NLRB regional director: College football players are employees, not student athletes, and can unionize

posted at 5:21 pm on March 26, 2014 by Allahpundit

Look on the bright side: Employment is finally growing in one sector of Obama’s America.

The magical combination of unions, the NCAA, college football, and Chicago makes me think this can’t possibly lead to a bad outcome.

NLRB regional director Peter Sung Ohr cited the players’ time commitment to their sport and the fact their scholarships were tied directly to their performance as reasons for granting them union rights…

CAPA attorneys argued that college football is, for all practical purposes, a commercial enterprise that relies on players’ labor to generate billions of dollars in profits. That, they contend, makes the relationship of schools to players one of employers to employees.

In its endeavor to have college football players be recognized as essential workers, CAPA likened scholarships to employment pay — too little pay from its point of view. Northwestern balked at that claim, describing scholarship as grants.

Giving college athletes employee status and allowing them to unionize, critics have argued, could hurt college sports in numerous ways — including by raising the prospects of strikes by disgruntled players or lockouts by athletic departments.

Here’s the ruling, which is short to begin with and even shorter in pertinent part (pages 14 to 20). Key bit:

stu

The ruling distinguishes walk-ons, who receive no financial benefit from playing and are given more freedom by coaches to behave like normal students, from scholarship recipients, who receive $75,000 or so in tuition and other benefits each year and who are forced to follow employee-like rules set by their bosses/coaches. They’re recruited for football, they spend most of their time on football, and they answer chiefly to the athletic department, not the academic faculty. Put all that together with the fact that their activities generate tens of millions in revenue for the university and ta da — you’ve got an employment relationship. Can’t wait for the first strike during bowl season.

The union isn’t asking for salaries yet. They want better medical care for players, scholarships that cover the “full cost” of attending school, and a trust fund that players could use to help finish their education once their eligibility has expired. The ruling doesn’t affect the NCAA’s own rules, either: Employee or not, you’re still ineligible to play if you take money (that isn’t sufficiently disguised as part of your “scholarship,” that is). Maybe a players’ strike, one no doubt supported by schools with more cash to spend on talent, will change that. Given how short most players’ careers are in the NFL, the urgency monetizing one’s college years is sky high. Makes me wonder, in fact, why a rival for-profit league for players 21 and under hasn’t developed as a competitor to the college system. Maybe there simply isn’t enough infrastructure for it, but if they signed a bunch of top high-school talent, they’d drum up some interest. At the very least, if you want to put pressure on the NCAA to allow salaries in the name of retaining the talent it has, that’d do it.

Ah well, doesn’t matter. Football will be defunct in a few decades anyway. Exit question via Lis Meinecke: If college scholarship students are employees, are high-school scholarship students also employees?

Update: Hmmmmm.


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Comment pages: 1 2

Solution:

NCAA ends sports scholarships; colleges and universities forced to return to educating.

BobMbx on March 26, 2014 at 5:26 PM

Let’s not get too drastic here ;)

In any event, this ruling is absolutely mind-boggling. There’s no way this doesn’t get overturned. It’s even stupider (yeah, I went to college) than the NFL talking about 86′ing the kick off. And more baffling than the Jets when they picked up Tebow.

JetBoy on March 26, 2014 at 7:31 PM

Yeah….but the real question is, “How will this impact the President’s brackets?”

ReaganWasRight on March 26, 2014 at 7:33 PM

So the NLRB is taking away a regulation — one against students organizing — and you all are crying foul? Not everything that is pro-union is anti-conservative. A freer market would give the stars more money, pure and simple. The anti-unionization argument is based on some very “progressive” notions: One is special status, i.e., that “students” shouldn’t get paid money above a certain salary cap, even if they’re only “students” for the sake of their real work, athletics. The other is the redistributionist notion that the money they earn should not benefit them above this monetary cap, but should instead benefit the entire student athletics program. These regulations have led to what excessive regulations always lead to: Rule-breaking, i.e., a black market in which rewards are handed under the table. Isn’t it better to have this all out in the open, determined according to market forces?

calbear on March 26, 2014 at 7:45 PM

What about research departments that generate $$$ based on students?

