Quotes of the day

posted at 8:01 pm on March 30, 2014 by Allahpundit

The Russian troops who are holding Crimea won’t be sent into Ukraine, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov says. “We have absolutely no intention of — or interest in — crossing Ukraine’s borders,” Lavrov told a Russian TV station Saturday, according to a translation by .

The comments from Moscow come after a phone call from Russian President Vladimir Putin to President Obama Friday. The two leaders discussed possible diplomatic solutions to the crisis, which has sparked Western sanctions. And they agreed that Lavrov and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry should meet “to discuss next steps,” as Friday…

On Friday, U.S. officials said that Russia has massed from 35,000 to 40,000 troops near the border with Ukraine, .

***

One of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s closest ex-advisers has claimed that the ex-KGB agent ultimately wants to reclaim Finland for Russia.

Andrej Illiaronov, Putin’s economic adviser between 2000 and 2005 and now senior member of the Cato Institute think tank, said that “parts of Georgia, Ukraine, Belarus, the Baltic States and Finland are states where Putin claims to have ownership.”

“Putin’s view is that he protects what belongs to him and his predecessors,” he said.

When asked if Putin wishes to return to the Russia of the last tsar, Nicholas II, Illiaronov said: “Yes, if it becomes possible.”

***

Russia’s ambassador to the United States this morning had a sharp retort when asked about President Obama’s comments that Russia is a “regional power acting out of weakness.”

“If you consider Russia ‘a regional power,’” he said, “look at our region — it is from Europe to Asia.” President Vladimir Putin has talked up a Eurasioan Union as his anti-Western alternative to the European Union, and close advisers to Putin believe in a certain Eurasian ideology.

When ABC’s George Stephanopoulos asked the ambassador whether Russia would consider pulling back from Crimea as a condition of a diplomatic solution, he wasn’t taken too seriously either: “What kind of from Crimea are you talking about?” Ambassador Kislyak said. “We are talking about territory of Russian Federation [sic].”

***

Russia threatened several Eastern European and Central Asian states with retaliation if they voted in favor of a United Nations General Assembly resolution this week declaring invalid Crimea’s referendum on seceding from Ukraine, U.N. diplomats said…

According to interviews with U.N. diplomats, most of whom preferred to speak on condition of anonymity for fear of angering Moscow, the targets of Russian threats included Moldova, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan as well as a number of African countries.

A spokesman for Russia’s Mission to the U.N. denied that Moscow threatened any country with retaliation if it supported the resolution, saying: “We never threaten anyone. We just explain the situation.”

According to the diplomats, the Russian threats were not specific. But they said it was clear to the recipients of the warnings not to support the resolution that retaliatory measures could include steps such as expelling migrant workers from Russia, halting natural gas supplies or banning certain imports to Russia to cause economic harm.

***

Rest assured that Putin’s bare-chested romps do not include navel-gazing over what the West’s actions imply about its intent. He fully understood that NATO was unwilling to extend to these former Soviet satellites its security guarantee — viz., that an attack on any NATO country is considered an attack on all NATO countries that must be repelled as such. Coupled with Europe’s willingness — actually, anxiousness — to increase economic intercourse with and energy dependence on Russia even after the Georgian invasion, Putin grasped that he had a green light to indulge his revanchist ambitions…

Russia is on the march because it was treated like a friend while it acted like an enemy. As usual, the bipartisan transnational-progressive clerisy convinced itself that our adversaries, who thrive on instability, have an abiding interest in international stability — that they are best seen as trusted “partners” in the pursuit of American objectives rather than aggressors pursuing their own very different objectives.

As Putin menaces Ukraine, Obama prattles about international law. Even if this president’s sudden interest in faithful adherence to law could be taken seriously, the international arena is not a “community” sharing common legal norms and enforcement mechanisms. Aggressors are not presumed innocent such that we must sit idle until their intent can be proved beyond a reasonable doubt. They are presumed hostile until they prove otherwise.

