Quotes of the day

posted at 10:41 pm on March 17, 2014 by Erika Johnsen

President Barack Obama’s incremental strategy on the Ukraine crisis marched forward Monday — but so did Russian President Vladimir Putin, without appearing to notice.

Through targeting the bank accounts of 11 Russian and Ukrainian government and business leaders, the administration hopes the pressure on the so-called “cronies” — as administration officials repeatedly called them Monday — will get through to Putin himself.

But though the sanctions are the most aggressive any American president has taken against Russia since the end of the Cold War, they’re going to take a while to be felt, and even then, it’s an open question of how much the people targeted by them will care. White House officials haven’t laid out what happens if Putin doesn’t back down — and the options aren’t great.

“Going forward, we can calibrate our response based on whether Russia chooses to escalate or to de-escalate the situation,” Obama said Monday at the White House, announcing the latest actions.

***

U.S. senators, congressmen and top Obama administration officials are sure to be on Vladimir Putin’s sanctions list; a response to the Obama Administration’s announcement on Monday that 7 Russian officials and 4 Ukrainian officials would be barred from holding assets or traveling to the United States.

Putin is expected to release his retaliation list as early as Tuesday and while the final list is still being crafted, it will include top Obama administration officials and high profile U.S. senators, in an effort to roughly mirror the U.S. sanctions against Russian officials and lawmakers, according to diplomatic sources. At the top of the list in Congress is Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin, who recently co-authored a resolution criticizing Russia’s invasion of Crimea.

Durbin’s inclusion on Putin’s list would mirror Obama’s naming of Valentina Matvienko, the head of the upper chamber of the Russian Duma. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell are not expected to be on the Russian sanctions list.

***

In short, America’s adversaries are testing the limits of America’s post-Iraq, post-Afghanistan moment.

We’re seeing the ‘light footprint’ run out of gas,” said one of Mr. Obama’s former senior national security aides, who would not speak on the record about his ex-boss.

“No one is arguing for military action, for bringing back George Bush’s chest-thumping,” the former aide said. At the same time, he said, the president’s oft-repeated lines that those who violate international norms will be “isolated” and “pay a heavy price” over the long term have sounded “more like predictions over time, and less like imminent threats.”

Mr. Obama acknowledges, at least in private, that he is managing an era of American retrenchment. History suggests that such eras — akin to what the United States went through after the two world wars and Vietnam — often look like weakness to the rest of the world. His former national security adviser Thomas Donilon seemed to acknowledge the critical nature of the moment on Sunday when he said on “Face the Nation” that what Mr. Obama was facing was “a challenge to the post-Cold War order in Europe, an order that we have a lot to do with.”

***

Putin has played on western illusions very successfully for a very long time. Remember all those ‘experts’ (many, alas, in government service) who thought that the Medvedev presidency represented a real shift in Russian politics? How shocked and disappointed people were when Putin stepped smoothly back into the top job? It is the oldest trick in the book: bait and switch. Humiliate John Kerry by making him cool his heels for three hours in the Kremlin, and then dangle hope of a cooperative relationship. Hold out a ‘helping hand’ when the Obama administration has gotten itself into an embarrassing predicament over its Syria red line, then kick Uncle Sam in the teeth at Geneva.

There was never a good reason to believe any of Putin’s talk of peace and cooperation. After the Cold War, America and its allies jammed NATO expansion down Russia’s throat. The European Union worked to expand right up to Russia’s frontiers while making it crystal clear that Russia could never be a member. Putin is no Hitler, but neither is he a Konrad Adenauer, determined to accept defeat and to cooperate wholeheartedly in building his country’s future within the lines drawn by the victors. And the US made Adenauer’s Germany a much better offer than it made Putin’s Russia. You would have to be living in what the Germans call das Wolkenkuckkucksheim, cloud-cuckoo-land, to believe that a man like Putin would passively accept the post-Cold War order.

***

Russia will regret its anti-Western turn because the (genuine and huge!) improvements in the country’s economic situation over the past 15 years have only been possible because the country was increasingly becoming seen as a “normal” country in which it was possible to invest and do business. Russia wasn’t perfectly integrated into the world economy, but in 2014 it is much more integrated than it ever was during the chaotic 1990′s or the “good” years of Putin’s first term as president. Russia’s trade with the EU exploded over the course of the past decade, and while the results of economic growth haven’t been evenly shared, huge numbers of Russians have been able to partake in a consumer lifestyle that increasingly resembles the West’s.

The growth of this consumer lifestyle depended not on government to government ties, even at their post 9/11 peak Russia and the West were highly suspicious of each other, but on the gradual development of organic connections between people and businesses. These sorts of connections can be very hard to form, but are exceedingly easy to break. As shown by the carnage in the Russian stock markets, Russia’s invasion of Crimea seems to have convinced an awful lot of people that Russia is not a particularly good place to invest in.

***

As U.S. and European officials began imposing sanctions in their face-off with Russia over Ukraine, Vladimir Putin’s $160 billion in oil and natural gas exports may be his most potent weapon to limit punitive measures. …

Russia, the world’s largest oil producer, exported $160 billion worth of crude, fuels and gas-based industrial feedstocks to Europe and the U.S. in 2012. While shutting the spigot on Russian energy exports would starve the Moscow government of essential flows of foreign cash, the price may be too high for European consumers and it may not alter Putin’s plans, said Jeff Sahadeo, director of Carleton University’s Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies.

Abstaining from Russian oil and gas would be “off the table” for Europe, said Marc Lanthemann, Eurasia analyst with Stratfor, a geopolitical intelligence company based in Austin, Texas. Europe risks a replay of its failed attempt six years ago to punish the Kremlin for going to war with the Republic of Georgia, when it was unable to impose sanctions after acknowledging its dependence on Russian energy.

“We’re not expecting sanctions with many teeth coming through,” Lanthemann said.

***

Should Putin choose to escalate by moving troops into Ukraine beyond Crimea, even Germany has pledged to hit Russia with painful sanctions. This would damage the economy seriously: Former Russian Finance Minister Alexei Kudrin has forecast $50 billion in capital flight per quarter this year, “in a mild scenario.”

