Video: Deaf woman hears sound for the first time

posted at 11:21 am on March 28, 2014 by Allahpundit

Via Time, something to put a spring in your step on a slow Friday morning. Videos of people with hearing impairments reacting to sound for the first time after being fitted with cochlear implants are an Internet favorite. The first one to go viral that I can remember was this one three years ago; another one, this time involving a toddler, went viral last year. They’re always affecting but the age of the patient makes them poignant in different ways. The toddler’s reaction is a thunderbolt of wonderment at experiencing a new stimulus. The adults, who’ve grown up knowing they’re missing something momentous, erupt in catharsis when something finally appears in the void. It’s not a religious experience, but that’s the best metaphor I can imagine for feeling suddenly awakened to something profound but otherwise inaccessible that’s been all around you forever.

I wonder how much of a fear factor there is for patients once the implants are up and running. Hearing sound in a controlled environment like this is one thing. Walking around a city and being bombarded by endless strange noises that you’ve never imagined before must be on some level terrifying, like a blind person who’s just recovered his sight being pushed into a huge kaleidoscope.


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These videos are always incredibly touching.

jake-the-goose on March 28, 2014 at 11:25 AM

amazing

dmacleo on March 28, 2014 at 11:25 AM

Man, I get choked up every time I see something like this. Awesome!

USNCVN on March 28, 2014 at 11:27 AM

I was struck by how detached and calm the worker was, the lady was so overcome it seems like she could’ve taken a second to give her a hug or something.

And if she’s never heard before, how does she know what “high pitched” is? Is that hard wired into our brains?

Fenris on March 28, 2014 at 11:28 AM

Life is beautiful.

John the Libertarian on March 28, 2014 at 11:28 AM

This sort of emotional appeal speaks to the same people who watch Juan Pablo on the Bachelor.

antisense on March 28, 2014 at 11:29 AM

I bet there is a lot of Job satisfaction there.

cozmo on March 28, 2014 at 11:31 AM

Modern medicine has been able to achieve the impossible at times.

vityas on March 28, 2014 at 11:32 AM

antisense on March 28, 2014 at 11:29 AM

I don’t understand the comparison, but it sounds really crappy.

cozmo on March 28, 2014 at 11:32 AM

A heart warming video, to be sure. Now it’s time to hear from the people who thinks she betrayed the deaf community for wanting to be able to hear.

You think I’m kidding? I wish that I were.

Physics Geek on March 28, 2014 at 11:33 AM

It may sound high-pitched at first screeches the high-pitched woman doing the assessment. LOL!

Happy Nomad on March 28, 2014 at 11:34 AM

If she thinks that’s a stunning noise, wait until she hears some Beethoven!

:-D

Good Lt on March 28, 2014 at 11:34 AM

We had to put our dog(Maggie) down this morning.

This helps.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

Unfiltered Joy!

portlandon on March 28, 2014 at 11:36 AM

I was struck by how detached and calm the worker was, the lady was so overcome it seems like she could’ve taken a second to give her a hug or something.

Fenris on March 28, 2014 at 11:28 AM

Besides being unprofessional, I don’t think a hug would have really dealt with the sensory overload that woman was experiencing. The worker certainly was friendly while doing her assessment.

Happy Nomad on March 28, 2014 at 11:36 AM

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

I’m guessing Maggie had a good life.

John the Libertarian on March 28, 2014 at 11:37 AM

We had to put our dog(Maggie) down this morning.

This helps.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

Very sorry for your loss. Worst pain in the world. Sending any good vibes I can your way from a fellow dog-human.

Good Lt on March 28, 2014 at 11:37 AM

This sort of emotional appeal speaks to the same people who watch Juan Pablo on the Bachelor.

antisense on March 28, 2014 at 11:29 AM

I dont’ know who Juan Pablo is (unless you are referring to the race car driver Juan Pablo Montoya) I’ve never watched any of those stupid “reality” shows and have no desire to. This is a person’s first experience with sound, and not as a child, but as an adult who has spent a lifetime with no sound.

I’m presuming you are attempting humor with your post, because if not you are a piece of work, and not in a good way.

