Boss Emeritus: Put aside the pot jokes and look again at Colorado legalization

posted at 12:41 pm on March 26, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

Our great friend and Boss Emeritus, Michelle Malkin, offers a powerful testimony today in her column on marijuana legalization — and a surprisingly personal perspective. Sure, we all have fun with jokes at Colorado’s experiment with recreational approval, but the access it creates does more than just serve as easy access to intoxication. Michelle found herself in one of the pot shops that have opened to serve demand that comes from more than just fun and games, hoping to find help for her mother-in-law:

It’s 9 a.m. on a weekday, and I’m at the Marisol Therapeutics pot shop. This is serious business. Security is tight. ID checks are frequent. Merchandise is strictly regulated, labeled, wrapped and controlled. The store is clean, bright and safe. The staffers are courteous and professional. Customers of all ages are here.

There’s a middle-aged woman at the counter nearby who could be your school librarian. On the opposite end of the dispensary, a slender young soldier in a wheelchair with close-cropped hair, dressed in his fatigues, consults with a clerk. There’s a gregarious cowboy and an inquisitive pair of baby boomers looking at edibles. A dude in a hoodie walks in with his backpack.

And then there’s my husband and me. …

For the past three months, my mother-in-law, Carole, whom I love with all my heart, has battled metastatic melanoma. After a harrowing week of hospitalization and radiation, she’s at home now. A miraculous new combination of oral cancer drugs seems to have helped enormously with pain and possibly contained the disease’s spread. But Carole’s loss of appetite and nausea persist.

A month ago, with encouragement from all of her doctors here in Colorado, she applied for a state-issued medical marijuana card. It still hasn’t come through. As a clerk at Marisol Therapeutics told us, there’s a huge backlog.

In states where only medicinal use is permitted, Carole would still be out of luck. However, in Colorado, access for recreational use also allows people to get around the permitting process temporarily, although the prices go up for non-medicinal use:

But thanks to Amendment 64, the marijuana drug legalization act approved by voters in 2012, we were able to legally and safely circumvent the bureaucratic holdup. “A lot of people are in your same situation,” the pot shop staffer told us. “We see it all the time, and we’re glad we can help.”

Be sure to read it all. Michelle makes a good point about the entrepreneurial aspects of Colorado’s legalization, as well as the improved ability for citizens to exercise their own choice on both recreational intoxicants and medical treatments. The marijuana is grown on site and/or locally, so it involves no issues that would normally invoke federal jurisdiction.

That leaves the question, though, of whether marijuana actually does provide an effective therapeutic treatment. Unfortunately, this is another area in which the federal government obstructs rather than clarifies, as the Washington Post reported last week:

While 20 states and the District have made medical marijuana legal — in Colorado and Washington state the drug is also legal for recreational use — it remains among the most tightly controlled substances under federal law. For scientists, that means extra steps to obtain, transport and secure the drug — delays they say can slow down their research by months or even years.

The barriers exist despite the fact that the number of people using marijuana legally for medical reasons is estimated at more than 1 million.

Stalled for decades because of the stigma associated with the drug, lack of funding and legal issues, research into marijuana’s potential for treating diseases is drawing renewed interest. Recent studies and anecdotal stories have provided hope that marijuana, or some components of the plant, may have diverse applications, such as treating cancer, HIV and Alzheimer’s disease.

But scientists say they are frustrated that the federal government has not made any efforts to speed the process of research. Over the years, the Drug Enforcement Administration has turned down several petitions to reclassify cannabis, reiterating its position that marijuana has no accepted medical use and remains a dangerous drug. The DEA has said that there is a lack of safety data and that the drug has a high potential for abuse.

It’s a typical bureaucratic catch-22. The government has declared marijuana to be among the most dangerous of controlled substances so few can access it for studies to determine its value, and the federal government uses the lack of established evidence of its value to justify its classification. Meanwhile, several states have had years of experience in medicinal legalization with apparently few ill effects, which is at least indirect evidence that the DEA has misclassified marijuana, but no one wants to take the politically risky step of reducing control over weed. Meanwhile, people like Carole have to live in states like Colorado in order to make their own decisions over access and effectiveness.

I’m not a fan of marijuana, and I do worry about the moral signal that legalizing recreational use sends, but at least so far it hasn’t had any worse impact than alcohol. We should at least study the impact of marijuana so that we can have an informed debate.


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But thanks to Amendment 64, the marijuana drug legalization act approved by voters in 2012, we were able to legally and safely circumvent the bureaucratic holdup.

That’s a rather weak argument.