And yet, sanctions too can add to the logic of escalation. Serious economic sanctions would, as the most fervent Soviet die-hards and Russian nationalists have been hoping ever since the 1990s, create a full break with the West and return Russia’s economy to a less extreme version of its Soviet-era isolation — or, in their view, self-sufficiency. Sanctions would also force corrupt businessmen either to repatriate their ill-gotten gains or flee the country. The “liberals” who have, according to conservatives, held the country ransom for private gain since the collapse of the Soviet Union and prevented Russia’s return to greatness would be routed.

The West would then have done its worst, while proving that it is unwilling to go to war with Russia in order to prevent Putin from sending troops into his non-NATO neighbors. Any future land grabs would incur smaller additional costs for Russia.

***

Several members of Congress voiced support for sanctions against Russian leaders announced by President Obama earlier today, but urged him to go further to deter Russian President Vladimir Putin from taking further steps to annex Crimea and take the region from Ukraine.

The sanctions, announced Monday morning, freeze the assets of seven Russian officials and four of their allies in Ukraine’s Crimea region. The action by the Obama administration was praised by several members of Congress, while others blasted the sanctions for not going far enough.  “The crisis in Ukraine calls for a far more significant response from the United States,” declared Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), in a lengthy statement released Monday afternoon. “Today’s Executive Order could be an important part of that response, but sanctioning only seven Russian officials is wholly inadequate at this stage.”

Without stronger U.S. and Western reaction, McCain said, “we run the risk of signaling to Putin that he can be even more expansive in furthering his old imperial ambitions, not only in Ukraine, but also in Central and Eastern Europe, the Baltic countries and parts of Central Asia.” McCain urged the Obama administration to “rush the modest military assistance to the Ukrainian government that its leaders have requested.”


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what is this hammer the hung over guy night??

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:08 AM

Heh heh heh, oh, and I am currently drinking water and taking aspirin so when I go to bed tonight, I won’t wake up in the morning hung over…

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:16 AM

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:07 AM

is that your site?..

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:17 AM

why do I feel like a harp seal?

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:14 AM

ROTFLMAO… that’s just your pesky hangover talking…

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:17 AM

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:07 AM

is that your site?..

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:17 AM

Wink wink nod nod, say no more… wouldn’t want me getting the hammer now would you???

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:18 AM

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:17 AM

Sebring was a wicked party…I left last Tuesday
for a Saturday race..
im older now so its gonna take time…

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:20 AM

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:17 AM

Sebring was a wicked party…I left last Tuesday
for a Saturday race..
im older now so its gonna take time…

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:20 AM

Heh heh, at 53, I’m not exactly a spring chicken any more either…

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:22 AM

Christ, you guys make me feel like a pedaphile! Young chumps!

NiteOwl on March 18, 2014 at 3:24 AM

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:18 AM

wow..when do you find the time to write all that..sheesh..
your one busy fellow.
that’s an amazing amount of thoughts there..
(i’ll have to read them now to see how twisted…lafs)
and many ppl here post their own sites…
that’s not permission.. its just I don’t think you’ll get banned opinion.

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:25 AM

Disclaimer: The owner of this Avatar neither condones or participates in non appropriate contact with any person of any age.

NiteOwl on March 18, 2014 at 3:29 AM

wow..when do you find the time to write all that.

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:25 AM

Comes of having nothing to do and all day to do it… <— Insert embarrassed look here…

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:30 AM

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:30 AM

reason number 47 that draw for a living
I couldn’t write in a month
what you write in a day..

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:39 AM

I couldn’t write in a month
what you write in a day..

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:39 AM

And it takes me a month to write what Ed or Allahpundit write in a day.

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:44 AM

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:44 AM

ppl like AP Ed MM and Ace and more
have a amazing talent to write relevant topical and often…
and I also like the way Sophies site reads..kj..
so many really..

id be out…first day…before lunch done done done

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:51 AM

i’ll leave you with cosmic messenger…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5ToXWEPkbg

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 4:07 AM

Sigh, I’ve always wanted someone who post links… kinda like… oh I don’t know… stealing someone else work. Links are great for conformation of like minded or opposite thoughts. Do you have original thoughts?

NiteOwl on March 18, 2014 at 2:58 AM

My degree was in math ed and geometry is my favorite branch of math. I see using links as building a proof. Yes, they’re for information, corroboration, and credibility, but they’re also the axioms and postulates that are put together with originality and creativity in what you choose to link, your analysis of what the links mean, the comparisons you draw between several links, and the conclusions you come to.

Q.E.D.

INC on March 18, 2014 at 4:37 AM

INC on March 18, 2014 at 4:37 AM

Good morning, INC. :)

Beautifully expressed. Well said, indeed.

I often see links used between two like minded individuals in the midst of a conversation on any given subject as a form of short hand, much as the symbols used in mathematics serve as short hand for expression of terms and sentences that would prove cumbersome fully written in words. The use of the links or the symbols simply reduces the language to a form of short hand that serves to replace a time consuming and unwieldy process in the course of expressing any given argument.

thatsafactjack on March 18, 2014 at 5:03 AM

Q.E.D.

INC on March 18, 2014 at 4:37 AM

Sweet, 1 1/2 hours after my last post… but I will accept the throw gauntlet.

It is an easy parry on my part… at what point in a debate do you believe they will stop for you to exhibit charts and graphs?

Politics is about sound bits and quick thinking on your feet. Unfortunately facts are secondary… sometimes even ignored.

NiteOwl on March 18, 2014 at 5:59 AM

Good morning ladies and gentlemen. The weather is beginning to improve. When I can walk again I’ll be able to get out and about.

I did well in geometry in school but I failed algabra, inc. I still don’t see much use for algebra but geometry is usefull.

crankyoldlady on March 18, 2014 at 6:01 AM

INC on March 18, 2014 at 4:37 AM

Your idea is sound, makes a great (well, passable) answer for college level testing. You wanna make it to higher ground? Understand what you are saying and express it in simple terms that everyone will feel they understand – even if they don’t.

That, my friend, is politics.

NiteOwl on March 18, 2014 at 6:04 AM

crankyoldlady on March 18, 2014 at 6:01 AM

Hope you get better. I always found algebra more useful than geometry! Guess it’s different for everyone. :-)

NiteOwl on March 18, 2014 at 6:08 AM

Since we know that the Universe is still expanding, that means it has not collided with anything that would have caused those diffusion waves.