USNCVN on March 28, 2014 at 11:38 AM

This sort of emotional appeal speaks to the same people who watch Juan Pablo on the Bachelor.

antisense on March 28, 2014 at 11:29 AM

No it doesn’t.

This is a rare moment to see pure joy in another huaman being and is something to celebrate given what our species has accomplished.

We are constantly assualted with pain and suffering why would anyone want to trivialize such moments of great wonder and joy.

Skwor on March 28, 2014 at 11:38 AM

We had to put our dog(Maggie) down this morning.

This helps.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

Sorry to hear that; never easy.

Midas on March 28, 2014 at 11:38 AM

Love these, amazing

superdave on March 28, 2014 at 11:39 AM

And if she’s never heard before, how does she know what “high pitched” is? Is that hard wired into our brains?

Fenris on March 28, 2014 at 11:28 AM

I wondered about that, too. Perhaps they had fed different tone frequencies into the implants in previous tests.

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 11:39 AM

I’m guessing Maggie had a good life.

John the Libertarian on March 28, 2014 at 11:37 AM

Maggie was an airedale terrier and she had a good life indeed.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:40 AM

And if she’s never heard before, how does she know what “high pitched” is? Is that hard wired into our brains?

Fenris on March 28, 2014 at 11:28 AM

I wondered about that, too. Perhaps they had fed different tone frequencies into the implants in previous tests.

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 11:39 AM

I suspect the helper was just talking out of her rear end. How do you describe color to a blind person?

John the Libertarian on March 28, 2014 at 11:41 AM

This sort of emotional appeal speaks to the same people who watch Juan Pablo on the Bachelor.

antisensebrain on March 28, 2014 at 11:29 AM

Schadenfreude on March 28, 2014 at 11:41 AM

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

So sorry for your loss.

CoffeeLover on March 28, 2014 at 11:41 AM

Maggie was an airedale terrier and she had a good life indeed.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:40 AM

Good for her! She was lucky to have you.

John the Libertarian on March 28, 2014 at 11:41 AM

Absolutely love this, thanks for posting it.

Midas on March 28, 2014 at 11:42 AM

Good Lt on March 28, 2014 at 11:34 AM

Or Mozart, or Bach, or Chopin, or…
But you have to admit his Symphony #9 is amazing, even more so when you consider it was composed after he had lost all of his hearing. That one is my absolute favorite.

USNCVN on March 28, 2014 at 11:42 AM

My wife has been blind for almost 34 years, and there is no chance for a surgical solution at this point outside of some miraculous bionic-eye replacement system. But if she got to see our granddaughters for the first time, this is exactly how she’d react.

Ed Morrissey on March 28, 2014 at 11:42 AM

Ed Morrissey on March 28, 2014 at 11:42 AM

Thanks, Ed! Now I’m balling my eyes out.

John the Libertarian on March 28, 2014 at 11:44 AM

I suspect the helper was just talking out of her rear end. How do you describe color to a blind person?

John the Libertarian on March 28, 2014 at 11:41 AM

It was the patient with the implants who noted the worker sounded “high pitched”, not the worker. The worker just mentioned that would change as the patient’s brain adjusted to hearing.

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 11:44 AM

Ed Morrissey on March 28, 2014 at 11:42 AM

Wow. Thanks for sharing that, Ed. I can only imagine that reaction. :)

USNCVN on March 28, 2014 at 11:44 AM

Yet, Mrs. Morrissey sees clearer than most all.

Schadenfreude on March 28, 2014 at 11:45 AM

Many Deaf people believe that implanting children before they are old enough to make the decision themselves could, and likely will, result in the end of Deaf culture.

Found here.

I admire people who manage to overcome their disability. We have a blind couple at our church whose child turned one recently. I have no idea how they manage, but they do. But saying that they aren’t disabled is stupid.

Physics Geek on March 28, 2014 at 11:46 AM

This sort of emotional appeal speaks to the same people who watch Juan Pablo on the Bachelor.
antisense on March 28, 2014 at 11:29 AM

One word: assh0le.

blatantblue on March 28, 2014 at 11:46 AM

Ed Morrissey on March 28, 2014 at 11:42 AM

Ed, having read your wife’s thoughtful and inspirational posts, I think she sees better than most.

portlandon on March 28, 2014 at 11:46 AM

Give he an Obama speeches disc to listen to and she’ll pull the implants out herself!! Other than that, these videos cut right into my heart. What a change that will make in her life. A much greater step than a populace hearing Al Jolson singing on film for the first time in the Jazz Singer.

