Mystery deepens: Missing Malaysian jet reportedly flew hundreds of miles in the wrong direction

posted at 3:21 pm on March 11, 2014 by Allahpundit

And by “wrong direction,” I mean the opposite direction. It was headed north to Beijing, then suddenly the transponder was switched off and it swung all the way around to the left until it was flying southwest, where it continued on for 350 miles. It didn’t blow up in mid-air.

Which, it seems, means one of two things. Could be that the pilot, for unknown reasons, decided he had to turn around and try to make it back to the airport at Kuala Lumpur, then simply flew off course. In that case, though, why would he turn off the transponder — and, presumably, the other navigation equipment? If the equipment malfunctioned, how did the plane manage to fly hundreds of miles after the malfunction?

Alternate theory: It was hijacked. Police are skeptical about terrorism here, though. They’ve all but ruled out involvement by the two Iranians who were carrying stolen passports. Evidently that’s not uncommon on flights in southeast Asia.

Could the pilots have done it deliberately? Why?

“It changed course after Kota Bharu and took a lower altitude. It made it into the Malacca Strait,” the senior military officer, who has been briefed on investigations, told Reuters…

Malaysia’s Berita Harian newspaper quoted air force chief Rodzali Daud as saying the plane was last detected at 2.40 a.m. by military radar near the island of Pulau Perak at the northern end of the Strait of Malacca. It was flying about 1,000 meters lower than its previous altitude, he was quoted as saying…

The effect of turning off the transponder is to make the aircraft inert to secondary radar, so civil controllers cannot identify it. Secondary radar interrogates the transponder and gets information about the plane’s identity, speed and height.

It would however still be visible to primary radar, which is used by militaries.

Lots of mini-mysteries here. Why did it take the Malaysian military four days to let everyone know that the jet didn’t vanish south of Vietnam, as the world had been led to believe? Why were they searching in that area at all? More importantly, is it even true that the plane made it all the way back to the Strait of Malacca? According to the NYT, no:

Adding to the confusion, Tengku Sariffuddin Tengku Ahmad, spokesman for the prime minister’s office, said in a telephone interview that he had checked with senior military officials, who told him there was no evidence that the plane had recrossed the Malaysian peninsula, only that it may have attempted to turn back.

“As far as they know, except for the air turn-back, there is no new development,” Mr. Tengku Sariffuddin, adding that the reported remarks by the air force chief were “not true.”

Malaysia Airlines, meanwhile, offered a third, conflicting account. In a statement, the airline said authorities were “looking at a possibility” that the plane was headed to Subang, an airport outside Kuala Lumpur that handles mainly domestic flights.

Follow the last link and scroll down to the Times’s map to see how far apart the old search area and the new search area are. Yet another mini-mystery: Is it significant that some of the passengers’ cell phones were still online as of Sunday afternoon? NBC says no, not really. WaPo seems more intrigued:

One of the most eerie rumors came after a few relatives said they were able to call the cellphones of their loved ones or find them on a Chinese instant messenger service called QQ that indicated that their phones were still somehow online.

A migrant worker in the room said that several other workers from his company were on the plane, including his brother-in-law. Among them, the QQ accounts of three still showed that they were online, he said Sunday afternoon.

Adding to the mystery, other relatives in the room said that when they dialed some passengers’ numbers, they seemed to get ringing tones on the other side even though the calls were not picked up.

Were there no working onboard-phones on a modern jet like the Boeing 777? If it was a hijacking and the passengers knew it, someone would have called someone, no? Either they didn’t know or the plane crashed somewhere before they figured it out.

Here’s your thread for irresponsible speculation. If you want to help look for evidence of the jet in the Strait of Malacca, ABC says this site is the place to be.


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Do you know anything about the subject matter at all? It doesn’t seem like you do. What are you trying to say?

A radio signal transmitted by a flight recorder is completely different than a sonic signal emitted by a flight recorder. A radio signal is useless underwater – even shallow water. So, if the flight recorder is underwater, then the sonic “ping” is what would be used to locate it. I’d like to know the frequency of the sonic ping. Low frequency pings will have more range than higher frequency pings, but there is more clutter in lower frequency noise. That’s why I’m curious. I’d love to know the power of the ping, too, but that’s probably asking for too much.

blink on March 11, 2014 at 4:15 PM

I know everything :P

Seriously tho, I do know flight recorders emit these pings, and that being underwater they do not travel very far…in relation to the distances it would travel in air. As for the specific frequencies used by this or other aircraft, I’m as clueless as you are. I’m sure a google search would reveal that, I can’t imagine it’s classified information.

JetBoy on March 11, 2014 at 4:19 PM

Obviously, that wasn’t going to happen with the datum being 350 miles off.

blink on March 11, 2014 at 4:16 PM

Yep, agreed.

bernzright777 on March 11, 2014 at 4:20 PM

Blink, I doubt it’s a very low-frequency “ping”… pinging takes a lot of energy, a black box is limited in volume and hence power… it’s a low powered device allowing you to home in on the box, once you are close… and the sea is very “noisy” spotting the box, on sonar is tougher than spotting a plane in the air with radar…

JFKY on March 11, 2014 at 4:21 PM

It was the dang Joooooos.