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 2:43 AM

I don’t know much about this stuff except instinctively but I have to say we don’t KNOW anything. Someone said the universe is not as we perceive it. So like the missing plane we probably will never KNOW. That doesn’t mean we can’t speculate.

crankyoldlady on March 18, 2014 at 6:21 AM

Good Morning, Patriots! And, Trolls.

I got a feeling about political correctness. I hate it. It causes us to lie silently instead of saying what we think.

- Hal Holbrook

My take: Political Correctness: The Liberal Sword of Intolerance

kingsjester on March 18, 2014 at 7:00 AM

Mr Putin is speaking at the Kremlin, where he is urging MPs to back Crimea’s attempt to split from Ukraine and join the Russian Federation.

He approved a draft bill on annexation after a Crimean referendum held on Sunday

11:18 GMT: When the Soviet Union collapsed, the situation was so difficult that Russians “couldn’t really protect our interests”, Mr Putin says. But he says people were not prepared to put up with “this historical injustice” – referring to the transfer of Crimea to Ukraine.

11:14: Mr Putin condemns the transfer of Crimea to Ukraine in 1954, in Soviet times. He says it was a decision taken unconstitutionally, behind the scenes.

11:11: Mr Putin says Crimea has “sacred” places, symbols of military glory, and that the different ethnic groups have worked together in harmony in Crimea.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 7:38 AM

11:40: The West behaved “irresponsibly” in Ukraine, Mr Putin argues, referring to the Maidan protests which toppled President Yanukovych. Russia “could not step back anymore” he says, adding: “Russia has national interests that need to be respected.” He tells Ukrainians: “Don’t trust those who frighten you with Russia… we do not need a split Ukraine.” He says Crimea will remain home for Russians, Ukrainians and Crimean Tatars, but Crimea will not be home for “Banderovtsy” – a reference to nationalists. He gets applause at that point.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 7:42 AM

Mr Putin is speaking at the Kremlin, where he is urging MPs to back Crimea’s attempt to split from Ukraine and join the Russian Federation.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 7:38 AM

Not going to be a nail-biter.

Happy Nomad on March 18, 2014 at 7:47 AM

11:46: Ukraine and Russia are “one nation”, Mr Putin says. He refers to Kiev as “the mother of Russian cities”. “We cannot live without each other,” he adds, promising that Russia will always protect the interests of Russians in Ukraine.

11:43: Russia had faced the possibility of Sevastopol being used by Nato, Mr Putin says, and that would have threatened southern Russia.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 7:48 AM

Not going to be a nail-biter.

Happy Nomad on March 18, 2014 at 7:47 AM

heh

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 7:49 AM

11:46: Ukraine and Russia are “one nation”, Mr Putin says. He refers to Kiev as “the mother of Russian cities”. “We cannot live without each other,” he adds, promising that Russia will always protect the interests of Russians in Ukraine.

11:43: Russia had faced the possibility of Sevastopol being used by Nato, Mr Putin says, and that would have threatened southern Russia.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 7:48 AM

Hmmmm….

This argument goes back to something like 940 AD

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 7:53 AM

Mr Putin announces two new laws: to make the “Republic of Crimea” and “the city of Sevastopol” subjects – that is, parts – of the Russian Federation. He asks parliament to back those laws.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 7:54 AM

Hmmmm….

This argument goes back to something like 940 AD

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 7:53 AM

It’s interesting that He said “Russia and Ukraine” not “Russia and Crimea”. That violates a lot of treaties I would think?

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 7:58 AM

Russia had faced the possibility of Sevastopol being used by Nato, Mr Putin says, and that would have threatened southern Russia.

He’s right.

The junta in Western Ukraine is illegitimate, but at this point in a revolutionary situation it’s not really about law any more. It’s about vital interests.

American politicians over-use that phrase. Freedom for all mankind is not a “vital interest”. Control of militarily dominating turf is a “vital interest”. When real “vital interests” are in play, things can get bloody. (In Ukraine of course, first blood is already spilled.) It is not like a “war on poverty”.

But the main thing of course is that all of this is nothing like a “vital interest” for America.

Real vital interests for the American nation include stopping the slow motion Mexican invasion. Unlike what happens in Crimea, that really will shape America’s future.

David Blue on March 18, 2014 at 7:59 AM

Hmmmm….

This argument goes back to something like 940 AD

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 7:53 AM

It’s interesting that He said “Russia and Ukraine” not “Russia and Crimea”. That violates a lot of treaties I would think?

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 7:58 AM

I guess it would depend on the perspective

Putin is using the ancient Russian argument.

Here’s a brief timeline with link on key events…Maps at the link

Mention of Rus’ in the Bertynsky chronicles associated with the mission to Ludwig I of the Frankish kingdom.
MAP: Eastern Europe, 250-800

840 Magyars and khazars attacking Kyiv.

853 Askold becomes Kyiv’s Prince.

877 Novgorod’s Prince Oleh annexes Kyiv, kills Askold and brings the capital of Rus’ from Novgorod to Kyiv.

890 Pechenegs advancing to Black Sea steppe. Ugrians (Hungarians) move to Danube.

907-911 Prince Oleh travels to Byzantine’s capital Constantinopol (Ukrainian “Czarhorod”) with a big army and demands an annuity to Kyiv.

945 Prince Ihor signs a treaty with Byzantine Empire – ready to accept Orthodox Christianity.

957 Princess Olha (Ihor’s wife) becomes a ruler of Kyiv.

960-972 Svyatoslav (Olha’s son) becomes a Prince of Kyiv. He confrontates with Khazars, then attacks Bulgaria and fights with Byzantine Empire. At the time Svjatoslav is in the offensive on Bulgaria, Khazars attack Kyiv. He returns but gets killed in a skirmish with Pechenegs.

980 Volodymyr The Great becomes a Prince.

988 Official Christianization of Kyiv Rus’. Volodymyr accepts Orthodoxy and marries Byzantine Princess Anna.

1015 Death of Volodymyr The Great. Sons are struggling to rule the country until 1019.

1019 Yaroslav The Wise – one of Volodymyr’s sons becomes a Prince.
MAP:
Kyivan Rus is 11th century

1027 Construction of Svyata Sofia (St. Sophia) Cathedral.

1054 Death of Prince Yaroslav.

1068 Polovtsi army attack Kyiv state for the first time.

1098 – 1099 Magyars attack Halychyna.

