Rogers: Snowden probably working with Russia

posted at 10:01 am on March 24, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

David Gregory hit House Intelligence chair Mike Rogers (R-MI) on earlier allegations by Rogers that Edward Snowden may have been a Russian agent. Rogers insisted that the widespread consensus in the intel community is that Snowden is now under the influence of Russian intelligence, and the only question is when that started. Rogers told Gregory that Snowden’s explanations of his adventures in Hong Kong and Russia don’t add up — and recent intelligence developments may boost Rogers’ arguments:

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers said Sunday former National Security Agency contractor and fugitive Edward Snowden is “actually supporting in an odd way this very activity of brazen brutality and expansionism of Russia. He needs to understand that. And I think Americans need to understand that….”

Rogers said on NBC’s Meet the Press that Snowden is “under the influence of Russian intelligence services today. For the investigators, they need to figure out: When did that influence start? And was he interested in cooperating (with Russian intelligence agencies) earlier than the timeline would suggest?”

The New York Times picked up the story immediately:

Mr. Rogers had previously raised the possibility that Mr. Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor, might be working for Russia, though the congressman has yet to offer any evidence. His assertions on Sunday, however, were his most sweeping to date.

“Every counterintelligence official believes that,” Mr. Rogers said on the NBC News program “Meet the Press.” “You won’t find one that doesn’t believe today he’s under the influence of Russian intelligence services.” …

“The more we look into this, I think the more you’re going to find that that date gets further and further away from his story,” Mr. Rogers said.

In a Jan. 19 appearance on the same NBC program, Mr. Rogers said that some of Mr. Snowden’s actions in absconding with secret N.S.A. materials were “beyond his technical capabilities.”

But investigators have disclosed no evidence that Mr. Snowden’s work, while under contract to the N.S.A., might have been directed by a foreign power.

That much is true. So far, there have been allegations of those kinds of connections but little evidence offered publicly. That would also make Snowden’s travels a little curious, too. Why go to Hong Kong first, which risked extradition by Beijing, and only then to Moscow? Why would the Russians take so long to offer him asylum, for that matter? If he was working for the Russians, one would presume that their intelligence services would have had a better exfiltration scheme in place for such a high-ranking mole.

On the other hand, Russia has recently acquired an apparent ability to defend against NSA penetration. Could it be that certain dots are connectable?

U.S. military satellites spied Russian troops amassing within striking distance of Crimea last month. But intelligence analysts were surprised because they hadn’t intercepted any telltale communications where Russian leaders, military commanders or soldiers discussed plans to invade.

America’s vaunted global surveillance is a vital tool for U.S. intelligence services, especially as an early-warning system and as a way to corroborate other evidence. In Crimea, though, U.S. intelligence officials are concluding that Russian planners might have gotten a jump on the West by evading U.S. eavesdropping.

“Even though there was a warning, we didn’t have the information to be able to say exactly what was going to happen,” a senior U.S. official says. …

Still, as Russia brings additional forces to areas near the border with eastern Ukraine, America’s spy chiefs are worried that Russian leaders might be able to cloak their next move by shielding more communications from the U.S., according to officials familiar with the matter. “That is the question we’re all asking ourselves,” one top U.S. official says.

The Obama administration is “very nervous,” says a person close to the discussions. “This is uncharted territory.”

I’m skeptical of the Russian-agent explanation for Snowden, thanks to his odd method of escape and his public exposure of the data, although still open to the possibility. That doesn’t mean that Russia hasn’t been able to exploit Snowden’s material to harden its signals apparatus, though, and even that puts an uncomfortable albatross around the neck of the Snowden-as-hero narrative if true. That could be just a coincidence, but that seems a lot less likely than Snowden as a Russian mole from the start.


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That still doesn’t make what the NSA is doing any less egregious.

If Obama can tap my phone and read my emails, then by God I have every right to tap and read his! He may be President but he has no more rights than I do.