Odie1941 on March 26, 2014 at 5:47 PM

Wait…this may not be such a bad thing now that I think on it. You make a great point. All those overpriced professors in academia have hordes of students working for them, being TAs, working on their tax payer funded grants, teaching for them while they write research papers and books mostly to self promote themselves.

I don’t like unions, But…it would be enjoyable, beyond enjoyable, to see students striking against the very leftist professors who pushed this crap in the first place. At least College Football is profitable, I can’t say the same about all the half-baked “academic” departments in college these days. If it caused Big Academia in America to go down in flames like the unions did to other American industries this might actually be a useful development.

William Eaton on March 26, 2014 at 7:47 PM

Can’t wait until they stop all sports scholarships. You’ll suddenly have 225 pound, musclebound linebackers getting a lot of “liberal arts” scholarships to these schools…

Cyhort on March 26, 2014 at 7:51 PM

William Eaton on March 26, 2014 at 7:47 PM

Could be, its the first point I bring up when I hear the nonsense about paying Student Athletes.

The majority who want this (there was an ESPN panel a few years ago) – are largely loud mouthed minorities who see “the man” exploiting black students.

Of course they overlook the opportunity in itself to flourish in academia, given this unique scenario. Hershel Walker is a fantastic case study of low income poor black kid, who went to UGA, with zero academic support – due to his amazing football prowess. And what did Hershel do? He went back, got his education – including the ability to read and write – then went on to be incredibly successful in life. Hell, he still – at 52/53 looks like a 20 year old. Dwayne Wade is another prime example.

Odie1941 on March 26, 2014 at 7:57 PM

Solution:
NCAA ends sports scholarships; colleges and universities forced to return to educating.BobMbx on March 26, 2014 at 5:26 PM

Ditto.get back to the academic business and let sports league start competing with farm teams etc. For once, be like Europe.

AH_C on March 26, 2014 at 8:03 PM

As much as I like College sports, we don’t need to fund the Pro sports minor leagues.

jpmn on March 26, 2014 at 8:15 PM

I think what colleges need to do is break apart their football teams from their schools and start a minor league. The school can be the owners and still make money off of the games, the players can get paid just like minor league baseball does. Then you can play college and non-college players.

dforston on March 26, 2014 at 8:25 PM

This will effect all college sports..these kids are there to get an education not to get paid! really outrageous and totally unfair to the kids going there truly for an education, without a sports scholarship

sadsushi on March 26, 2014 at 8:29 PM

The AD of OSU makes $900k.

Akzed on March 26, 2014 at 8:35 PM

This will effect all college sports..these kids are there to get an education not to get paid! really outrageous and totally unfair to the kids going there truly for an education, without a sports scholarship sadsushi on March 26, 2014 at 8:29 PM

I’m ambivalent.

Cut out football and basketball at a major school and how many many many millions does that school lose?

If those programs were done away with, how much would tuition have to rise to make it up?

Yes, the athletes should have to declare their compensation as income like everyone else. However, I don’t think the schools should be putting them on salary, other than their tuition, but the athletes should be allowed to make as much money as they can doing whatever they want: selling autographs, jerseys, whatever.

Or not.

Akzed on March 26, 2014 at 8:40 PM

I wonder how college student-athletes will pay their union dues.

I imagine the unions will try to collect dues directly from the bloated university budgets.

Alopen on March 26, 2014 at 5:35 PM

Good point…many of them don’t know how to write a check…everything they needed came through EFT directly into Mom’s SNAP card. Sad situation all around but let the universe reach its balance on its own (painful and will take some time).

teejk on March 26, 2014 at 8:50 PM

NLRB regional director Peter Sung Ohr cited the players’ time commitment to their sport and the fact their scholarships were tied directly to their performance as reasons for granting them union rights…

So are students on academic scholarships requiring them to maintain a certain GPA also “employees”?

malclave on March 26, 2014 at 10:05 PM

It was a Big Ten rule that kept the same team from representing them for 2 years in a row. If I remember right it was changed in the mid to late 70′s.