1111 Kyiv Princes conquer Polovtsi.

1113 Volodymyr Monomakh – the last of great princes of Kyiv.

1152 Yaroslav Osmomysl becomes a Prince of Halychyna.

1155 – 1157 Suzdal (Russian) Prince Yuriy Dovgoruky (founder of Moscow) attacks Kyiv and becomes a prince for a short period of time.

1155 – 1169 Destruction of Kyiv by Andrey Bogoliubsky, the Vldimir-Suzdal prince

1187 The word Ukraine (Ukrayina) first used to describe Kyiv and Halychyna lands.

1223 Ukrainians first battle Tatars in a battle near Kalko River in treaty with Polovetz – Tatars win.

1238 Danylo Halytsky becomes a Prince of Halychyna. Next year he unites Halychyna with Kyiv.

1240 Tatars capture Kyiv.

Lviv is founded by King Lev.

1320 Yuriy becomes a King of Halychyna.

1330 Yuriy marries Lithuanian Princess, daughter of Gedymin.

1360s Lithuanian Prince Olgerd frees Kyivschyna and Podillya from Tatars. They fell under Lithuanian control.

1378 Last Halychyna King Volodyslav dies.

1387 – XVIII century Poland rules Halychyna.

1414 Prince Fedir Koryatovych of Mukachevo.

1475 – 1774 Crimea (Krym) under Turkish (Osman) Empire’s rule.
MAP:
Ukrainian lands 1400

1490 First mentioning of cossacks (kozaks).
(More)

1550 Dmytro Vyshnyvetsky establishes a fortress of Zaporizhzhya (Zaporizhia).

1569 Lyublinska Uniya (Lublin Union) – All Ukrainian territory under Lithuanian rule (except Polissia and Beresteyshchyna) transfers to Poland.
MAP: Ukrainian lands after 1569

1576 Foundation of Ostroh Academy – first University-like school in Eastern Europe.

1590 First Kozak uprisings (Kostynsky, Mazyvako).

1596 Union of Brest (Beresti) – beginning of religious struggles.

1608 Fall of Ostroh Academy.

1610 – 1622 Het’man Sahaydachny is a het’man (the arch) of Zaporizka Sich.
MAP:

Zaporizka Sich

1630 Kozak uprising against Poland.

1637 Petro Mohyla establishes a Collegium in Kyiv.

1648 Beginning of liberation of Ukraine from Polish rule headed by kozak het’man Bohdan Khmelnytsky
MAP: Kozak state after 1649

(more info)

1654 Bohdan Khmel’nytsky signs Pereyaslav treaty with Muscovy
(more)

1657 Swedish-Ukrainian coalition against Russia.

1663 Two het’mans in Ukraine. Het’man of the Left bank of Dnipro – in coalition with Russia; het’man from right bank – against Russia.

1665 – 1676 Het’man Petro Doroshenko.

Establishment of Russian control under the right-bank kozaks.

1685 Kyiv Orthodox Church Metropolitan (Patriarkhat) becomes a division of Muscovite Metropolitan.

1687 – 1709 Het’man Ivan Mazepa – period of palingenecy of Kozak state.

1708 Treaty had been signed between Ukraine and Sweden.

1709 Battle in Poltava (Ukraine). Russians defeat Swedish-Ukrainian army and execute Kozak troops after the surrender of Swede army

1709 Death of Ivan Mazepa.

1710 Pylyp Orlyk becomes a het’man.

1720 Russians prohibit the use of Ukrainian language – still preferred by Ukrainians.

1722 – 1727 First het’man of Ukraine appointed by Russian Czar.

1734 Het’man Danylo Apostol’s uprising on the Right Bank (Haydamaky).

1744 Construction of St. George Cathedral in Lviv.

1745 Oleksa Dovbush – legendary Ukrainian hero.
MAP:
Ukrainian lands around 1750

1764 Abolition of Zaporizhzhya Het’manate (Zapiriz’ka Sich).

1765 Slobodzhanschyna falls under Russian control.

1772 Russian, German and Austrian empires divide parts of Poland among themselves.(First division) Halychyna falls under Austrian control.

1775 Second division of Poland. Austria annexes Bukovyna

1775 Zaporizka Sich destroyed by Russians.

1787 Russians rebuild a village of Kodak into a city and name it after queen Ekaterina II (Katerynoslav). During Ukrainian Republic of 1917 – 1920 the city was renamed into Sicheslav (“In Honour of Sich”). In 1924 communists gave it a present name – Dnipropetrovsk (Combination of words “Dnipro” (main Ukrainian river) and “Petrovskij” (The last name of major of city, a Stalinist)).

1789 Establishment of Mykolayiv (Nikolayev)

1780 End of Het’manate.

1794 Establishment of Odesa (Odessa).

1793 Transfer of lands on the Right Bank to Russia from Poland excluding Halychyna, Bukovyna, Volyn and a part of Polissya, already annexed by Austria.

1798 Ivan Kotlyarevsky publishes “Eneyida”.

1831 Repnev attempts to renew kozak army.

Establishment of The University of Kyiv.

1840 Taras Shevchenko’s first publication of “Kobzar”, probably the most popular book in Ukrainian.

1861 First railroad on Ukrainian territory (Peremyshl – Lviv).

1861 Abolition of slavery in Russia.

1863 Ukrainian language is officially prohibited to use by Russian government.

1890 First Ukrainian Political Party (Halytska)

1905 Annulment of restrictions on the usage of Ukrainian language in Russian empire.

1917 Revolution in Russia. Ukrainian writer and historian Mykhaylo Hrushevsky becomes the president of newly proclaimed Ukrainian state (Ukrayinska Narodna Respublika). The power of the new government is very weak, Russian czarists, communists and Germans try to conquer Ukraine again. Symon Petlyura becomes a commanders of Ukrainian armed forces. President signs a treaty with Germans, but it was annulled in 1919 in Brest, Belorussia, where Germany signed a treaty with Communist Russia. Ukrainian lands are united after Western Ukrainian Republic and Ukrainian republic unite.
MAP:
Ukrainian lands 1914-1919

1918 Austrian empire breaks up. Newly established West-Ukrainian Republic is annexed by Czechoslovakia and Romania.
MAP:
Western Ukraine 1772-1914

1921 Formation of Soviet Socialist Republic of Ukraine.

1929 Collectivization starts. All lands that belonged to Ukrainian farmers are taken away and put into a large “kolhosps” (co-operative farms.) People, who didn’t want to give their land away are arrested and murdered.
MAP:
Ukraine in interwar years

(more)

1933-1934 Artificial Famine in Ukraine, caused by Stalin’s policy. At least three million people die in result.
(more)

1939-1940 Annexation of Western Ukraine by Soviet Union according to a secret treaty with Nazi Germany.

