Flight 370: Pilot’s flight simulator and deleted files are focus of investigators

posted at 10:01 am on March 19, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

It’s not exactly breaking news to say that no one knows still what happened to Malaysia Air Flight 370, and no one seems to be getting much closer. In fact, we still aren’t sure that what we do supposedly know is correct about the flight. Yesterday a pilot offered a simple explanation for the sharp left turn and the apparent direction of the plane after contact was lost, which then swept the Internet for its simplicity. In Chris Goodfellow’s scenario, a fire broke out on the flight killing the communications and forcing a rapid change in the flight to the nearest emergency landing field capable of handling a Boeing 777. The altitude changes can be explained by a last-ditch effort to put out the flames, with the flight then going into a similar dead-stick finale as seen in the death of golfer Payne Stewart.

Not so fast, John Dickerson argues at Slate. While that might cover a few of the known facts about Flight 370′s actions, it leaves out critical points — such as course changes that deviated away from that airport:

Goodfellow’s account is emotionally compelling, and it is based on some of the most important facts that have been established so far. And it is simple—to a fault. Take other major findings of the investigation into account, and Goodfellow’s theory falls apart. For one thing, while it’s true that MH370 did turn toward Langkawi and wound up overflying it, whoever was at the controls continued to maneuver after that point as well, turning sharply right at VAMPI waypoint, then left again at GIVAL. Such vigorous navigating would have been impossible for unconscious men.

Goodfellow’s theory fails further when one remembers the electronic ping detected by the Inmarsat satellite at 8:11 on the morning of March 8. According to analysis provided by the Malaysian and United States governments, the pings narrowed the location of MH370 at that moment to one of two arcs, one in Central Asia and the other in the southern Indian Ocean. As MH370 flew from its original course toward Langkawi, it was headed toward neither. Without human intervention—which would go against Goodfellow’s theory—it simply could not have reached the position we know it attained at 8:11 a.m.

Not only that, but new reports indicate that the first, sharp course change got entered into the navigation system twelve minutes before the last communication from the flight crew:

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

An NBC News report that sources familiar with the investigation say data from the plane’s communications systems indicate someone manually programmed a turn into the Boeing 777′s navigation system 12 minutes before a voice from the cockpit said “all right, good night,” to Malaysian air traffic controllers.

If that is what happened, it could mean that whoever was at the controls had already planned a sharp turn to the west — well off the jet’s planned Kuala Lumpur-to-Beijing route — before the seemingly routine sign-off.

That turn is why the search for the jet has extended thousands of miles south across the Indian Ocean and thousands of miles north into Central Asia.

The focus on the pilots, therefore, looks at least appropriate. Malaysian officials earlier noted that the captain had a flight simulator program in his home computer, which isn’t terribly unusual. Overnight, though, they updated that part of the story to note that some files had been deleted from that system, and officials want to see whether they have any bearing on this mystery:

Malaysia’s defense minister said Wednesday that files were recently deleted from the home flight simulator belonging to the pilot aboard the missing Malaysian airliner, while a massive multinational search unfolded for the jet in the southern Indian Ocean.

Hishammuddin Hussein told a news conference Wednesday that investigators are trying to retrieve the files. He also said that the pilot, Capt. Zaharie Ahmad Shah, is innocent until proven guilty of any wrongdoing.

It’s hardly unusual to delete files from a computer either. If the captain was trying to hide his actions, it would make more sense to get rid of the flight simulator program entirely.

Meanwhile, some of the families of the missing passengers staged a demonstration today over Malaysia’s poor handling of the crisis:

Frustration with the search for missing flight MH370 boiled over into chaotic scenes as Chinese relatives were dragged away from journalists.

They were attempting to speak to Chinese journalists outside the daily press conference in Kuala Lumpur.

A BBC reporter was pushed away from the relatives, who were carrying banners criticising the handling of the case.

Teams from 26 countries are trying to find flight MH370, which went missing on 8 March with 239 people on board.

One of the relatives, a middle-aged woman, cried: “They give different messages every day! Where’s the flight now? Find our relatives! Find the aircraft!”

Who can blame them? The mystery has been intensified by errors, miscommunications, and a lack of international coordination that didn’t get addressed until days into the search. Officials still vacillate on results of their investigation, creating more and more confusion. We still aren’t even sure which direction to look, but the longer this goes without any sign of the passengers, crew, or potential malefactors becoming visible, the worse this looks.