I guess someone who thought they weren’t getting enough pain killers would argue that recreational heroin should be legalized so that they can self-medicate, to which, I’m sure, the dealer would tell them that many others are in the same situation.

I’m not sure why Malkin wrote this. She’s pro-recreational pot, now. Good for her. Pot was never difficult to get or to grow, to begin with.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:31 PM

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:06 PM

The vast majority of cigarettes, alcohol and electronics sold are sold legally. The same would be true for pot. And growing pot is easy enough too. Most people can’t make their own electronics. Making your own alcohol happens, but few people grow their own tobacco. The black market would shrink greatly for pot if legal.

Flange on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

Well, I’d just add that for any product, it also depends on the tax rate. The black market thrives with a product that has very high tax rates in any particular area.

So far in Colorado, the illegal market for pot hasn’t dried up yet because the legal supply of pot has not quite gotten up to demand levels, so prices are a bit higher, and add to that the high sin tax the state slapped on pot, so the legal price is even higher. Illegal pot is still plentiful, and currently cheaper than legal pot – according to one of my sons who apparently knows what’s going on there…

Eventually demand for legal retail pot may also come down because the law also allows people to grow up to 6 plants for their own personal use. That in turn might bring down the price, along with a larger legal supply being made available.

dentarthurdent on March 26, 2014 at 1:31 PM

I thought this story about Yemen and khat was interesting in light of this topic.

By 4 in the afternoon, most men walking the streets of Sana’a are high, or about to get high — not on any sort of manufactured narcotics, but on khat, a shrub

“You sit up discussing all your problems and think you’ve solved everything, but in fact you haven’t done anything in the last four hours, because you’ve just been chewing khat and all your problems actually got worse,”

A khat-addled public is more inclined to complacency about the failings of the government,

it certainly provides a steadier income than growing vegetables does — that’s why nearly all of the country’s arable land is devoted to khat. And khat needs a lot of water, which is scarce in Yemen.

Khat plays a big role in keeping people calm, and keeping them off the streets.

http://content.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1917685,00.html

Wigglesworth on March 26, 2014 at 1:32 PM

Are there no HA’ers who will step forward and acknowledge that my saying MM can often be shrill is accurate?

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

What’s the point? All of us can be shrill at times.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:32 PM

They don’t have a test to tell if your driving is impaired like they do with alcohol. They do have a test to tell if you’ve smoked in the last month but that’s not sufficient. If you insist that smoking impairs you for a month, then fine, conversation ended as I don’t think you have enough experience to discuss it further – but I don’t dispute that probably more will drive impaired though.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:29 PM

How do they know (referring to the linked study that said MJ-imparied driving accidents were up 300% – sorry if I have the figures incorrect) that these accidents were due to people impaired from MJ use? Not being snarky or argumentative, seriously – if they have studies showing a correlation, how do they know if they can’t test for it?

Midas on March 26, 2014 at 1:33 PM

If a Phillip Morris or Miller Brewing Co. got involved the smugglers of pot would be greatly diminished.

Flange on March 26, 2014 at 1:28 PM

And a well financed marketing campaign to sell pot to all and sundry with it. I don’t think a doped up population is a good thing, though I do understand why the politicians would be fine with it.

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:33 PM

Are there no HA’ers who will step forward and acknowledge that my saying MM Verbaluce can often be shrill is accurate?

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Testify!

dreadnought62 on March 26, 2014 at 1:33 PM

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Nope, Kiddo, you’re on your own.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 1:33 PM

annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

I can understand your feeling on that. I have also known people who toked to relieve pain. Either cancer or, crushed body parts. They were responsible and whether it actually did relieve the pain, or it was psychosomatic, it did ease the pain.

As long as they didn’t drive under the influence or leave laced brownies out for kids, I don’t care what they did. Though, at the time I would be periodically drug tested for contracts, so I stayed away from them while they did it.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

For that to happen you would have to actually be right.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:33 PM

So pot reduces nausea and pain, and there are no other drugs that produce the same effect?

Doctors don’t know what to proscribe to reduce the side effects of chemo?

Joseph OHenry on March 26, 2014 at 1:34 PM

Yeah obesity isn’t a large cause of death and heart disease in this country.

Pot is.

mazer9 on March 26, 2014 at 1:30 PM

All caused by legal cheeseburgers, no doubt. Run along pot head and save your intellect for more useful endeavors.