ConstantineXI on March 24, 2014 at 10:04 AM

If Snowden wasn’t originally a Russian agent…he is a collaborator now.

workingclass artist on March 24, 2014 at 10:07 AM

In Crimea, though, U.S. intelligence officials are concluding that Russian planners might have gotten a jump on the West by evading U.S. eavesdropping.

Hmmmm…..just like the Germans did prior to the Battle of the Bulge. HINT: If they don’t ‘transmit’, you can’t receive.

GarandFan on March 24, 2014 at 10:12 AM

I don’t know why Obama’s guys are so upset……
As Beck said: “Progressives are just patient Communists”.

Obama’s people are probably cheering Vlad on…..

redguy on March 24, 2014 at 10:13 AM

In Crimea, though, U.S. intelligence officials are concluding that Russian planners might have gotten a jump on the West by evading U.S. eavesdropping.

…how does a US citizen…do that?

KOOLAID2 on March 24, 2014 at 10:14 AM

snowden helped them avoid nsa eavesdropping for invasion

reliapundit on March 24, 2014 at 10:14 AM

This is the governments fault. If they had left American citizen alone, and only spied on them with warrant that was backed up by probable cause, and specific to what is to be seized/ monitored. They are out of control.

MoreLiberty on March 24, 2014 at 10:16 AM

Any idiot still have sympathy for Snowden?

NotCoach on March 24, 2014 at 10:17 AM

Hey at this point in time, Vlad could send Obama his complete itinerary and it would not matter. The feckless wonder couldn’t/wouldn’t do anything about it anyway!!

Deano1952 on March 24, 2014 at 10:19 AM

That still doesn’t make what the NSA is doing any less egregious.

If Obama can tap my phone and read my emails, then by God I have every right to tap and read his! He may be President but he has no more rights than I do.

ConstantineXI on March 24, 2014 at 10:04 AM

Snowden is not the hill to die on. He is now a traitor, and a fool.

NotCoach on March 24, 2014 at 10:20 AM

David Gregory hit House Intelligence chair Mike Rogers (R-MI) on earlier allegations

Too bad you and your compadres couldn’t do the same concerning obama’s qualifications to be president. Or anything else, for that matter.

Lanceman on March 24, 2014 at 10:20 AM

There was a report that some of the data Snowden acquired, he would have needed help in order to get it. Hong Kong was the fastest plane ride from Hawaii to what we are now learning is a Russian-aligned nation.

Sekhmet on March 24, 2014 at 10:21 AM

If Snowden wasn’t originally a Russian agent…he is a collaborator now.

workingclass artist on March 24, 2014 at 10:07 AM

Hush! There is enough going on in the news right now that you don’t need to stoke the passions of the “Snowden is an American hero” crowd.

Happy Nomad on March 24, 2014 at 10:22 AM

Snowden is a traitor.

djl130 on March 24, 2014 at 10:26 AM

Any idiot still have sympathy for Snowden?

NotCoach on March 24, 2014 at 10:17 AM

Much like Chomsky, MoreLiberty says it’s our fault, not Snowden; we made him do it or something.

thebrokenrattle on March 24, 2014 at 10:27 AM

It is funny how how the only reason snowmen is in Russia to begin with is because they would not let him leave to his country of choice, Iceland. The administration worked overtime to get him stuck there and now they want you to believe he is a Russian spy. Thank God I was born in a dictatorship, I know all the ins and outs of propaganda speak.

coolrepublica on March 24, 2014 at 10:27 AM

Any idiot still have sympathy for Snowden?

NotCoach on March 24, 2014 at 10:17 AM

About as much as for the NSA.

ElectricPhase on March 24, 2014 at 10:27 AM

“Every counterintelligence official believes that,” Mr. Rogers said on the NBC News program “Meet the Press.” “You won’t find one that doesn’t believe today he’s under the influence of Russian intelligence services.”

And every counter-intelligence official believes Mike Rogers molests collies.
But seriously, Mike Rogers is terrible.

iwasbornwithit on March 24, 2014 at 10:28 AM

About as much as for the NSA.

ElectricPhase on March 24, 2014 at 10:27 AM

I’m no fan of the NSA, but a real patriot doesn’t run off to foreign lands and become a traitor.