***

[D]id it really take Russia’s invasion of Crimea for the White House to finally realize that Putin is an authoritarian hegemon who has long been moving away from Europe and building Russia’s domination of its “near abroad?” McFaul tells us that “Mr. Putin’s own thinking has changed over time,” and that, with Crimea, “Mr. Putin has made a strategic pivot.” But the Russian president has not veered from the course he set out on as far back as 1999, when as prime minister he made the decision to unleash a crippling war on the republic of Chechnya…

[B]y failing to recognize Moscow’s larger regional aims, the West may be underestimating the Kremlin’s readiness to take advantage of a situation that has offered new opportunities to exert its influence, and that has played well at home. In recent weeks, Putin’s inner circle of siloviki from his hometown of St. Petersburg, several of whom have been targeted by the new US sanctions imposed this month, have closed ranks around their leader. And polls show that, among the Russian population at large, Putin’s popularity is at a new high. (Russians typically rally around their leader when their military forces are deployed, as they did in the past during the conflicts with Chechnya and Georgia.)…

During a news conference early this week in Brussels, Obama responded to those who claim he has been naïve about Putin by dismissing Russia as a “regional power” that poses no risk to the security of the United States. But this assessment seems more like a justification for allowing the Kremlin to call the shots than a true statement of reality. A Russian demarche into eastern Ukraine, and possibly Moldova, would threaten the security of all the newly independent states of Europe and, by implication, that of the US as well.

***

During his Brussels speech this week, Obama also declared that Russia leads “no bloc of nations, no global ideology.” This is true, up to a point: Russia’s “ideology” isn’t well-defined or clear. But the U.S. president was wrong to imply that the Russian president’s rhetoric, and his annexation of Crimea, has no wider echo. Of course there were the predictable supporters of Russia in the United Nations: Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua, North Korea. More interesting are his new European friends. Nigel Farage, the leader of the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) — an anti-European and anti-immigrant party that is gaining momentum in Britain — declared last week that the European Union has “blood on its hands” for negotiating a free-trade agreement in Ukraine. Marine Le Pen, leader of the French far-right National Front, has also said she prefers France to “lean toward Russia” rather than “submit to the United States.” Jobbik, Hungary’s far-right party, sent a representative to the Crimean referendum and declared it “exemplary.” These are all minority parties, but they are all poised to make gains in European elections this spring.

Russia’s ideology may be mishmash: the old Soviet critique of hypocritical “bourgeois democracy,” plus some anti-Europeanism, some anti-globalism and a homophobic twist for contemporary appeal. But let’s not assume that competition between ideas is absurd and old-fashioned. And let’s not pretend that ideologies don’t matter, because even if we’d prefer otherwise, they do.

***

McFaul, an NBC News analyst who served as Obama’s ambassador to Moscow until last month, said the Russians are now in effect saying, “OK, Crimea’s done. We’ve taken that. Now let’s start negotiating about the Ukrainian constitution. Let’s start negotiating about the autonomy of places like Donetsk (in eastern Ukraine).’ As President Kennedy said very famously during the Berlin crisis, he was not going to negotiate about the freedom of Berlin under the guise of ‘what’s mine is mine, and what’s yours is negotiable.’ This feels a little but like that: they (the Russians) are changing the subject to talk about what they want, not what we want to talk about.”

Another question is the future of the separatist Transdniestria region of Moldova, populated largely by Russian speakers. Putin is going to make Moldova “an issue that we’re going to have to now negotiate. And we’re going to negotiate in, I think, a weak position given where he is right now.”

McFaul added “there’s no doubt in my mind that if Russia goes into eastern Ukraine some Ukrainians will fight in a guerrilla struggle.”

***

How can the U.S. add muscle in the present Ukraine crisis?

The boldest and riskiest course would be to dispatch 50 or 60 of the incredibly potent F-22s to Poland plus Patriot batteries and appropriate ground support and protection. Russian generals and even Putin surely know that the F-22s could smash the far inferior Russian air force and then punish Russian armies invading eastern Ukraine or elsewhere in the region.

