Video: Mystery of Flight 370 deepens

posted at 8:41 am on March 10, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

On Friday, a Malaysian Air flight bound for Beijing simply disappeared off radar screens over the sea between Kuala Lumpur and Vietnam. The only clues thus far are two oil slicks seen on the South China Sea, but no debris has been found at all and other rumors of a possible emergency landing have proven false. Even the oil slicks themselves might not have any connection to Flight 370; initial tests indicate one of them isn’t. Meanwhile, a Malaysian official confirmed that two passengers used stolen passports to board the flight, and appear to have bought tickets together:


ABC Entertainment News | ABC Business News

Two suspects on Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 who used stolen passports had no record of entering Malaysia legally, officials say.

Malaysia’s Inspector General of Police, Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar, said Monday that the identity of one of the two suspects has been confirmed.

“He is not a Malaysian, but I cannot divulge which country he is from yet,” he said.

Two passengers managed to board the ill-fated aircraft using passports reported stolen in Thailand in recent years, booking their tickets at the same time. The passports belonged to Italian and Austrian residents.

How could passports stolen in Thailand in 2012 and 2013 manage to pass muster at airports? It’s because many countries aren’t checking the Interpol database — a security gap that might have been well enough known to exploit:

The stolen passports could be related to other activities, though, such as drug smuggling. There is also another point to consider: Flight 370 went missing four days ago, and yet there has been no claim of responsibility by any terrorist organization. If the point was to take down an airplane to inspire terror, usually a declaration by the terrorists involved would immediately follow the attack. These days, even if governments wanted to keep that quiet, the groups would know how to get that message out through alternative means — and yet we’ve heard nothing of the kind, not even the attempt to take credit as a PR stunt.

Unless the plane suddenly appears, this mystery will be a long time unraveling, it appears.

Update: The first reports were that the flight was bound for Japan, but it was bound for Beijing. I’ve corrected it above.


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Ed –

Believe the flight was to Beijing and not Japan.

unaffiliated on March 10, 2014 at 8:43 AM

The flight was scheduled to land in Beijing; the passengers with the stolen passports were booked on continuing flights to Europe. I don’t think Japan is in the picture at all.

Lolo on March 10, 2014 at 8:44 AM

Meanwhile, a Malaysian official confirmed that two passengers used stolen passports to board the flight, and appear to have bought tickets together:

Other troubling details emerged when a telephone operator on a China-based hot line for KLM airlines confirmed Sunday that the passengers traveling with the stolen passports had booked one-way tickets on the same KLM flight from Beijing to Amsterdam on Saturday.

SOURCE

Flora Duh on March 10, 2014 at 8:44 AM

a/c can’t just “disappear” unless it had sudden and fully catastrophic failure OR crew turned all nav/acars/tcas/comms off (flipped breakers on avionics panel) and took the plane somewhere. And you can’t land a 777 in a pasture….well you can but its the last landing ever for it.

dmacleo on March 10, 2014 at 8:50 AM

Wow. I think it is really surprising that a jet traveling in that part of the world can be missing. That’s a high traffic area. I mean, there are scores of aircraft and ships looking for that thing 24/7. Curious.

ted c on March 10, 2014 at 8:52 AM

If it was some kind of new bomb that evaporated the plane I don’t think a terrorist group would be crowing about it.They might want to keep it secret.

docflash on March 10, 2014 at 9:00 AM

Might have been part of a coordinated effort,and they are trying to keep that on the down-low until they can regroup.

Maddie on March 10, 2014 at 9:01 AM

Oceanic 815–the real world version.

hungrymongo on March 10, 2014 at 9:02 AM

Wow. I think it is really surprising that a jet traveling in that part of the world can be missing. That’s a high traffic area. I mean, there are scores of aircraft and ships looking for that thing 24/7. Curious.

ted c on March 10, 2014 at 8:52 AM

There’s a radar screenshot of the last position of the Malaysian Airlines flight HERE with all other flights in the air, in that region, at the time. The missing plane was rather isolated, so no visuals could have been acknowledged if the plane exploded, or certainly if the plane simply crashed.