1941-1944 1941-1944 German occupation of Ukraine. Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA). SS Division “Galizien”.
MAP:
Ukraine during WW2

(more on division “Galizien”)

(more on UPA)

1943-1944 Russians return. Massive immigration to the west (England, France, Canada, USA.)
(Ukrainians in Saskatchewan, Canada)

1945-1947 Discrimination and murders of Ukrainian population in Poland by Polish army and police.

1945-1955 Continued fight for liberation of Ukraine in the western regions.

1950′s Illegal anti-communist literature begins to appear.

1986 Nuclear reactor explosion in Chernobyl, Ukraine.
(picture)

1980′s National movement for the liberation of Ukraine “Rukh” is formed.

1990 Human chain protests for Ukrainian independence.
(more)

1990 Ukrainian sovereignty is proclaimed.

1991 Ukrainian independence is proclaimed. Elections of Parliament (Verkhovna Rada) and the President Leonid Kravchuk.

1994 Ukraine signs an treaty with NATO

1996 Constitution is proclaimed.

http://ukraine.uazone.net/history.html

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:04 AM

It’s interesting that He said “Russia and Ukraine” not “Russia and Crimea”. That violates a lot of treaties I would think?

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 7:58 AM

Budapest is merely a city in Hungary under the rat-eared dictator, not the site of a mutual support agreement from 1994.

Happy Nomad on March 18, 2014 at 8:08 AM

It’s interesting that He said “Russia and Ukraine” not “Russia and Crimea”. That violates a lot of treaties I would think?

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 7:58 AM

Putin is using this to unify the Russians…and signal Merkel that this ancient argument isn’t over.

Russians consider Ukraine the heart of the establishment of Russia.

Germany…Poland and other Kingdoms/Tribes have been squabbling over the territory for a very long time.

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:08 AM

1990 Ukrainian sovereignty is proclaimed.

1991 Ukrainian independence is proclaimed. Elections of Parliament (Verkhovna Rada) and the President Leonid Kravchuk.

1994 Ukraine signs an treaty with NATO

1996 Constitution is proclaimed.

http://ukraine.uazone.net/history.html

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:04 AM

What treaties did the Russian Federation sign with Ukraine though? I’m pretty sure that under Yeltsin they recognized Ukranian independence and territorial integrity.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 8:11 AM

The junta in Western Ukraine is illegitimate, but at this point in a revolutionary situation it’s not really about law any more. It’s about vital interests.

David Blue on March 18, 2014 at 7:59 AM

Sorry, but the existing government lost all legitimacy the minute Viktor Yanukovych sanctioned mass murder.

And as to vital interests, the United States has a moral obligation to live up to the Budapest memorandum. No matter how inconvenient that is to the left, Paulbots, and idiot listeners of Michael Savage.

Happy Nomad on March 18, 2014 at 8:12 AM

Russia had faced the possibility of Sevastopol being used by Nato, Mr Putin says, and that would have threatened southern Russia.

He’s right.

The junta in Western Ukraine is illegitimate, but at this point in a revolutionary situation it’s not really about law any more. It’s about vital interests.

American politicians over-use that phrase. Freedom for all mankind is not a “vital interest”. Control of militarily dominating turf is a “vital interest”. When real “vital interests” are in play, things can get bloody. (In Ukraine of course, first blood is already spilled.) It is not like a “war on poverty”.

But the main thing of course is that all of this is nothing like a “vital interest” for America.

Real vital interests for the American nation include stopping the slow motion Mexican invasion. Unlike what happens in Crimea, that really will shape America’s future.

David Blue on March 18, 2014 at 7:59 AM

To Putin he’s protecting the vital interests of his Southstream Pipeline and his Black Sea Ports.

Odessa holds a mythic place in Russian history.

South and Southeastern Ukraine are also the most productive wheat growing regions and the Chinese had a deal to lease a huge section of land to farm wheat. The land lease (both sides of the Dnieper) is now in peril.

Putin’s Southstream pipeline bypasses Ukraine landmass altogether.

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:13 AM

That, my friend, is politics.

NiteOwl on March 18, 2014 at 6:04 AM

Sorry, the discussion you interjected yourself into complaining about the use of links was between two individuals discussing a recent article dealing with physics, not politics.

As to the timing of the comment: who’s got the time to wait around for you to decide to check back in? By your own estimation, it took you an hour and a half.

thatsafactjack on March 18, 2014 at 8:14 AM

Russians consider Ukraine the heart of the establishment of Russia.

Germany…Poland and other Kingdoms/Tribes have been squabbling over the territory for a very long time.

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:08 AM

True. I think that if you look at history Kiev has as much right to claim sovereignty over Russia as Moscow does over Ukraine.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 8:15 AM

What treaties did the Russian Federation sign with Ukraine though? I’m pretty sure that under Yeltsin they recognized Ukranian independence and territorial integrity.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 8:11 AM

Maybe…But it sounds like Putin is calling much of that recent history illegitimate?

I wonder what Gorbachev has to say about that?

Hmmmm….

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:15 AM

…thanks for the piece kj…a group of us were talking about that yesterday!

KOOLAID2 on March 18, 2014 at 8:16 AM

True. I think that if you look at history Kiev has as much right to claim sovereignty over Russia as Moscow does over Ukraine.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 8:15 AM

Stalin was Ukrainian.

To Putin the two are basically inseparable…and he’s telling the EU to back off…that this is an internal matter?

Merkel is in quite the fix. The EU cancelled the Turkish Pipeline.