Neitherleftorright on March 26, 2014 at 1:34 PM

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:15 PM

That would be fine….if it were heavily monitored.
I’m not a monster. Ashkenazic Jews-which Mrs. Malikn is one of-are genetically at a higher risk for melanoma. I’m at a high risk of it for the same reason-and that’s a disease that terrifies me.
I certainly don’t want Mrs. Malkin and others like her to be suffering.
annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:22 PM

Yeah, I’m a big anti-drug guy and have no use for potheads or other druggies. But if it were treated as a controlled prescription drug, to me it’s not a problen. As you said, as long as people aren’t just handed out scrips willy-nilly for it.

MM’s mother-in-law is an Ashkenazi Jew? Is Malkin a “Jewish name” or how did you know?

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:34 PM

kingsjester on March 26, 2014 at 1:28 PM

Don’t you be calling him annoying.
*I really wish I could trademark that word. LoL*

annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:34 PM

No! No! No! to drug legalization.Sorry for Malkin’s personal situation but still-No!

redware on March 26, 2014 at 1:35 PM

I have also known people who toked to relieve pain.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:33 PM

Getting high doesn’t relieve pain. Often, it focuses the attention on the pain and amplifies it.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:36 PM

And a well financed marketing campaign to sell pot to all and sundry with it. I don’t think a doped up population is a good thing, though I do understand why the politicians would be fine with it.

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:33 PM

Talk about “the opiate of the people”….

dentarthurdent on March 26, 2014 at 1:36 PM

ya know …. I do not have a dog in this fight
that said …. I would not prevent anyone from obtaining
something that could stop the pain of cancer treatment.
my only question is .. do they currently have a way to
field test someone and see if they are high ?

like they do with booze ….

conservative tarheel on March 26, 2014 at 1:36 PM

Gee, who’d a thunk it? Michelle is a squishy RINO sellout who hates America. I know because in my support for CO’s law I have been told so by the most reputable and knowledgeable of such critics right here at HA.

I’m not a fan of marijuana, and I do worry about the moral signal that legalizing recreational use sends

And I am sure I speak for all Americans when I thank you for your relentless efforts to safeguard my morals. It would suck for me to have to decide what is right and wrong for myself.

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:37 PM

Getting high doesn’t relieve pain. Often, it focuses the attention on the pain and amplifies it.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:36 PM

So? a distinction without a difference to somebody in pain.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:37 PM

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:34 PM

Malkin’s a Jewish name+ I read it some place a long time ago.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:38 PM

Is Malkin a “Jewish name”

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:34 PM

Yes.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:38 PM

Talk about “the opiate of the people”….

dentarthurdent on March 26, 2014 at 1:36 PM

The Romans called it Bread and Circuses.

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:38 PM

Flange on March 26, 2014 at 1:28 PM

I don’t think you understand how drugs are traded on then street.

The criminal element, as it relates to drugs will be unaffected. How they manage illegal weed will change somewhat, but it won’t be eliminated it’ll just be sold at cost or at a loss to undercut the legal stuff, and with the intent of enticing those buyers into purchasing more addictive product.

If you’re suddenly able to buy pot legally -with that bog ‘ole tax stamp on it- but you know you can get the same thing without paying the ever-rising tax, why wouldn’t you? There’s a good chance you’ve already been buying it illegally, so morality certainly isn’t an issue. And if you’re a pothead, you’re probably not prone to writing charitable checks to the state government.

So the gangs will sell it cheaper and just as strong, along with the added benefit of being able to pick up a couple of Mollies and maybe a gram of cocaine while you’re conducting the transaction.

BKeyser on March 26, 2014 at 1:38 PM

When Michelle rails against environmentalists, or PETA, or any other liberal cause, she will just be another hypocrite…each of them have a personal vested interest in their beliefs, just like Michelle has in hers.

right2bright on March 26, 2014 at 1:01 PM
.

You have got to expound on that.

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:05 PM

.
She has a personal interest in pot, so now she advocates it to be sold publicly.

Many people have “personal” interests, so they go out and advocate for a new law, or set of rules for all of us to abide by.

The new rule is about “me”, and not society…Michelle has fallen into that trap.

I understand her love for her relative, and she is basically saying that that relief of pain is more important to Michelle than the potential harm of the new laws.

When she now tells us the hold up for the fracking is wrong, well it’s wrong for her, but maybe not for the people supporting it, in the same vein as she is supporting for her relative, it’s personal.

She has to say her personal need is greater than the anti-fracking personal need…

right2bright on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

.
I’m pretty sure she still doesn’t approve the “recreational” use of marijuana, and she wouldn’t have had to go to a store like that one, were it not for ‘government bureaucracy’ :
.