JetBoy on March 10, 2014 at 9:03 AM

Pan Am 130 was a known terrorist act, done by Libya but not acknowledged because then Gaddafi would have met his fate decades earlier. On the other hand, TWA 800 exploded by a 1 in ten billion or so coincidence.

The stolen passports may turn out to be a red herring. Have these been used before? Are there records tracking when and where specific passports are used? If this is the first time they’ve been used since being stolen that’s a big red flag. On the other hand, they may just be regular money laundering or drug running mules.

And to complicate things, what if North Korea is involved:

Further, China has issued a series of warnings about North Korean missiles, including one that crossed paths with a Chinese airliner carrying 220 people just last week.

On Friday, China complained to North Korea when one of its missiles came dangerously close to a civilian jet last Tuesday. The airplane had departed Tokyo’s Narita airport en route to the northeastern Chinese city of Shenyang.

One day earlier, South Korea’s defense ministry released a statement saying the Chinese civilian plane had “passed as the ballistic missile (from North Korea) was in the course of descending.”

http://kleinonline.wnd.com/2014/03/09/missile-downed-malaysian-plane-follows-recent-warning-of-nightmare-threat-airliners/

rbj on March 10, 2014 at 9:04 AM

The whole time I’ve been reading about this it’s been astounding to me that there is not — built into every billion dollar airplane and INACCESSIBLE from the interior of the plane — a device which takes a GPS reading every couple of seconds and transmits it to something like the Inmarsat satellite phone constellation. If a plane goes down (a thankfully and admittedly rare event) wouldn’t it be super helpful to know the GPS coordinates 2 seconds before it did so?

There are plenty of places planes fly that are not on anyone’s radar screen, and we already know of a variety of scenarios when someone on board (whether deranged crew or terrorist) might disable the normal communications. But there are exactly ZERO legitimate scenarios when a plane would NEED to go “off the grid” so why not put a device like this in the tail of the plane accessible only from the outside when on the ground?

SoRight on March 10, 2014 at 9:05 AM

Oceanic 815–the real world version.

hungrymongo on March 10, 2014 at 9:02 AM

That’s exactly where I went too. Truth is stranger than fiction!

nukemhill on March 10, 2014 at 9:06 AM

Oceanic 815–the real world version.

hungrymongo on March 10, 2014 at 9:02 AM

Me three. It was that or Ajira 316.

Free Indeed on March 10, 2014 at 9:10 AM

“He is not a Malaysian, but I cannot divulge which country he is from yet,” he said.

right2bright on March 10, 2014 at 9:10 AM

hungrymongo on March 10, 2014 at 9:02 AM

Never heard of that until now. I guess that makes more sense to y’all youngsters.

cozmo on March 10, 2014 at 9:12 AM

Malaysian authorities identify 1 of 2 men who used stolen passports to board missing plane – @staronline
read more on thestar.com.my

Murphy9 on March 10, 2014 at 9:12 AM

Is it possible something of that size may never be found?

frank on March 10, 2014 at 9:12 AM

If it blew to pieces in flight at 35,000 feet the debris trail will be how many tens of miles long at a depth of how many thousands of feet in a trackless ocean.

This thing will only be found accidentally by treasure hunters or something, or a lone seat cushion will float ashore somewhere.

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:16 AM

March 12: “Malaysian authorities announced that the two suspects were young Islamic males, originally from the Middle East.”

March 13: “TSA authorities in the US announced new security measures, including mandatory strip searches of wheelchair-bound travelers and ‘enhanced interrogation’ of nuns, children and middle aged white males. ‘We want to make sure to prevent new terrorist events, without resorting to profiling’, explained TSA representative Barney Fife Jr.”

orangemtl on March 10, 2014 at 9:18 AM

Is it possible something of that size may never be found?

frank on March 10, 2014 at 9:12 AM

It took over 70 years to find the Titanic.