RickB on March 26, 2014 at 7:06 PM

Actually, the one I was thinking of was the 1962 Rose Bowl. It wasn’t a 2nd year thing like I remembered incorrectly. They just turned it down.

Fenris on March 26, 2014 at 10:10 PM

it would be enjoyable, beyond enjoyable, to see students striking against the very leftist professors who pushed this crap in the first place….If it caused Big Academia in America to go down in flames like the unions did to other American industries this might actually be a useful development.

William Eaton on March 26, 2014 at 7:47 PM

I’ll shake my head here. Zero percent chance of that happening.

a.) Dems will protect their self interests and won’t let that happen, and

b.) neither will next GOP presidential candidate, education globalist Jeb Bush

People like us are gamed out by the system, Eaton…Heads we win, tales you lose.

Too many Republicans in positions of power aspire to be a part of these institutions, not to reform and end them.

FrankT on March 26, 2014 at 10:13 PM

The players spend 40 to 60 hours per week for one month during a one-month training camp prior to the start of the academic year and an additional 40 to 50 hours per week on those duties during the 3 or 4 month football season.

Really?

So this means marching band members can unionize IN HIGH SCHOOL.
This means any competitive team; be it sports, academic or social club can unionize so long as their efforts are school related but not directly related to their studies.

To wit – This opens the door to allow americorp students to unionize.

it’s a stupid regulation put there only for purely political purposes and a power grab and has no basis in any legal reality whatsoever.

Skywise on March 26, 2014 at 11:13 PM

This is really a bad idea..This is all about $$$..:(

Dire Straits on March 26, 2014 at 11:26 PM

This will effect all college sports..these kids are there to get an education not to get paid! really outrageous and totally unfair to the kids going there truly for an education, without a sports scholarship

sadsushi on March 26, 2014 at 8:29 PM

This.

The ability to unionize won’t be limited to just the football team. Every other scholarship athlete would also be allowed to join the union. Schools aren’t going to stop giving out scholarships for football and basketball, but the unintended consequence of this ruling will most likely be an end to scholarships in all of the other sports.

HarryBackside on March 27, 2014 at 2:28 AM

One of the NCAA’s eligibility requirements is amateurism. If athletes are employees, then they are professionals, and not eligible to participate in college athletics.

HarryBackside on March 27, 2014 at 2:30 AM

This will effect all college sports..these kids are there to get an education not to get paid! really outrageous and totally unfair to the kids going there truly for an education, without a sports scholarship

sadsushi on March 26, 2014 at 8:29 PM

This.

The ability to unionize won’t be limited to just the football team. Every other scholarship athlete would also be allowed to join the union. Schools aren’t going to stop giving out scholarships for football and basketball, but the unintended consequence of this ruling will most likely be an end to scholarships in all of the other sports.

HarryBackside on March 27, 2014 at 2:28 AM

A win for Calbear!
/

CW on March 27, 2014 at 7:47 AM

Disband the football team….problem solved.

olesparkie on March 27, 2014 at 7:51 AM

I now predict a 10 fold increase in NESN channel costs.

Don L on March 27, 2014 at 7:55 AM

Make all college teams be composed of walk-on athletes. Let the pros run farm teams and let the schools stop pretending they’re educating the players.

katiejane on March 27, 2014 at 7:57 AM

NLRB regional director Peter Sung Ohr cited the players’ time commitment to their sport and the fact their scholarships were tied directly to their performance as reasons for granting them union rights…

So are students on academic scholarships requiring them to maintain a certain GPA also “employees”?

malclave on March 26, 2014 at 10:05 PM

I expect Harvard and Yale will soon be offering “A+” students bonus money in accordance with their contracts. So much for equal pay that the Obama administration loves.