A month ago, with encouragement from all of her doctors here in Colorado, she applied for a state-issued medical marijuana card. It still hasn’t come through. As a clerk at Marisol Therapeutics told us, there’s a huge backlog. But thanks to Amendment 64, the marijuana drug legalization act approved by voters in 2012, we were able to legally and safely circumvent the bureaucratic holdup. “A lot of people are in your same situation,” the pot shop staffer told us. “We see it all the time, and we’re glad we can help.”

Michelle Malkin, michellemalkin.com on March 25, 2014 at 11:50 PM

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:38 PM

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:37 PM

Nah, you are still a squishy RINO sellout. I support the Colorado legalization as a 10th amendment issue.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:39 PM

So pot reduces nausea and pain, and there are no other drugs that produce the same effect?

Doctors don’t know what to proscribe to reduce the side effects of chemo?

Joseph OHenry on March 26, 2014 at 1:34 PM

Not to worry, Pfizer, Roche, et al. are doing everything they than can to protect their interests. And our ‘hands-out’ politicians are eager to help them.

But the proscription seems to be ending, and the prescription is for more freedom from vested interests.

M240H on March 26, 2014 at 1:40 PM

my only question is .. do they currently have a way to
field test someone and see if they are high ?

like they do with booze ….

conservative tarheel on March 26, 2014 at 1:36 PM

And it’s a good question. I don’t think they do. They can tell if you’ve smoked in the last month but that’s hardly useful. I do hope they come up with some sort of field test becaeuse they’re going to have to – people are driving high now (legalization regardless).

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:40 PM

So? a distinction without a difference to somebody in pain.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:37 PM

I’m just saying … because lots of people are claiming that pot is, somehow, an analgesic and it most definitely is not. Somebody in pain might like smoking pot (because it IS fun) but they aren’t getting any pain relief from it. They’d get more pain relief from getting drunk.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:40 PM

It would suck for me to have to decide what is right and wrong for myself.

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:37 PM

Wouldn’t you need to actually believe in something first?

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:40 PM

BKeyser on March 26, 2014 at 1:38 PM

CO wisely allows people to grow their own. Up to 6 plants, which is quite a lot for personal use. That will keep the prices down. Furthermore, most people will elect to pay a little more and be on the right side of the law rather than deal with low lives who may or may not rip them off.

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:41 PM

They’d get more pain relief from getting drunk.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:40 PM

Except for the hangover.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:42 PM

Wouldn’t you need to actually believe in something first?

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:40 PM

You mean something supernatural? No, absolutely not.

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:42 PM

Malkin’s a Jewish name+ I read it some place a long time ago.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:38 PM

Yes.
ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:38 PM

Huh, learn something new every day, thanks.

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:42 PM

Except for the hangover.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:42 PM

You’ve got to take the bad with the good :)

All pain relievers have hangovers of one sort of another.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:43 PM

And I am sure I speak for all Americans when I thank you for your relentless efforts to safeguard my morals. It would suck for me to have to decide what is right and wrong for myself.

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:37 PM

.
It would really SUCK for you, if you had been in the lead coach of that train that plowed into Ricky Gate’s freight engines.

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:43 PM

Heck, may as well go with amnesty too, and give in on Obama Care, and then all the way to voter fraud. Got to get along with the commie Democrats and stop all this personal responsibilty stuff that is so hard on every one…….! Just can’t we all go along with the destruction of the U.S.A. and quit all this strife?

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 1:43 PM

Somebody in pain might like smoking pot (because it IS fun) but they aren’t getting any pain relief from it. They’d get more pain relief from getting drunk.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:40 PM

How are you so sure? How do you know these things? Personal experience?

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:44 PM

You mean something supernatural? No, absolutely not.

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:42 PM

Sorry…missed again.

I don’t believe in God.

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:44 PM

And a well financed marketing campaign to sell pot to all and sundry with it. I don’t think a doped up population is a good thing, though I do understand why the politicians would be fine with it.

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:33 PM

Do you oppose the Twenty First Amendment?

alchemist19 on March 26, 2014 at 1:44 PM

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 1:43 PM

Guardian of the Hand-basket to Hell.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:45 PM

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 1:43 PM

Well, since you put it that way. Full speed ahead.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:45 PM

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:43 PM

Even if one were to double your allowance for lack of lucidity (a highly generous quantity to begin with), that is an exceptionally incoherent post.

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:46 PM

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Hows about we just call you shrill…and annoying?

kingsjester on March 26, 2014 at 1:28 PM

Hi Kingjester,
How’s all in your world…good?

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:46 PM

Stop the pot dealers, force them into the meth bussiness.

