Family Cow, whose milk has been linked to three outbreaks from a pathogen called campylobacter. The pathogen has the CDC especially worried because it has been the fastest-growing cause of raw milk outbreaks in the past five years.

Mr. Shank seems like a decent man, a family farmer who did his best to keep healthy animals and provide healthy milk. Didn’t work out too well.

Mari Tardiff, a 58-year-old Californian, said she fell ill nearly six years ago for “the romantic notion” about the benefits of raw milk. But in June 2008, she was paralyzed from the neck down after drinking raw milk tainted with campylobacter that she bought from a cow-share program she joined that month.

I’ll bet Ms. Tardiff did a lot of research trying to find a good source for that raw milk that nearly killed her. Oh well, caveat emptor. I’ll bet the family that owned the farm where she had shares in a cow had been drinking raw milk for centuries without any ill effect.

You read all this raw milk propaganda from people like the carnivorous hippies over at WestonPrice.org and they can’t point to a decent study that shows any appreciable benefit from drinking raw milk over pasteurized.

Before the widespread urban growth caused by industrialization, people kept dairy cows even in urban areas, and the short time between milking and consumption minimised the disease risk of drinking raw milk.[16] However, as urban densities increased and supply chains lengthened to the distance from country to city, the often days-old raw milk began to be recognized as a source of disease. For example, between 1912 and 1937 some 65,000 people died of tuberculosis contracted from consuming milk in England and Wales alone.

That’s 65000, Mr. Farmer. I’ll drink pasteurized, and take a vitamin pill.

Joseph K on April 6, 2014 at 11:36 AM

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 8:22 PM

Enjoy your servility… I’ll stick to freedom… Good luck.

JSchuler on April 6, 2014 at 11:38 AM

The danger from raw milk comes from the way most dairies manage their cows. If they heat the milk, they then can ignore most of the precautions farmers traditionally took to keep milk safe before pasteurization was available. None of the raw-milk bills I’ve seen absolve milk producers from liability for their product, and that remains the most effective incentive for them to take proper care with what they sell.

tomwinfl on April 6, 2014 at 10:05 AM

Well, that’s so much bullshit. You’ve never been around a Grade A dairy farm much have you? Bacterial counts, white cell counts,, regular, rigorus( a high stress event) inspections, health records, heifer vaccination for Brucellosis, TB testing, etc. Claiming that pasteurization is used to cover up lapses in dairy cow health is just foolish. It will get you put out of business pretty fast as a production unit. That’s what inspectors are for. And it is why each bulk tank is sampled and lab tested.

butch on April 6, 2014 at 1:01 PM

That’s 65000, Mr. Farmer. I’ll drink pasteurized, and take a vitamin pill.

Joseph K on April 6, 2014 at 11:36 AM

http://www.flu.gov/pandemic/history/1918/the_pandemic/index.html

AND, live in the country.

WryTrvllr on April 6, 2014 at 1:04 PM

Remember when that SWAT team frog-walked that Amish family out of their own home over this issue? What was that all about?

Another Libertarian on April 6, 2014 at 1:40 PM

And it is why each bulk tank is sampled and lab tested.

Bulk tanks and the whole centralized distribution system are are why store-bought milk tastes horrible. It doesn’t even taste like milk, because it is largely milk-based solids that are mixed with lactic acid to form it into a milk like substance. Then they label it “fresh”.

What a joke this country has become.

Another Libertarian on April 6, 2014 at 1:42 PM

I’ll make you this deal: arrange that I am not responsible for the consequences of anyone else’s “risk-taking” and I’ll back their “freedom” to take the risks.

But as long as I have to cover the bills, or care for their family if their risks backfire, then I expect them to be prudent enough to minimize the risk.

I don’t ask them not to ride motorcycles but, dammit, put on the helmet. And vaccinate your children.

When my wallet is off the hook, you’ll be free to engage in whatever crackpot fad you like. But if I have to clean up your mess, I demand reasonable precautions.

Adjoran on April 5, 2014 at 4:25 PM

Welcome, Comrade, to Obamacare.

captnjoe on April 6, 2014 at 1:50 PM

Another Libertarian on April 6, 2014 at 1:42 PM

I was referring to the farm bulk tank where the milk is collected at milking. It is a refrigerated, sterilizable, multigallon unit. Milk is sampled for the lab by the hauler as he collects it. The results are used as a barometer on herd health and milk quality.

butch on April 6, 2014 at 1:53 PM

Time to jump in on this one.
It seems to me that all sides in this and a few more points are correct. The problems and solutions are not mutually exclusive.

First, dose heating of the milk alter the milk? Yes it does. Good or bad. Depends on what you use the milk for. Almost every thing you do with milk it is OK. Except making cheese, butter, ice cream or yogurt. Then you have to add back the enzymes that were destroyed. Except for some highly special cheeses, not a big problem. One Norwegian cheese called Gjetost needs the high heat to form. For these reasons Raw milk should be available to the public.