Galtian on March 11, 2014 at 4:22 PM

Hijackers usually want something and would claim credit for it and make some demands by now, if they survived. Maybe like someone else said, it was a hijacking foiled by passengers and the plane went down, but there would have been a huge fireball if it hit land, and a huge impact on water from 30,000 ft would have broken it into a million pieces. After four days something would have washed ashore somewhere. Maybe. But then there’s the phones. Do we know if that is actually true, that phones were ringing and showing people as being online? That’s really creepy.

scalleywag on March 11, 2014 at 4:22 PM

It will be interesting to see who was on the flight manifest.

I’m not buying that it was an accident. The transponder was turned off, it was off course, and there is no wreckage (as of yet).

I’m not buying that it was terrorism. The point of terrorism is to carry out some kind of political extortion using terror. In order to do this, you have to cause terror and make your motives in causing the terror known. If it was in conjunction with a terrorist group, someone would have claimed it by now. If it was a lone wolf, he would have mailed a manifesto or video to the media before he left. Nothing like this has appeared.

My guess is that it’s a kidnapping. Some CEO was on the plane and he is being held for ransom. The kidnappers are making the corporation avoid going to the police.

Glenn Jericho on March 11, 2014 at 4:22 PM

JetBoy’s plane knowhow >> JetBoy’s football acumen

philw1776 on March 11, 2014 at 4:17 PM

ಠ_ಠ

JetBoy on March 11, 2014 at 4:22 PM

It’s all coming together, man!

Vanceone on March 11, 2014 at 4:06 PM

Hilarious!

crankyoldlady on March 11, 2014 at 4:23 PM

Cell phones could have been left home, stolen prior to flight, or could even be on forward to another line. It is very easy to know if a cell phone is actually on, and the general region where it is.

OregonPolitician on March 11, 2014 at 4:24 PM

A radio beacon range would be LOS (line of sight) which could be over a hundred miles for an aircraft looking for the beacon – IF the beacon antenna is above water. Radio beacon range would be zero if the antenna is underwater.

blink on March 1

Talking about the underwater sonar beacon that pings. Single digit miles range. You gotta be looking in the right places.

philw1776 on March 11, 2014 at 4:25 PM

I’m not buying that it was terrorism. The point of terrorism is to carry out some kind of political extortion using terror. In order to do this, you have to cause terror and make your motives in causing the terror known. If it was in conjunction with a terrorist group, someone would have claimed it by now

Glenn Jericho on March 11, 2014 at 4:22 PM

PanAm 103 ring a bell?

bernzright777 on March 11, 2014 at 4:26 PM

My guess is that it’s a kidnapping. Some CEO was on the plane and he is being held for ransom. The kidnappers are making the corporation avoid going to the police.

Glenn Jericho on March 11, 2014 at 4:22 PM

We’ll have to stay tuned for the next episode of ‘The Blacklist’

DarkCurrent on March 11, 2014 at 4:28 PM

I think it’s somewhere in Indonesia on an abandoned WWII runway.

However, Ancient astronaut theorists suggest….

cktheman on March 11, 2014 at 4:28 PM

Wait, are you sure this wasn’t Hz instead of kHz?

blink on March 11, 2014 at 4:24 PM

KHz according to what I found. See my post right after this one.

bernzright777 on March 11, 2014 at 4:28 PM

This story keeps getting more bizarre by the hour and I’m willing to accept almost any conspiracy theory short of aliens from Venus transporting them to a secret island bases in the Andaman Islands where they’re breakfasting with Jimmy Hoffa, Judge Crater and Amelia Earhart.

MaiDee on March 11, 2014 at 4:31 PM

It’s not classified, just obscure. Google is cluttered right now by the news of this incident.

But someone on here claims to have found it to be in the 30Hz to 40Hz range.

blink on March 11, 2014 at 4:22 PM

I found this:

Source

Underwater Beacons

All commercial air transport (CAT) aircraft are fitted with underwater locator beacons to assist in the relocation of black box flight data recorders (FDRs) and cockpit voice recorders (CVRs). These beacons are free-running pingers transmitting at an acoustic frequency of 37.5kHz with a claimed battery life of at least 30 days. The maximum detection range is determined primarily by the frequency and the transmission power, with an initial source level of 160.5dB re 1µPa @ 1m, which reduces to 157.0dB re 1µPa @ 1m, after 30 days. The quoted maximum detection range is 2-3km, although this is influenced by environmental conditions. The equipment used to search for the beacons can be deployed from a surface vessel, on a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) or operated by a diver. The detection equipment acts only as a direction finder, however, with no indication being given of the range to the pinger.

JetBoy on March 11, 2014 at 4:32 PM

JetBoy on March 11, 2014 at 4:32 PM

Thanks, I posted that about 20 mins ago

bernzright777 on March 11, 2014 at 4:33 PM

dmacleo on March 11,2014 at 3:50 PM

I’ve been thinking the same thing…

SweetSensationalist on March 11, 2014 at 4:33 PM

Many, many years ago I remember a movie in which a plane disappeared never to be seen again. It had been flown to an isolated airfield, I think in Africa. The passengers were all killed and the plane was equipped with a nuke. When the time was right a plane flying from Europe to Washington DC was blown up and the bomb carrying one took its place. Maybe somebody was watching old movies.

Dr. Frank Enstine on March 11, 2014 at 4:36 PM

Just because that factoid has been repeated a few thousand times in the past 3 days doesn’t make it true. Debris of AF447 was spotted one day after its disappearance. 5 days later 2 bodies were recovered, and 6 days later the part of a vertical stabilizer was recovered.

