Boss Emeritus: Put aside the pot jokes and look again at Colorado legalization

posted at 12:41 pm on March 26, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

Our great friend and Boss Emeritus, Michelle Malkin, offers a powerful testimony today in her column on marijuana legalization — and a surprisingly personal perspective. Sure, we all have fun with jokes at Colorado’s experiment with recreational approval, but the access it creates does more than just serve as easy access to intoxication. Michelle found herself in one of the pot shops that have opened to serve demand that comes from more than just fun and games, hoping to find help for her mother-in-law:

It’s 9 a.m. on a weekday, and I’m at the Marisol Therapeutics pot shop. This is serious business. Security is tight. ID checks are frequent. Merchandise is strictly regulated, labeled, wrapped and controlled. The store is clean, bright and safe. The staffers are courteous and professional. Customers of all ages are here.

There’s a middle-aged woman at the counter nearby who could be your school librarian. On the opposite end of the dispensary, a slender young soldier in a wheelchair with close-cropped hair, dressed in his fatigues, consults with a clerk. There’s a gregarious cowboy and an inquisitive pair of baby boomers looking at edibles. A dude in a hoodie walks in with his backpack.

And then there’s my husband and me. …

For the past three months, my mother-in-law, Carole, whom I love with all my heart, has battled metastatic melanoma. After a harrowing week of hospitalization and radiation, she’s at home now. A miraculous new combination of oral cancer drugs seems to have helped enormously with pain and possibly contained the disease’s spread. But Carole’s loss of appetite and nausea persist.

A month ago, with encouragement from all of her doctors here in Colorado, she applied for a state-issued medical marijuana card. It still hasn’t come through. As a clerk at Marisol Therapeutics told us, there’s a huge backlog.

In states where only medicinal use is permitted, Carole would still be out of luck. However, in Colorado, access for recreational use also allows people to get around the permitting process temporarily, although the prices go up for non-medicinal use:

But thanks to Amendment 64, the marijuana drug legalization act approved by voters in 2012, we were able to legally and safely circumvent the bureaucratic holdup. “A lot of people are in your same situation,” the pot shop staffer told us. “We see it all the time, and we’re glad we can help.”

Be sure to read it all. Michelle makes a good point about the entrepreneurial aspects of Colorado’s legalization, as well as the improved ability for citizens to exercise their own choice on both recreational intoxicants and medical treatments. The marijuana is grown on site and/or locally, so it involves no issues that would normally invoke federal jurisdiction.

That leaves the question, though, of whether marijuana actually does provide an effective therapeutic treatment. Unfortunately, this is another area in which the federal government obstructs rather than clarifies, as the Washington Post reported last week:

While 20 states and the District have made medical marijuana legal — in Colorado and Washington state the drug is also legal for recreational use — it remains among the most tightly controlled substances under federal law. For scientists, that means extra steps to obtain, transport and secure the drug — delays they say can slow down their research by months or even years.

The barriers exist despite the fact that the number of people using marijuana legally for medical reasons is estimated at more than 1 million.

Stalled for decades because of the stigma associated with the drug, lack of funding and legal issues, research into marijuana’s potential for treating diseases is drawing renewed interest. Recent studies and anecdotal stories have provided hope that marijuana, or some components of the plant, may have diverse applications, such as treating cancer, HIV and Alzheimer’s disease.

But scientists say they are frustrated that the federal government has not made any efforts to speed the process of research. Over the years, the Drug Enforcement Administration has turned down several petitions to reclassify cannabis, reiterating its position that marijuana has no accepted medical use and remains a dangerous drug. The DEA has said that there is a lack of safety data and that the drug has a high potential for abuse.

It’s a typical bureaucratic catch-22. The government has declared marijuana to be among the most dangerous of controlled substances so few can access it for studies to determine its value, and the federal government uses the lack of established evidence of its value to justify its classification. Meanwhile, several states have had years of experience in medicinal legalization with apparently few ill effects, which is at least indirect evidence that the DEA has misclassified marijuana, but no one wants to take the politically risky step of reducing control over weed. Meanwhile, people like Carole have to live in states like Colorado in order to make their own decisions over access and effectiveness.

I’m not a fan of marijuana, and I do worry about the moral signal that legalizing recreational use sends, but at least so far it hasn’t had any worse impact than alcohol. We should at least study the impact of marijuana so that we can have an informed debate.


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Whatever a state wants.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 12:45 PM

If I as an adult wish to indulge in edibles in the same way many others indulge in a glass of wine, beer etc., I will and should be able to without fear of the “state” deciding they know better.