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Even if there was a fire in the cockpit, there would be no reason to shut down the communications system. If there had been a fire in the cockpit, and the pilots turned the plane to make an emergency landing at a nearby airport along Malaysia’s west coast, they would normally alert air-traffic control ahead of time to enable them to clear all other planes off the runway and approach to ensure there were no collisions with other planes.

Also, if they wanted to make an emergency landing, why would they climb to 45,000 feet? Wouldn’t they want to decrease their altitude for an emergency landing?

With the latest news of people on the Maldives islands (southwest of India) having seen a low-flying plane over them that morning, it seems more and more likely that the plane flew west, around the outhern tip of India to avoid detection by Indian radar, then turned north to land in Pakistan or Iran. It is probably now being re-fueled and re-painted for use as a terrorist weapon, where it presents a danger to Israel and Europe.

If we were smart, we would be demanding information from Pakistan and Iran about all commercial planes in their airspace that morning. We could also enlist the help of the Chinese, who just might want some information on their passengers who were supposed to arrive in Beijing 11 days ago.

Steve Z on March 19, 2014 at 11:57 AM

MaiDee on March 19, 2014 at 11:48 AM

I’ll stick with the secret nazi base at the south pole.

cozmo on March 19, 2014 at 11:57 AM

It dawns on me that you have NO understanding of the information that has been released since the plane disappeared.

PolAgnostic on March 19, 2014 at 11:43 AM

Let me type slower.

Please explain the rationale for the gap between the north and south arcs.

Mapping satellite pings produces a circle – not arcs. The missing arc – the gap – assumes that the plane flew in a straight line away from it’s last known position. We can no longer make that assumption based on the Thai radar disclosure. Therefore, the 2 arcs become a solid half circle.

faraway on March 19, 2014 at 11:57 AM

What We Know Timeline, with Map (PPRUNE) March 18, 18:30

Detailed description of INMARSAT’s “pings”

PPRUNE was up to page 300 last night. Times on the posts appear to be GMT (they are at least 2 or 3 hours ahead of EST). Seem to be up to page 306 now … so I won’t be reading here until I finish there.

gh on March 19, 2014 at 11:59 AM

PolAgnostic on March 19, 2014 at 11:50 AM

Ah, thanks.

freedomfirst on March 19, 2014 at 11:57 AM

Of course silly.

Haven’t you seen Airport 77?

cozmo on March 19, 2014 at 12:00 PM

I mentioned a few days ago chem/bio agents. Someone else mentioned an EMP.

Shy Guy on March 19, 2014 at 11:51 AM

.
Chem/bio weapons achieve maximum effectiveness through widespread dispersal – circling a city would do. One of the EU countries would be a good target because they would be relatively slow to respond to a suspicious aircraft.

I know EMP is possible without a nuke but those are not going to get as “big of bang for your buck” as a small nuke at high altitude – more effective against Israel than France – but Israel would take out any 777 they were suspicious about WAY outside their airspace.

The “Hiroshima approach” makes for visuals the media would keep using for weeks.

PolAgnostic on March 19, 2014 at 12:06 PM

US Assets (Spy Satellite)

USA-223, aka NROL-32, is a geosynchronous signals intelligence satellite launched in 2010, now located at 100.9E.

As “national assets”, their involvement would not be disclosed but I’m reading something into the White House press officer’s statements last week as suggesting the call on what role they could play was Obama’s, as CINC.

Something for all you conspiracy nuts.

gh on March 19, 2014 at 12:06 PM

We can no longer make that assumption based on the Thai radar disclosure. Therefore, the 2 arcs become a solid half circle.

faraway on March 19, 2014 at 11:57 AM


Go do some research …

The Thai radar disclosure was that they noticed when MH370 diverged from their flight plan and turned back towards the west.

Zero, zip, nada understanding

PolAgnostic on March 19, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Typing slower doesn’t help. Maybe repeating helps.

at 1:28 a.m., Thai military radar “was able to detect a signal, which was not a normal signal, of a plane flying in the direction opposite from the MH370 plane,” back toward Kuala Lumpur. The plane later turned right, toward Butterworth, a Malaysian city along the Strait of Malacca.