NotCoach on March 24, 2014 at 10:28 AM

I’m no fan of the NSA, but a real patriot doesn’t run off to foreign lands and become a traitor.

NotCoach on March 24, 2014 at 10:28 AM

Agreed. Snowden is lower than whale crap.

ElectricPhase on March 24, 2014 at 10:30 AM

@notcoach, i am an idiot who has a lot of sympathy for snowden. I am also the idiots who knows that if he did not come forward. O one would know the extent our rights are being trampled on by the NSA in the name of security. Everyone in this country has something they are passionate about. Some love their guns and want to hold on to them no matter how many die. Some love this right to free speech and want to hold on to it no matter how much it offends others. And there people like me who love them all and want to protect all of them. I matter what. I value my rights granted to me by the bill of rights and mr snowden did an amazing job telling all American how it was being destroyed in the name of security.n. You can choose not to give a hoot about those rights, but at least now you are an informed customer.

coolrepublica on March 24, 2014 at 10:33 AM

While Snowden’s actions are questionable, at best, none of this should take the NSA off the hook for what they are doing.

Tater Salad on March 24, 2014 at 10:34 AM

Oh, please.

Every single solitary intelligence guy is now convinced Snowdon is the big mastermind/Svengali behind the Russian bear advancing on its satellites? Yeah, right.

American intelligence was probably the ONLY group who stated Russia was going to refrain from invading Crimea. Could it be that our intelligence organs are headed up by people of the same quality as the rest of the Administration? Hmmm?

This sounds like “we got rolled so we be blaming SNOWDON, baby!”

Or does it sound more like “In case of giant foreign relations debacle, deflect blame from Dear Leader by focusing it on Edward Snowdon AKA Emmanuel Goldstein”

Pless1foEngrish on March 24, 2014 at 10:37 AM

So now Snowden becomes the CYA for every mistake the intel community makes.

J_Crater on March 24, 2014 at 10:38 AM

If Snowden wasn’t originally a Russian agent…he is a collaborator now.

workingclass artist on March 24, 2014 at 10:07 AM

Hush! There is enough going on in the news right now that you don’t need to stoke the passions of the “Snowden is an American hero” crowd.

Happy Nomad on March 24, 2014 at 10:22 AM

Hey workingclass artist,

Don’t say I didn’t warn you:

coolrepublica on March 24, 2014 at 10:33 AM

Happy Nomad on March 24, 2014 at 10:40 AM

coolrepublica on March 24, 2014 at 10:33 AM

Not only that cool, but we all KNOW what happens to those who whistleblow on our intel svcs .. in the past I might’ve said ‘rightly so’ .. but given our bureaucratic corps over whelming penchant to champion everything coming up Barack these daze, I don’t give the benefit of the doubt anymore. TSA, IRS, ICE, Feebs, DOSJ, EPA, and on and on.

GKChesterton99 on March 24, 2014 at 10:42 AM

While Snowden’s actions are questionable, at best, none of this should take the NSA off the hook for what they are doing.

Tater Salad on March 24, 2014 at 10:34 AM

Two separate issues.

The “Snowden is a hero” crowd will lecuture on and on about NSA illegalities. They go silent when Snowden’s actions also disrupted the ability to monitor and collect intelligence overseas.

Happy Nomad on March 24, 2014 at 10:43 AM

The Russians have taken a hint from their fave Prez, Carter, and are sending all their super secret squirrel ‘stuff’ via the USPS.

vnvet on March 24, 2014 at 10:52 AM

‘Vlad The Impaler’ vs ‘Choom the Inhaler’. Just thought I’d toss that out for s&g…

vnvet on March 24, 2014 at 10:54 AM

It wasn’t Snowden that helped the Russians evade detection on Crimea. The US didn’t know about it because the Russians used snail mail.

moo on March 24, 2014 at 10:59 AM

This is all propaganda. If Snowden were a Russian agent, we would have seen evidence by now. Mike Rogers has been a tool for the Straussians for a long time. Notice that he doesn’t present a single bit of evidence – it’s all vague accusations with a veneer of decisiveness. He just says that the NSA believes it. His whole argument is an appeal to authority. The NSA is also propagandized by the Straussians.