It took 2 years to recover AF447′s black boxes, not to locate the area of the wreck.

chimney sweep on March 11, 2014 at 4:00 PM

That’s all well and good, but it still took two years to discover the main body of wreckage. And this is Malaysia searching off the coast of Vietnam. I consider the French more competent and open about their recovery mission any day of the week.

NotCoach on March 11, 2014 at 4:37 PM

A really old Elvis decided that it was time to finally check out, in a way that no one would ever discover his actual gravesite…….

Vanceone on March 11, 2014 at 4:38 PM

The Langoliers

Goody2Shoes on March 11, 2014 at 4:01 PM

Dang – beat me to it.
So I got nuthin’ now…..

dentarthurdent on March 11, 2014 at 4:39 PM

JetBoy on March 11, 2014 at 4:32 PM

Thanks, I posted that about 20 mins ago

bernzright777 on March 11, 2014 at 4:33 PM

Sorry…missed it.

Always a bridesmaid, never a bride.

JetBoy on March 11, 2014 at 4:46 PM

JetBoy: LOL!!

bernzright777 on March 11, 2014 at 4:47 PM

Bush’s fault.

jennifernaz on March 11, 2014 at 4:47 PM

Bush’s fault.

jennifernaz on March 11, 2014 at 4:47 PM

But shared responsibility with

*White racists
*Conservativ4es
*Global warming enablers

MaiDee on March 11, 2014 at 4:54 PM

This is all distraction for something bigger that is happenning right now. There was no plane in the first place. I am going to put on my tinfoil hat and go sit in the corner :)

SoCalInfidel on March 11, 2014 at 4:55 PM

But then there’s the phones. Do we know if that is actually true, that phones were ringing and showing people as being online? That’s really creepy.

scalleywag on March 11, 2014 at 4:22 PM

I leave my facebook and gmail logged in all the time on my home computer. If I left right now and something happened to me, it would show me as online for quite a while.

cptacek on March 11, 2014 at 4:59 PM

My guess is that it’s a kidnapping. Some CEO was on the plane and he is being held for ransom. The kidnappers are making the corporation avoid going to the police.

Glenn Jericho on March 11, 2014 at 4:22 PM

Naw, it was aliens thousands of feet up that caught the plane in their capture beam, and whisked the whole plane away up to their base station on the dark side of the moon. The plane and passengers are currently in the theta x galaxy being examined and studied by a superior race of beings. They will be returned in due time without the slightest memory of their adventure.

Hey, could happen, and it’s about as good a theory as has been posited thus far.

NOMOBO on March 11, 2014 at 5:01 PM

Has anyone checked ebay for a slightly used Boeing 777 Dreamliner?

Flyovercountry on March 11, 2014 at 5:01 PM

I pray that the reports of a transponder being turned off, the flight changing direction and phones ringing are incorrect. A civilian airliner in the wrong hands would serve as an excellent tool for real terror.

If a government or terrorist organization wanted to deliver a nuke but didn’t have access to an ICBM a reconfigured civilian airliner would give them the capability and anonymity. Few governments would have the stones to shoot down an airliner pretending to be in distress before it was too late.

Come and take it on March 11, 2014 at 5:03 PM

With the transponder shut off, but no phone calls from passengers indicating a hijacking, it sounds like the pilot, or another crewman in the cockpit, went rouge and crashed the plane a la EgyptAir Flight 990 back in 1999.

Nomennovum on March 11, 2014 at 5:03 PM

Wreckage and luggage float, as do the departed. –just remember TWA 800…

So this entire episode stinks like a 4 day old fish. Best wild guess.….Iran is sending a message to the Chinese to back off or stay out of some nasty situation.

ursa5000 on March 11, 2014 at 5:03 PM

Has anyone checked ebay for a slightly used Boeing 777 Dreamliner?

Flyovercountry on March 11, 2014 at 5:01 PM

Thread winner.

crankyoldlady on March 11, 2014 at 5:04 PM

Obviously, someone neglected to push the button again. They really do need to come up with some way to automate that process.

Or maybe they didn’t exactly forget, but the decision was too complex and they got bogged down thinking about the deeper implications.

[Locke enters 42, and is about to press the execute button.]

LOCKE: You do it, Jack.

JACK: What?

LOCKE: You have to do it.

JACK: You do it yourself, John.

LOCKE: No, you saw the film, Jack. This is a two person job, at least.

JACK, SAYID, and KATE (in unison, sotto voce): Wait, what?

SAYID: This argument is irrelevant.

JACK: Sayid, don’t.

SAYID: Jack.

JACK: Don’t. It’s not real. Look, you want to push the button, you do it yourself.

LOCKE: If it’s not real, then what are you doing here, Jack? Why did you come back? Why do you find it so hard to believe?!

JACK: Why do you find it so easy?!

LOCKE: It’s never been easy!

[The timer shows 1:04. Another, more insistent alarm starts to sound.]

JACK: Wait a sec. If it’s never been easy, then why did you ask me, just five seconds ago, why it’s so hard?

LOCKE: Huh? Oh, right, I guess that didn’t really make much sense.

JACK: You know, Locke, you’re a sharp guy and all, but sometimes I get the sense you say these things just so you can feel like you came up with a profound rejoinder, rather than out of a genuine desire to contribute to the conversation.

LOCKE: That hurts, Jack. Anyway, how about we agree to disagree, just for the moment, and just push the button as a sort of Pascal’s Wager kind of thing. If we decide later that it isn’t real, we can always stop pushing it. We’ll get lots of chances – once every four minutes in fact..