Flora Duh on March 10, 2014 at 9:19 AM

It would seem that if there had been an explosion, that it could be seen on radar as well as pieces of the plane. The plane was at 35K ft so if there was a huge explosion, another pilot should have seen something even if their plane was quite a distance away if the visibility was good. The Uighers(sp) are getting bolder in China but it seems that knife attacks are their best plan.

Kissmygrits on March 10, 2014 at 9:20 AM

If it blew up in flight, then you would think that a floating debris field would be kinda large and somewhat visible (?). I mean, explosion or not, lotsa stuff on that A/C floats. I would think that if a debris field hasn’t been found then it went down intact. But if that is true, how did it not send a distress call?

Lots of questions.

ted c on March 10, 2014 at 9:22 AM

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:16 AM

I don’t know, complete disintegration would have made lots of buoyant debris.

It took over 70 years to find the Titanic.

Flora Duh on March 10, 2014 at 9:19 AM

Lots of differences.

cozmo on March 10, 2014 at 9:22 AM

It took over 70 years to find the Titanic.

Flora Duh on March 10, 2014 at 9:19 AM

And they had a pretty good idea where to look for that.

CurtZHP on March 10, 2014 at 9:24 AM

I don’t know about ya’ll, but those brave lost souls of Flight 93 have been heavy on my heart that past few days.

Lots of differences.

cozmo on March 10, 2014 at 9:22 AM

Yes, I realize that.

Flora Duh on March 10, 2014 at 9:26 AM

March 13: “TSA authorities in the US announced new security measures, including mandatory strip searches of wheelchair-bound travelers and ‘enhanced interrogation’ of nuns, children and middle aged white males. ‘We want to make sure to prevent new terrorist events, without resorting to profiling’, explained TSA representative Barney Fife Jr.”

orangemtl on March 10, 2014 at 9:18 AM

Yes, because molesting our own women and children is infinitely more acceptable than offending those who are already offended by our very existence. And if you disagree, you’re a racist.

/liblogic

CurtZHP on March 10, 2014 at 9:28 AM

Ok then.

100 years from now the descendents of the passengers will be found living on a remote island, similar to the crew of the Bounty. The plane itself will be a crazy adapted habitat for the people, half covered by the jungle, the drink cart as an altar and an assortment of mini alcohol bottles their gods.

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:28 AM

It would seem that if there had been an explosion, that it could be seen on radar as well as pieces of the plane. The plane was at 35K ft so if there was a huge explosion, another pilot should have seen something even if their plane was quite a distance away if the visibility was good. The Uighers(sp) are getting bolder in China but it seems that knife attacks are their best plan.

Kissmygrits on March 10, 2014 at 9:20 AM

Radar won’t pick up on any explosion…it relies on the plane’s transponder. the 9/11 hijacker’s turned off the responders of the planes, and they simply “disappeared”.

During daylight hours, an explosion may well not have been seen…and at 35,000 ft., wouldn’t have been heard.

And not to make light of this, but anyone who’s ever flown knows we’re told before every flight that seat cushions can be used as floatation devices. But when is the salt time a plane crashed on water, and there’s seat cushions floating around everywhere?

Just sayin’.

JetBoy on March 10, 2014 at 9:29 AM

Ok then.

100 years from now the descendents of the passengers will be found living on a remote island, similar to the crew of the Bounty. The plane itself will be a crazy adapted habitat for the people, half covered by the jungle, the drink cart as an altar and an assortment of mini alcohol bottles their gods.

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:28 AM

We’re ready for you to take us home, Captain Walker! We kept it straight! Everything marked, everything ‘membered!

CurtZHP on March 10, 2014 at 9:31 AM

Two people using very old stolen passports bought one-way tickets for that flight seconds apart less than two hours before the flight was scheduled to leave.

Find out who those guys were and the mystery will most likely be solved.

My money is on a test run for a new terrorist weapon delivery system.