Results management.

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 1:46 PM

And I am sure I speak for all Americans when I thank you for your relentless efforts to safeguard my morals. It would suck for me to have to decide what is right and wrong for myself.

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:37 PM

There is more to it than the moral issue of “you” being able to smoke pot and therein lies the rub.

My main argument against marijuana legalization is that it will increase the use of marijuana to huge extent and with all the accompanying ills. Loss of work time, psychological impairment, intoxicated drivers and an increase in crime.

Crime will increase.

Drug dealers are already networked and in place to reap the benefits of selling drugs illegally. They will undercut the legal pot sellers.

People will burglarize those who will try to grow it legally.

More people will be driving intoxicated.

Drug wars between rival gangs and mafia will continue unabated as they seek to dominate territories.

Forget about whether you can handle pot well, most people can’t and we all know it.

Neitherleftorright on March 26, 2014 at 1:47 PM

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:44 PM

So what is this “something” that you find so indispensible?

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:47 PM

Are there no HA’ers who will step forward and acknowledge that my saying MM can often be shrill is accurate?

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Nope. In fact, we’re delighted that she ruins your day.

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:47 PM

My brother went skiing in CO recently and decided to visit a pot shop. His experience was just like MM’s. The patrons were not a bunch of losers but a slice of life just like you’d see in a local liquor store. Everything from grannies to business people. The stereotypical image of people who consume marijuana is a myth.

iceman1960 on March 26, 2014 at 1:47 PM

Example here,,,

verbsoutofbalance , long time pot smoker would be the best bet.

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 1:47 PM

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Nope, Kiddo, you’re on your own.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 1:33 PM

Well I know that.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:48 PM

I was listening to a professor from FSU who studies drugs and drug use. Unlike Heroin, which lab rates will go back for again and again, they haven’t found a way of ingestion for pot that interests them. That also makes it hard to use as a prescribed substance.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 1:48 PM

I read the article and MM makes a great case for medical pot.

She doesn’t make the case that legalizing pot doesn’t come with legitimate and valid concerns about the potential societal and cultural harm from legalizing pot. Just wait until we see the data on how many Coloradans are getting behind the wheel both drunk and stoned. The situation might not be as rosy as MM and the potheads insist.

Happy Nomad on March 26, 2014 at 12:48 PM

I’m certainly opposed to throwing the doors open for potheads to dull their brains into insensibility (or libertarianism, which seems to be the same thing sometimes.)

But it seems to me the whole point of managing controlled substances is to make sure those who really need them are able to get them, while the ones that have no redeeming value remain outlawed.

Morphine is a great example of a harmful illegal drug that can be prescribed legally for certain conditions.

So on the one hand, we have those claiming pot is a wonder drug with little or no side effect, and on the other hand, claiming that pot has absolutely no bona fide medicinal value.

I think the truth lies somewhere between the two extremes. I think there’s a little too much evidence to claim marijuana has NO medicinal value, but I’m not convinced that other drugs can’t provide the whole medicinal benefit of MJ, either.

Regardless, I see no problem with marijuana being prescribed by doctors as needed, just like other dangerous prescription drugs.

But a little bit of perspective, please: It’s not like MJ is the only drug that has had a hard time gaining FDA approval. I don’t know that it constitutes a horror story, or a morality play about over-intrusive government, any more than other drugs that were held up for years over safety concerns by the FDA.

There Goes the Neighborhood on March 26, 2014 at 1:48 PM

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:46 PM

Lovely. I’m at what we grown-ups refer to as a “job”.

Please….you and Bruti carry on with the obfuscation.

kingsjester on March 26, 2014 at 1:48 PM

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:48 PM

I’m sure your side is passionate, the other is shrill. Words mean something.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 1:48 PM

No, there has been an extensive and ongoing study of marijuana for medical purposes and despite claims by the potheads that it is a miracle drug that cures brain tumors, it has no medical use when smoked. THC has been used in a non-smoked form, but no medical uses have been found for smoked marijuana.

federale86 on March 26, 2014 at 1:12 PM

Do you have a credible study to back up your wild claims, or are you just making it up as you go?

Del Dolemonte on March 26, 2014 at 1:48 PM

Read this earlier in the comment section. I’ll say here what I said there with one addition.

The one issue I might take with her is on the pain comment she made. Experience for me has been pot is terrible at relieving pain. It can actually accentuate it. Does work for the nausea thingy though.

Bmore on March 26, 2014 at 10:39 AM

Bmore on March 26, 2014 at 1:49 PM

The fact that it is a slice of life of every day Americans is the problem.