Stay off the road, stay away from anything motorized the same as with alcohol…

theblacksheepwasright on March 26, 2014 at 12:47 PM

MM – a reasoned spokeswoman – well done Michelle.

jake-the-goose on March 26, 2014 at 12:47 PM

Al Capone had some really swanky night clubs, good entertainment, and hired a lot of truck drivers and warehouse labor too.

Joseph OHenry on March 26, 2014 at 12:47 PM

I read the article and MM makes a great case for medical pot.

She doesn’t make the case that legalizing pot doesn’t come with legitimate and valid concerns about the potential societal and cultural harm from legalizing pot. Just wait until we see the data on how many Coloradans are getting behind the wheel both drunk and stoned. The situation might not be as rosy as MM and the potheads insist.

Happy Nomad on March 26, 2014 at 12:48 PM

The next lot of D-rats and obama voters

The future of the land is doomed choomed.

Schadenfreude on March 26, 2014 at 12:48 PM

obama is choomed.

The rest is small change.

Schadenfreude on March 26, 2014 at 12:49 PM

What is lost in the discussion is the fact that most drug trafficking in the US is tied to human trafficking as well. Legalizing drugs does nothing more than provide even more money to the purveyors of this horrendous business. Legalize drugs, empower human traffickers even more. Is that what we want?

rotorhead on March 26, 2014 at 12:49 PM

states rights.

dmacleo on March 26, 2014 at 12:50 PM

We need to protect people from the evils of drugs by putting them in prison.

/sarc

myiq2xu on March 26, 2014 at 12:50 PM

There is no realistic doubt that marijuana has legitimate medical uses. Much of the opposition to medical marijuana is rooted in the fear that its acceptance will undermine the broader “War On Drugs”, already failing on so many levels.

As for recreational use of marijuana, we’ll have some actual evidence on how that works out shortly, thanks to the states actually testing the waters. In the meantime, in those states, those with legitimate medical needs but without official sanction can now obtain medicine that effectively treats their pain and suffering.

novaculus on March 26, 2014 at 12:50 PM

My pot is cleaner than yours.

Schadenfreude on March 26, 2014 at 12:51 PM

Joe Kennedy made a lot of money in the import business and all of his kids turned out ok.

Joseph OHenry on March 26, 2014 at 12:51 PM

Go ahead make the day into night, make reason hard to locate in your random access memory, make it emotional and not the rule of law, make it all about the easy way, make it about anything but the crime, the lawlessness, the drug gangs, if made legal the nightmare of millions of addicts, the long slow slide into a drug indused national stuper.

May be the way to outwhit thee commie Democrats on a solution of the destruction of the U.S.A., the rule of law and loss of reason.
Hell if we all smoke pot then we would be dumb enough to belive the Climate Change lies, the good part of $17 Trillion of debt and how good it would be to do away with borders, and no army navy ect. to make the world dislike U.S..

Being strong is not easy seems.

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 12:52 PM

rotorhead on March 26, 2014 at 12:49 PM

hawkdriver ain’t gonna’ like that.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 12:52 PM

There is gambling going on…newsflash: doctors always had access to pot. They also, always were taking it themselves and ‘prescribing’ it to their patients, er friends :)

Dear God, I should not be granted so much schadenfreude.

Schadenfreude on March 26, 2014 at 12:52 PM

Just wait until we see the data on how many Coloradans are getting behind the wheel both drunk and stoned.

As if that wasn’t happening before?

myiq2xu on March 26, 2014 at 12:52 PM

but at least so far it hasn’t had any worse impact than alcohol.

That’s a pretty low bar considering the number of people killed,and lives ruined by alcohol just last year.

2.5 Million deaths annually due to alcohol.

E L Frederick (Sniper One) on March 26, 2014 at 12:54 PM

Just wait until we see the data on how many Coloradans are getting behind the wheel both drunk and stoned.

I can’t wait on how they’ll merge being choomed on the shooting ranges, or outside. It’ll be way cool for the Reids, Pelosis and Patty Murrays of the land.

Schadenfreude on March 26, 2014 at 12:54 PM

Why isn’t it sold in a pharmacy instead of in a “pot shop?”

gocatholic on March 26, 2014 at 12:54 PM

Why isn’t it sold in a pharmacy instead of in a “pot shop?”

They sell alcohol and nicotine in liquor stores, and those are drugs.

myiq2xu on March 26, 2014 at 12:55 PM

rotorhead on March 26, 2014 at 12:49 PM

Exactly the opposite. Legalization strips them of their ability to make easy money. Those people only make money off marijuana because it’s illegal. It was the criminals that profited off Prohibition. Once booze became legal again, legitimate source started to provide it.