Don L on March 27, 2014 at 7:58 AM

This is the NCAA fault! They are a bunch of incompetent morns who can’t find a good idea with two hands and flashlight. They have been spending time running around trying to make sure all these athletes don’t make money from selling their jerseys to tattoo parlors they have never stopped to look at the big picture.
That student “athletes” are in fact not really students is not news and has been true for 30 years or more. The college have been making more and more money off of football and have always thought, we don’t need to pay these guys more they are our free labor because there student…wink wink. This and the pending lawsuit where student images were used in video games with any compensation are going to take the NCAA over a barrel. They could have headed this off at the pass but chose not to.
You cannot use a free labor force in this country and continue to make more and more money off of them and expect people not to take action these days. The NCAA is using rules from 40 years ago and they are under the delusion that they are going to fly today. They need to wake up and fix this issue. Something tells me they are getting calls from the NFL to the same effect.

falcaner on March 27, 2014 at 8:01 AM

It appears one of the driving factors the NLRB used was the income generated by the football program. Other programs mentioned above (like the dance scholarships, etc.) wouldn’t apply since they don’t bring in huge sums of money to the university.

I have a son on a “full-ride” academic scolarship, and any scholarship money above and beyond his tuition, fees, room & board is taxable as income (He has extra money from a state scholrship program). Seems like that would also apply here when the schools pay for “all costs of college” the NWU student cited.

HornHiAceDeuce on March 27, 2014 at 8:11 AM

Make all college teams be composed of walk-on athletes. Let the pros run farm teams and let the schools stop pretending they’re educating the players.

katiejane on March 27, 2014 at 7:57 AM

Spot on.

Mekei on March 27, 2014 at 8:12 AM

Has the NLRB ever seen a proposal to unionize it didn’t like?

Do socialists ever see a new big government spending program they don’t like, other than for national defense?

Do bears sh!t in the woods?

Is the Pope Catholic?

farsighted on March 27, 2014 at 8:12 AM

calbear on March 26, 2014 at 7:45 PM

If the unions had to follow the same rules as everyone else, I could see that, but as it stands unions have rights individuals don’t. Until you remove those, they shouldn’t get the same treatment as everyone else. In fact, until corrected, they shouldn’t exist. The ONLY benefit a union should have is numbers and organization. That’s it.

Arssanguinus on March 27, 2014 at 8:17 AM

The demise of big time college athletics should win the Democrats a lot of votes.

Viator on March 27, 2014 at 8:24 AM

Earth to Hot Gas Readers:

They’re not going to college for an education.

The NCAA needs to refocus its mission on education through sports, not vice versa.

blammm on March 27, 2014 at 8:28 AM

Make the whiny little babies claim the value of the scholarship as income and let them pay taxes on it. Don’t forget your union dues. Welcome to the real world you spoiled brats.

rmkdbq on March 27, 2014 at 8:45 AM

Make all college teams be composed of walk-on athletes. Let the pros run farm teams and let the schools stop pretending they’re educating the players.

katiejane on March 27, 2014 at 7:57 AM

Looks like America’s real sport, baseball, had it right all along.

Nutstuyu on March 27, 2014 at 8:48 AM

So the cost of a college education is about to jump?

birdwatcher on March 26, 2014 at 5:33 PM

No, the cost to go to a college game…

PatriotRider on March 27, 2014 at 8:49 AM

I disagree with this decision because I am opposed to unions in general and I don’t believe there is any constitutional basis for the NRLB to even exist.

That being said, I agree with their underlying premise. College football is a business. And those who play college football are not student athletes, they are essentially employees of the business. There is virtually nothing about academics left in the typical college football program.

Shump on March 27, 2014 at 8:56 AM

This regime has done more to tear apart the social fabric of this country than all of the previous ones put together. That an unelected putz who knows nothing about college football can make a decision like this is not going to stand. Ohr should not visit AL, FL, GA, or TX anytime soon, oh, better add OK, NE and TN to that list.

Kissmygrits on March 27, 2014 at 9:07 AM

How will this effect schools in “Right To Work” states versus the other states?

Will student-athletes be required to pay union dues even if they’re not on scholarship? What union will represent them? Will non-union college players be blacklisted from the professional union teams?

Time to get out the popcorn.

JetBlast on March 27, 2014 at 9:13 AM

Kissmygrits on March 27, 2014 at 9:07 AM

Actually Ohr has done college football and the public a big favor, by unintentionally exposing it for what it has really become; nothing more than an NFL farm system.