Johnnyreb on March 10, 2014 at 9:31 AM

I think Flight 370 collided with some dark matter which was unobservable but real.

jaime on March 10, 2014 at 9:32 AM

And not to make light of this, but anyone who’s ever flown knows we’re told before every flight that seat cushions can be used as floatation devices. But when is the salt time a plane crashed on water, and there’s seat cushions floating around everywhere?

Just sayin’.

JetBoy on March 10, 2014 at 9:29 AM

If it ever came to that, what my seat cushion would be used for wouldn’t pass for flotation.

CurtZHP on March 10, 2014 at 9:33 AM

http://tinyurl.com/qy4ce2y

the wsj link was too long so I shortened it, the link is to wsj article.
don’t know if this has been disproven or anything

dmacleo on March 10, 2014 at 9:33 AM

But when is the salt time a plane crashed on water

JetBoy on March 10, 2014 at 9:29 AM

Or when was the pepper time a plane crashed on water?

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:34 AM

What happened to the “eyes in the sky” that probably can read the headline on my morning paper lying in the driveway?
It’s hard to believe that China wouldn’t have any commercial jet under surveillance as it heads to their airspace as a routine matter.

srdem65 on March 10, 2014 at 9:34 AM

I don’t know about ya’ll, but those brave lost souls of Flight 93 have been heavy on my heart that past few days.

Flora Duh on March 10, 2014 at 9:26 AM

Same here. Just tired of all the specultaion.

The Gulf of Thailand is relatively shallow but lots of sediments.

IIRC, not much current either.

JetBoy on March 10, 2014 at 9:29 AM

Approximately 0130 local dude.

cozmo on March 10, 2014 at 9:35 AM

Why can’t the satellites video show what was going on. there is enough out there to see every movement of the plane.

ConservativePartyNow on March 10, 2014 at 9:36 AM

Two people using very old stolen passports bought one-way tickets for that flight seconds apart less than two hours before the flight was scheduled to leave.

Find out who those guys were and the mystery will most likely be solved.

My money is on a test run for a new terrorist weapon delivery system.

Johnnyreb on March 10, 2014 at 9:31 AM

Dog Eater has Top Men on it right now, in fact various Amish enclaves throughout the nation are being cordoned off and a general interrogation of all their citizens will begin shortly.

Dearborn is quiet, ignored, and for good reason.

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:36 AM

Most probable cause:

However, the missing Malaysia Airlines 777 is reportedly the same aircraft that crashed into the tail of another plane while taxiing at Shanghai’s Pudong International Airport in August 2012.

An independent accident-tracking website, Aviation Safety Network, listed the accident and claimed damaged suffered by the Boeing 777 was ‘‘substantial … the tip of the wing of the Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 was broken off and hung on the tail of the China Eastern Airbus 340-600, according to pictures posted by passengers on the internet’’.

http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/story/2138904/missing-malaysia-airlines-plane-what-happened-to-mh370/?cs=12

Very similar situation to a 747 that was repaired, then disintegrated while flying over Japan.

At 600 MPH, any turbulence or slight change in angle of attack when changing from climb to level flight, etc., might strain a faulty repair, and when you lose part of a wing at that speed, probably a violent yaw occurred. Note that some military RADAR noticed a turn just before it went off the screen.

I submitted this info as an email TIP yesterday, but it didn’t make the article.

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 9:39 AM

The stolen passports might just be a coincidental red herring. Passports were stolen in Thailand, a country of much intrigue including gun smuggling and dope. If you are doing something illegal, it might be better if you do business under a stolen identity.

Since there was no “Mayday it is obvious to assume there was no time for a distress call.

Most likely reason: Mechanical failure. (Engine explodes and crashes through the fuselage. Wing falls off, etc.–either design failure or maintenance mistake.))
Second most likely: Terrorist bomb
third most likely: A guided missile.
fourth most: Both pilots Muslim. one decided to meet Allah early
Finally: Clear air turbulence and subsequent pilot error.