JACK: I guess you have a point. Ok, let’s go push the button. (I’m still a little confused about the two-man job thing)

SAYID: It’s too late, the timer hit 0 two minutes ago while you were talking. Kate and I would have gone ahead and pushed it, but we were both too entranced with your bizarre discussion. Quite frankly, both of you guys torture reason and common sense more ruthlessly than I torture human beings.

KATE: Hey, what’s that rumbling sound?

All 4: Oh, cr@p…

RINO in Name Only on March 11, 2014 at 5:06 PM

Wreckage and luggage float, as do the departed. –just remember TWA 800…

ursa5000 on March 11, 2014 at 5:03 PM

And seat cushions.

Best airline safety brief I ever heard was on a Westpac plane headed from Colorado Springs to Las Vegas (partial here): “In the unlikely event of an emergency water landing, your seat cushion can be used as a flotation device. And if that should actually happen, please feel free to keep it as a souvenir from your flight…”

dentarthurdent on March 11, 2014 at 5:23 PM

Somebody on that flight invented one of these.

http://mst3k.wikia.com/wiki/Time_Chasers

moo on March 11, 2014 at 5:28 PM

Has anyone noticed that no terrorists are taking credit (wrongly or rightly) for this?

It seems to me in the past every initially unexplained mishap has multiple terrorist organizations taking credit for them. Now? Not so much…..jes’ sayin’

E9RET on March 11, 2014 at 5:29 PM

RAAAACISM!

wyntre9 on March 11, 2014 at 5:37 PM

Has anyone noticed that no terrorists are taking credit (wrongly or rightly) for this?

It seems to me in the past every initially unexplained mishap has multiple terrorist organizations taking credit for them. Now? Not so much…..jes’ sayin’

E9RET on March 11, 2014 at 5:29 PM

No one claimed credit for Pan Am 103 in 1988.

Del Dolemonte on March 11, 2014 at 5:39 PM

Has anyone checked ebay for a slightly used Boeing 777 Dreamliner?

Flyovercountry on March 11, 2014 at 5:01 PM

http://tinyurl.com/osf8fr7

Nomennovum on March 11, 2014 at 5:43 PM

There is only one rational, scientific explanation for all this: Aliens.

Hayabusa on March 11, 2014 at 5:43 PM

Has anyone noticed that no terrorists are taking credit (wrongly or rightly) for this?

It seems to me in the past every initially unexplained mishap has multiple terrorist organizations taking credit for them. Now? Not so much…..jes’ sayin’

E9RET on March 11, 2014 at 5:29 PM

As we’ve seen recently, the terrorists of today ain’t the brightest bulbs on the tree. In fact, I think almost all of the terrorists worth a damn are already enjoying their virgins.

So, I suggest it was an act of terrorism, and this bunch forgot to leave someone behind to take the credit.

BobMbx on March 11, 2014 at 5:44 PM

No one claimed credit for Pan Am 103 in 1988.

Del Dolemonte on March 11, 2014 at 5:39 PM

According to a CIA analysis dated 22 December 1988, several groups were quick to claim responsibility in telephone calls in the United States and Europe:
A male caller claimed that a group called the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution had destroyed the plane in retaliation for Iran Air Flight 655 being shot down by U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf the previous July.
A caller claiming to represent the Islamic Jihad Organization told ABC News in New York that the group had planted the bomb to commemorate Christmas.
Other callers claimed responsibility for the “Ulster Defence League”.[42][43]
Another anonymous caller claimed the plane had been downed by Mossad.[42][43]

bernzright777 on March 11, 2014 at 5:45 PM

This story has knocked Russia/Ukraine/Crimea off the front page for five days running and looks set to do so for many more.

Either Putin had a hand in it or he’s the world’s luckiest dictator.

cool breeze on March 11, 2014 at 5:48 PM

Heard on the radio earlier that several terror-claims of responsibility had been received and were being checked out by CIA-FBI and foreign services. It may be that the claims are not credible enough to have made big news. It may also be that the terrorists, if there are any, simply don’t have their own TV network like al Jazeera to publicize those claims.

slickwillie2001 on March 11, 2014 at 5:52 PM

Many, many years ago I remember a movie in which a plane disappeared never to be seen again. It had been flown to an isolated airfield, I think in Africa. The passengers were all killed and the plane was equipped with a nuke. When the time was right a plane flying from Europe to Washington DC was blown up and the bomb carrying one took its place. Maybe somebody was watching old movies.

Dr. Frank Enstine on March 11, 2014 at 4:36 PM

Maybe the Discovery Channel repo team scored it.

slickwillie2001 on March 11, 2014 at 5:53 PM

Could it have been a major electrical malfunction which shut off the transponder and screwed up the navigation system?

blammm on March 11, 2014 at 5:59 PM

Just some thoughts.

1. Malaysia is one of the world’s maritime piracy hot-spots. One reason is that the local authorities are easily bought off by said pirates. It’s possible that some of the pirate gangs might have decided to branch out into aircraft hijacking, especially if they had intel that a high-value package or two was aboard in the security locker. This would probably require an “inside man” at the airline, a good hacker, or both; I suspect any pirates planning a coup like this would have both in hand up front.

The odd flight pattern (if that southbound skin-paint with no ident was in fact the plane) strongly suggests that the plane was taken into the Malaysian northern coastal areas, aka Pirate Central. Its disappearance off radar could indicate a crash after a struggle in the cockpit; then again, it could indicate a descent to below 300 meters to deliberately get lost in surface return.