We also don’t have any evidence that no one in the intel community knew the Russians were about to invade. Realistically, it probably was discovered, but the information was suppressed. The Straussians have been driving a wedge between Obama and Putin since Syria, and they are using the invasion to deepen it. This is about restoring Straussian power to create military interventions. Their inability to agitate the politicians into intervening in Syria was a big blow to them, and they have not forgotten it. They are determined to overcome it.

Observation Post on March 24, 2014 at 11:03 AM

Why go to Hong Kong first, which risked extradition by Beijing, and only then to Moscow?

Naivete is extremely contagious around here. Intelligence situations are not single threaded. They require multiple stages in order to increase the complexity of cover and confuse alibi or motive.

It is not sheer coincidence at all that Snowden’s working and probably has been working with the Russians. What is absolutely weak and confusing is Mr. Obama’s tepid response. Which is why the media is once again trying to cover for him by casting aspersions on Rodgers intelligent, highly professional claims.

But this goes even deeper than that. Why did we lose SIGNET when the Russians moved on Crimea?

Maybe the press will ask Mr. Obama. Ten years from now…

Marcus Traianus on March 24, 2014 at 11:05 AM

Remember last Summer when the FSB and the SVR bought hundreds of old non-electric mechanical typewriters as a security measure?

Gene Hunt on March 24, 2014 at 11:05 AM

What a great idea — let’s poison the potential jury pool so that even if we get him back, he can’t get a fair trial.

The brilliance and skills of this administration is breath taking.

platypus on March 24, 2014 at 11:12 AM

is s/b are. D@mn cheap keyboard.

platypus on March 24, 2014 at 11:14 AM

“Every counterintelligence official believes that,” Mr. Rogers said on the NBC News program “Meet the Press.” “You won’t find one that doesn’t believe today he’s under the influence of Russian intelligence services.”

And every counter-intel official dismissed the potential of Putin moving on Crimea, and continue to scoff at the suggestion he’s not done in the Ukraine.

F-

BobMbx on March 24, 2014 at 11:16 AM

More:

“Every counterintelligence official believes that,” Mr. Rogers said on the NBC News program “Meet the Press.” “You won’t find one that doesn’t believe today he’s under the influence of Russian intelligence services.”

And the NSA gave Snowden a job,a clearance and access to all the information he has.

So who’s at fault there?

BobMbx on March 24, 2014 at 11:18 AM

Rogers insisted that the widespread consensus in the intel community is that Snowden is now under the influence of Russian intelligence, and the only question is when that started.

I ask the very same question about Barack Obama. And many among the current Democrats in US government.

Lourdes on March 24, 2014 at 11:19 AM

I doubt he’s a mole, but he clearly holds the naive view that a lot of large L libertarians hold, that the American government is the only bad actor in the world and all that’s needed to make things right is to put mean ol’ Uncle Sam in his place and voila, paradise. Shame, because libertarianism for the most part is a fantastic alternative to the dem/repub morass we’re currently in, but the Ron Paul strain still has a lot of hold on it unfortunately.

clearbluesky on March 24, 2014 at 11:40 AM

Ed needs to do his homework, for starters when Snowden fled to Hong Kong he was staying in Russian consulate housing which has been reported

jp on March 24, 2014 at 11:56 AM

If Snowden was directed by Russia, what resources do or did they have inside the NSA to tell him what to steal? Rogers can’t stop halfway in these accusations.

PersonFromPorlock on March 24, 2014 at 12:00 PM

I don’t know if Snowden was bought and trained by Russia but he is most likely under their influence now. He probably has many women and much vodka!!

Our intelligence services has lost many veterans recently and when clandestine operations are run by democrats, be prepared for lots and lots of failures. Actually, politicians in general are the big screw ups.

Vince on March 24, 2014 at 12:06 PM

See, this is why I think it’s stupid taht the Paul-bots and big-L liberatarians worship this guy. He is a traiter. Why?