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:17 AM

Hope you get better. I always found algebra more useful than geometry! Guess it’s different for everyone. :-)

NiteOwl on March 18, 2014 at 6:08 AM

I guess it’s a personal thing. I have an artistic mind rather than a mathematical mind. Geometry is attached to something concrete and can be used for measurement.

crankyoldlady on March 18, 2014 at 8:18 AM

I wonder what Gorbachev has to say about that?

Hmmmm….

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:15 AM

Gorbie, when he was still Premier oh the USSR, always thought that Yeltsin, as President of Russia, went behind his back and made a treaty with Ukraine to break up the Soviet Union.

Gorbachev: Crimean Referendum “Happy Event”

Former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev has hailed Crimea’s vote to join Russia as a “happy event.”

Gorbachev said in remarks carried Tuesday by online newspaper Slon.ru that the vote offered the Crimean residents the freedom of choice and justly reflected their will.

He said that Sunday’s referendum showed that “people really wanted to return to Russia” and was a “happy event.”

Gorbachev added that the Crimean referendum has set an example for people in Russian-speaking in eastern Ukraine, who also should decide their fate.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 8:20 AM

Putin is a Russian Nationalist…so he’s playing to type.

He and China would like to establish their own alternative to the geo-political influence of the EU & the USA.

They’ve been working on it for a few years.

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:20 AM

crankyoldlady on March 18, 2014 at 6:21 AM

Morning COL. Saw your post about your cat and sorry about that. One thing I have noticed is that animals and humans, especially the females, seem to experience a time of normal before they pass. Not always of course, but I have seen it time and time again. It is like they have made peace with their mortality and the preparations are complete for ending their journey.

For example, we all knew my FIL was going to pass and we had planned a fishing trip many months before. We went anyway. Got there on a Thursday night and fished Friday in the bitter cold and then it warmed up on Saturday. The entire day on Saturday, my FIL was “normal”….we ate……we drank….he told true war stories……I rehashed and added “facts” to my war stories…….we laughed…….we talked about the three Fs…..flying/fishing/(can’t type that word in public.) It turned warm and all was as it had been all those many/many years we fished together.

I knew; he knew; and we both knew the other knew. He went downhill quickly after that Saturday and passed a little while later. I did not share that day with the family until he passed because I did not want to give them false hope.

Not really sure why I typed all that? Guess your post about your cat brought back the memory of that day of fishing with my FIL. Oh yea, I am in the dog house today as my MIL passed on a March 17th and I forgot all about it and I need to find a way to get back in the good graces with the wife. Opps!!

Good grief…..I’m a ray of sunshine this morning.

HonestLib on March 18, 2014 at 8:22 AM

My take: Political Correctness: The Liberal Sword of Intolerance

kingsjester on March 18, 2014 at 7:00 AM

The way to deal with this is to stop letting ourselves be bullied.

crankyoldlady on March 18, 2014 at 8:23 AM

Gorbie, when he was still Premier oh the USSR, always thought that Yeltsin, as President of Russia, went behind his back and made a treaty with Ukraine to break up the Soviet Union.

Gorbachev: Crimean Referendum “Happy Event”

Former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev has hailed Crimea’s vote to join Russia as a “happy event.”

Gorbachev said in remarks carried Tuesday by online newspaper Slon.ru that the vote offered the Crimean residents the freedom of choice and justly reflected their will.

He said that Sunday’s referendum showed that “people really wanted to return to Russia” and was a “happy event.”

Gorbachev added that the Crimean referendum has set an example for people in Russian-speaking in eastern Ukraine, who also should decide their fate.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 8:20 AM

Well…He’s a Cossack at heart?… He’s from Stavropol Krai Region.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Південно-Східна_Європа_1684.JPG

Putin is from St. Petersburgh…formally known as Leningrad.

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:28 AM

Good grief…..I’m a ray of sunshine this morning.

HonestLib on March 18, 2014 at 8:22 AM

I’ve seen that happen too. People seem to have their best day just before they go. And everybody thinks maybe they are getting better.

This isn’t exactly the same thing but a friend of my brothers’ wanted to get together with all his buddies and they did. They sat around and drank beer and talked and the next morning his wife found him still sitting in his chair dead. Bad heart. He was only in his 30′s. Yeah, ray of sunshine here too.

crankyoldlady on March 18, 2014 at 8:31 AM

What treaties did the Russian Federation sign with Ukraine though? I’m pretty sure that under Yeltsin they recognized Ukranian independence and territorial integrity.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 8:11 AM

Wiki link:

The Belavezha Accords (Russian: Беловежские соглашения, Belarusian: Белавежскія пагадненні, Ukrainian: Біловезькі угоди) is the agreement that declared the Soviet Union effectively dissolved and established the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) in its place. It was signed at the state dacha near Viskuli in Belovezhskaya Pushcha on December 8, 1991, by the leaders of the three largest Slavic republics of the Soviet Union–Russian President Boris Yeltsin, Ukrainian president Leonid Kravchuk and Belarusian parliament chairman Stanislau Shushkevich.

