House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan released his annual budget blueprint on Tuesday morning, and it looks like a fairly familiar iteration of a lot of the deficit-reducing measures we’ve seen in his past proposals. As Philip Klein notes at the Washington Examiner, there are some changes that are clearly mindful of both our fraying economic-growth forecasts as well as election-year optics — namely, switching to a dynamic scoring analysis that accounts for the “macroeconomic fiscal impact” when calculating the budgetary effects of policy proposals to achieve some of the budget cuts, while avoiding huge new entitlement reform proposals that Democrats could use as ammunition — but the overarching message and goal is pretty similar:

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But of course, the mere mention of such a vastly more sustainable long-term fiscal plan almost immediately inspired Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to launch into yet another of his unhinged Koch-addled rants that seem to be dominating his floor speeches lately, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

Whereas, for their part, Senate Democrats were so courageous as to… not actually make a budget to function as the party’s defining fiscal platform. Again.