Second, is raw milk bad? It seems the problem is not that the bad things are always in the milk when it is in the cow. The problem seems to be what happens if the dairy heard is not taken proper care of and the milk is not properly handled. To this the Government should be responsible to the public to insure safety.

Third, is the milk you drink raw or pasteurized? Not a simple question. Unless you understand what is going on with the milk after it leaves the cow.

Is the milk:
1. Raw
2. Powdered
3. Reconstituted
4. Condensed
5. Whole
6. Skim
7. 2%
8. Fat Free
9. Electron Irradiated
10. Gamma Irradiated
11. x-ray Irradiated
12. Long-life Shelf Stable

It is not the governments job to tell me if I can or can not drink raw milk but it dose look to me that it is the Governments job to tell me if it was properly produced and handled.

jpcpt03 on April 6, 2014 at 1:59 PM

JSchuler on April 5, 2014 at 8:17 PM

Enjoy your raw milk crusade…I’ll stick to pasteurization…Good Luck

workingclass artist on April 5, 2014 at 8:22 PM

Enjoy your pasteurized milk, and let the rest of us decide for ourselves. Your concern mongering is getting really annoying.

captnjoe on April 6, 2014 at 2:07 PM

Edsel Ford, Henry Ford’s son supposedly died from Brucellosis from drinking raw milk. Smart people learn from other peoples hard lessons.

V7_Sport on April 6, 2014 at 7:49 AM

A lot of people die driving Ford cars too. What is your point?

captnjoe on April 6, 2014 at 2:13 PM

Edsel Ford, Henry Ford’s son supposedly died from Brucellosis from drinking raw milk. Smart people learn from other peoples hard lessons.

V7_Sport on April 6, 2014 at 7:49 AM

Liberace died from HIV

WryTrvllr on April 6, 2014 at 11:16 AM

OK, I have to admit: there was a “what the heck, why would he bring that up” moment followed by the “Hey, I get it” moment.

V7_Sport on April 6, 2014 at 2:20 PM

Should Americans be allowed to buy anything raw? Meat is dangerous and should be kept away from children. Perhaps the safest thing would be to pass laws that require all products to be cooked by professionals before they pass into the stupid hands of the unwashed masses.

Another Libertarian on April 6, 2014 at 3:39 PM

It is not the governments job to tell me if I can or can not drink raw milk but it dose look to me that it is the Governments job to tell me if it was properly produced and handled.

Given that the federal government is inherently unfit to this task, does it seem reasonable to expect that it will do as you demand? Or is it more likely that favored parties will use the government (guns) to create a special market for themselves?

Another Libertarian on April 6, 2014 at 3:41 PM

Should Americans be allowed to buy anything raw? Meat is dangerous and should be kept away from children. Perhaps the safest thing would be to pass laws that require all products to be cooked by professionals before they pass into the stupid hands of the unwashed masses.

Another Libertarian on April 6, 2014 at 3:39 PM

Aye, including vegetables, as raw vegetables are responsible for an enormous number of food-poisoning cases.

slickwillie2001 on April 6, 2014 at 4:41 PM

I saw some raw milk recently in a hippy coffee shop/general store along this bike trail and they had it in a separate little cooler from the rest of the refrigerated dairy products. I thought it was a marketing thing at the time but perhaps they’re worried about contamination? I’m all about freedom but as a civilized society if things like heating up milk a little bit to keep these epidemics from breaking out, we better do it.

mike_NC9 on April 6, 2014 at 6:11 PM

“Dear lord please protect me from my fellow americans for they seem to know what is best for me.”

kregg on April 6, 2014 at 6:23 PM

Raw milk is absolutely delicious. It may cost $8-10/gallon, but it’s so damn good I can’t go back to the regular stuff that’s at the store. That stuff tastes like swill to me.

I’ve been drinking it for the past 2 years and have never had problems of any sort. In fact, I drink a gallon of it a day to help build muscle. GOMAD, check it out.

They should absolutely be allowed to sell it. The large companies lobbying for the ban of raw milk have an agenda : they don’t make money if milk can be bought directly from farmers.

thinkingthought on April 6, 2014 at 7:46 PM

I have no choice but to weigh in on this.

Yes.

moo on April 6, 2014 at 10:13 PM

Literally millions of lives have been saved by pasteurization… and people think it’s bad for them. Are these the same people that think vaccines cause autism?

Raw milk is stupid and dangerous- BUT, having said that, you can have at it.

My only hesitation is when people’s poor choices come to limit my choice. Like how at the grocery store more and more shelf space is being given over to “organic” foods. If people want to pay 4x as much for the same thing because it has an organic label on it- that’s their business. I just hate that it’s also reducing my selection by competing for shelf space.

bettercallputin on April 7, 2014 at 4:38 AM

But, then again milk isn’t that good for us as the USDA says it is now … is it?

kregg on April 7, 2014 at 5:42 AM

As always, though, praise for this effort should be balanced with realization of how inconsequential this issue is in the grand scheme of things.