Lower standards, lower results.

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 1:49 PM

Care to give us some credible examples of MM being “shrill”, and of not being thoughtful, in the past?

Del Dolemonte on March 26, 2014 at 1:07 PM

No. I just made it up out of thin air.

verbaloon on March 26, 2014 at 1:13 PM

A+

Del Dolemonte on March 26, 2014 at 1:50 PM

Except for the hangover.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:42 PM

Which is apparently the reason one of my sons uses pot – so I’m told. He claims that alcohol has always made him sick, one way or another, and pot doesn’t do that that. So instead of having a glass or 2 of wine or some other drink after work, as my wife and I do, he prefers a little pot. I grew up with an alcoholic father, so I know what that can do as well. But so far, my son is still doing well at work, and does not appear inclined to any harder drugs… we’ll see how it all goes.

I still don’t like it. I’ve never smoked anything, well, other than fish, but that’s a little different…
But overall I’m very much on the fence on this issue. There are some good arguments on both sides of this one.

dentarthurdent on March 26, 2014 at 1:50 PM

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:48 PM

I’m sure your side is passionate, the other is shrill. Words mean something.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 1:48 PM

verbaluce, did not seem shrill to me. I only read the article. Did not view the vid. Cindy has an excellent point however.

Bmore on March 26, 2014 at 1:50 PM

The best things about legalizing pot, as we have already seen in Colorado, are that children are much more likely to be exposed and ingest the drug, and the rapid increase in pot-related vehicular accidents and fatalities … Oh, wait a minute …

Pork-Chop on March 26, 2014 at 12:57 PM

Yep – it’s a national trend – as pot laws are weakened, pot-related vehicular accidents/fatalities climb.

Pork-Chop on March 26, 2014 at 1:15 PM

The only thing is the study cited was conducted before the laws in Colorado and Washington took effect so even if the study is legitimate you can’t blame the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana for what they claimed to see.

Speaking of what they claimed to see, note the semantics. They said drivers would “test positive”, that’s a far cry from being under the influence. A person will test positive for marijuana use weeks after being exposed to it. Merely saying they tested positive does not prove they were under the influence. Thanks for trying though.

alchemist19 on March 26, 2014 at 1:50 PM

I think medical pot is fine–dispensed by doctors like any other drug–but selling pot like alcohol? NO!

PattyJ on March 26, 2014 at 1:51 PM

While my heart geos out to MM’s mother-in-law…I must stay firmly in the no to decriminalization/no to legalization camp.
annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:03 PM

What about it being legalized as a by prescription-only drug, ALT?

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:15 PM

My 27 yr. old sister-in-law died of uterine cancer after a three year battle. Illegal pot (Tx., circa 1975) was the only thing she found to quell the horrible nausea which was caused by chemo. She was not able to eat anything for a week after treatments, which were 3 days of “therapy” two weeks apart in the end, and was wasting away from lack of nourishment in addition to the ravages of the disease. I’m in the MM camp on this one. My brother and his wife were faithful and in church regularly but he bought pot to ease his wife’s pain and suffering… when all else failed. I refuse to judge him for that.

jffree1 on March 26, 2014 at 1:51 PM

OT – the rapture is on – obama speaks in Europe and they are all crying with joy, no kidding.

OT = on topic, in this thread.

Schadenfreude on March 26, 2014 at 1:51 PM

BKeyser on March 26, 2014 at 1:38 PM

Every person that buys from a dispensary is a person NOT buying from a street vendor illegally. That is LESS money for the criminals. Their prices won’t come down much if any because of the expenses they accrue smuggling it. They aren’t in it to lose money and they aren’t Toyota dumping Corollas on America to build brand recognition.

Flange on March 26, 2014 at 1:52 PM

Maybe this is the start of MM toning it down overall. It wouldn’t require her changing her positions…just her style.

verbaloon on March 26, 2014 at 1:16 PM

What is it about MM’s style that you dislike? Is it because she tells the truth?

Del Dolemonte on March 26, 2014 at 1:52 PM

federale86 on March 26, 2014 at 1:12 PM

The IQ level here just sank 75 points…

ToddPA on March 26, 2014 at 1:52 PM

All pain relievers have hangovers of one sort of another.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:43 PM

Alcohol doesn’t set well on a lot of people’s stomachs, especially if they are already feeling ill/queezy. Not the best route if the objective is to help increase a sick person’s appetite.