If this doesn’t help, we could try some chanting.

faraway on March 19, 2014 at 12:13 PM

Chem/bio weapons achieve maximum effectiveness through widespread dispersal – circling a city would do.

PolAgnostic on March 19, 2014 at 12:06 PM

Flying straight over a highly populated route, with a disperser attached to the plane, with a manual release of some sort. Easy to build and install.

Shy Guy on March 19, 2014 at 12:14 PM

I keep coming back to this…man, right out of the box too.

Super engineer platypus…

cozmo on March 19, 2014 at 10:28 AM

cozmo, are you mocking me? I only ask because I’d rather respond in the spirit of the moment rather than go off on some snipe hunt.

platypus on March 19, 2014 at 10:33 AM

Ask yourself this (try being honest when answering) would you drive a car that required two people to drive? Keep in mind, once an airplane takes off, you cannot pull over to the nearest cloud and call a tow-truck if their is some kind of problem.

Aircraft absolutely must be capable of being flown by only one pilot, because the alternative is crashing at 500 miles per hour. It’s not a design flaw, it is an emergency design measure.

More importantly, remember, the computers used to control airplanes are not much more sophisticated than your home computer, would you honestly fly in a aircraft that was 1oo percent controlled by Microsoft Windows?

Remember, there are no genuine Artificial Intelligence computers. Humans absolutely must be able to manually take control of and fly the aircraft because a Blue Screen of Death at 30,000 feet and 500 miles per hour means the Death part of Blue Screen of Death literally means death for everyone on board.

oscarwilde on March 19, 2014 at 12:14 PM

Map of Australian Search Area

I infer from some of the posts on PPRUNE that Australia has taken responsibility for the Indian Ocean search area on the southern arc.

gh on March 19, 2014 at 12:18 PM

I’m still convinced Iran is behind this, and the plane is either parked in Iran, or parked somewhere Iran can use it.

I don’t know how they can write off the Iranians with stolen passports. They got their stolen passports and tickets while they were in Qatar? So explain why they were going to Europe as their ultimate destination by way of Malaysia and Beijing?

The Rogue Tomato on March 19, 2014 at 12:19 PM

When you delete them they don’t really go away unfortunately.

crankyoldlady on March 19, 2014 at 10:28 AM

That’s what “sudo dd if=/dev/random of=myfile bs=1M count=ash!tload” is for :)

But, if the guy had really had something serious on his computer and he was preparing to go jihadi then he probably would have just zeroed out all of his disks or bathed them in orange juice or something …

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 19, 2014 at 12:21 PM

777 Pilot Debunks a few things

FWIW. Begins:

I am a 777 pilot and have waded painfully through all these pages.

gh on March 19, 2014 at 12:24 PM

If this doesn’t help, we could try some chanting.

faraway on March 19, 2014 at 12:13 PM

.
So you coming back quoting to me what I said to you proves your correct?

Didn’t take our meds today, did we?

PolAgnostic on March 19, 2014 at 12:27 PM

Flying straight over a highly populated route, with a disperser attached to the plane, with a manual release of some sort. Easy to build and install.

Shy Guy on March 19, 2014 at 12:14 PM

.
Yes, I was just thinking of the number of times flying into London, Paris, etc when we were put into a holding pattern circling the city.

Circle, disperse and then drop below radar level and get away while the effects are beginning to take hold.

Scariest of all?

If you got away clean … Rinse, repeat.

PolAgnostic on March 19, 2014 at 12:37 PM

Please explain the rationale for the gap between the north and south arcs.

Mapping satellite pings produces a circle – not arcs. The missing arc – the gap – assumes that the plane flew in a straight line away from it’s last known position. We can no longer make that assumption based on the Thai radar disclosure. Therefore, the 2 arcs become a solid half circle.

faraway on March 19, 2014 at 11:57 AM

This is wrong. The gap isn’t based on any assumptions. Rather, the satellite coverage overlaps but only one satellite recieved a signal which means the plane could not have been in that overlap. The gap is that overlap.

HidetheDecline on March 19, 2014 at 12:40 PM

Flying straight over a highly populated route, with a disperser attached to the plane, with a manual release of some sort. Easy to build and install.