Flange on March 26, 2014 at 12:56 PM

When reasoning a touchy subject I find that the phrase “There but for the grace of God go I” is handy. Mrs. Maulkin’s mother in law should have this option and I hope it works for her. We have a lot of areas where dumbing down the masses can be addressed first, starting with the “educational” system.

Cindy Munford on March 26, 2014 at 12:56 PM

The best things about legalizing pot, as we have already seen in Colorado, are that children are much more likely to be exposed and ingest the drug, and the rapid increase in pot-related vehicular accidents and fatalities … Oh, wait a minute …

Pork-Chop on March 26, 2014 at 12:57 PM

So now Michelle knows how the liberal mind thinks…they have a personal investment in something, so they want to make it legal or a law.

Society be darn, it’s all about me…

Well there are other ways, like a prescription program like most other drugs…pharmacies is what they are called.

right2bright on March 26, 2014 at 12:57 PM

I am willing to give this woman a lot of leeway on this…..

No, I am against legalization of this drug…..

But I have always had a level of respect for this woman
I have for few others…..I don’t think she ever wanted to
be put in this situation….

I’ll simply end by saying God Bless you MM. You make
the world a better place…..

ToddPA on March 26, 2014 at 12:57 PM

For the past three months, my mother-in-law, Carole, whom I love with all my heart, has battled metastatic melanoma. After a harrowing week of hospitalization and radiation, she’s at home now. A miraculous new combination of oral cancer drugs seems to have helped enormously with pain and possibly contained the disease’s spread. But Carole’s loss of appetite and nausea persist.

Michelle Malkin, michellemalkin.com on March 25, 2014 at 11:50 PM

.
Thanks for the insight of your experience at Marisol Therapeutics.
That was rather educational.

Prayers for your mother-in-law, Carole.

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 12:58 PM

Why isn’t it sold in a pharmacy instead of in a “pot shop?”

gocatholic on March 26, 2014 at 12:54 PM

Does it have something to do with federal drug laws pertaining to prescription drug distribution?

hawkeye54 on March 26, 2014 at 12:58 PM

What is lost in the discussion is the fact that most drug trafficking in the US is tied to human trafficking as well. Legalizing drugs does nothing more than provide even more money to the purveyors of this horrendous business. Legalize drugs, empower human traffickers even more. Is that what we want?

rotorhead on March 26, 2014 at 12:49 PM

It seems to me that legalizing it would decouple marijuana from the criminal element, especially since it’s so easily grown. Not that that’s an argument for legalizing it, but yours against it is weak.

Fenris on March 26, 2014 at 12:58 PM

Medical use is fine but that does not excuse the mindless potheads on their perpetual highs. Opiates also have great utility in reducing the pain of serious ill people but they are not and should not be used for recreational purposes.

rplat on March 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM

In other news….Thousands of DEA Agents laid off….

Quartermaster on March 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM

They sell alcohol and nicotine in liquor stores, and those are drugs.

myiq2xu on March 26, 2014 at 12:55 PM

Discernment is a word to learn…so they should sell cocaine in liquor stores?

right2bright on March 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM

Make marijuana legal, the Mexican drug cartels will doubble down on meth, cocain, and worse.

You can run but you can not hide from evil, it will come, you will be judged.

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM

I’m not a fan of marijuana, and I do worry about the moral signal that legalizing recreational use sends, but at least so far it hasn’t had any worse impact than alcohol. We should at least study the impact of marijuana so that we can have an informed debate. – Ed Morissery

I can agree with that and the also that it should not be in the same classification as heroin and cocaine.

SC.Charlie on March 26, 2014 at 1:00 PM

Joe Kennedy made a lot of money in the import business and all of his kids turned out ok.

Joseph OHenry on March 26, 2014 at 12:51 PM

.
Aw, c’mon … that ain’t no fair: )

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:01 PM

When Michelle rails against environmentalists, or PETA, or any other liberal cause, she will just be another hypocrite…each of them have a personal vested interest in their beliefs, just like Michelle has in hers.

right2bright on March 26, 2014 at 1:01 PM

Being strong is not easy seems.

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 12:52 PM

There’s a big difference between being strong and being stubborn.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:01 PM

Like I said in the thread upstream: I have dealt with chronic pain for years. I don’t take pain pills any longer, because I build a tolerance and find that I require more to alleviate pain. I will never begrudge someone any pain killing measure. There have been times when I wanted to cut off the offending body part it hurt so bad. I am not a pot head, and have NEVER used any type of recreational drug even when I was young, but I would never rule out marijuana for future use. Seems to me if it works, it should be used. It really can’t be any worse than Oxy on a body.

melle1228 on March 26, 2014 at 1:02 PM

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:01 PM

The stubborn say no.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:03 PM

Funny how when its your relative you are willing to overlook everything that you stood against previously. There really is nothing more than anecdotal evidence that marijuana consumption is actually useful medicinally.