I wouldn’t say it’s inconsequential. The most consequential portion of this would be to rein in the ban on raw milk solely to interstate commerce. As it is right now, if I sell you some raw milk in my town, and you drive across the state border to your home to drink it, that is considered “interstate commerce” and I will get raided by Milk SWAT. Get rid of that idea and you begin to break the back of the federal leviathan.

GWB on April 7, 2014 at 9:13 AM

Should Americans be allowed to buy alcohol?

Should Americans be allowed to buy tobacco products?

Should Americans be allowed to possess firearms?

Should Americans be allowed to own and operate automobiles?

Should Americans be allowed to decline the practice of meeting the minimum RDA through supplementation?

Should Americans be allowed to worship the God of their choosing, in the church of their choosing?

Every one of these things has a potential for physical harm to the chooser, even to the point of death.

Since we’re obviously not educated enough or bright enough to work the calculus for ourselves, and later generations won’t want to decide for themselves either, it sure is a good thing the government is here to decide for us.

applebutter on April 7, 2014 at 11:12 AM

And how does the requirement that milk be pasteurized harm you?

This sounds a lot like an attempt to put the ‘dumb’ back in freedom.

Stoic Patriot on April 6, 2014 at 7:42 AM

The FDA, the original organization to implement food safety, now engages in deliberately trying to destroy small businesses (my friend runs a small vitamin company and knows their raids, and subsequent court tossing of the charges, first hand) and delaying healthcare drugs to market. Much of the expansion of government, that now causes pharmaceuticals to be so expensive, has been directly caused by this organization. This organization has also spawned dozens of similar agencies that now overlap areas and result in thousands upon thousands of unneeded regulations. Like the hydra of Greek legend, this one organization has sprouted many heads that threaten our liberty on countless fronts. It needs severely trimmed. Yet some “patriots” think that the many bites and environment of fear to exercise our liberty is somehow a good thing.

By the way… what article/section of the US Constitution authorizes the existence of this department? (And don’t cite I.8.3 or you’ll just embarrass yourself.)

dominigan on April 7, 2014 at 2:01 PM

Well, that’s so much bullshit. You’ve never been around a Grade A dairy farm much have you? Bacterial counts, white cell counts,, regular, rigorus( a high stress event) inspections, health records, heifer vaccination for Brucellosis, TB testing, etc. Claiming that pasteurization is used to cover up lapses in dairy cow health is just foolish. It will get you put out of business pretty fast as a production unit. That’s what inspectors are for. And it is why each bulk tank is sampled and lab tested.

butch on April 6, 2014 at 1:01 PM

Agreed. My grandad was a dairy farmer for years. If anything, the pasteurization law encourages poor cleanliness since it allows lapses to be covered up. People who would buy raw milk usually know the farm and farmer it is coming from. Pasteurized milk is for those who don’t know where the milk is coming from.

dominigan on April 7, 2014 at 2:08 PM

applebutter on April 7, 2014 at 11:12 AM

Excellent post!

dominigan on April 7, 2014 at 2:09 PM

That’s a funny word – “allowed”. I wonder if the government keeps a master list of the things we’re allowed to do. I should very much like a copy, so that I can review it every morning before going out to live my life.

ceruleanblue on April 7, 2014 at 6:57 PM

It’s downright depressing how often you scratch a self-identified conservative and find a statist.

Most of the rationales given here for making it illegal for me to continue to buy raw milk and feed it to my large family as I have done for the last five years (without any problems) are precisely the same arguments given for ObamaCare.

Face it, those of you in favor of banning raw milk sales are not really Constitutionalists at all. The primary difference between you and Progressives is not opposition to overweening government intrusion into our lives, it’s that you just have a different shopping list of preferred unconstitutional government regulations.

DeputyHeadmistress on April 8, 2014 at 6:31 PM

The problem with legalizing raw milk in America is that the milk will come from the same system that makes meat in America. Awful cow growing practices will produce awful and often deadly milk. There will be 95% of that kind of milk, and 5% of the good, well-grown milk in a healthy normal way.

For that reason alone it’s probably good to keep it illegal and let the practice remain underground, with those in tiny communities who know the farmer and how s/he grows the cow buying directly and under the radar.

AlexB on April 8, 2014 at 6:56 PM

Face it, those of you in favor of banning raw milk sales are not really Constitutionalists at all. The primary difference between you and Progressives is not opposition to overweening government intrusion into our lives, it’s that you just have a different shopping list of preferred unconstitutional government regulations.

DeputyHeadmistress on April 8, 2014 at 6:31 PM

That’s a pretty queer litmus test Headmistress.

Murphy9 on April 9, 2014 at 5:32 PM

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