Shy Guy on March 19, 2014 at 12:14 PM

run a valved (controlled) tube into the outflow valve(s) from a tank. would need minor bulkhead work (if you wanted to takeoff from distance away) but not hard. at certain altitude the pressurization system opens them anyways as pressurixation not needed(iirc its 10K agl and below) and would not need any electronic/avionics work. built in system already handles it, lower to 10k (or whatever the altitude is) flip tube valve and circle.
climb up and it shuts off, saving whats left in tank for another drop. 777 can carry a lot of whatever they use too.
not saying/advocating this is whats happening, because I do not know, just on how easy it is to do.
I expect some countries security forces are worried about that.

dmacleo on March 19, 2014 at 12:42 PM

Nothing much new on PPRUNE. Up to page 311 now.

1. search off australia continues
2. McInerney says Pakistan is possible

See y’all tomorrow.

gh on March 19, 2014 at 12:49 PM

Forgot. Maldives completely ruled out. Time too late. Probably scheduled plane landing at airport.

gh on March 19, 2014 at 12:50 PM

Forgot. Maldives completely ruled out. Time too late.

gh on March 19, 2014 at 12:50 PM

“Besides, South America is a bit too far.” — King Admiral Emperor Barky, Geographic Sooper-Geenyus and Ivy Leaguer of note.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 19, 2014 at 12:57 PM

Haven’t you seen Airport 77?

cozmo on March 19, 2014 at 12:00 PM

Yes, but the way info is dribbling out, Airplane seems more appropriate an analogy.

freedomfirst on March 19, 2014 at 12:57 PM

The fact that the pilot deleted some files on February 3 doesnt strike me as particularly suspicious.

LASue on March 19, 2014 at 1:02 PM

It was stolen by El Macho.

Ward Cleaver on March 19, 2014 at 1:06 PM

Anyone who knows anything about flying knows that it is ABSURD to think that a pilot would climb to 9 miles in the sky if there was a fire. They would point the nose down to pick up airspeed and get the plane on the ground as quickly as possible, and they would get on the radio and declare an emergency to make sure that equipment met them on the runway when they got down. And they would head towards the nearest airport with a long enough runway, not an airport 120 nm away because “the pilot was familiar with it”.

The article that is “sweeping the internet” doesn’t sound credible for a number of reasons.

DaveS on March 19, 2014 at 1:21 PM

“I could care less.” – Mark Levin

antisense on March 19, 2014 at 1:37 PM

More on the pilot’s ‘simulator’: From the Caspian to the Southern Indian Ocean

slickwillie2001 on March 19, 2014 at 1:39 PM

This is wrong. The gap isn’t based on any assumptions. Rather, the satellite coverage overlaps but only one satellite recieved a signal which means the plane could not have been in that overlap. The gap is that overlap.

HidetheDecline on March 19, 2014 at 12:40 PM

A ‘gap’ is impossible. See Inmarsat 3 coverage picture.

There is only one ‘arc’. It would look like this (sorry for crude drawing – ignore the dots that I had to add):

\ <-circular area based on distance from 'western' satellite
..\
…| <– end of coverage area for satellite to east
…|
../
/

faraway on March 19, 2014 at 1:44 PM

One thing in favor of the theory is the notion the Boeing 777 has more than its share of problems. Weren’t there other 777s where some kind of batteries got too hot, with possibilities of a fire?

LashRambo on March 19, 2014 at 1:59 PM

One thing in favor of the theory is the notion the Boeing 777 has more than its share of problems. Weren’t there other 777s where some kind of batteries got too hot, with possibilities of a fire?

LashRambo on March 19, 2014 at 1:59 PM

that was 787 dreamliner

dmacleo on March 19, 2014 at 2:09 PM

Here is a very interesting theory: http://mh370shadow.com/post/79838944823/did-malaysian-airlines-370-disappear-using-sia68-sq68

supernal on March 19, 2014 at 2:10 PM

Faraway, I didn’t say there was a gap in coverage. The image you posted supports what I said. The Pacific satellite didn’t recieve a signal from the airliner which means the airliner could not have been in the Pac satellite’s territory. If you look at the image you see the edge of the Pac satellite coverage is where there is a gap between the north and south arcs. That is why they know there are two small arcs and not one big one, because of the overlap between satellites. If the plane had flown back to the east it would have been picked up by the Pac satellite.