There’s no sense at all in making this move unless Obama unambiguously resolves to use the F-22s. The worst thing to do is bluff. Nor would the dangers end there even if Obama were not bluffing; Putin might think he was bluffing anyway and start a war. With all these complications and risks, the Obama team still should give this option a serious look—and let Russia and our NATO partners know this tough course is under serious consideration. Obama has sent a few F-15’s and F-16’s to Eastern Europe, some military aid to Ukraine and other states. But everyone knows this is tokenism.

Another plausible and perhaps less risky measure: help prepare Ukrainians for guerrilla war against an invading Russian force. Pound for pound in conventional war, the Ukrainian forces are no match whatsoever for the Russians. But irregular Ukrainian troops armed with first-class rifles, mortars, and explosive devices would do Russian troops great damage. Russians know this. They have surely not forgotten the horrors fighting guerrillas in Afghanistan.

***

According to Western officers and several private specialists, the forces gathered in Russia’s Western Military District are capable of invading Ukraine’s easternmost cities, like Donetsk and Dnipropetrovsk. They would probably start off by sending in special forces to recruit local allies, then mount a wave of cyber-attacks to degrade or spoof the Ukraine military’s warning and communication networks, followed by a blitzkrieg attack by tanks, paratroopers, and so forth.

But occupying those towns for any length of time is another matter. Logistics—refurbishing troops with a line of supplies—were always the Russian army’s weak point, even in the Cold War heyday; that’s still the case. Then there’s the army itself. The special forces and paratroopers are professional, but the rest of the army consists of draftees, serving one-year terms that many of them spend drunk and disorderly. If they face any resistance, whether from the Ukrainian army (a ragtag force itself) or “irregulars” (homegrown insurgents) or outside agents (a squad or two of Delta Force troops), the Russian soldiers could find themselves seriously bogged down.

Politically, Putin would find himself on very shaky ground. Already, he mustered only 10 other countries—the likes of Belarus, Cuba, North Korea, Nicaragua, Sudan, and Syria—to oppose a U.N. resolution condemning the annexation of Crimea. If he invades Ukraine, a sovereign nation with a United Nations seat, his isolation will widen and deepen politically, diplomatically, and economically.

If he crosses that line, he will also do more than anyone ever has to rouse the European nations out of their post-Cold War stupor.

***

Putin’s seizure of Crimea may have provided him with the opportunity to beat his chest before adoring Russian crowds, but it will eventually undermine Russian security.

Ukraine is and will remain too weak to be a threat. And on its own, no country in Russia’s “near abroad” can pose a threat. Even taken together, the non-Russians will be weaker than Russia. But Putin’s land grab will make all of them inclined to regard Russia as a potentially land-grabbing foe and to promote their own security independently of Russia and outside of any Russian-led blocs or unions. Expect the Central Asians and Azerbaijanis to turn increasingly to China and Turkey, and the Georgians, Moldovans, Ukrainians, and even the Belarusians to head for the West. Also expect the Russian Federation’s non-Russian autonomous republics and regions to press for greater autonomy from Moscow…

Seen in this light, annexing Crimea has to be one of Putin’s worst strategic blunders. Had the province become “independent,” there would still have been a theoretical possibility of finding some accommodation with Kiev. After annexation, any dialogue with the Ukrainian government — and, thus, any resolution of the Russo-Ukrainian conflict — becomes significantly more difficult. It’s perfectly possible that Putin wants the conflict to remain unresolved, on the assumption that it will undermine Ukraine. The problem is that an unresolved conflict will also undermine Russia.

As Ukraine and Russia’s other non-Russian neighbors are compelled by Moscow’s aggression to enhance their security, Russia may soon face a nightmare of its own creation — non-Russian encirclement.

***


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Wanna bet enforcement is reserved selectively for dissidents in Red States?

Repercussions and Reprieves at Health Insurance Enrollment Deadline

“WASHINGTON — America’s health insurance marketplace closes on Monday night, the deadline for most people to obtain coverage or face a penalty.