Whether or not one thinks the government should control certain things or not, the legalization of marijuana in Colorado will not lower drug related crime, it will raise it.

Even if we were to legalize it nationally, the very nature of marijuana and the ease with which it is grown will sustain a large black market for it. The people who traffic in marijuana traffic in all sorts of illegal contraband and marijuana is a big profit center. Bootleg marijuana will always undersell legal marijuana.

But what the heck lets go ahead and get lazier, its the new American way. Kick back play the lotto, bet sports, gamble, dream of winning a reality TV show, but work and sacrifice? That is so old school.

Neitherleftorright on March 26, 2014 at 1:03 PM

Sorry-but I disagree. My brother-whom I’m unfortunately estranged from. is a near genius who started doing dope @ 14 or 15. He dropped out of high school at 16-later got his GED-and is now almost 36.
Alex is FB w/ my sister-in-law…and from what he’s told me-’Stu’ is now working in a music shop or something.
My ex-husband also did weed for about 7 years before we met. He’s another very bright guy.
My ex refers to those years as ‘the lost years’. We are BOTH anti-weed.
Pot is an evil mistress-and it does ruin lives.

While my heart geos out to MM’s mother-in-law…I must stay firmly in the no to decriminalization/no to legalization camp.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:03 PM

We should at least study the impact of marijuana so that we can have an informed debate. – Ed Morissery

I agree, and it needs to be a honest study not tinged with bias or political agenda. I don’t think marijuana is harmless as some report, but I also think when living with chronic pain- you weigh your priorities.

melle1228 on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

I read Michelle’s article earlier.
A very well written piece of advocacy. It’s nice to see her put down the shrill pen and write something from a more thoughtful place.
So often, when it comes to social/cultural issues, conservatives seem to need see the impact on a friend or relative before they’re able to find empathy and understanding. Michelle writes that is indeed the case here. Perhaps when she’s more personally impacted on the SSM issue, she’ll return to the thoughtfulness shown here, and she’ll leave behind her shrill rants against “the mob of left-wing, same-sex marriage activists”.
But she deserves praise for this article.
And a welcome embrace by the mob of left wing marijuana legalization activists.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

Medical use is fine but that does not excuse the mindless potheads on their perpetual highs. Opiates also have great utility in reducing the pain of serious ill people but they are not and should not be used for recreational purposes.

rplat on March 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM

Sort of like alcoholics, aren’t they?

dentarthurdent on March 26, 2014 at 1:05 PM

When Michelle rails against environmentalists, or PETA, or any other liberal cause, she will just be another hypocrite…each of them have a personal vested interest in their beliefs, just like Michelle has in hers.

right2bright on March 26, 2014 at 1:01 PM

.
You have got to expound on that.

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:05 PM

Exactly the opposite. Legalization strips them of their ability to make easy money. Those people only make money off marijuana because it’s illegal.

Flange on March 26, 2014 at 12:56 PM

They make money off of smuggled cigarettes, alcohol and electronics.

All of them legal.

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:06 PM

It’s nice to see her put down the shrill pen and write something from a more thoughtful place.

verbaloon on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

Care to give us some credible examples of MM being “shrill”, and of not being thoughtful, in the past?

Take your time.

(Starts another Snowdial)

Del Dolemonte on March 26, 2014 at 1:07 PM

Cases of children accidentally ingesting pot on rise, study says

http://articles.latimes.com/2013/may/28/science/la-sci-children-eating-pot-20130529

After Colorado legalized MEDICAL marijuana …

SURGE IN CHILDREN ACCIDENTALLY EATING MARIJUANA-LACED FOODS:

http://www.ucdenver.edu/about/newsroom/newsreleases/Pages/Surge-in-children-accidentally-eating-marijuana-laced-foods.aspx

More Child Poisonings Following Marijuana Legislation, Colorado

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/261074.php

After Colorado legalized RECREATIONAL marijuana …

Longmont toddler tests positive for THC; Mother says girl ate a pot cookie she found:

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/local-news/longmont-toddler-tests-postive-for-thc

Pork-Chop on March 26, 2014 at 1:07 PM

A very well written piece of advocacy. It’s nice to see her put down the shrill pen and write something from a more thoughtful place.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

Hmmm, thoughtful when you agree, shrill when you don’t. Do you not see the irony in your posting here and your latest statement?

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:08 PM

Just wait until we see the data on how many Coloradans are getting behind the wheel both drunk and stoned.