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:52 PM

they haven’t found a way of ingestion for pot that interests them. That also makes it hard to use as a prescribed substance.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 1:48 PM

Maybe the effect is so slight, the rats aren’t interested. Smoking definitely gets the drug into the system faster than eating. Perhaps the delay is too long for the rats to make the cause and effect connection… just saying, as someone who studied rat behavior in school too.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:52 PM

I hope the store worker didn’t make any claims that haven’t been approved by the full FDA bureaucratic process – you know – incredibly expensive studies, etc.

blink on March 26, 2014 at 1:45 PM

I wonder when we’ll have our first case of pot cookies or brownies being pulled off the shelves because they were made with too much sugar or transfats….
I can’t wait to see that story.

dentarthurdent on March 26, 2014 at 1:53 PM

In states where only medicinal use is permitted, Carole would still be out of luck.

This is incorrect. I know people in Co and Ca who have obtained medical weed licenses (before it was legalized in Co) for “medical conditions” as silly as back pain and headaches. And they didn’t even need to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that they were unable to carry on without their “medication”. It was as easy as finding a “doctor” who’s sympathy lies with the cause of legalization.

jawkneemusic on March 26, 2014 at 1:53 PM

I wonder when we’ll have our first case of pot cookies or brownies being pulled off the shelves because they were made with too much sugar or transfats….
I can’t wait to see that story.

dentarthurdent on March 26, 2014 at 1:53 PM

Statists must keep busy.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:54 PM

Are there no HA’ers who will step forward and acknowledge that my saying MM can often be shrill is accurate?

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

What’s the point? All of us can be shrill at times.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:32 PM

For sure. And I’m not trying to throw stones from a glass house.
I was guilty of this a lot more when I first started commenting here. Make a real effort to avoid that these days. Imperfection assured.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:54 PM

Heck, may as well go with amnesty too, and give in on Obama Care, and then all the way to voter fraud. Got to get along with the commie Democrats and stop all this personal responsibilty stuff that is so hard on every one…….! Just can’t we all go along with the destruction of the U.S.A. and quit all this strife?

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 1:43 PM

An absolute prohibition enforced by the government is the exact opposite of personal responsibility.

alchemist19 on March 26, 2014 at 1:54 PM

Are there no HA’ers who will step forward and acknowledge that my saying MM can often be shrill is accurate? If I were to offer that she’s prone to snark, will I be asked for ‘proof’?

I mean, come on people.

verbaloon on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Your lack of credible examples of your claims is all we need to know.

A+

Del Dolemonte on March 26, 2014 at 1:54 PM

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:52 PM

It was an interesting discussion. The lab rats weren’t interested in smoke at all.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 1:54 PM

And I am sure I speak for all Americans when I thank you for your relentless efforts to safeguard my morals. It would suck for me to have to decide what is right and wrong for myself.

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:37 PM
.

It would really SUCK for you, if you had been in the lead coach of that train that plowed into Ricky Gate’s freight engines.

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:43 PM

.
Even if one were to double your allowance for lack of lucidity (a highly generous quantity to begin with), that is an exceptionally incoherent post.

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:46 PM

.
Okay, I’ll accept blame for assuming too much.

. . . . . Ricky Gates’ freight engines.

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:55 PM

I think medical pot is fine–dispensed by doctors like any other drug–

PattyJ on March 26, 2014 at 1:51 PM

Medical marijuana is a total joke. Doctors love it because they make tons of money writing prescriptions for it for anyone with $75 and a gripe about … anything. Medical marijuana is really just recreational pot, but with the added cost of having to go through a doctor for it.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:55 PM

I’m in the MM camp on this one. My brother and his wife were faithful and in church regularly but he bought pot to ease his wife’s pain and suffering… when all else failed. I refuse to judge him for that.
jffree1 on March 26, 2014 at 1:51 PM

Yes. Though I have no use for pot, it doesn’t make any sense at all to withhold it from those who benefit medically from it.

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:56 PM

I read Ms. Malkin’s article on her Web site and agree with her arguments for dispensing Marijuana for medical purposes.

Once the Government used the beneficial effects of Marijuana as the rational for how dangerous and habit forming it is, it was impossible for the Government to change its stance without looking stupid.

If the CDC, AMA, HHS or other prominent medical association/group would perform proper studies showing the medical benefits, and the Bar Association could word a Constitutional Amendment, authorizing its medical use that would still outlaw unauthorized use, I would envision all States would ratify it just like repealing “Prohibition”.

MSGTAS on March 26, 2014 at 1:56 PM

It was an interesting discussion. The lab rats weren’t interested in smoke at all.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 1:54 PM

That doesn’t surprise me. Besides humans, I think I’ve only seen chimps smoke.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:56 PM

federale86 on March 26, 2014 at 1:12 PM

The IQ level here just sank 75 points…

ToddPA on March 26, 2014 at 1:52 PM

lol, this is a different one…you’re thinking of “antifederalist”.