The confusion and uncertainty of the last six months appear likely to continue as consumers, including some who have never had insurance, begin using new policies for the first time. Here are answers to some frequently asked questions.

Q. What happens if a consumer does not sign up for insurance by the Monday deadline?

A. The consumer may be subject to financial penalties, to be paid with federal income taxes next year. However, the federal government has said it will stretch the sign-up deadline for people who started an application and could not finish it for one reason or another.

To preserve their rights, consumers can call the federal insurance marketplace (1-800-318-2596) and request a “special enrollment period.”

Officials running the federal marketplace, which serves 36 states, will provide an unspecified amount of extra time to people who are “in line as of March 31,” and some states running their own exchanges have adopted similar policies.

In addition, the White House says, consumers may be able to obtain more time if they attest that they have had difficulty signing up — if, for example, they encountered error messages or “other system errors.” Officials will not generally investigate such claims, but they note that the application for health coverage is submitted under penalty of perjury.

Q. What is the penalty for going without insurance?

A. The penalty is either a fixed dollar amount or a percentage of household income, whichever is greater.

The flat dollar amount this year is $95 per adult and $47.50 per child, up to a maximum of $285 for a family.

Many people will be subject to a higher penalty: 1 percent of household income above the “filing threshold.” The threshold this year is $10,150 for individuals and $20,300 for married couples filing joint returns. People with gross income below these thresholds are generally not required to file tax returns, and they can obtain exemptions from the penalties.

For a single person with income of $40,000 this year, the penalty would be $298.50. The first step in calculating the penalty is to subtract the filing threshold ($10,150) from household income ($40,000). The result is $29,850. One percent of that is $298.50.

For a married couple with two children and household income of $70,000, the penalty would be $497. That is 1 percent of household income above the threshold.

The penalty will increase in future years. In 2016, it will be $695 per adult or 2.5 percent of household income over the threshold, whichever is greater.

It is unclear how aggressive the government will be in enforcing the requirement to have insurance and in collecting the penalty. If a consumer fails to pay the penalty at tax time, the Internal Revenue Service can deduct it from any refund owed to the taxpayer, but it cannot impose a lien on property or garnish wages. Under the health care law, the consumer “shall not be subject to any criminal prosecution” for the failure.

Q. Who is exempt?

A. The health care law authorizes many kinds of exemptions, and the Obama administration has added a few.

Under the law, no penalties can be imposed on people who would have to pay more than 8 percent of their household income for the lowest-priced insurance available to them.

The requirement for people to have coverage does not apply to members of certain religious sects who are “conscientiously opposed to acceptance” of health insurance benefits. Nor does it apply to members of organizations known as health care sharing ministries, which provide a faith-based alternative to traditional insurance.

Prisoners and illegal immigrants are also exempt, and no penalties can be imposed on members of federally recognized Indian tribes.

Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of health and human services, has authorized “hardship exemptions” for people in more than a dozen categories. These include people who are homeless or facing eviction or foreclosure; victims of domestic violence; and victims of fires, floods and other disasters.

In addition, people are entitled to exemptions if they were found ineligible for Medicaid solely because they live in a state that decided not to expand the program. Congress tried to require states to expand Medicaid, but the Supreme Court ruled in 2012 that states could opt out, and about half have done so.

Exemptions are also available to people who face the cancellation of individual health insurance policies and consider the alternatives unaffordable.

Finally, the administration has created an open-ended category of exemption for people who experience other, unspecified hardships in obtaining insurance.

Some exemptions can be obtained only from an insurance exchange, and others only from the I.R.S.

Q. What should people do if they applied for insurance but never received an insurance card?

A. They should call the insurance company or the toll-free number for the federal insurance marketplace. The government has caseworkers to help consumers, but it could take weeks or months to solve some problems.