Because telling OTHER countries that we have been spying on them has NOTHING to do with our country spying on us. He wants other countries to hate us. And if he’s been working with the Russians all along then it makes all the more sense as to why he would do this.

DethMetalCookieMonst on March 24, 2014 at 12:07 PM

I’m no fan of the NSA, but a real patriot doesn’t run off to foreign lands and become a traitor.

NotCoach on March 24, 2014 at 10:28 AM

True. A real patriot faced with government wrongdoing would go off somewhere and commit suicide without leaving a note. Or, he could report to the government that he’d caught them in the act.

PersonFromPorlock on March 24, 2014 at 12:12 PM

Snowden did something wrong but aren’t we glad he did. Doesn’t make him a hero.

If he had been a Russian spy he would have just handed it over to them and wouldn’t have made it public.

Our incompetent government didn’t know what Russia was doing because they were too busy spying on us. They see the American public as the enemy.

crankyoldlady on March 24, 2014 at 12:26 PM

It’s convenient to think we didn’t know anything about Russia heading to Crimea, ex post facto.

It allows this Admin a scapegoat for 2 reasons: 1) they can blame their inability to stop it on said “not knowing” and 2) wtf was Bambi going to do if they admitted they knew?

This Admin is hedging one set of weakness “evil Intelligence doesn’t know anything” vs. “we couldn’t do anything anyway”

I am sure the timing of NSA spying on Congress was just… dumb luck timing. Just like the Benghazi failures had nothing to do with this Admin and everything to do with anyone else, namely throwing intelligence under the bus.

Ego trumps everything else for this Admin.

Odie1941 on March 24, 2014 at 1:00 PM

Rogers is a scumbag whose wife gets money from military contracts. A perfect example of the type of propaganda artist we need to ignore.

antisense on March 24, 2014 at 1:01 PM

There were also articles this weekend about his release of information about our intercept of Chinese communications. I noticed it wasn’t posted here and seemed to disappear from other places rather quickly. He is a low-life, narcissistic punk.

rlwo2008 on March 24, 2014 at 1:06 PM

1) NSA spent more money in the last 5 years spying on American Citizens or building the infrastructure to do so than they did on spying on Russia.
2) We had a choice to chase Snowden into the arms of our enemies, which by the WAY Obama did not see Russia as an enemy, or to allow him to seek asylum elsewhere. There were plenty of other nations that Snowden could have gone to that are allies to us and those were his first choices.
3) I am looking for the evidence that the intelligence agency had access to the Russian intel to begin with. When is the last time we had any clue as to what they were doing before it happened? Did we see Georgia coming in advance?

The truth is our intelligence agencies are worthless to us for the purpose for which they supposedly exist. They had no clue on Iraq, they had no clue on 9/11, they had no clue on the boston bombers, they just simply have no clue and now they have a scapegoat to attack.

astonerii on March 24, 2014 at 1:07 PM

In Crimea, though, U.S. intelligence officials are concluding that Russian planners might have gotten a jump on the West by evading U.S. eavesdropping.

Who the hell didn’t know the Russians were going to invade Crimea after the Sochi olympics?

sharrukin on March 24, 2014 at 1:23 PM

Looks like InfoWars have unleashed the hounds. The Paul-Bots are all over here now.

DethMetalCookieMonst on March 24, 2014 at 1:34 PM

Why go to Hong Kong first, which risked extradition by Beijing, and only then to Moscow? Why would the Russians take so long to offer him asylum, for that matter? If he was working for the Russians, one would presume that their intelligence services would have had a better exfiltration scheme in place for such a high-ranking mole.

Hmm. Let’s see. I’m an American traitor working for the Russians. I don’t want people to know this, and I don’t want to end up in an American jail. I can do one of two things. I can attempt asylum in a variety of places until my handlers accept me “reluctantly” or I can fly straight to home base.

Wait. Now I am the Russian government and I have a mole in the NSA. I don’t want people to know this. I can do one of two things. I can hem and haw and finally offer the mole asylum “reluctantly”, hopefully throwing people off the scent, or I can just send him a plane ticket and hope nobody notices.