If no debris found, you might suspect electrical failure (or hydraulic or pneumatic failure) and subsequent pilot error in reacting to the emergency.

MaiDee on March 10, 2014 at 9:40 AM

Or when was the pepper time a plane crashed on water?

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:34 AM

ಠ_ಠ

JetBoy on March 10, 2014 at 9:44 AM

I don’t know, I think it’s more likely human error than anything sinister…kind of like the Airbus going to Paris where the autopilot disengaged and the plane stalled. Once a plane stalls…
but who knows, anything is possible at this point.

scalleywag on March 10, 2014 at 9:44 AM

I’m hesitant to opine on the disappearance of the plane having worked on accident investigations. Early conclusions tend to be wrong. The stolen passports are a real mystery. Did China issue them visas (transit or otherwise) ? If not, how did the passengers get through both passport control and MAS airline security in Kuala Lumpur? Did the plane attempt to turn back at some point? If so, the South China Sea might be the wrong search zone. Vietnam is partly without civilian ATC radar, the MAS 777 was not equipped with SATCOM and data downlink that would help with the mystery. Try to avoid cable news talking heads. They know exactly what I know about the situation, which isn’t much. This may take a lot of time in this instant info world. Don’t jump to conclusions

simkeith on March 10, 2014 at 9:45 AM

What happened to Flight 370 will become apparent in the coming months, I will bet the farm that it was something other than a failure of the Boeing 777.

V7_Sport on March 10, 2014 at 9:45 AM

Dog Eater has Top Men on it right now, in fact various Amish enclaves throughout the nation are being cordoned off and a general interrogation of all their citizens will begin shortly.

Dearborn is quiet, ignored, and for good reason.

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:36 AM

I suppose even when your paper arrives late or your coffee is too cold, you curse Obama.

But you’d think a tragedy like this might not be seen as an opp for inanne OT drivel.

verbaluce on March 10, 2014 at 9:47 AM

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 9:39 AM

Um yeah, we all know how unreliable those Boeing repair teams are.

V7_Sport on March 10, 2014 at 9:45 AM

I’d be willing to join you…if I had a farm.

cozmo on March 10, 2014 at 9:54 AM

The same plane had a wing severely damaged in 2012:

http://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=147571

A bad repair to a 747 caused this crash in 1985, killing 520 people 7 years after the repair.

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19850812-1

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 9:55 AM

Let’s not discount the possibility that one of the pilots committed suicide or a terrorist act. There is precedence.

To me, the most dangerous threat to aviation these days is the insider threat.

IF this was a test run, I wouldn’t be flying any time soon. Now that the terrorists know it works, they’ll be going after the real targets.

NavyMustang on March 10, 2014 at 9:56 AM

I suppose even when your paper arrives late or your coffee is too cold, you curse Obama.

But you’d think a tragedy like this might not be seen as an opp for inanne OT drivel.

verbaluce on March 10, 2014 at 9:47 AM

Just re-gifting 8 years of “Dubya killed Wellstone, Cheney bombed the NOLA levees, Rumsfeldt caused me to contract syphilis, they all worked with the Mossad to drop the twin towers on 911!” but without the glaze-eyed hysterics you lefties are known for.

So lighten up, Francis, and enjoy the colonoscopy you receive in the airport security line while the sweaty guy clutching the Koran and mumbling “Alahu Ackbar” is waved through with barely a glance.

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:58 AM

Most probable cause:
fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 9:39 AM

From what I’ve read, (and it may be wrong at this juncture) the wing was repaired by Boeing and that was 2 years ago.