While doubts remained over the authority of the leaders of three of the 12 remaining republics (the three Baltic republics had seceded in August) to dissolve the Union, according to Article 72 of the 1977 Soviet Constitution, Soviet republics had the right to secede freely from the Union. On December 12, 1991 the Supreme Soviet of the Russian SFSR ratified the accords on behalf of Russia and at the same time denounced the 1922 Treaty on the Creation of the Soviet Union, effectively seceding from the USSR.
However, in the aftermath of the failed coup in August 1991, the Communist Party of the Soviet Union had been effectively dissolved and the republics were scrambling to pull free of Moscow. By the end of the summer of 1991, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev could no longer influence events outside of the Kremlin. He was being challenged even there by Yeltsin, who by the end of the fall had taken over most of the Soviet government.
The preamble of the document stated that the Soviet Union no longer existed “as a subject of international law” or a “geopolitical reality.” It also invited other republics to join the three founding members.
These attempts to dissolve the Soviet Union were seen as illegal by what remained of the Soviet federal government. Gorbachev himself described the moves thus:
…The fate of the multinational state cannot be determined by the will of the leaders of three republics. The question should be decided only by constitutional means with the participation of all sovereign states and taking into account the will of all their citizens. The statement that Unionwide legal norms would cease to be in effect is also illegal and dangerous; it can only worsen the chaos and anarchy in society. The hastiness with which the document appeared is also of serious concern. It was not discussed by the populations nor by the Supreme Soviets of the republics in whose name it was signed. Even worse, it appeared at the moment when the draft treaty for a Union of Sovereign States, drafted by the USSR State Council, was being discussed by the parliaments of the republics.[1]
All doubts relating to the legal dissolution of the Soviet Union were removed on December 21, 1991, when the representatives of 11 of the 12 remaining Soviet republics–all except Georgia–signed the Alma-Ata Protocol, which confirmed the extinction of the Soviet Union and restated the establishment of the CIS. Given that 11 of the republics now agreed that the Soviet Union no longer existed, the plurality of member-republics required for its continuance as a federal State was no longer in place. The summit of Alma-Ata also agreed on several other practical measures consequential to the extinction of the Union.
However, for four more days a Soviet Federal Government continued to exist, and Gorbachev continued to hold control over the Kremlin as President of the Soviet Union. This ended in the early hours of December 25, 1991, when Gorbachev resigned and turned control of the Kremlin and the remaining powers of his office over to the office of the president of Russia, Yeltsin.
Gorbachev’s televised resignation speech and the subsequent lowering of the flag of the Soviet Union and hoisting of the flag of Russia on the flagpole in front of the Kremlin was broadcast around the world. On this day, President of the United States George H.W. Bush, a former head of the CIA, gave a short speech on national TV in the United States to commemorate the ending of the Cold War and to recognize the independence of the former states of the Soviet Union.[2]
Also on December 25, 1991, the Russian SFSR, now no longer a sub-national entity of the Soviet Union but a sovereign Nation State, adopted a law renaming itself the “Russian Federation” or “Russia” (both being equally official).

The following day, December 26, 1991, the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union, formally the highest governmental body of the Soviet Union, recognized the collapse of the Union and dissolved itself, an event that marked the final step in the extinction of the Soviet Union.
The Summit of Alma-Ata also issued a statement on December 21, 1991 supporting Russia’s claim to be recognized as the successor state of the Soviet Union for the purposes of membership of the United Nations. On December 25, 1991, Russian President Yeltsin informed the UN Secretary General that the Soviet Union had been dissolved and that Russia would, as its successor State, continue the Soviet Union’s membership in the United Nations. The document confirmed the credentials of the representatives of the Soviet Union as representatives of Russia, and requested that the name “Soviet Union” be changed to “Russian Federation” in all records and entries. This was a move designed to allow Russia to retain the Soviet Union’s Security Council seat, which wouldn’t have been possible if all States resulting from the breakup of the Union were regarded equal successors of the Soviet Union, or if it was regarded as having no successor State for the purpose of continuing the same UN membership. (see Russia and the United Nations). The Secretary General circulated the request, and there being no objection from any Member State, the Russian Federation took the Soviet Union’s UN seat. On January 31, 1992, Russian Federation President Yeltsin personally took part in a Security Council meeting as representative of Russia, the first Security Council meeting in which Russia, as successor State, occupied the permanent Security Council seat assigned by the UN Charter to the Soviet Union.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belavezha_Accords

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:34 AM

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:34 AM

Thanks for the link.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 8:37 AM

Good morning ladies and gentlemen. The weather is beginning to improve. When I can walk again I’ll be able to get out and about.

crankyoldlady on March 18, 2014 at 6:01 AM

Hope you heal up quickly.

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:37 AM

Thanks for the link.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 8:37 AM

If memory serves Gorbachev had quite the beef with Yeltsin…

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:39 AM

If memory serves Gorbachev had quite the beef with Yeltsin…

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:39 AM

Pure unadulterated hatred is more like it. Gorbachev promoted Yeltsin and then Yeltsin turned on him. Gorbachev then banished Yeltsin to the provinces. Yeltsin came back as Mayor of Moscow and established himself as the alternative to Gorbachev and ran for President of Russia while Russia was still part of the USSR. Then signed the Belavezha Accords after secret negotiations – Gorbachev never knew what hit him.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 9:00 AM

. . . because it is so alien to most people to understand that curved space is the exact same distance as straight space. The added curvature does not increase the distance of said distorted/curved space-time. So physicists will say that light bends because it’s easier for non-physicists to understand, as opposed to trying to explain how space-time can curve without the distance involved increasing.

oscarwilde on March 18, 2014 at 3:04 AM

Could have used you in a discussion about God the other day. :)

The first point to make is that while photons (little packets of light energy) do not have mass, they do have momentum, and a change in momentum yields a force, so in actual fact light is able to physically interact with matter. However, the key to this question came when Einstein developed his theory of general relativity. Photons of light are not technically affected by large gravitational fields; instead space and time become distorted around incredibly massive objects and the light simply follows this distorted curvature of space.

http://www.spaceanswers.com/deep-space/4186/if-photons-of-light-have-no-mass-how-can-space-be-bent-by-gravity/#sthash.Utsb5RPG.dpuf

No more alien than the idea that a thing without mass might have “momentum.” She gave it a shot though.

g2m — and that Wilde person — and INC, and basically any of you mortals, if you are into all that ridiculous gibberish, you might like this: The Advent of the Algorithm. It’s a step off the path but there are a couple of ideas floating in there that will light up your little . . . “brain” things.

. . . though personally I wish you people would quit ruining HA with all the pointless off-topic chit chat. This is a serious political blog and people come here to read the — *yawn* — etc. etc.

[PS: Axe ♥ RWM -- Have a great day, Sophie Ro! :) xxx ]

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 9:04 AM

*holds up prism*

How weird.

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 9:17 AM

If memory serves Gorbachev had quite the beef with Yeltsin…

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 8:39 AM

Pure unadulterated hatred is more like it. Gorbachev promoted Yeltsin and then Yeltsin turned on him. Gorbachev then banished Yeltsin to the provinces. Yeltsin came back as Mayor of Moscow and established himself as the alternative to Gorbachev and ran for President of Russia while Russia was still part of the USSR. Then signed the Belavezha Accords after secret negotiations – Gorbachev never knew what hit him.

kcewa on March 18, 2014 at 9:00 AM

nice summary

workingclass artist on March 18, 2014 at 9:29 AM

*accelerates to 0.75C*

*turns on headlights*

OMG

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 10:34 AM

Hope your trip was cool. Nothing happened here, nothing out of the ordinary.