Gee, I wonder what the correct choices are?

Joseph K on March 24, 2014 at 1:37 PM

Yah Think?

Another Drew on March 24, 2014 at 1:42 PM

Letting a person with this much knowledge of our intelligence operations into the hands of the Russians is absolutely disasterous and unacceptable. I hope the appropriate people at the Justice Department and CIA/NSA are held to account. The consequences of Snowden working with our geopolitical foes on how to actively dodge our survelliance is much worse than the fallout from an immunity deal. Shame on us.

FreshAir on March 24, 2014 at 1:49 PM

Rogers has become a useful idiot, like McCain.

Schadenfreude on March 24, 2014 at 1:55 PM

But intelligence analysts were surprised because they hadn’t intercepted any telltale communications where Russian leaders, military commanders or soldiers discussed plans to invade.

They’re blaming Snowden for their skrewups? Even when Russia warned them about the Boston Bombers they were still clueless on what was what.

whatcat on March 24, 2014 at 2:41 PM

That doesn’t mean that Russia hasn’t been able to exploit Snowden’s material to harden its signals apparatus, though, and even that puts an uncomfortable albatross around the neck of the Snowden-as-hero narrative if true.

No, it doesn’t. The enemy of my enemy is my friend, and the federal government is the enemy of freedom.

earlgrey on March 24, 2014 at 2:41 PM

1) NSA spent more money in the last 5 years spying on American Citizens or building the infrastructure to do so than they did on spying on Russia.

Don’t worry. The ‘Cuda was keepin’ an eye on’em from her house.

2) We had a choice to chase Snowden into the arms of our enemies, which by the WAY Obama did not see Russia as an enemy, or to allow him to seek asylum elsewhere. There were plenty of other nations that Snowden could have gone to that are allies to us and those were his first choices.

Rule #1 about Fight Club: Don’t talk about Fight Club.

3) I am looking for the evidence that the intelligence agency had access to the Russian intel to begin with. When is the last time we had any clue as to what they were doing before it happened? Did we see Georgia coming in advance?

What difference, at this point, does it make?

BobMbx on March 24, 2014 at 2:48 PM

Who the hell didn’t know the Russians were going to invade Crimea after the Sochi olympics?

sharrukin on March 24, 2014 at 1:23 PM

Our intelligence apparatchiks?

BobMbx on March 24, 2014 at 2:50 PM

Our intelligence apparatchiks?

BobMbx on March 24, 2014 at 2:50 PM

And when Russia moves into Eastern Ukraine to ‘safeguard’ civilian lives…you know Responsibility to Protect and all that, they will undoubtedly be utterly shocked that the Russians didn’t first announce it on Facebook, or tweet the plans ahead of time.

sharrukin on March 24, 2014 at 2:55 PM

Who the hell didn’t know the Russians were going to invade Crimea after the Sochi olympics?

sharrukin on March 24, 2014 at 1:23 PM

I’ll give you three guesses. The first two don’t count.

Look the NSA is too busy spying on us to catch AQ or watch Putin, mKay?

Oh wait the CIA! Oh yeah they don’t actually have spies anymore right?

Look, Putin isn’t using cell phones, email, twitter or facebook so our 16 intelligence agencies don’t have a clue. Or so our elected aristocracy wants us to believe.

dogsoldier on March 24, 2014 at 3:07 PM

Look the NSA is too busy spying on us to catch AQ or watch Putin, mKay?

While Mosques are out of bounds.

Look, Putin isn’t using cell phones, email, twitter or facebook so our 16 intelligence agencies don’t have a clue. Or so our elected aristocracy wants us to believe.

dogsoldier on March 24, 2014 at 3:07 PM

The scary scenario is that it is true. I certainly hope not.

sharrukin on March 24, 2014 at 3:13 PM

Our government created Snowden. The Russians may take advantage of that, but he is our own fault.