As if that wasn’t happening before?

myiq2xu on March 26, 2014 at 12:52 PM

As if there won’t be greater numbers doing so after legalization?

Basilsbest on March 26, 2014 at 1:09 PM

Sorry-but I disagree. My brother-whom I’m unfortunately estranged from. is a near genius who started doing dope @ 14 or 15. He dropped out of high school at 16-later got his GED-and is now almost 36.
Alex is FB w/ my sister-in-law…and from what he’s told me-’Stu’ is now working in a music shop or something.
My ex-husband also did weed for about 7 years before we met. He’s another very bright guy.
My ex refers to those years as ‘the lost years’. We are BOTH anti-weed.
Pot is an evil mistress-and it does ruin lives.

While my heart geos out to MM’s mother-in-law…I must stay firmly in the no to decriminalization/no to legalization camp.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:03 PM

You do understand that the people who’s stories MM shares here are using weed medicinally – and effectively so?
Had your ex and brother abused valium, morphine, and codeine – would you want those made illegal as well? Would you want such remedies denied to you or your loved ones?

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:09 PM

Medical use is fine but that does not excuse the mindless potheads on their perpetual highs. Opiates also have great utility in reducing the pain of serious ill people but they are not and should not be used for recreational purposes.

rplat on March 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM
Sort of like alcoholics, aren’t they?

dentarthurdent on March 26, 2014 at 1:05 PM

They are also sort of like the people riding on caffeine highs all day or nicotine buzzes, or for that matter sugar blasts as a pick-me-up from the vending machine. Drugs in various forms are available everywhere. ANYTHING can be abused and the gov ain’t your momma!

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:10 PM

Make marijuana legal, the Mexican drug cartels will doubble down on meth, cocain, and worse.

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM

You mean they aren’t simply going to give up their evil ways, go down and apply for a job at McDonald’s? /sarc

They will also continue to smuggle marijuana because the state will tax it and they will simply sell it cheaper than the government.

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:11 PM

And a welcome embrace by the mob of left wing marijuana legalization activists.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

Fata morgana

Schadenfreude on March 26, 2014 at 1:12 PM

No, there has been an extensive and ongoing study of marijuana for medical purposes and despite claims by the potheads that it is a miracle drug that cures brain tumors, it has no medical use when smoked. THC has been used in a non-smoked form, but no medical uses have been found for smoked marijuana.

federale86 on March 26, 2014 at 1:12 PM

“I’m sorry, we can’t give you a prescription for Marijuana since it’s a horrible drug that can lead to addiction and impairment on the road…now, let me get you that prescription for 200 Oxycodone.”

And THAT is why I never understood the reluctance for at least medically prescribed marijuana.

nextgen_repub on March 26, 2014 at 1:13 PM

We should at least study the impact of marijuana so that we can have an informed debate.

You know what we should study? The freakin’ Constitution and the writings that preceded it for intent.

It’s a freakin’ plant. It’s not poisonous. If people want to use it and are willing to avoid driving or operating heavy equipment under the influence of it, MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS AND LEAVE THEM ALONE.

Caps intentional.

By the way, regarding Malkin’s mother-in-law I truly hope she heals. But I just have to say, pain and death do have a way of clarifying one’s thinking.

chuckh on March 26, 2014 at 1:13 PM

Care to give us some credible examples of MM being “shrill”, and of not being thoughtful, in the past?

Del Dolemonte on March 26, 2014 at 1:07 PM

No.
I’m not saying anything here that hasn’t been echoed by even those who are generally supportive of her positions.
If you wanna tie a bow around her that up to you.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:13 PM

Why isn’t it sold in a pharmacy instead of in a “pot shop?”

gocatholic on March 26, 2014 at 12:54 PM

This is a very good question. We have a functional system for control and accountability of medicines/drugs. So if this is medicine (and I actually believe it is beneficial for some) why is it treated differently in those states that have legalized it?

Why isn’t it sold in a pharmacy instead of in a “pot shop?”

They sell alcohol and nicotine in liquor stores, and those are drugs.

myiq2xu on March 26, 2014 at 12:55 PM

Yes, those are drugs, but I think G.C. was commenting in regard to medicine, not recreation. I don’t think anyone considers cigarettes or alcohol medicine.

JusDreamin on March 26, 2014 at 1:14 PM

Very disappointing argument. The morality of law is no longer discussed, rather it is an appeal to personal need. The same case could be and has been made for euthanasia and abortion. I am sure Meth helps some people, I hear it’s great for depression. And cocaine for chronic fatigue disorder. Heroin works well for anxiety. The cases for a highly restricted medical application and recreation approval are very different. The whole point MM makes is that it was convenient, therefore should be legal.