Colleges and Universities should now simply end all football scholarships…

PatriotRider on March 27, 2014 at 9:17 AM

how about the people in the band? They get scholarships also….

tractah on March 27, 2014 at 9:19 AM

Sometimes getting what you think you want is worse than not getting it. What these student geniuses haven’t considered is that if they are employees, they can be fired, have their pay cut, and have dictated to them when they can go to class and what they can major in. In addition, they have not considered that once they are employees, the value of their scholarships become taxable income. For a Northwestern student, where tuition, room and board, and fees likely top sixty grand, that would mean that they would owe close to thirty grand in local, state, and federal taxes every year. And don’t forget union dues.

Mr. Curly on March 27, 2014 at 9:23 AM

Akzed on March 26, 2014 at 8:40 PM

bet the amount lost pretty closely offset by not having coaches salaries and salaries for staff as well as field/bldg mtx and utilities for the sport.

dmacleo on March 27, 2014 at 9:39 AM

Really?

So this means marching band members can unionize IN HIGH SCHOOL.
This means any competitive team; be it sports, academic or social club can unionize so long as their efforts are school related but not directly related to their studies.

To wit – This opens the door to allow americorp students to unionize.

it’s a stupid regulation put there only for purely political purposes and a power grab and has no basis in any legal reality whatsoever.

Skywise on March 26, 2014 at 11:13 PM

What I highlighted is why this utter joke of a decision will not withstand a court challenge. Students receiving scholarships are not employees, and neither are those without scholarships who freely choose to join teams.

However, wouldn’t it be great to see what would happen if a team voted to unionize, and some of the members didn’t want to join the union? Could these members be kicked off the team by the unionized players? Be forced to pay dues? Could the unionized team decide to go on strike for greater compensation from the colleges and universities? lol the NLRB hasn’t thought this through.

non-nonpartisan on March 27, 2014 at 9:48 AM

What these student geniuses haven’t considered is that if they are employees, they can be fired, have their pay cut, and have dictated to them when they can go to class and what they can major in.

Mr. Curly on March 27, 2014 at 9:23 AM

The players who were seeking a union basically alleged that most of those things apply to them already.

J.S.K. on March 27, 2014 at 9:51 AM

Maybe I’m missing something, but this is just absolutely insane to me. If you’re an athlete, your scholarship is all the compensation you should get. I don’t care how much money the schools and the NCAA make. Let’s consider all the questions that arise from this, too. If a scholarship is being considered a wage for this purpose, should it not be taxed as such? What about everyone else that receives a scholarship? If football and basketball players are to be paid and and compensated like this, should that not extend to athletes in other sports too?

College sports as we knew them are dead, imo.

changer1701 on March 27, 2014 at 9:56 AM

Good. They’re going to help kill the nonsense that is professional sports. And yes, the NCAA is a professional sports league.

I look forward to going to see Engineering and Accounting majors playing Saturday football again.

FineasFinn on March 27, 2014 at 10:14 AM

College sports that generate large incomes for the schools are very much like slavery. If a team is generating income for the school. they should share in that income and be paid. The only reason the NCAA doesn’t allow pay is because they are owned by the schools and they are a bunch of greedy bastards. F them and start paying the athletes. The same goes for student interns.

earlgrey on March 27, 2014 at 10:16 AM

I’ve always believed that the one promise that coaches and universities should be able to make to student athletes and their parents is to help them get an education.

My thought was to give every scholarship athlete 10 years to complete their education at the school that signed them, with eight of those years in school. Not everyone can work at the same pace.