Deano1952 on March 28, 2014 at 11:47 AM

A heart warming video, to be sure. Now it’s time to hear from the people who thinks she betrayed the deaf community for wanting to be able to hear.

You think I’m kidding? I wish that I were.

Physics Geek on March 28, 2014 at 11:33 AM

I’ve seen that happen. You get the same thing with homosexuality. Heaven forbid you should suggest maybe they could be helped.

crankyoldlady on March 28, 2014 at 11:47 AM

I don’t understand how she understood anything. Her hearing loss was from birth and she was blind for the last decade or so. How did she understand the brain stimulation as words? How could she understand the words any more than somebody reciting the days of the week in a different language. She even responded to questions being asked. Something seems missing here or I missing something?

Dr. Frank Enstine on March 28, 2014 at 11:47 AM

It was the patient with the implants who noted the worker sounded “high pitched”, not the worker. The worker just mentioned that would change as the patient’s brain adjusted to hearing.

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 11:44 AM

Yeah, I heard that. My first reaction was the worker was doing her best to be reassuring, not that she could relate.

John the Libertarian on March 28, 2014 at 11:48 AM

We had to put our dog(Maggie) down this morning.

This helps.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

I’m so sorry.

crankyoldlady on March 28, 2014 at 11:48 AM

Besides being unprofessional, I don’t think a hug would have really dealt with the sensory overload that woman was experiencing. The worker certainly was friendly while doing her assessment.

Happy Nomad on March 28, 2014 at 11:36 AM

Yes, I’m sure the worker is trained to be professional in situations like this. But a little human contact goes a long way towards dealing with things emotionally, and it doesn’t have to be over the top or take much time. Well, not a big deal.

Fenris on March 28, 2014 at 11:48 AM

Man, I get choked up every time I see something like this. Awesome!

USNCVN on March 28, 2014 at 11:27 AM

I’m crying my eyes out.

Life is beautiful.

John the Libertarian on March 28, 2014 at 11:28 AM

Yes, it is.

magicbeans on March 28, 2014 at 11:48 AM

…She even responded to questions being asked. Something seems missing here or I missing something?

Dr. Frank Enstine on March 28, 2014 at 11:47 AM

I assumed she was simultaneously using sign language.

Fenris on March 28, 2014 at 11:49 AM

It may sound high-pitched at first screeches the high-pitched woman doing the assessment. LOL!

Happy Nomad on March 28, 2014 at 11:34 AM

I am sure the woman understands the concept of high vs. low. Given that and the human mind to perceive much more with our senses than we realize I am not surprised at this characterization.

For example I suspect the woman at some point had explained to her that “low / base sounds rumble through the body and she could feel them. As such hearing sounds that vibrate noticeably slower than other, even if only her ear could detect, wouldn’t surprise me that her brain made the connection and she didn’t even realize she applied the “high pitch” characterization intuitively.

Skwor on March 28, 2014 at 11:50 AM

Dr. Frank Enstine on March 28, 2014 at 11:47 AM

Just postulating here, but she could read, and was reading along. She could also read lips and so could make the translation relatively quickly.

USNCVN on March 28, 2014 at 11:50 AM

I thought the technician was very professional. She reached out and touched the patient a couple of times, and her voice and words were gentle and kind. I think it’s best to give the person some space in these kinds of situations. I am 100% certain that hugs were exchanged at some point during the session even if not in this clip.

Spring in my step, for sure. Thank God for Western medicine. This was lovely – thanks Allah.

Missy on March 28, 2014 at 11:51 AM

Dr. Frank Enstine on March 28, 2014 at 11:47 AM

Probably reading her lips. The Doctor was enunciating perfectly and the former deaf woman was probably still reading her lips.

portlandon on March 28, 2014 at 11:52 AM

Many Deaf people believe that implanting children before they are old enough to make the decision themselves could, and likely will, result in the end of Deaf culture.