Corinthian on March 26, 2014 at 1:14 PM

As if there won’t be greater numbers doing so after legalization?

Basilsbest on March 26, 2014 at 1:09 PM

STUDY: FATAL CAR CRASHES BY MARIJUANA SMOKERS UP 300% OVER LAST DECADE

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2014/02/24/Study-Fatal-Car-Crashes-by-Marijuana-Smokers-up-300-over-Last-Decade

Yep – it’s a national trend – as pot laws are weakened, pot-related vehicular accidents/fatalities climb.

Pork-Chop on March 26, 2014 at 1:15 PM

While my heart geos out to MM’s mother-in-law…I must stay firmly in the no to decriminalization/no to legalization camp.
annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:03 PM

What about it being legalized as a by prescription-only drug, ALT?

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:15 PM

A very well written piece of advocacy. It’s nice to see her put down the shrill pen and write something from a more thoughtful place.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

Hmmm, thoughtful when you agree, shrill when you don’t. Do you not see the irony in your posting here and your latest statement?

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:08 PM

None.
I might agree with Keith Olbermann on something, but he’s still annoyingly shrill most of the time.
Maybe this is the start of MM toning it down overall. It wouldn’t require her changing her positions…just her style.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:16 PM

If you wanna tie a bow around her that up to you.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:13 PM

And it’s up to you to make unsubstantiated statements eh? got it.

JusDreamin on March 26, 2014 at 1:16 PM

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:06 PM

The vast majority of cigarettes, alcohol and electronics sold are sold legally. The same would be true for pot. And growing pot is easy enough too. Most people can’t make their own electronics. Making your own alcohol happens, but few people grow their own tobacco. The black market would shrink greatly for pot if legal.

Flange on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

So often, when it comes to social/cultural issues, conservatives seem to need see the impact on a friend or relative before they’re able to find empathy and understanding.
verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

That is the whole point with progressives, it’s always about the feelings. We feel it so it must be good; ok, correct. Except, that we know it isn’t. Pot is destructive, as is alcohol. Legalizing it doesn’t make it safer, doesn’t curb crime.

The progressive mantra, “if it feels good do it.” Logic and truth are foreign to people who base their life on feelings.

Neitherleftorright on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

Welcome to Zimbabwe America

Schadenfreude on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

You have got to expound on that.

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:05 PM

She has a personal interest in pot, so now she advocates it to be sold publicly.

Many people have “personal” interests, so they go out and advocate for a new law, or set of rules for all of us to abide by.

The new rule is about “me”, and not society…Michelle has fallen into that trap.

I understand her love for her relative, and she is basically saying that that relief of pain is more important to Michelle than the potential harm of the new laws.

When she now tells us the hold up for the fracking is wrong, well it’s wrong for her, but maybe not for the people supporting it, in the same vein as she is supporting for her relative, it’s personal.

She has to say her personal need is greater than the anti-fracking personal need…

right2bright on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

Yep – it’s a national trend – as pot laws are weakened, pot-related vehicular accidents/fatalities climb.

Pork-Chop on March 26, 2014 at 1:15 PM

I don’t dispute your statement. I’d just like to know how you’ll know.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:03 PM

Didn’t you just jump all over me about the importance of state’s rights?

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:18 PM

I’m not a fan of marijuana, and I do worry about the moral signal that legalizing recreational use sends, but at least so far it hasn’t had any worse impact than alcohol. We should at least study the impact of marijuana so that we can have an informed debate.

Do you worry about the “moral signal” that endorsing the use of booze sends?

It’s retarded out government continues to classify a drug with obvious medicinal benefits and very few negative side effects as a schedule one drug.

We live in a “free” country where the government for blatant political reasons tell us what we can and can’t consume. We essentially have to ignore federally law to use a drug that is a lot less harmful than the ones they say we can use.

I can’t believe “conservatives” are even on the fence about this.

mazer9 on March 26, 2014 at 1:18 PM

That is the whole point with progressives, it’s always about the feelings. We feel it so it must be good; ok, correct. Except, that we know it isn’t. Pot is destructive, as is alcohol. Legalizing it doesn’t make it safer, doesn’t curb crime.

The progressive mantra, “if it feels good do it.” Logic and truth are foreign to people who base their life on feelings.

Neitherleftorright on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

Eating too many cheeseburgers is “destructive”. Perhaps the Nanny State should limit our access to them?

mazer9 on March 26, 2014 at 1:19 PM

The whole point MM makes is that it was convenient, therefore should be legal.
Corinthian on March 26, 2014 at 1:14 PM

I believe her point is when it’s used medically that it’s not a problem for her.