Schadenfreude on March 18, 2014 at 12:30 AM

laffs..I missed this post last night..
not exactly the way I heard of your HA lately..
but its good to see your face…
and read your words.. cheers mr Schad

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 12:08 PM

INC on March 18, 2014 at 4:37 AM
thatsafactjack on March 18, 2014 at 8:14 AM

thank you both for your kind words..
I didn’t say it nearly as well as you both did..
science, space, physics, reaching for new ideas
has always been built on the building blocks
of those that came before…
sometimes you clip a little 17th century Russian theory..
to disprove a 16th century French Astronomer.. or
to help prove a 18th century German Physics theorem ..
really tough to do longhand…in a post..
OW has… and who am I to say he’s wrong or right..
I never say never about space… I simply don’t ‘know’ .. few do.
as i’ve said before I design bits…I am no writer..
my bits mostly work and my writing sucks.. so I picked the correct profession..
when I went to JPL the first task I got was Martian Rock Crusher..
I wasn’t concerned with ‘if the big bang was a myth or not’..
im thinking… how much force do I need to crack a Martian rock..
how many rocks will be sampled.. how clean must the hopper
be between samples…how to clean it… spare tools..
lite on theory.. more product focused.. sample acquisition..
oh and the MSL is doing soil samples NOW of the surface of Mars..
so…. it works..

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 12:32 PM

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 9:04 AM

OW and I clearly are not lucky or fortunate as you are to
have found someone as wonderfully bright and kind
and Ms Sophie..
“pointless off-topic chit chat” about space, or whatever,
might be all we have left…
you wouldn’t deny us that now …would ya??..
thank you for another ‘Axe’s books I should read”…cheers

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 12:43 PM

Assume the position and prepare to be ungently fisked.

OW and I clearly are not lucky or fortunate as you are to
have found someone as wonderfully bright and kind
and Ms Sophie..

Being pounded occasionally into the ground underneath a liquefying SparkPlus is a small price to pay. :)

Her skin is like corn silk and her mind sounds like a thunderstorm gathering in the distance. She truly digs me, and her flower truly had an integral multiple of “he loves me” petals.

“pointless off-topic chit chat” about space, or whatever,
might be all we have left…
you wouldn’t deny us that now …would ya??..

I think I can safely say I speak for . . . six or seven people when I say, YOU SHOULD BE BANNED IMMEDIATELY.

thank you for another ‘Axe’s books I should read”…cheers

Dang it, this is not like Lord of the Rings. :) Which you should read. The Advent of the Algorithm is about math and science and reason and life, and totally up your alley.

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 1:10 PM

Forgot to finish it.

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 12:43 PM

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 1:11 PM

BANNED..??

Schoouch…that seems a tad harsh..

any other choices??…

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 1:22 PM

The Advent of the Algorithm is about math and science and reason and life, and totally up your alley.

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 1:10 PM

I read the Amazon page on it as well as the reviews
so I know its about math and science..
I can read..
I just cant write..
“Her skin is like corn silk and her mind sounds like a thunderstorm gathering in the distance.”
your just rubbing it in now….
why don’t you just gig me with a trident for sport…

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 1:28 PM

any other choices??…

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 1:22 PM

Bluegill (old nick: “Gabby”) chose electrical pulse reprogramming.

The technology isn’t entirely proven, yet.

I just cant write..
“Her skin is like corn silk and her mind sounds like a thunderstorm gathering in the distance.”
your just rubbing it in now….
why don’t you just gig me with a trident for sport…

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 1:28 PM

You’ve said something like that before. :) You’re selling yourself short. I’ve read your stuff. I doubt there’s any complex idea you couldn’t express clearly. — Is it a matter of tools bugging you or something? Tools.

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 2:16 PM

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 2:16 PM

electrical pulse reprogramming from axe.
anti global warming reprogramming from liberal Harvard professors.
ACA jail time and reprogramming from the IRS..
and then finally off t the BHO gulag for more reprogramming..

im not sure how much reprogramming I can take..

and then…tools
so after i spent a lifetime learning to draw
you want me to spend another lifetime learning to write..
(might be a long while till you hear from me again)
I can draw every part on the car you own or the last plane you flew on..
and I will let you “bright” people write a glowing advert to sell it..

how about that?

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 2:32 PM

I can draw every part on the car you own or the last plane you flew on..
and I will let you “bright” people write a glowing advert to sell it..

how about that?

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 2:32 PM

Not sure what to do with this. It sounds suddenly drunk and pissy. You said you couldn’t write, not me. I said you could. And I am bright, but I don’t know who “you ‘bright’ people” is, or why you scare-quoted ‘bright,’ or why you didn’t include yourself.

Maybe I misunderstood you. I’ll leave you alone.

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 2:55 PM

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 2:55 PM

I admire those of you that have that talent…greatly..
so I consider writers…bright..

words are the most powerful thing..

see ive even screwed this up…im sorry

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 2:59 PM

if im pissy at anyone…its me
for just reading Shakespeare cliff notes
and not much of the text..

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:02 PM

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 2:59 PM

I guess I did misunderstand. I apologize.

It was like this:

‘I will come up with the specifications, and you “talented” people can draw it. How about that?’

But then, I thought Romney was going to beat Obama. So . . . there are limits. :)

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 3:06 PM

Axe on March 18, 2014 at 3:06 PM

cute little pictures of nuts and bolts don’t change minds

words do.. props given

and I also thought Romney was going to beat the fraud in the WH..
hangs head

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:09 PM

the 270ish words in the Gettysburg address changed the nation..
(I have read of at least 5 different accounts)
no one knows or cares who made the train it was written on..

going2mars on March 18, 2014 at 3:36 PM

Jackie,
You understood exactly when I meant. Thanks so much for the backup!

Axe,
I think my son told me about that book. I’ll have to see if he ever read it or if the library has a copy.

g2m,
I sit back and appreciate that you and Oscar doing a physics riff.

NiteOwl,
Slogans are usually lower, not higher ground. I also loved abstract algebra—again because of the proofs. We went to the bare bones of algebra and had to prove things were true that seemed glaringly obvious.

crankyoldlady,
There’s incredible artistry in math and science. See the golden ratio. Some appreciate the visual, and others appreciate the structure. Each has its own beauty.

INC on March 21, 2014 at 12:15 AM

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