Found here.

I admire people who manage to overcome their disability. We have a blind couple at our church whose child turned one recently. I have no idea how they manage, but they do. But saying that they aren’t disabled is stupid.

Physics Geek on March 28, 2014 at 11:46 AM

This is quite surprising, and yet strangely, I’ve heard it all before.

LancerDL on March 28, 2014 at 11:52 AM

Maggie was an airedale terrier and she had a good life indeed.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:40 AM

One of my favorite breeds.

crankyoldlady on March 28, 2014 at 11:52 AM

If she thinks that’s a stunning noise, wait until she hears some Beethoven!

:-D

Good Lt on March 28, 2014 at 11:34 AM

Rush Limbaugh has the same kind of implants and if I recall correctly he said that it allows him to hear speech but that music has no joy because of the limited frequency range of the implant.

Dr. Frank Enstine on March 28, 2014 at 11:53 AM

Skwor on March 28, 2014 at 11:50 AM

Yes. You can feel the difference in frequencies even if you can’t hear them. For example, the vibrations from a subway rumbling underground in contrast to those from a plane taking off. The woman would have been perceiving this all her life.

Missy on March 28, 2014 at 11:53 AM

Rush Limbaugh has the same kind of implants and if I recall correctly he said that it allows him to hear speech but that music has no joy because of the limited frequency range of the implant.

Dr. Frank Enstine on March 28, 2014 at 11:53 AM

Rush says he keeps his turned down or off quite a bit and I’ve read that other patients do, too. It’s got to be difficult when you’re used to silence. However, the fact that hearing is there for them when they want/need it is incredible. And the technology is only going to improve.

Missy on March 28, 2014 at 11:55 AM

I suspect the helper was just talking out of her rear end. How do you describe color to a blind person?

John the Libertarian on March 28, 2014 at 11:41 AM

When I worked in the blouse department of a department store a blind man came in and wanted to buy a blouse. I really had a hard time describing the colors to him. In fact I did really bad job of it. I thought later what I should have done was said that blue is a color most people wouldn’t hate and red is a color that might be too bright.

crankyoldlady on March 28, 2014 at 11:57 AM

IMO the worker should be as clinical as possible as a balance to the overwhelming emotion

a source of stability

commodore on March 28, 2014 at 11:58 AM

This sort of emotional appeal speaks to the same people who watch Juan Pablo on the Bachelor.

antisense on March 28, 2014 at 11:29 AM

So you were unmoved?

magicbeans on March 28, 2014 at 11:58 AM

Something in my eye, darn dust.

Minnfidel on March 28, 2014 at 12:02 PM

We had to put our dog(Maggie) down this morning.

This helps.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

.
I remember how I felt the last time I had to do this, in 2006. It was very, very difficult at the time and for days afterward. I sympathize with your pain and loss, I really do. I have great memories of my dogs, I wish I could have dogs again. I even took comfort in that silly Rainbow Bridge fantasy, so deep was my grief.
.
My dogs were my constant companions and I went everywhere with them.

ExpressoBold on March 28, 2014 at 12:02 PM

Probably reading her lips. The Doctor was enunciating perfectly and the former deaf woman was probably still reading her lips.

portlandon on March 28, 2014 at 11:52 AM

From the article I read earlier this morning.

The 39-year-old from Gateshead, who was also registered blind in her 20s because of the condition, fights back the tears as she tells the doctor that hearing her own voice is ‘very, very strange’.

She does have her hand on some paper on her lap so I guess she is reading the words as they are said but I’m not sure that would cover the questions being asked.

It’s not really important as it’s a really amazing thing that she can now hear. I was just curious.

Dr. Frank Enstine on March 28, 2014 at 12:02 PM

So you were unmoved?

magicbeans on March 28, 2014 at 11:58 AM

That explains a lot, doesn’t it?

Fenris on March 28, 2014 at 12:06 PM

Being an audio engineer by profession (read: someone who hears for a living), these always hit me right in the gut. Either that, or I need to dust my office.

CurtZHP on March 28, 2014 at 12:07 PM

I even took comfort in that silly Rainbow Bridge fantasy, so deep was my grief.
.
My dogs were my constant companions and I went everywhere with them.