Q. What changes or delays might be expected in the coming year?

A. The experience of the last four years strongly suggests that there will be more surprises. Federal officials will almost surely make changes to rules and policy as they discover problems and respond to political pressure and pleas from consumers in this election year. The government and insurers could be dealing with a substantial backlog of work because of the last-minute surge in applications.

Officials have said they may allow special enrollment periods for other reasons. With all the exceptions and adjustments, an insurance executive said, “open enrollment could go on for the rest of the year.”

As midterm election campaigns heat up, the administration may look for ways to address or deflect Republican criticism of the law. It could, for example, relax or delay requirements for medium-size employers to offer insurance to employees. Officials will also look for ways to prevent big premium increases next year. The law already allows the government to provide a financial backstop to insurers that sign up disproportionate numbers of sick people.

The administration will also try to protect employees whose hours might be cut by employers eager to avoid the cost of providing health benefits. Officials have already indicated that they want to address complaints about high deductibles and “narrow networks” of doctors and hospitals in some health plans….”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/30/us/repercussions-and-reprieves-at-health-insurance-enrollment-deadline.html?_r=0

workingclass artist on March 31, 2014 at 7:42 AM

canopfor on March 31, 2014 at 7:37 AM

No problemo, Canop.
I am friendly with her outside HA, she is fine. Prob just needed
a break from the madness.

bazil9 on March 31, 2014 at 7:39 AM

bazil9: Alright, ya, we all need a break, now and then, especially
the crap,..the world is spewing of late:)

canopfor on March 31, 2014 at 7:43 AM

Lol,……more Progressive Polling:

Ukrainian Updates ‏@Ukroblogger 2m

Levada.ru: Rus view of #Ukraine reaction to #Crimea annexation

17% no hard feelings

25% negative but not hate

18% hate Rus govt but not ppl

canopfor on March 31, 2014 at 7:45 AM

bazil9: Alright, ya, we all need a break, now and then, especially
the crap,..the world is spewing of late:)

canopfor on March 31, 2014 at 7:43 AM

Yep. I’ve cut down the time I spend here and beyond- Just to much.
I just feel rage.

bazil9 on March 31, 2014 at 7:46 AM

Speaking of Chris Christie

Roger Stone @RogerJStoneJr
Why Shariah loving Chris Christie will never be President- danielpipes.org/blog/2011/08/w…

Flora Duh on March 31, 2014 at 7:48 AM

I’m shocked that such a smooth running, well planned system, operated by the finest technicians with intensive training, isn’t operating at full capacity.

thatsafactjack on March 31, 2014 at 7:33 AM

People who sent money to this crooked system have no idea where it went.

crankyoldlady on March 31, 2014 at 7:48 AM

It looks to me as if they are bailing on the whole thing.

crankyoldlady on March 31, 2014 at 7:31 AM

You perhaps fail to comprehend that this only appears so because they face an election or two that could take them down individually. It will stay in waiting, as all socialist plans do, until the time is ripe.

I am certain that the corrupt GOP will continue to help keep it alive for they want and need this as bad as their co-ruling friends across the aisle do. Non in the entrenched political institutions of America can afford to throw away this bounty. Like Pirates, they will merely tuck their Obamacare treasure in a hidden cave until later on.

Don L on March 31, 2014 at 7:49 AM

I am certain that the corrupt GOP will continue to help keep it alive for they want and need this as bad as their co-ruling friends across the aisle do. Non in the entrenched political institutions of America can afford to throw away this bounty. Like Pirates, they will merely tuck their Obamacare treasure in a hidden cave until later on.

Don L on March 31, 2014 at 7:49 AM

Maybe they figure they have enough and are cutting their losses.

crankyoldlady on March 31, 2014 at 7:51 AM

53% #Russians believe badgeless troops in #Crimea ‘could be anybody’ (Levada.ru poll) #Ukraine pic.twitter.com/wfBWrKE5LI

canopfor on March 31, 2014 at 7:41 AM

LOL! Badgeless troops who happen to speak Russian, drive Russian military vehicles, and are occupying the very same real estate that Russia is claiming. Yeah, pretty sure that they’re Norwegians.