I believe something, anything from the NCAA and member schools could have stopped this from happening.

itsspideyman on March 27, 2014 at 10:25 AM

BTW, is this the NLRB with the Obama “recess” appointments still in place?

itsspideyman on March 27, 2014 at 10:27 AM

This is the NCAA fault! They are a bunch of incompetent morns who can’t find a good idea with two hands and flashlight. They have been spending time running around trying to make sure all these athletes don’t make money from selling their jerseys to tattoo parlors they have never stopped to look at the big picture.
That student “athletes” are in fact not really students is not news and has been true for 30 years or more. The college have been making more and more money off of football and have always thought, we don’t need to pay these guys more they are our free labor because there student…wink wink. This and the pending lawsuit where student images were used in video games with any compensation are going to take the NCAA over a barrel. They could have headed this off at the pass but chose not to.
You cannot use a free labor force in this country and continue to make more and more money off of them and expect people not to take action these days. The NCAA is using rules from 40 years ago and they are under the delusion that they are going to fly today. They need to wake up and fix this issue. Something tells me they are getting calls from the NFL to the same effect.

falcaner on March 27, 2014 at 8:01 AM

Exactly. Because there is TOO much money being made at these kid’s expenses. Yes, they get an opportunity at an education. So? Why is this not an issue with baseball? Or soccer? The scale right now is tipped in favor of the NCAA. And they know it, and the TV networks know it. There is so much money floating around they can’t see straight. And the kids deserve some of it. It’s their knees and heads that are paying for the $Billions the NCAA and these big schools are making. There is no competition to the NCAA, and there should be. Would love to see walk-ons at the college level, and an NFL minor league started. That would make this a balanced system. Pretty much what happens in the baseball world.

Deckard BR on March 27, 2014 at 10:35 AM

College sports that generate large incomes for the schools are very much like slavery.

earlgrey

People who make posts like yours are very much like the KKK.

xblade on March 27, 2014 at 10:45 AM

My thought was to give every scholarship athlete 10 years to complete their education at the school that signed them, with eight of those years in school. Not everyone can work at the same pace.

itsspideyman on March 27, 2014 at 10:25 AM

Anyone who needs 10 years to complete what s considered a 4 year program does not belong in college. Students get thru college in 4 or 5 years while working/raising families/ etc so why should the scholarship athletes get more time when they already have less to be worried about.

katiejane on March 27, 2014 at 10:50 AM

So, preschoolers should be able to organize as well. They are forced to make crafts, and do the alphabet all day with NO PAY!!

faraway on March 27, 2014 at 10:51 AM

Like to see them try and Unionize the Aggies….

*snicker*

workingclass artist on March 27, 2014 at 10:55 AM

By the logic used here, every student with a scholarship is an employee. You don’t get to keep your scholarship unless you “perform” in one way or another.

Is the issue here that universities get money from sporting events? Seems a very fine line to draw. Universities get money from governments based upon how students they have. I don’t see how athletes make that special of a case.

This will be drug through the courts. Hopefully a judge somewhere has the sense to see this is all silly.

The issue is not unionization, but the corruption within college sports.

bartbeast on March 27, 2014 at 10:57 AM

Anyone who needs 10 years to complete what s considered a 4 year program does not belong in college. Students get thru college in 4 or 5 years while working/raising families/ etc so why should the scholarship athletes get more time when they already have less to be worried about.

katiejane on March 27, 2014 at 10:50 AM

I don’t disagree with your premise. My thought was generosity. It’s easy for students to get sidetracked, or a student is drafted without finishing, gets cut and is suddenly left without a diploma.

I teach in a university, and I have student-athletes in my classes. They have very busy, structured lives, from the moment they get up. They travel, are out of classes to attend events, but aren’t given slack, as it should be. Their lives are no different than any other student. They are, however, outward representatives of the universities and if you read the story about the Northwestern athletes have restrictions on their liberties.

I agree with you. Students have taken less time. It took me 5 1/2 years to finish my undergraduate. A study shows now on average it takes six years now. I’m sure there are other studies that might say different.

My thought is that it doesn’t damage the university in any pejorative way, and helps the student-athlete to complete his education, which can give them a greater chance to be successful.

It can’t guarantee success, but it doesn’t mean colleges shouldn’t support them.