ExpressoBold on March 28, 2014 at 12:02 PM

The rainbow bridge thing is a tear jerker for sure. But it does give comfort.

crankyoldlady on March 28, 2014 at 12:07 PM

Yes, I’m sure the worker is trained to be professional in situations like this. But a little human contact goes a long way towards dealing with things emotionally, and it doesn’t have to be over the top or take much time. Well, not a big deal.

Fenris on March 28, 2014 at 11:48 AM

Actually, she does touch the patient several times in the vid. But I think the professionalism part has more to do with not injecting more emotion into a situation in so as to be able to make a good assessment and to be a “rock” the patient can stand on. Also, the worker repeatedly acknowledge it was a big life change. I expect the hugging was saved for afterwords with the friend taking the video and others close to her.

What I’m wondering is – now that she can actually hear how words sound, will she gain a Brit accent?

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 12:07 PM

This sort of emotional appeal speaks to the same people who watch Juan Pablo on the Bachelor.

antisense on March 28, 2014 at 11:29 AM

What does this even mean? I nominate this for the most nonsensical post of the year.

Ed Morrissey on March 28, 2014 at 11:42 AM

God bless you and your wife, Ed. You’re both very lucky to have each other. Your granddaughters are the luckiest of all.

GOPRanknFile on March 28, 2014 at 12:07 PM

We had to put our dog(Maggie) down this morning.

This helps.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

Very sorry for your loss. People without pets just do not understand the absolute heartache you are going through.

oceansidecon on March 28, 2014 at 12:07 PM

…What I’m wondering is – now that she can actually hear how words sound, will she gain a Brit accent?

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 12:07 PM

I’m guessing a thick Russian one, she’ll be spouting ‘da’ and ‘comrade’ in no time.

Fenris on March 28, 2014 at 12:11 PM

She’s going to flip out when she hears Bach for the first time.

JetBoy on March 28, 2014 at 12:12 PM

This sort of emotional appeal speaks to the same people who watch Juan Pablo on the Bachelor.

antisense on March 28, 2014 at 11:29 AM

I don’t watch television, particularly reality television, but I am a keen observer of human experience in my desire to better understand the human condition.

This lady’s joy is one of those moments in the human experience that elevates and informs us. Through understanding her experience, living it vicariously, we gain insight and understanding of our fellow human beings and, thereby, ourselves.

Walking past this woman’s experience and sneering is tantamount to walking along a sidewalk, seeing a diamond laying there in your path, mistaking it for a piece of glass, and thoughtlessly walking right on past it. Such thoughtlessness leaves you considerably poorer than you might have been.

thatsafactjack on March 28, 2014 at 12:14 PM

I’d like to preemptively apologize to her for much of what passes for “music” today. Well at least she can turn them off when Miley Virus comes on.

Minnfidel on March 28, 2014 at 12:17 PM

We had to put our dog(Maggie) down this morning.

This helps.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

We haven’t “met” jm but I just want to say i’m sorry for your loss. {{{hug}}}

31giddyup on March 28, 2014 at 12:20 PM

We had to put our dog(Maggie) down this morning.

This helps.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

I am so very sorry.
have a cat (Duska) with seizures getting worse and meds losing the ability to stop them. we may have to make a decision soon.
just remember the good times and love the dog gave you.

dmacleo on March 28, 2014 at 12:25 PM

We had to put our dog(Maggie) down this morning.

This helps.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

We haven’t “met” jm but I just want to say i’m sorry for your loss. {{{hug}}}

31giddyup on March 28, 2014 at 12:20 PM

Well said, Rhonda.

I missed this the first time through.

I’m an animal lover, myself. Sincere sympathy for your loss, jmtham156.

thatsafactjack on March 28, 2014 at 12:29 PM

I’d like to see a video of the person who took this video being shown how to properly hold a phone camera (sideways) for the first time. :)

Kensington on March 28, 2014 at 12:31 PM

She’s going to flip out when she hears Bach for the first time.

JetBoy on March 28, 2014 at 12:12 PM

But Bach is dead! What kind of devil implants have they given this poor woman!?!