Happy Nomad on March 31, 2014 at 7:51 AM

Down here in Texas we’d call that all hat and no cattle.

workingclass artist on March 31, 2014 at 7:18 AM

PETA would object if the fat man ever tried to get on a horse.

Perry and some of the other governors contemplating runs lack one important thing, IMO. Experience with foreign policy and national security issues. I’d be happier with somebody who could talk about these issues in more than the theoretical.

Happy Nomad on March 31, 2014 at 7:37 AM

2 things come to mind.

1. Gov. Perry said we need a New Monroe Doctrine for our hemisphere. (John Kerry said last week the Monroe Doctrine is dead and Obama is loading up voter polls with illegals.)

Perry also said Obama can’t afford to stop Keystone as it’s legitimate economic/diplomatic leverage against Putin.

2. Killary Clinton will tout her foreign policy experience…

Hiring experienced foreign policy advisory team is the key….imho…

workingclass artist on March 31, 2014 at 7:51 AM

I’m shocked that such a smooth running, well planned system, operated by the finest technicians with intensive training, isn’t operating at full capacity.

thatsafactjack on March 31, 2014 at 7:33 AM

People who sent money to this crooked system have no idea where it went.

crankyoldlady on March 31, 2014 at 7:48 AM

Yep!

They go to their doctor or pharmacy and find out there’s no record of their coverage.

workingclass artist on March 31, 2014 at 7:53 AM

People who sent money to this crooked system have no idea where it went.

crankyoldlady on March 31, 2014 at 7:48 AM

I’d be more concerned where all my personal information went than where my money went. Think about it, Obamacare is set up like Amazon or Kayak if either of those businesses demanded to know your SSN, date of birth, and all sorts of other PII before you were able to shop. And I’m certain that any stupid idiot who signed up for Obamacare will find that OFA has every bit of information that they were forced to provide.

Happy Nomad on March 31, 2014 at 7:54 AM

Yep!

They go to their doctor or pharmacy and find out there’s no record of their coverage.

workingclass artist on March 31, 2014 at 7:53 AM

Well we tried to warn them.

crankyoldlady on March 31, 2014 at 7:55 AM

I’d be more concerned where all my personal information went than where my money went. Think about it, Obamacare is set up like Amazon or Kayak if either of those businesses demanded to know your SSN, date of birth, and all sorts of other PII before you were able to shop. And I’m certain that any stupid idiot who signed up for Obamacare will find that OFA has every bit of information that they were forced to provide.

Happy Nomad on March 31, 2014 at 7:54 AM

I’m sure the Nigerians appreciate it.

crankyoldlady on March 31, 2014 at 7:58 AM

canopfor on March 31, 2014 at 7:43 AM

Yep. I’ve cut down the time I spend here and beyond- Just to much.
I just feel rage.

bazil9 on March 31, 2014 at 7:46 AM

bazil9: I try to stay de-tached, I love to,..er, like to hunt the news, and
breaking stuff:0

canopfor on March 31, 2014 at 7:58 AM

Peter Doocy @pdoocy
BREAKING: now healthcare.gov “has a lot of visitors” making it impossible to log-in or enroll on deadline day pic.twitter.com/cqkdpM6FK0

So what is it, maintenance or overload? Because it can’t be both.

Oh, wait, with this bunch it can be whatever lie they feel like claiming it is.

Flora Duh on March 31, 2014 at 7:58 AM

Hiring experienced foreign policy advisory team is the key….imho…

workingclass artist on March 31, 2014 at 7:51 AM

It’s a start. Keep in mind that is why Joe Biden was on the ticket with the rat-eared wonder….. foreign policy credibility. No, really! It’s true!!!!!

GWB had many critics of his foreign policy and national security policies but at least he had serious adults in charge. With the exception of Colin Powell who was merely there to draw votes in 2000. Worst SecState in recent years until Killary.