HidetheDecline on March 19, 2014 at 2:17 PM

oops, ignore my last post. It’s completely wrong. I had a ‘gap’ in my thinking :)

Thanks HideTheDecline for helping me to think this through.

faraway on March 19, 2014 at 2:17 PM

“I could care less.” – Mark Levin

antisense

So you were the idiot he was talking too, lol. I couldn’t care less about his misuse of the phrase.

xblade on March 19, 2014 at 2:26 PM

Here is a very interesting theory: http://mh370shadow.com/post/79838944823/did-malaysian-airlines-370-disappear-using-sia68-sq68

supernal on March 19, 2014 at 2:10 PM

It’s a good theory, the best I’ve seen. The problem is that it would be extraordinarily difficult for a large plane to fly close enough to another in pitch black night to appear as one blip on radar, especially if they aren’t working together.

HidetheDecline on March 19, 2014 at 2:27 PM

I hope to goodness that plane landed somewhere. I don’t see any reason for anyone to fly it into the ocean without leaving a reason. Maybe they’ll find out that one of the passengers did leave something behind.

crankyoldlady on March 19, 2014 at 2:53 PM

I was under the impression that the two arc hypothesis has been developed because Inmarsat believe that the aircraft was equal distance from the satellite at all times, and that Inmarsat believes this because the response time for the aircraft’s signal to be received back by the satellite was constant during the flight.

Where did hear? I haven’t heard such a thing.

I was under the impression that if the aircraft flew due west, that it would had been closer to the satellite which means that it’s response time to the satellite would have taken less time.

The distance measurement isn’t based on response time but the angle at which the return signal was recieved.

HidetheDecline on March 19, 2014 at 3:04 PM

Where did hear?

I meant “Where did you hear this?”

HidetheDecline on March 19, 2014 at 3:11 PM

faraway on March 19, 2014 at 1:44 PM

Gold Star! for the bonus artwork.

mike_NC9 on March 19, 2014 at 5:16 PM

YOU HEARD IT HERE FIRST!!!
What if:
The plane was sent into the Arabian Sea, exactly where OSAMA BIN LADEN’s watery grave lay?!!

askwhatif on March 19, 2014 at 5:16 PM

YOU HEARD IT HERE FIRST!!!

askwhatif on March 19, 2014 at 5:16 PM

I’m pretty sure I already saw that one.

It might have been on one of those “Osamabama lives” websites.

cozmo on March 19, 2014 at 5:44 PM

So you were the idiot he was talking too, lol. I couldn’t care less about his misuse of the phrase.

xblade on March 19, 2014 at 2:26 PM

Negative. I am far more articulate than either of those two.

My point is I don’t give a flying fuselage about this stupid plane.

antisense on March 19, 2014 at 6:37 PM

How else would the measure the location of the aircraft?

By measuring the signal strength. If you know how powerful the transmitter is then you will be able to determine its position relative to the reciever.

Measuring distance via time makes perfect sense.

Read your link again. It makes no reference to timing the ping but instead talks about the angle of the signal. Using the timing method would require the transmitter on the aircraft to have an extraordinarily precise clock.

4. Through the hourly “handshakes”, the satellite can determine the approximate location of the plane so that it can relay messages efficiently. A plane that is flying directly under a satellite would be at a 90-degree angle to the satellite. An aircraft flying at the poles would be at 0 degrees, the CNN report said. The last message sent by MH370 was at 40 degrees.

HidetheDecline on March 19, 2014 at 6:39 PM

My point is I don’t give a flying fuselage about this stupid plane.

antisense on March 19, 2014 at 6:37 PM

Then why are you on this thread?

crankyoldlady on March 19, 2014 at 8:48 PM

The pilot had quite a flight simulator arrangement at home. As usual, it takes UK press to get the details. Good article with pics from the UK Daily Mail

A member of the cabin crew also had a flight simulator at home

A Malaysian flight engineer who supposedly works for a private charter jet company was also on board, although the company refuses to verify

Family of missing Malaysia plane’s captain moved out of home day before flight left
There is a strange lack of interest in why the wife moved the family from the home the day before. There was a similar lack of curiosity over the American wife of the Boston bomber, until the UK press started digging. From the same link:

Strange online post by Zaharie ‘looking for buddies to share this passion’ and said it was ‘time to take to the next level of simulation. Motion!’