V7_Sport on March 10, 2014 at 10:00 AM

I can’t see the prior wingtip repair being an issue here, many a/c have wingtip damage from ground equipment.
I’ve processed parts and mtx records on tons of them.
it takes a lot to damage the wing root, ground strikes usually can’t. not saying it can’t be the issue, just don’t think so. any issues with repair should have shown up before this due to vortices.
the airframe is at an age (TAT/TAC) where age and stress often start to show up, but boeing has a decent inspection program.
pure speculation on my part though.

dmacleo on March 10, 2014 at 10:01 AM

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 9:39 AM

Um yeah, we all know how unreliable those Boeing repair teams are.

cozmo on March 10, 2014 at 9:54 AM

If you are not a pilot and an engineer, as I am, you may have forgotten this incident:

It floated after touchdown and on the second touchdown the tail struck the runway. The aircraft sustained substantial damage to the rear underside of the fuselage. The rear pressure bulkhead was cracked as well. The aircraft was repaired by Boeing. Engineers replaced the lower part of the rear fuselage and a portion of the lower half of the bulkhead.

The reason why the aft pressure bulkhead was ruptured in flight is estimated to be that the strength of the said bulkhead was reduced due to fatigue cracks propagating at the spliced portion of the bulkhead’s webs to the extent that it became unable to endure the cabin pressure in flight at that time.
The initiation and propagation of the fatigue cracks are attributable to the improper repairs of the said bulkhead conducted in 1978, and it is estimated that the fatigue cracks having not be found in the later maintenance inspection is contributive to their propagation leading to the rupture of the said bulkhead.

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19850812-1

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 10:04 AM

Was gointo explain how transpoders work and the difference betwen mode c and s, but decided just to copy and paste from WIKI.

“Because primary radar generally gives bearing and range position information, but lacks altitude information, mode C and mode S transponders also report pressure altitude. Around busy airspace there is often a regulatory requirement that all aircraft be equipped with an altitude-reporting mode C or mode S transponders. In the United States, this is known as a Mode C veil. Mode S transponders are compatible with transmitting the mode C signal, and have the capability to report in 25 foot increments. Without the pressure altitude reporting, the air traffic controller has no display of accurate altitude information, and must rely on the altitude reported by the pilot via radio.[6][7] Similarly, the Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) installed on some aircraft needs the altitude information supplied by transponder signals.”

HonestLib on March 10, 2014 at 10:04 AM

Would help if I would use spell check.

Was going to explain how transponders work and the difference between mode c and s, but decided just to copy and paste from WIKI.

HonestLib on March 10, 2014 at 10:07 AM

A bad repair to a 747 caused this crash in 1985, killing 520 people 7 years after the repair.

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 9:55 AM

JAL was aware of the issue in that case, (as I recall it was rear pressure bulkhead that had been repaired after it was cracked in an over-rotation. The bulkhead cracked and depressurized into the vertical stabilizer and blew the rudder off….Right? I can remember that yet I just forgot my nephews birthday.) and the repair was past it’s service date.

V7_Sport on March 10, 2014 at 10:12 AM

…Just re-gifting 8 years of “Dubya killed Wellstone, Cheney bombed the NOLA levees, Rumsfeldt caused me to contract syphilis, they all worked with the Mossad to drop the twin towers on 911!”….

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:58 AM

All you’re doing is throwing yourself with that tiny lot.
Maybe y’all can start a club and hang out together.
Kindred spirits that you are.
You wouldn’t need too big a space to handle a gathering.

verbaluce on March 10, 2014 at 10:12 AM

One thing to add regarding repairs to damaged planes. MAS has one of the best maintained fleets around. Their planes don’t fall apart from shoddy repairs and their facility in KUL is certified by FAA for repairs and mods. Again, be careful about drawing conclusions or reading too much in press releases or MSM talking points.

simkeith on March 10, 2014 at 10:15 AM

cozmo on March 10, 2014 at 9:05 AM

Exactly what I thought of when I heard about this. If only that was what happened in this case :(

changer1701 on March 10, 2014 at 10:16 AM

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 10:04 AM

I haven’t.

Or the Air France in the South Atlantic that took years to discover the cause.