The plane could be crashlanded at any number of fields around there (many of them dating back to WW2), or ditched in shallow water near shore. The plan would probably involve concealment of the aircraft, but not it being “reusable”.

If this is what happened, the crew and passengers have probably already been terminated, on the old buccaneer principle of “dead men tell no tales”.

2. I suspect the cellphone activity is a non-critical item. Once the names of the missing were posted, half the phone hacker/thieves in South Asia were probably trying to “steal” the accounts. Also, in the scenario listed under (1), hackers could be “playing” the accounts to lay a false trail. The old KGB term “wolf meat” comes to mind.

3. Keep in mind that substantial elements of the pirate gangs are Muslim. And one of the men identified as using a false passport was an Iranian national allegedly seeking asylum in the West. A better cover for a covert op along these lines would be hard to come up with, for an operative whose real nationality could be determined by security forces.

4. As for serious far-out speculation, a high-value cargo (say, gemstones) would be nearly-irresistible target for the local “sporting gentry”. And such a haul, in the hands of various radical groups, could provide a source of funding for terrorist activities that would be entirely deniable by their “patrons”. Remember, the European Marxist groups of the Seventies (Baader-Meinhof, Brigade Rosse, etc.) mainly financed their activities with bank robberies, a trick they picked up from the French rightist OAS a decade earlier.

/just my opinion, take it for what it’s worth

clear ether

eon

eon on March 11, 2014 at 6:03 PM

Just some thoughts.

1. Malaysia is one of the world’s maritime piracy hot-spots. One reason is that the local authorities are easily bought off by said pirates. It’s possible that some of the pirate gangs might have decided to branch out into aircraft hijacking, especially if they had intel that a high-value package or two was aboard in the security locker. This would probably require an “inside man” at the airline, a good hacker, or both; I suspect any pirates planning a coup like this would have both in hand up front.

The odd flight pattern (if that southbound skin-paint with no ident was in fact the plane) strongly suggests that the plane was taken into the Malaysian northern coastal areas, aka Pirate Central. Its disappearance off radar could indicate a crash after a struggle in the cockpit; then again, it could indicate a descent to below 300 meters to deliberately get lost in surface return.

The plane could be crashlanded at any number of fields around there (many of them dating back to WW2), or ditched in shallow water near shore. The plan would probably involve concealment of the aircraft, but not it being “reusable”.

If this is what happened, the crew and passengers have probably already been terminated, on the old buccaneer principle of “dead men tell no tales”.

2. I suspect the cellphone activity is a non-critical item. Once the names of the missing were posted, half the phone hacker/thieves in South Asia were probably trying to “steal” the accounts. Also, in the scenario listed under (1), hackers could be “playing” the accounts to lay a false trail. The old KGB term “wolf meat” comes to mind.

3. Keep in mind that substantial elements of the pirate gangs are Muslim. And one of the men identified as using a false passport was an Iranian national allegedly seeking asylum in the West. A better cover for a covert op along these lines would be hard to come up with, for an operative whose real nationality could be determined by security forces.

4. As for serious far-out speculation, a high-value cargo (say, gemstones) would be nearly-irresistible target for the local “sporting gentry”. And such a haul, in the hands of various radical groups, could provide a source of funding for terrorist activities that would be entirely deniable by their “patrons”. Remember, the European Marxist groups of the Seventies (Baader-Meinhof, Brigade Rosse, etc.) mainly financed their activities with bank robberies, a trick they picked up from the French rightist OAS a decade earlier.

/just my opinion, take it for what it’s worth.

clear ether

eon

eon on March 11, 2014 at 6:04 PM

Missing Malaysia airline pilot SMOKED and chatted with us in the cockpit, reveals young blonde passenger

A young woman claims she spent an entire flight in 2011 in the cockpit being entertained by one of the pilots who was flying the missing Malaysian Airlines plane while smoking.
Jonti Roos, who is who is currently living in Melbourne during a year-long stay in Australia, said she and her friend Jaan Maree were waiting to board their flight from Phuket to Kuala Lumpur three years ago when two pilots plucked them out of the queue and asked them if they would like to ride in the cockpit.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2578146/Young-blonde-says-missing-Malaysia-Airlines-pilot-invited-friend-ride-cockpit-entire-flight-2011.html#ixzz2vgbwr3qS
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

kcewa on March 11, 2014 at 4:03 PM

So much for the suicidal jihadi pilots theory. These two look like party boys.

slickwillie2001 on March 11, 2014 at 6:07 PM

Sorry about the double post. It said “duplicate comment” the first time, but didn’t show any post. I added a period, thinking it would accept it as a single comment. It did- a second one.

Please get this fixed, tech staff.

Thank you.

cheers

eon

eon on March 11, 2014 at 6:07 PM

eon on March 11, 2014 at 6:03 PM

Now that is a conspiracy theory worthy of Hollyweird.

It is also the secret too big to keep.

cozmo on March 11, 2014 at 6:09 PM

Many, many years ago I remember a movie in which a plane disappeared never to be seen again. It had been flown to an isolated airfield, I think in Africa. The passengers were all killed and the plane was equipped with a nuke. When the time was right a plane flying from Europe to Washington DC was blown up and the bomb carrying one took its place. Maybe somebody was watching old movies.

Dr. Frank Enstine on March 11, 2014 at 4:36 PM

1978 movie, “Evening in Byzantium” with Glenn Ford. I didn’t watch the movie but did actually see the climatic moments towards the end.