Routine news questions are not being answered

Ultimately, the public is not being told everything investigators know. The dribble of information is simply to satiate peoples information needs and distract from the truth.
Marcus Traianus on March 19, 2014 at 10:23 AM

I agree

Why keep the story alive? With China and Malaysia involved it isn’t like a free and open press is a concern. Just declare that this is “one of those things,” pay off the families, and move on.
Happy Nomad on March 19, 2014 at 10:28 AM

The story is reluctantly being fed to the public. That tells me they are worried more information will surface, and they don’t want to be caught looking like they did a cover up

Malaysia has no reason to be up to evil in this case.
But they may have plenty of reason to try to cover up incompetence and liability.
db on March 19, 2014 at 10:40 AM

This is debatable. In the 2002 Bali bombings, there was an unforgettable photo of smiling police joking with their suspect. There is always a possibility that there were people on the ground attempting to cover for the pilot until the plane got away. Malaysia has quite a radical muslim representation.

The preferred way to detonate a nuke is above ground at prime altitude. Detonating from a suicide plane eliminates the need to perfect the timing on the explosion required to force critical mass during free fall.

entagor on March 19, 2014 at 8:50 PM

I still think The Langoliers got them. Check the airport at Bangor, Maine.

schmuck281 on March 19, 2014 at 9:53 PM

CNN is still rehashing BREAKING NEWS and still have the toy plane on display.
Only thing new I see are Don Lemon’s eyebrows. He must go to the same brow bar as Moochelle.

Brat on March 19, 2014 at 10:10 PM

So there’s a debris field nowhere near the predicted tracks of the aircraft where all the aviation “experts” on CNN and Fox have been claiming the plane would travel so that the Iranian / al Queda / Martian atom bomb could be installed in the 777 to attack Israel.

If this does prove to be the actual debris of the aircraft, I hope CNN and Fox have a nightly segment scheduled for the next month of their aviation “experts” being punched in the face by the survivor families.

DarthBrooks on March 20, 2014 at 12:06 AM

BallisticBob on March 19, 2014 at 11:36 PM
DarthBrooks on March 20, 2014 at 12:06 AM

The story was linked on PPRUNE. Someone reported debris that might be an aircraft to the local government. The report was forwarded to the appropriate authorities but at the time of the newspaper article was written, no-one had followed-up.

I didn’t think it was worth mentioning.

I’m going back to page 311 on PPRUNE now to get caught up. I don’t expect to have much to report.

gh on March 20, 2014 at 8:08 AM

Conspiracy Theorists and Idiots Everywhere, Take Note.

Having read all the posts on this thread and followed this incident closely since it happened, I conclude that the Malaysian authorities and others have been transparent in releasing information. The problem is that every snippet of information has been challenged, twisted and analysed to death on this forum. The fuel load of the aircraft, Inmarsat pings, acars inoperative, flight crew and pilots, everything that has been issued has been challenged and more information demanded.

PPRuNe is a source for much of the journalist BS now. Particularly the BBC (which has been linking back to it according to posts in the forum).

gh on March 20, 2014 at 8:13 AM

Update PPRuNe Timeline, 19th Mar 2014, 19:54

Time is GMT, I think. Minor adjustments to the original (link posted upthread).

gh on March 20, 2014 at 8:21 AM

I still think The Langoliers got them. Check the airport at Bangor, Maine.

schmuck281 on March 19, 2014 at 9:53 PM

I did, its not there.
as an aside I worked there for a bunch of years.

dmacleo on March 20, 2014 at 8:27 AM

PPRuNe comment links AMSA Media Site (Australian Maritime Safety Authority).

AMSA Update 6 (PDF)

20 March 2014, 1530 AEDT
Received satellite imagery … may or may not be related … Orion arrived … 1:50pm …

According to PPRuNe comments, the Orions can drop sonobuoys to listen for the black box (and the Australians have this capability).

gh on March 20, 2014 at 8:47 AM

Satellite Photos, ABC News (Australian)

Gallery seems to have 3 photos and 2 maps (thumbnails) … possibly more. Have not looked yet.

gh on March 20, 2014 at 8:54 AM

Ah … I see Ed’s on this … I will move to latest thread …

gh on March 20, 2014 at 8:55 AM

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