It’s the rampant speculation that bugs me. You may end up being right. But right now, you are just bloviating.

cozmo on March 10, 2014 at 10:20 AM

Just re-gifting 8 years of “Dubya killed Wellstone, Cheney bombed the NOLA levees, Rumsfeldt caused me to contract syphilis, they all worked with the Mossad to drop the twin towers on 911!” but without the glaze-eyed hysterics you lefties are known for.

So lighten up, Francis, and enjoy the colonoscopy you receive in the airport security line while the sweaty guy clutching the Koran and mumbling “Alahu Ackbar” is waved through with barely a glance.

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:58 AM

He’s a re-gifter!

JetBoy on March 10, 2014 at 10:33 AM

Did China issue them visas (transit or otherwise) ?

simkeith on March 10, 2014 at 9:45 AM

The passengers using stolen passports had booked onward one-way flights to Amsterdam from Beijing, as such they had no need for visas from China, they never would leave the airport in Beijing except via their onward flights.

Even if they did not, China has a 72-hour visa program on-arrival that they might have used, so the visa thing really is a non-starter regarding the investigation.

Difficultas_Est_Imperium on March 10, 2014 at 10:37 AM

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 10:04 AM

Aircraft just returned from maintenance (either a progressive inspection program or from an annual) always gave me pause. I learned the hard way to always spend time looking over the squawks before accepting PIC duties.

I had the dreaded loss of critical engine at 200’ agl once due to a turbocharger being installed/replace incorrectly. Would my preflight have caught the problem…most likely not. But if I would have read the squawk sheet during preflight and noticed the turbo charger replacement, I would have done two things differently. (1) My run up would have been longer than my usual hurry up and go routine and (2) I would have been mentally prepared for the possibility of engine loss. Caught me completely off guard, but I had sucked up at the gear at “no more useable runway” and had blue line pegged. Still was slow with the (power up, clean up, identify, verify, fix or feather) stopping yaw and got slow and close to redline, as you know……Vmc with loss of critical engine at 200’ is a handful. Did learn to feather no matter what when less than 500’ agl.

Aviate, Navigate, Communicate. Did not yap a word till on final.

I realize that I post on things I think I understand fully, but reading some of the comments on this thread I realize why I get nicely schooled from time to time and I don’t mind.

HonestLib on March 10, 2014 at 10:37 AM

It’s the rampant speculation that bugs me. You may end up being right. But right now, you are just bloviating.

cozmo on March 10, 2014 at 10:20 AM

No need to be snide on a nice Sunday.

The fact that this plane was damaged and repaired 2 years ago was first “bloviated” yesterday by the WSJ, in an item with a link to the 2012 photo, etc.

http://stream.wsj.com/story/malaysia-airlines-flight-370/SS-2-475558/

All I did was point out the possible similarity between this incident and another previously-repaired plane. When you consider the incredible safety record of the 777, and that this same plane had a major flight surface repair 2 years ago, look for the obvious (i. e. non-rampant) cause first. Have a nice day.

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 10:38 AM

All you’re doing is throwing yourself with that tiny lot.
Maybe y’all can start a club and hang out together.
Kindred spirits that you are.
You wouldn’t need too big a space to handle a gathering.

verbaluce on March 10, 2014 at 10:12 AM

That tiny lot managed to elect Dog Eater with a majority vote, and you were right there with ‘em, sister.

You know, “Faux News is making up stories again!”

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 10:39 AM

All you’re doing is throwing yourself with that tiny lot.
Maybe y’all can start a club and hang out together.
Kindred spirits that you are.
You wouldn’t need too big a space to handle a gathering.

verbaluce on March 10, 2014 at 10:12 AM

But your beloved lefty hero, Noam Chomskey, says the Holocaust never happened.

sentinelrules on March 10, 2014 at 10:41 AM

If they were testing a new method of smuggling explosives it’s possible they wouldn’t claim responsibility just yet.

Drug smuggling is pretty rampant in that area, so the stolen passports don’t necessarily mean anything, although I read over the weekend that they’re finding more suspect passports on the flight: http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/03/09/us-malaysia-crash-interpol-idUSBREA280CM20140309

The more suspect ones they find the more likely this wasn’t mechanical failure.

cameo on March 10, 2014 at 10:41 AM

Ok then.