Russ808 on March 11, 2014 at 6:20 PM

Inter-dimensional Wormholes.

trigon on March 11, 2014 at 6:22 PM

The Mk-1 magnetic compass would have still worked. They should have been able to find an airport via dead reckoning – unless they were completely incompetent – which is certainly a possibility. But it’s suspect that it’s now being claimed the aircraft headed through a strait.

blink on March 11, 2014 at 6:21 PM

Did Captain Sum Ting Wong of Korea by chance have a Malaysian half brother?

dentarthurdent on March 11, 2014 at 6:26 PM

Again in case y’all MISSED IT ABOVE if you want to help search for this plane from the comfort of your computer go to

http://www.tomnod.com/nod/challenge/malaysiaairsar2014

SgtSVJones on March 11, 2014 at 6:28 PM

How heavy is a 777? Would it be able to land on asphalt or would it have to land on reinforced concrete?

How many smaller airports in SE Asia would be able to handle one?

TX-eye on March 11, 2014 at 6:32 PM

You’re all wrong. It’s obviously the start of the rapture.

Tim LeHaye

Yankee Doodle on March 11, 2014 at 6:35 PM

How many smaller airports in SE Asia would be able to handle one?

TX-eye on March 11, 2014 at 6:32 PM

Since the original destination was Beijing – draw a circle for that range to see where it could possible be if it was hijacked – basically anywhere in Australia, India, Sri Lanka, just about all of southern Asia.
Not likely, but technically speaking, it really could be almost anywhere in that hemisphere.

dentarthurdent on March 11, 2014 at 6:38 PM

Has anyone checked ebay for a slightly used Boeing 777 Dreamliner?

Flyovercountry on March 11, 2014 at 5:01 PM

You win the thread. :)

nullrouted on March 11, 2014 at 6:41 PM

How frequent do people get on international flights with someone else’s passport..?

d1carter on March 11, 2014 at 6:49 PM

d1carter on March 11, 2014 at 6:49 PM

I don’t really want to know the answer to that.

cozmo on March 11, 2014 at 6:52 PM

How heavy is a 777? Would it be able to land on asphalt or would it have to land on reinforced concrete?

How many smaller airports in SE Asia would be able to handle one?

TX-eye on March 11, 2014 at 6:32 PM

My guess is that you can land on just about anything, so long as you’re not worried about the condition of the landing gear afterward.

Taking off would be another issue.

They’re landing on pneumatic tires, so the contact pressure can only be so high, right?

TexasDan on March 11, 2014 at 6:58 PM

If you were stealing a plane for its cargo, it sure seems like the hard way to get your hands on whatever-it-is. If you could get pilots on your payroll to steal a plane full of passengers, surely you could get baggage people on your payroll and just boost the stuff while it’s on the ground, no?

The idea of stealing the plane for the plane itself seems more plausible but still incredibly far-fetched.

TexasDan on March 11, 2014 at 7:00 PM

How heavy is a 777? Would it be able to land on asphalt or would it have to land on reinforced concrete?

How many smaller airports in SE Asia would be able to handle one?

TX-eye on March 11, 2014 at 6:32 PM

My guess is that you can land on just about anything, so long as you’re not worried about the condition of the landing gear afterward.

Taking off would be another issue.

They’re landing on pneumatic tires, so the contact pressure can only be so high, right?

TexasDan on March 11, 2014 at 6:58 PM

You’re right, TexasDan.

I’ve got a life-long friend who flies 47′s with a worldwide freight service. The triple 7′s can land in any space about 8,000 feet long. That’s a mile and a half. The flatter the better; taking off however, you need around 12,000 feet.

The smoother the space the better. A small shrub could royally mess things up if it hit the nose gear or burst a tire.

This….is one of the weirdest things imaginable.

I wish I never saw The Langoliers.

itsspideyman on March 11, 2014 at 7:06 PM

4. As for serious far-out speculation, a high-value cargo (say, gemstones) would be nearly-irresistible target for the local “sporting gentry”. And such a haul, in the hands of various radical groups, could provide a source of funding for terrorist activities that would be entirely deniable by their “patrons”. Remember, the European Marxist groups of the Seventies (Baader-Meinhof, Brigade Rosse, etc.) mainly financed their activities with bank robberies, a trick they picked up from the French rightist OAS a decade earlier.

eon on March 11, 2014 at 6:04 PM

.
Sorry, but the most valuable thing involved in all of this is the Boeing 777 itself

The price starts at $ 261,000,000 and quickly goes up from that point.

Pirates would have wanted the plane landed at an airstrip they control which would NOT damage the plane.

Then they contact the insurance company and say,

“Give us $ 50 million in gold or we blow the plane up.”

Most insurance companies would pay the 20% ransom without blinking an eye.

PolAgnostic on March 11, 2014 at 7:07 PM

I wish I never saw The Langoliers.

itsspideyman on March 11, 2014 at 7:06 PM

I agree.

The short story was dumb. But kinda’ fun in a goofy way.

The TV movie was horrible.

cozmo on March 11, 2014 at 7:14 PM

My guess is that you can land on just about anything, so long as you’re not worried about the condition of the landing gear afterward.

Taking off would be another issue.

They’re landing on pneumatic tires, so the contact pressure can only be so high, right?

TexasDan on March 11, 2014 at 6:58 PM

.
Like virtually every plane Boeing makes, the 777 has greater limits than the recommended “operating parameters”.

There was an excellent PBS documentary on the plane’s developement – here’s a short excerpt.