Kensington on March 28, 2014 at 12:32 PM

very touching — bearing witness to joy like that, even via video, is a gift…

We had to put our dog(Maggie) down this morning.

This helps.

jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

I’m so sorry for your loss — they never leave us entirely…

dpduq on March 28, 2014 at 12:38 PM

She’s going to flip out when she hears Bach for the first time.

JetBoy on March 28, 2014 at 12:12 PM

But Bach is dead! What kind of devil implants have they given this poor woman!?!

Kensington on March 28, 2014 at 12:32 PM

He was referring to Richard Bach, the writer of “Jonathan Livingston Seagull”!

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 12:41 PM

How can a person speak or understand spoken language when they’ve never heard it before?

jaime on March 28, 2014 at 12:41 PM

How can a person speak or understand spoken language when they’ve never heard it before?

jaime on March 28, 2014 at 12:41 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oralism

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 12:46 PM

How can a person speak or understand spoken language when they’ve never heard it before?
jaime on March 28, 2014 at 12:41 PM

More:
“One of the most enduring traditional oral techniques in teaching speech to deaf people has incorporated the use of both sight and touch in the learning process. This process involves the instructor placing the hand of the student on the instructor’s throat while forming specific words. The student learns how the lips move when a word is formed, and also get a sense of how the muscles in the neck move when a particular word is formed. While considered a process that involves a great deal of patience on the part of both student and teacher, the student begins to associate movements with the production of particular sounds. By replicating the movement of the lips and the manipulation of the muscles used in producing sounds, deaf people learn how to receive and send verbal communications. It becomes possible to understand what is being said through employing the sense of sight, and also learn how to verbally respond based on the proper sequence of muscle contractions and lip movements associated with pronouncing a given word.”

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 12:51 PM

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 12:46 PM

Yes, I get that. I went to high school with two young women who communicated like that. But it does not sound the same as a hearing person sounds. The difference is readily apparent.

jaime on March 28, 2014 at 12:55 PM

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 12:46 PM

OK, the woman in this video sounds like she has never heard before. I was basing my question (wrongly, without watching this video) on the video AP linked here.

My question refers to that video. Sorry.

jaime on March 28, 2014 at 1:01 PM

For Jo.

Bmore on March 28, 2014 at 1:03 PM

Yes, I get that. I went to high school with two young women who communicated like that. But it does not sound the same as a hearing person sounds. The difference is readily apparent.
jaime on March 28, 2014 at 12:55 PM

You asked about how they learn to speak without hearing. How it sounds when they speak is a whole nother different critter of a question. Since they can’t hear themselves they can’t reproduce the actual sounds – so others can most often notice that it doesn’t sound like a “usual” voice.

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 1:07 PM

Bmore on March 28, 2014 at 1:03 PM

Ya’ think maybe she should start with something a little lighter?

cozmo on March 28, 2014 at 1:08 PM

A heart warming video, to be sure. Now it’s time to hear from the people who thinks she betrayed the deaf community for wanting to be able to hear.
 
You think I’m kidding? I wish that I were.
 
Physics Geek on March 28, 2014 at 11:33 AM

 
+1. Including death threats to the parents of implanted kids from what I understand, because they think it’s the equivalent of genocide.
 
Same rules with kids who have bad vision, right? Or kids with a hole in their heart? Nope. No community gets offended when a kid gets a wheelchair or takes anti-seizure medication. Just when they get to hear.

rogerb on March 28, 2014 at 1:10 PM

My question refers to that video. Sorry.

jaime on March 28, 2014 at 1:01 PM

Ah, yeah, if memory serves that woman is profoundly deaf but had some hearing. I remember wondering the same thing as you on that.

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 1:10 PM

We had to put our dog(Maggie) down this morning.
 
This helps.
 
jmtham156 on March 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

 
I’m sorry. It’s tough because they’re no less than family.
 
Do me a favor. Type or write down a page or two of what you remember, good and bad, and fold it up and put it in a book or a drawer you don’t go into very much.
 