Anyway, I think it’s the least a university could do, and it may have helped avoid where they are now.

itsspideyman on March 27, 2014 at 11:04 AM

Decisions like this are what will eventually wake up the LIV’s. Unelected unaccountable bureaucrats stealing their liberty by dribs and drabs is not on the radar, but mess with their entertainment and Katie bar the door! Right now the minions at the alphabet soup agencies are giddy and drunk with power. Sooner or later one of the morons will step over the line in a way that really pisses off the sleeping masses. They have the rope and they are busy looking for tall trees.

cornbred on March 27, 2014 at 11:05 AM

Be careful what you wish for. Can anyone just imagine the tax consequences of such an employment relationship. Tax on all benefits received by the college athlete.

rjoco1 on March 27, 2014 at 11:39 AM

Tax on all benefits received by the college athlete.

Yes, if this is employment, these athletes owe income tax and FICA/Medicare on the entire scholarship amount.

MTinMN on March 27, 2014 at 12:19 PM

This will be the end of college sports. Football players will go to the highest bidder, the athletes won’t be required to go to class as their JOB is playing football.

and this WILL tricle down to other sports in a matter of just a couple years.

And for all those saying how much the football program makes, IIRC MOST programs are a net loss, but even for those that do make money, much of the profit goes to support other sports. that will all go away when football is cut off from acedemics.

say good bye to underwater womens left handed albino basket weaving…

todler on March 27, 2014 at 12:43 PM

My daily Metamucil Musings from reading a couple of posts…………not much to see here just thinking out loud.

In a free market, let’s not discuss how much of a free market is left, compensation is largely based on how much wealth you create, how much FINANCIAL risk you assume, or a combination of both. A dean has a very important job and is compensated for their skill set, but a football college head coach of a top tier football team brings in more wealth for the university. The lacrosse coach is an equal hard worker, dedicated, and educated; but the wealth creation for the university from lacrosse is just not there and thus the lower salary.

To change this would be to set up wage and price controls and I would not think that Libertarians or Conservatives would be for that. Free Markets. Free Minds.

Maybe I am wrong and just greedy and need to be schooled!

“There is, however, a world of social difference between the harms inflicted by the use of force and those inflicted through competition. In the first case, we know that injury to the person and damage to property reduce the total store of resources available for human betterment. One person, to make himself better off, inflicts losses on a second person. That individual’s reduced stock of wealth necessarily reduces the opportunities for trade that are available to third persons. The externalities from coercion turn from generally positive to sharply negative. However much a single actor might benefit from her own use of force, no one thinks it is possible to prosper in a society that generalizes from that experience and that allows all individuals to adopt the same practices at will.

In contrast, competition may cause harm to one rival producer, but it also leaves his stock of labor and capital intact for a second transaction. By helping trading partners, it opens up new avenues to those individuals who receive goods at low prices and high quality and to the many third persons who stand to benefit in further transactions. Taking a broad definition of actionable harm transforms liability from an occasional occurrence, such as a car accident, into an inevitable and ubiquitous occurrence: If A’s success in competition is an actionable harm to B, then so too is B’s success to A. A’s claim only looks plausible when considered in isolation; it looks grotesque when its full implications are considered.”

HonestLib on March 27, 2014 at 1:09 PM

The schools are banking billions, coaches get millions a year, and the players are virtual slaves. If a college player gets hurt and their pro career is dead-ended, does the school even pay for their medical care? The current system is designed to enrich everyone but the players the whole house of cards is built on. I’m not a great fan of unions, but student athletes have only two choices. Do exacty whatthey are told or not play. It’s time for a change.

hdc77494 on March 27, 2014 at 1:20 PM

Remember when the baseball players went on strike? Crowds disappeared. The same thing will happen when the unions get into college football. PO the public and you won’t see anyone at the games and the schools will howl like hell.

mixplix on March 27, 2014 at 1:37 PM

Tax on all benefits received by the college athlete.

rjoco1 on March 27, 2014 at 11:39 AM

It wouldn’t be 100%. 20% is considered a qualified employee discount and a tax-exempt fringe benefit.

blammm on March 27, 2014 at 2:03 PM

People who make posts like yours are very much like the KKK.

xblade on March 27, 2014 at 10:45 AM

That’s not possible; I’m not a democrat. However, you are a moron who has comprehension problems because you obviously didn’t read my post.

earlgrey on March 28, 2014 at 11:25 AM

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