PolAgnostic on March 11, 2014 at 7:16 PM

S P E C T R E is back – need Bond, James Bond, to find the thing.

A.S.R. on March 11, 2014 at 7:31 PM

Another hole in the navigational system failure is that at an altitude of 35K, your line of sight to the ground is almost 250 miles. More than enough to see the glow of lights of Saigon to the north, Kuala Lumpur to the south, and a whole host of things regardless of the direction chosen. Give the range of the 777 (7700 NM max for the 777-200ER in this case), eventually they would see something from that altitude.

Curiouser and curiouser.

dreadnought62 on March 11, 2014 at 7:31 PM

Has anyone noticed that no terrorists are taking credit (wrongly or rightly) for this?

It seems to me in the past every initially unexplained mishap has multiple terrorist organizations taking credit for them. Now? Not so much…..jes’ sayin’

E9RET on March 11, 2014 at 5:29 PM

What if this was a practice run? I doubt they’d want any extra attention.

CWchangedhisNicagain on March 11, 2014 at 7:36 PM

Did Captain Sum Ting Wong of Korea by chance have a Malaysian half brother?

dentarthurdent on March 11, 2014 at 6:26 PM

I hope Bang Ding Ow isn’t on that flight.

itsspideyman on March 11, 2014 at 7:45 PM

With the transponder shut off, but no phone calls from passengers indicating a hijacking, it sounds like the pilot, or another crewman in the cockpit, went rouge and crashed the plane a la EgyptAir Flight 990 back in 1999.

Nomennovum on March 11, 2014 at 5:03 PM

That one does keep coming back to me. Also the Silk Air 185 you, or someone alse, mentioned the other day. There have been cases where the Mode C transponder and comms have been turned off prior to a PIC’s suicide by aircraft.

Difficultas_Est_Imperium on March 11, 2014 at 7:49 PM

/just my opinion, take it for what it’s worth

clear ether

eon

eon on March 11, 2014 at 6:03 PM

Always enjoy perusing your opinion.
Pretty much everything you post is worth reading.

(You might want to talk to Eric in Hollywood about some screen-writing gigs…)

AesopFan on March 11, 2014 at 7:56 PM

Meanwhile, back at SPECTRE headquarters, Ernst Blofeld chuckles to himself.

RSbrewer on March 11, 2014 at 7:56 PM

The most curious part to me is why no one has picked up any transmissions from the ELT.

Every commercial aircraft, as well as virtually all US military aircraft, and many private planes, have an ELT aboard. It stands for Emergency Locator Transmitter. It is distinct from the “black boxes” that record data and comms. The ELT is usually located in the tail of the aircraft, and is designed to physically eject itself from the A/C at a given G impact metric.

The ELT transmits on what we used to cal the Guard Frequency of 121.5 and harmonics thereof. It broadcast a warbling beacon that you could pick up and could triangulate with other search & rescue aircraft and/or ships, etc.

Modern ELT’s also use GPS and other satellite systems for reception and rebroadcast. These things are almost impossible to destroy, and given that they are ejected away from an aircraft, they are up and running within seconds. All aircraft and almost all ships still monitor the 121.5 guard freq for just such beacons, as well as voice radio comms. Pilots and other crewmen know to broadcast, if they can, on 121.5 in emergency situations as you will always have the greatest chance of someone hearing you, due to the constant monitoring of the frequency.

So again, why was the aircraft’s ELT not deployed and/or heard of? There are questions here, and ones to which the answers trouble me.

TKindred on March 11, 2014 at 8:19 PM

used to deal with fdr/cvr/elt/fdau parts and records every day but I’ll be damned if I can remember part numbers now.
if I can remember then could get the specs, but lot of that was due to change soon anyways.
iirc by 2020 overwater a/c need to last 90 days pinging.

dmacleo on March 11, 2014 at 8:20 PM

I pray that the reports of a transponder being turned off, the flight changing direction and phones ringing are incorrect. A civilian airliner in the wrong hands would serve as an excellent tool for real terror.
If a government or terrorist organization wanted to deliver a nuke but didn’t have access to an ICBM a reconfigured civilian airliner would give them the capability and anonymity. Few governments would have the stones to shoot down an airliner pretending to be in distress before it was too late.

Come and take it on March 11, 2014 at 5:03 PM

Not to worry, in this case. The plane would have already landed or it would be out of fuel by now.

whatcat on March 11, 2014 at 8:22 PM

TKindred on March 11, 2014 at 8:19 PM

there may be a distinct one (would make sense to have one) but fdr and cvr (multiple of each on most passenger a/c) has elt physically attached to it that (like the fdr/cvr) is tracked for certification by time and cycles and replaced on schedule.
the digital fdr/elt combo I dealt with were used (certified for) on boeing 737/57/67 but not sure on 777.

dmacleo on March 11, 2014 at 8:26 PM

I’m in Phuket now, about 250 miles north of the Strait of Malacca. I’ll let you guys know if I see anything while swimming today.

crrr6 on March 11, 2014 at 8:32 PM

crrr6 on March 11, 2014 at 8:32 PM

Oh just Phuket.

cozmo on March 11, 2014 at 8:35 PM

apparently the malaysian military morons are in charge of this search and have refused to share their data with the rest of the world’s experts…that’s why it’s so ****** up.

gracie on March 11, 2014 at 9:03 PM

Sorry, but the most valuable thing involved in all of this is the Boeing 777 itself

The price starts at $ 261,000,000 and quickly goes up from that point.

Pirates would have wanted the plane landed at an airstrip they control which would NOT damage the plane.