This one must be its twin.

Del Dolemonte on March 26, 2014 at 1:57 PM

MJBrutus on March 26, 2014 at 1:41 PM

Again, I don’t think you quite understand the majority user. Sure, there are still stoners from the 60′s that might be happy about paying a tax for their high, but most college kids can’t afford a decent meal, much less contribute to the regulatory state just to get their buzz on.

Additionally, while some may take on the arduous task of growing their own weed, the vast majority of potheads likely have neither the time, money, space, or equipment needed to produce anything remotely as convenient as the guy on the corner… who also happens to have a line on oxys and heroin.

BKeyser on March 26, 2014 at 1:58 PM

Bmore on March 26, 2014 at 1:50 PM

I agree, verbaluce was not and has never been shrill as far as I can tell through text. But he’s not trying to throw stones.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 1:58 PM

Every person that buys from a dispensary is a person NOT buying from a street vendor illegally. That is LESS money for the criminals. Their prices won’t come down much if any because of the expenses they accrue smuggling it. They aren’t in it to lose money and they aren’t Toyota dumping Corollas on America to build brand recognition.

Flange on March 26, 2014 at 1:52 PM

Oh yeah, just like here in California where we have had legal medicinal marijuana for years. Do you know what one of the number one jobs is for the California Dept. of Fish and Game? Tracking down and destroying illegal marijuana grows. And why do they do that? Because they are polluting with illegal chemicals and trash, and killing animals that eat the pot.

If you think that drug related crime will go down, you must not understand the human condition very well.

Neitherleftorright on March 26, 2014 at 1:58 PM

An absolute prohibition enforced by the government is the exact opposite of personal responsibility.

alchemist19 on March 26, 2014 at 1:54 PM

When welfare is gone you might have a point, but it isn’t personal responsibility when others have to pay for your lifestyle.

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:58 PM

Are there no HA’ers who will step forward and acknowledge that my saying MM can often be shrill is accurate?

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

You want the Hillary thread…

And NO, MM is not shrill.

ToddPA on March 26, 2014 at 1:59 PM

Are there no HA’ers who will step forward and acknowledge that my saying MM can often be shrill is accurate?

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

.
Nope. In fact, we’re delighted that she ruins your day.

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:47 PM

.
. : )

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:59 PM

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:56 PM

LOL! The two “smartest” animals.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 2:00 PM

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

…take another toke v@ginajuice!

KOOLAID2 on March 26, 2014 at 2:00 PM

Medical marijuana is a total joke. Doctors love it because they make tons of money writing prescriptions for it for anyone with $75 and a gripe about … anything. Medical marijuana is really just recreational pot, but with the added cost of having to go through a doctor for it.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 26, 2014 at 1:55 PM

Yes – absolutely true. When medical MJ was approved in CO, long before recreational MJ, my sons told me they knew lots of people who went to certain doctors (and there were quite a few) who were known to be willing to write MJ prescriptions for anyone, for anything.

dentarthurdent on March 26, 2014 at 2:01 PM

I agree, verbaluce was not and has never been shrill as far as I can tell through text. But he’s not trying to throw stones.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 1:58 PM

Oh. Well in that case I find neither MM or verbaluce shrill. Stubborn yes, shrill, not normally.

Bmore on March 26, 2014 at 2:01 PM

lol, this is a different one…you’re thinking of “antifederalist”.

This one must be its twin.

Del Dolemonte on March 26, 2014 at 1:57 PM

I figured they were a Box set..

ToddPA on March 26, 2014 at 2:01 PM

jffree1 on March 26, 2014 at 1:51 PM

Forgot to add – I’m sorry about what your sister went through. From everything I’ve heard, I think I’d probably skip chemo if it were ever prescribed. Fortunately, my only experience so far with cancer was a basal cell carcinoma which was taken care of in a few hours in the doctor’s office.

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 2:02 PM

My prayers for you, Michelle. Good for you for trying everything to help.

John the Libertarian on March 26, 2014 at 2:03 PM

If I were to offer that she’s prone to snark, will I be asked for ‘proof’?

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

I was commenting on Michelle Malkins site long before I came around here.

I learned my snark from the best.

Great article MM. I’ll be in Pueblo visiting relatives in June. Maybe we’ll run into each other somewhere.

Southpaw

MichaelGabriel on March 26, 2014 at 2:03 PM

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