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:19 PM

I can’t believe “conservatives” are even on the fence about this.

mazer9 on March 26, 2014 at 1:18 PM

Despite what every flavor of conservative tells you, there ARE flavors of conservatives.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:19 PM

Very disappointing argument. The morality of law is no longer discussed, rather it is an appeal to personal need…. The whole point MM makes is that it was convenient, therefore should be legal.

Corinthian on March 26, 2014 at 1:14 PM

I believe the point Malkin made is that is merciful, something that always escapes the puritanical. But please, feel free to expound upon the morality of denying relief to the suffering.

A**hole.

M240H on March 26, 2014 at 1:20 PM

It’s nice to see her put down the shrill pen and write something from a more thoughtful place.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

.
Translation : “… usually your columns SUCK … but not this time.”
.

So often, when it comes to social/cultural issues, conservatives seem to need see the impact on a friend or relative before they’re able to find empathy and understanding. Michelle writes that is indeed the case here.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

.
I’m pretty sure Conservatives are FOR the medical use of marijuana. I know I am.
.

Perhaps when she’s more personally impacted on the SSM issue, she’ll return to the thoughtfulness shown here, and she’ll leave behind her shrill rants against “the mob of left-wing, same-sex marriage activists”.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

.
(didn’t see this coming)
Translation : “As soon as you write another anti-’same-sex-marrige’ column, you’ll be on my bad list, again.”
.
Refusal to recognize homosexuality, as a valid, legitimate, alternate state of ‘normal’, will only impact Michelle in the ‘positive’.
.

But she deserves praise for this article.
And a welcome embrace by the mob of left wing marijuana legalization activists.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

.
Well, at least she got that much from you.

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:20 PM

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:16 PM

Um, I am no big fan of MM and once in a great while she can be a little hyperbolic. Mostly on purpose as a writing tool. Or video when she did those.

To even attempt to compare her and Olberman shows a bias on your part and ignorance when it comes to her.

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:21 PM

The vast majority of cigarettes, alcohol and electronics sold are sold legally. The same would be true for pot.

Flange on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

I am not saying there wouldn’t be a massively expanded market for pot. I am saying the criminals would not stop.

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:21 PM

Welcome to Zimbabwe America

Schadenfreude on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

What was left out of the story?

A description of the attackers? Why?

right2bright on March 26, 2014 at 1:21 PM

“I’m sorry, we can’t give you a prescription for Marijuana since it’s a horrible drug that can lead to addiction and impairment on the road…now, let me get you that prescription for 200 Oxycodone.”

And THAT is why I never understood the reluctance for at least medically prescribed marijuana.

nextgen_repub on March 26, 2014 at 1:13 PM

Have to love the irony of our hypocritical approach to medicine.

mazer9 on March 26, 2014 at 1:21 PM

I don’t dispute your statement. I’d just like to know how you’ll know.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

Know what?

Pork-Chop on March 26, 2014 at 1:22 PM

whatcat on March 26, 2014 at 1:15 PM

That would be fine….if it were heavily monitored.
I’m not a monster. Ashkenazic Jews-which Mrs. Malikn is one of-are genetically at a higher risk for melanoma. I’m at a high risk of it for the same reason-and that’s a disease that terrifies me.
I certainly don’t want Mrs. Malkin and others like her to be suffering.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:22 PM

What is lost in the discussion is the fact that most drug trafficking in the US is tied to human trafficking as well. Legalizing drugs does nothing more than provide even more money to the purveyors of this horrendous business. Legalize drugs, empower human traffickers even more. Is that what we want?

rotorhead on March 26, 2014 at 12:49 PM

What on earth are you talking about? It says in the article that the pot for the pot shop is grown at that location. Are you saying that the owners of the pot shop Michelle went to are also involved in sex slavery? That’s a little nuts, isn’t it?

WhatSlushfund on March 26, 2014 at 1:22 PM

I don’t dispute your statement. I’d just like to know how you’ll know.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM

Know what?

Pork-Chop on March 26, 2014 at 1:22 PM

Who wrote The Book of Love?

M240H on March 26, 2014 at 1:23 PM

I’m not a fan of marijuana, and I do worry about the moral signal that legalizing recreational use sends, but at least so far it hasn’t had any worse impact than alcohol

Except perhaps for the recent stories of grade schoolers using it in Colorado, I believe. Are the stories about classrooms of grade schoolers being found in the bathroom drinking vodka just so commonplace that we don’t notice them anymore, or is it that pot *is* having a deeper impact than alchohol, and at younger ages?

Midas on March 26, 2014 at 1:23 PM

Make marijuana legal, the Mexican drug cartels will doubble down on meth, cocain, and worse.
You can run but you can not hide from evil, it will come, you will be judged.