GEAH on March 24, 2014 at 9:30 PM

The jokes write themselves

roflmmfao

donabernathy on March 24, 2014 at 9:33 PM

Snowden did something wrong but aren’t we glad he did. Doesn’t make him a hero.

If he had been a Russian spy he would have just handed it over to them and wouldn’t have made it public.

Our incompetent government didn’t know what Russia was doing because they were too busy spying on us. They see the American public as the enemy.

crankyoldlady on March 24, 2014 at 12:26 PM

I agree with everything except stating he isn’t a hero. How would you have found out without these revelations? The 4th Amendment trumps any private business contract. He saw corruption and sacrificed his whole life to expose it. And none of what he had went with him to Russia. Nada.

You are not going to replace human intelligence on the ground with computer intelligence. You are deluding yourself to think that tapping 200 million phones and millions of computers of your own countrymen is a failsafe. Obviously now the Russians simply use visual or written and we obviously have very few sources on the ground.
Someone has to be on the ground and from what I understand, our human covert activities are almost gutted. After all, the FBI was warned about the Boston bombers and with all our vaunted NSA we never connected the dots……….meanwhile we have ex-presidents using the mail so as not to be spied on.
Starlink on March 24, 2014 at 10:45 AM

Right on. You gotta hand it to the Russkies- they’re very practical. The AK47 is ultra reliable and cheap. When NASA was spending gobs of cash designing a pen that works in space? The Russians used pencils. Duh.

Rogers has become a useful idiot, like McCain.
Schadenfreude on March 24, 2014 at 1:55 PM

Pretty much. Yes.
A commenter posted it and I find it quite humorous–

I was in a coal mine once and there was this narcissistic little canary

Little bird was all like “look at me, I can’t breathe! You’re all going to die if you don’t get to fresh air!”

It was all about him. We told him to shut up.

Right before we passed out.

Thanks, Ed. I want the truth, warts and all.

Nape-wa-ste on March 24, 2014 at 10:04 PM

Apparently, I should go by the name of Thread Ten Killer instead of my Lakota moniker. Sheesh.

Nape-wa-ste on March 25, 2014 at 1:52 AM

Too often we view the world through “America Centric” glasses. We think other countries share the same values and geopolitical goals and would react similarly to the way we might. Even the Europeans have fallen into that trap.

Russia’s national security interests are not the same as ours or Europe’s and you can only predict what Russia will do if you put yourself into their shoes.

For years the Russians have been transitioning away from electronic communications for its most sensitive activities. It has been reported that the Kremlin even uses manual typewriters for sensitive documents to avoid being bugged or electronically intercepted–a horrifying thought to an American, but a very effective practice if you don’t want to keep a secret.

If I were the Russians and intended to invade the Crimea, I wouldn’t use electronic communications; I’d use couriers and face to face meetings with my generals and they with their subordinates.

The US is so confident of its electronic intercept capabilities that it has almost abandoned the idea of developing spies within the Russian government and military.

So when Russia goes off the grid to plan for an operation, it’s no wonder we get surprised.

There is a reason why our special forces units go to radio silence or low probably of detection/low probability of intercept communications. Often theirs is just a 2-3 second transmission of a single code word to report status. Even if an adversary intercepts and decodes that transmission, the only thing they may discover is a single word such as “apple.” Lots of luck interpreting what that means.

I think the Russians simply didn’t use a lot of electronic communications to plan and execute the invasion of Crimea. Snowden didn’t need to tell them that. The Russians have known for many years that we have an extraordinary capability to intercept communications and the best way to defeat that technical capability is to reduce your reliance on it.

Rogers is looking at the problem through his “American Centric” glasses because he can’t accept the idea that Russia would go off the grid to plan the invasion. In Roger’s mind, it can only be explained by Snowden teaching the Russians how to design and build communications networks that are intercept proof.

Obviously Rogers is not a fan of the Occam’s Razor theory.

BMF on March 25, 2014 at 7:44 AM

Very well said, BMF.
Bravissima!

Nape-wa-ste on March 25, 2014 at 10:47 AM

What a crock

Brock Robamney on March 25, 2014 at 11:12 AM