In a year or so you’ll stumble across it, smile, and probably tear up in a good way. Trust me.

rogerb on March 28, 2014 at 1:14 PM

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 1:07 PM

Yes, you’re quite right. I should have watched this video as well as the one linked further up in the article. Thanks.

jaime on March 28, 2014 at 1:15 PM

cozmo on March 28, 2014 at 1:08 PM

I don’t think she can go wrong either way. I chose the Mozart piece as both a nice listen but also symbolically. ; )

Bmore on March 28, 2014 at 1:17 PM

whatcat on March 28, 2014 at 12:51 PM

There is a fascinating HBO documentary about an older married couple who first met as children at a deaf school in (I think) St. Louis that taught using these techniques. Because the process is immersive and takes a long time, naturally it is easiest to start with young children in a boarding school environment. Anyway, these folks eventually learned to speak, married happily, raised three hearing children, and when they were 65, eventually became candidates for cochlear implants.

The documentary is about their experience before and after the implants. In the end, the difference in their reactions proved to be the most challenging factor. The wife had an easier time adjusting to the new hearing world than did her husband, who was more set in his ways, and this became a new and unforeseen difficulty in their marriage.

Here it is. I really recommend it.
http://www.hbo.com/documentaries/hear-and-now/synopsis.html#/

Missy on March 28, 2014 at 1:18 PM

rogerb on March 28, 2014 at 1:14 PM

; )

Bmore on March 28, 2014 at 1:18 PM

Bmore on March 28, 2014 at 1:17 PM

If you wanted symbolism, wouldn’t you want Beethoven?

cozmo on March 28, 2014 at 1:22 PM

Oh – the film was made by their daughter. It is really just as much the portrait of a happy marriage and loving family as it is the story of deaf people receiving implants.

Also, I think I may be remembering wrong – it may have been the wife who had more trouble adjusting than the husband. It’s been a few years since I saw it. Anyway, again, I really recommend it. They are lovely people.

Missy on March 28, 2014 at 1:22 PM

Wait, she said the voice sounded “really high”. How would she know the difference if she was deaf?

mitchellvii on March 28, 2014 at 1:24 PM

Makes you stop and think of the all the amazing and beautiful sounds we hear and take for granted. Kids giggling, church bells on Sunday morning, waves crashing, soft whispers….

I think I just found a renewed appreciation for every one.

Great video.

lynncgb on March 28, 2014 at 1:27 PM

hhee hee you all cry like john boehner

tlynch001 on March 28, 2014 at 1:32 PM

I am a Deaf attorney in Utah.

Even if a person is born deaf, the brain has an amazing ability to determine sounds, even if it never has heard sound before. The brain is hard wired to interpret sounds. However, due to some deficiency in the ear or in the nerve endings, the brain just never had a chance to interpret what the ear is transmitting from the sound waves it receives coming into the ear.

As for the Deaf community, some Deaf people will be upset by this video and others won’t. Those in the Deaf community who will dislike this video will feel that this video is essentially sending a message that “sound is better than no sound”, or “hearing is better than deafness” or that “speech is better than sign language.” Those who oppose Cochlear implants are more likely to consider themselves culturally Deaf than those who have no problems with cochlear implants. They would see this as an example of audism.

As for me, I can see both sides of this issue. For Deaf people, they argue that society (as well as hearing people) place too much value on speech and hearing and see it as being superior to Sign Language and Deafness. And to some degree, they are right. It is amazing how much our world revolves around sound and speech and hearing people need to be sensitive and aware of the idea that people can be successful without sound or speech and in criminal matters, a person’s hearing loss does play a role in how the situation unfolded and how the police can better handle a situation.

However, as this video shows, the value and power of sound cannot be ignored or dismissed and those who are culturally Deaf need to realize that there is tremendous value in being able to hear and speak. That’s why when a Deaf person encounters sound for the first time, they are overwhelmed by the value of sound.

In reality, neither being deaf or being able to hear is better than the other.

Its helpful to see both sides of this issue.

Conservative Samizdat on March 28, 2014 at 1:41 PM

So let’s go with Socialized medicine to stop all this happiness./

Absolutely incredible.

To those of you who explained how she could speak thank you. I had no idea.

CW20 on March 28, 2014 at 1:46 PM

Spectacular! So happy for her. Health care workers are amazing people.

scalleywag on March 28, 2014 at 1:48 PM

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