APACHEWHOKNOWS on March 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM

So we should maintain a ban on a less dangerous substance in order to entice criminals to focus on that substance rather than more dangerous drugs?

By this crazy logic, we should ban a bunch of other more benign substances. Let’s ban alcohol, caffeine, sugar, chocolate, bacon, etc… Then the drug cartels will be too busy smuggling those, and pot, and will have no time at all for the hard stuff!

People say the drug war has failed, but maybe we can still win it if we open up just a few more fronts.

You should go run for office in New York City, if you don’t work there already. You’ll fit right in.

RINO in Name Only on March 26, 2014 at 1:23 PM

Eating too many cheeseburgers is “destructive”. Perhaps the Nanny State should limit our access to them?
mazer9 on March 26, 2014 at 1:19 PM

There are stupid arguments and then there are really stupid arguments, like the one above. It is so absurd as to be a pointless point.

Neitherleftorright on March 26, 2014 at 1:24 PM

I believe the point Malkin made is that is merciful, something that always escapes the puritanical. But please, feel free to expound upon the morality of denying relief to the suffering.

A**hole.

M240H on March 26, 2014 at 1:20 PM

You can relieve the suffering without opening a store to market it other kind of suffering…that’s the point.

We have doctors and pharmacies that could have prescribed what was needed by people who are in need of that relief.

right2bright on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

cozmo on March 26, 2014 at 1:18 PM

Yeah. I’m all for state rights-but I just can’t take my brother out of the equation.
His wife’s asthma is much worse than me-and mine is getting worse-yet he still lights up the joint.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Are there no HA’ers who will step forward and acknowledge that my saying MM can often be shrill is accurate? If I were to offer that she’s prone to snark, will I be asked for ‘proof’?
I mean, come on people.

I commend her both for this piece – and the style and approach she took in writing it.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Legalizing weed will grow government, exponentially.

BKeyser on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

I agree, and it needs to be a honest study not tinged with bias or political agenda. I don’t think marijuana is harmless as some report, but I also think when living with chronic pain- you weigh your priorities.

melle1228 on March 26, 2014 at 1:04 PM

Yeah, I’m so sick how one is compared to the town elders in Footloose for merely standing on freedom of religion, traditional marriage, or anti-amnesty positions.

Happy Nomad on March 26, 2014 at 1:26 PM

Are there no HA’ers who will step forward and acknowledge that my saying MM can often be shrill is accurate?

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

No.

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:26 PM

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Hows about we just call you shrill…and annoying?

kingsjester on March 26, 2014 at 1:28 PM

I am not saying there wouldn’t be a massively expanded market for pot. I am saying the criminals would not stop.

sharrukin on March 26, 2014 at 1:21 PM

Legalization, I think, would greatly reduce the criminal element with regards to pot. Criminals will find other ways to be criminals, but black market pot is a cash cow, and legalizing it would create opportunities for American farmers. If a Phillip Morris or Miller Brewing Co. got involved the smugglers of pot would be greatly diminished.

Flange on March 26, 2014 at 1:28 PM

Well, at least she got that much from you.

listens2glenn on March 26, 2014 at 1:20 PM

I look at as mutually assured progress.
Logic and righteousness always prevails.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:29 PM

I don’t dispute your statement. I’d just like to know how you’ll know.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:17 PM
Know what?

Pork-Chop on March 26, 2014 at 1:22 PM

They don’t have a test to tell if your driving is impaired like they do with alcohol. They do have a test to tell if you’ve smoked in the last month but that’s not sufficient. If you insist that smoking impairs you for a month, then fine, conversation ended as I don’t think you have enough experience to discuss it further – but I don’t dispute that probably more will drive impaired though.

rhombus on March 26, 2014 at 1:29 PM

There are stupid arguments and then there are really stupid arguments, like the one above. It is so absurd as to be a pointless point.

Neitherleftorright on March 26, 2014 at 1:24 PM

Yeah obesity isn’t a large cause of death and heart disease in this country.

Pot is.

mazer9 on March 26, 2014 at 1:30 PM

Are there no HA’ers who will step forward and acknowledge that my saying MM can often be shrill is accurate?

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Not when the benchmark is “At this point, what difference does it make?”

To reach that level, would have to hire a team of Sherpas and a case of Yeti repellent.

M240H on March 26, 2014 at 1:30 PM

Logic and righteousness always prevails.

verbaluce on March 26, 2014 at 1:29 PM

If that were true, Obama wouldn’t be President, Harry Reid would be unemployed, etc.

Midas on March 26, 2014 at 1:31 PM

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