Happy Nomad on March 31, 2014 at 7:58 AM

canopfor on March 31, 2014 at 7:41 AM

LOL! Badgeless troops who happen to speak Russian, drive Russian military vehicles, and are occupying the very same real estate that Russia is claiming. Yeah, pretty sure that they’re Norwegians.

Happy Nomad on March 31, 2014 at 7:51 AM

Happy Nomad:Oh gawd,….here I go agains,..I’m shocked:)

canopfor on March 31, 2014 at 7:59 AM

Oh its a Pinko Rotation:

Crimean crisis
2m
Decrease in Russian troop numbers on Ukrainian border might be due to rotation of forces, Ukrainian defense ministry official says – @Reuters
end of alert

canopfor on March 31, 2014 at 8:01 AM

It looks to me as if they are bailing on the whole thing.

crankyoldlady on March 31, 2014 at 7:31 AM

It looks to me like they’re going to come out and say that you don’t really have to have something in the system by midnight to start the enrollment process. We can’t penalize the sucker who is trying to sign up for Obamacare if the system is down, now can we?

Happy Nomad on March 31, 2014 at 8:02 AM

Hiring experienced foreign policy advisory team is the key….imho…

workingclass artist on March 31, 2014 at 7:51 AM

I agree. And IMHO, a new Republican administration would be foolish not to have John Bolton and KT McFarland on their foreign policy advisory team.

Flora Duh on March 31, 2014 at 8:03 AM

And IMHO, a new Republican administration would be foolish not to have John Bolton and KT McFarland on their foreign policy advisory team.

Flora Duh on March 31, 2014 at 8:03 AM

I want John Bolton as Secretary of State with the explicit orders to clean house like Christ chased the money changers out of the Temple. I want the SecDef given the same orders to chase out the political generals and replace them with warriors.

Happy Nomad on March 31, 2014 at 8:11 AM

It looks to me like they’re going to come out and say that you don’t really have to have something in the system by midnight to start the enrollment process. We can’t penalize the sucker who is trying to sign up for Obamacare if the system is down, now can we?

Happy Nomad on March 31, 2014 at 8:02 AM

It looks to me like they will in effect shut it down until after the elections.

crankyoldlady on March 31, 2014 at 8:12 AM

Happy Nomad on March 31, 2014 at 8:11 AM

I was just thinking last night, that when a Republican takes over the WH, I’d like to see every single orifice of government bureaucracy receive a thorough enema.

Flora Duh on March 31, 2014 at 8:21 AM

Strong American leadership DOES make a difference. That does not mean that we go to war but that we do assert ourselves with conviction, not flimsy rhetoric.
http://www.frontpagemag.com/2014/joseph-klein/condoleezza-rice-takes-on-obama/

onlineanalyst on March 31, 2014 at 8:31 AM

I doubt that Obama, Kerry or 99% of this administration could find Ukraine on a map, much less have any clue how to deal with this situation.

justltl on March 31, 2014 at 8:35 AM

On the other hand, I feel quite certain that Obama can name every team in the brackets, Kerry has mastered the phrase, “Où est la bibliothèque?”, and Big Mooch knows the recipe for clarified butter by heart.

justltl on March 31, 2014 at 8:55 AM

I was just thinking last night, that when a Republican takes over the WH, I’d like to see every single orifice of government bureaucracy receive a thorough enema.

Flora Duh on March 31, 2014 at 8:21 AM

I admire your optimism.

crankyoldlady on March 31, 2014 at 8:58 AM

I was just thinking last night, that when a Republican takes over the WH, I’d like to see every single orifice of government bureaucracy receive a thorough enema.

Flora Duh on March 31, 2014 at 8:21 AM

On my wishlist is the elimination of entire agencies. EPA and Dept of Ed for starters.

Shay on March 31, 2014 at 10:55 AM

My take: Obamacare Workers Passing Out Filled Out Democratic Ballots. GOP Establishment Still Wants to “Fix” It.

kingsjester on March 31, 2014 at 6:49 AM

….cripes!

KOOLAID2 on March 31, 2014 at 1:19 PM

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