Then they contact the insurance company and say,

“Give us $ 50 million in gold or we blow the plane up.”

Most insurance companies would pay the 20% ransom without blinking an eye.

PolAgnostic on March 11, 2014 at 7:07 PM

Yep.

The problems are;

1. They might not control any strips they could land it on without fragging it.

2. If the insurers don’t bite, they have a quarter-billion dollar white elephant.

3. CT forces all over them like ants at a picnic.

Frankly, hijacking a plane to grab a high-value, low-volume cargo is right out of the funny papers. Unfortunately, that’s about the IQ of the average local Cap’n Kidd types around there, too.

A smart hijacker works out of the warehouses at the air terminal, he doesn’t try to grab the goodies by grabbing the plane. But as stated, we’re not dealing with Professor Moriarty here.

My first best guess is another Air France-type event. And of course it’s entirely possible that that reversed-course track was something else altogether.

The phone “behavior” I still suspect is hacking or account stealing.

cheers

eon

eon on March 11, 2014 at 9:06 PM

Has anyone noticed that no terrorists are taking credit (wrongly or rightly) for this?

It seems to me in the past every initially unexplained mishap has multiple terrorist organizations taking credit for them. Now? Not so much…..jes’ sayin’

E9RET on March 11, 2014 at 5:29 PM

I thought there was a claim, but if was deemed unreliable?

BallisticBob on March 11, 2014 at 9:23 PM

Could there be a connection to Aceh? Assuming the plane did turn back and crossed the Malay Peninsula as indicated, once it crossed the Strait of Malacca it would have been over the Aceh region of Sumatra. Aceh is perhaps the most lawless region of Indonesia – and that’s saying something. Aceh is a major reason why the straits are so dangerous. Historically, Aceh has had a major separatist element, dating back to at least Dutch rule of Indonesia, but I thought they had reached some kind of agreement on that a few years ago. In any event, if you wanted to steal a plane, that would be the perfect place to take it, even more so if they have protection from Aceh militants.

JCCentCom on March 11, 2014 at 9:35 PM

Yep.

The problems are;

1. They might not control any strips they could land it on without fragging it.

2. If the insurers don’t bite, they have a quarter-billion dollar white elephant.

3. CT forces all over them like ants at a picnic.

Frankly, hijacking a plane to grab a high-value, low-volume cargo is right out of the funny papers. Unfortunately, that’s about the IQ of the average local Cap’n Kidd types around there, too.

A smart hijacker works out of the warehouses at the air terminal, he doesn’t try to grab the goodies by grabbing the plane. But as stated, we’re not dealing with Professor Moriarty here.

My first best guess is another Air France-type event. And of course it’s entirely possible that that reversed-course track was something else altogether.

The phone “behavior” I still suspect is hacking or account stealing.

cheers

eon

eon on March 11, 2014 at 9:06 PM

.
I don’t think this plane was “hijacked” in any of the traditional meanings. My response was to your scenario #4 re: cargo on the plane.

There is no way trained pilots DIDN’T know the plane had been turned around. The First Officer was “new” enough” (~ 2,000+ flight hours) that he would be a likely “inside job” candidate.

Military radars are routinely recorded so someone has had time to rerun the plane track enough times to be confident (or forced) to admit the new location.

The two Iranians traveling under false passports probably don’t have terror connections … but they could be mules carrying special electronic packages courtesy of Iranian scientists.

Interesting test case – remotely hack the computers on a quarter billion dollar plane and turn it into the world’s largest drone … with the convenience of a rated pilot to go “hands on” if things get glitchy.

Keep the plane … or ditch it somewhere far away from where it is supposed to be?

Ditch it … you’ve sent the message to the folks you wanted to get it.

PolAgnostic on March 11, 2014 at 11:25 PM

Seriously tho, I do know flight recorders emit these pings, and that being underwater they do not travel very far…

JetBoy on March 11, 2014 at 4:19 PM

Actually the opposite is true as water is far more dense than air.

Next time you are in a tub or pool tap a ring against the side above the water then below water with your ear also under water.

Much, much louder with water as a superior conductor.

A modern submarine with passive sonar knowing the frequency to track could likely detect it 50-100 miles away and with computer signal processing and active filtering probably much further away than that. Sonobuoys dropped at intervals from helicopter and monitored by P-3 or similar aircraft likely also would stand a high chance of detection. Since Indochina is monitored for unrest such as that recently in Thailand and because of the Hainan incident where China’s government hijacked one of our aircraft it also is probable that our CIA has the aircraft position and fate data via satellite and if there was an explosion and debris scatter aloft that likely has been detected and tracked as well.

viking01 on March 11, 2014 at 11:32 PM

JetBoy on March 11, 2014 at 4:19 PM

viking01 on March 11, 2014 at 11:32 PM

This says about a mile, 1 Hz rep rate, frequency of the ping is not given but it sounds to me like it is above-audible because a converter is needed to ‘hear’ it: Black Box: Locating Flight Recorder of Air France Flight 447 in Atlantic Ocean

slickwillie2001 on March 11, 2014 at 11:48 PM

Has anyone checked ebay for a slightly used Boeing 777 Dreamliner?

Flyovercountry on March 11, 2014 at 5:01 PM

Lol :) better check for parts :)

jimver on March 11, 2014 at 11:55 PM

Barack needed a separate plane from The Mooch. Well, another separate plane from The Mooch.

SouthernGent on March 11, 2014 at 11:55 PM

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