Or at least lay off it a little bit. I suppose it’s tough when those are a lot of the questions you’re fielding as the law you aggressively helped pass is unfolding (and your minimum-wage and war-on-women memes can only do so much to distract from it), but as Larry Sabato put it this afternoon, it’s easy for Nancy Pelosi to embrace President Obama’s crowning legislative achievement and go on the offense considering that she’s from a deep-blue district. Some of her fellow Democrats probably aren’t so appreciative of the strategy.

Look, Nancy Pelosi is from a deep-blue district. I have no doubt in her district, in the San Francisco area, you can be for ObamaCare and not have any electoral problems. The difficulty for Pelosi and the Democrats is, in every single reliable survey for a year, a plurality or majority of Americans have been opposed for a variety of reasons. She’s arguing, the best defense is a good offense. The problem with that is, when you are on the offense, using your time in the public arena to discuss a subject people have more or less made up their minds about, and they don’t like it, you’re wasting your time in the arena. Second point, Neil, which I think is even more important for the midterm elections: The people who favor ObamaCare, which is a minority, aren’t really that enthusiastic about it even if they favor it. But the majority who oppose ObamaCare are much more charged up, and they’re the people who tend to turn up in a low-turnout midterm election.