100 years from now the descendents of the passengers will be found living on a remote island, similar to the crew of the Bounty. The plane itself will be a crazy adapted habitat for the people, half covered by the jungle, the drink cart as an altar and an assortment of mini alcohol bottles their gods.

Bishop on March 10, 2014 at 9:28

Hey, I like that scenario.

crankyoldlady on March 10, 2014 at 10:45 AM

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 10:04 AM

Aircraft just returned from maintenance (either a progressive inspection program or from an annual) always gave me pause. I learned the hard way to always spend time looking over the squawks before accepting PIC duties.

….

HonestLib on March 10, 2014 at 10:37 AM

One of my instructors years ago bought a used Mooney with a freshly-overhauled engine. On takeoff, the throttle linkage failed, he did a low-level 180 and landed crashed amid a few parked planes. He couldn’t extricate himself from the narrow cockpit, and had to be pulled out. Luckily, no fire. He then bought an Arrow (wider cockpit!).

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 10:51 AM

yes, the most amazing part is that some agent of the religion of peace has not yet claimed responsibility for the slaughter of hundreds of innocents, in a fiery tragic suicidal mass murder. when thats what everyone on the planet first thought of. what the hell is this world coming to.

t8stlikchkn on March 10, 2014 at 10:52 AM

Is anyone following through on the information about the number of employees on board from a tech company?

What about the information that some relatives have been able to call the cell phones of some of the passengers? The numbers are ringing, but there is no answer.

onlineanalyst on March 10, 2014 at 10:53 AM

third most likely: A guided missile.
MaiDee on March 10, 2014 at 9:40 AM

Wasn’t it a tad high for anything but a major ground installation? Are there any such installations in range?

Lucy43 on March 10, 2014 at 10:55 AM

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 10:51 AM

I do look back at my times as a CFI with fond memories.

HonestLib on March 10, 2014 at 10:57 AM

Surely the NSA must know something.

Cindy Munford on March 10, 2014 at 10:58 AM

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19850812-1

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 10:04 AM

Flight 123 Japan 1985 (Boeing 747 repaired in 1978)

this is an amazing read. i didn’t realize the possibility that a repaired site could deteriorate like this over time and result in such a violent disaster: “Due to the damage…controlling the plane was very difficult as the airplane experienced dutch rolls and phungoid oscillations (unusual movements in which the altitude and speed change significantly in a 20-100 second cycle without change of angle of attack)….the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks are attributable to improper repairs…”

wow

gracie on March 10, 2014 at 11:01 AM

Speculation is all we have and it’s what we humans do. Nothing wrong with it.

It looks like something went wrong with the plane that also took out the radio.

Possibly the pilot went crazy and turned off the radio and took the plane into the sea.

If it was terrorism it must be some group that doesn’t want to be known until they get out of danger. I can’t believe any group would do that and not want it to be known.

It’s also possible they meant to hijack the plane and take it somewhere but there was a fight in the cockpit. Hard to believe they still couldn’t radio.

Intelligent people speculate.

crankyoldlady on March 10, 2014 at 11:01 AM

The numbers are ringing, but there is no answer.

onlineanalyst on March 10, 2014 at 10:53 AM

According to my husband the ring you hear when calling a number is generated at a central location and does not originate from the number or phone being called. The central location can detect if a land line phone is connected but a cell phone may just ring or go to voice mail. Forty years ago he was in the phone business so his info may be dated.

Lucy43 on March 10, 2014 at 11:01 AM

Surely the NSA must know something.

Cindy Munford on March 10, 2014 at 10:58 AM

They know what the American passengers ordered from Amazon the past few months, what forwarded jokes were passed around, and what YouTube replies on funny vids were responded to.

JetBoy on March 10, 2014 at 11:03 AM

Surely the NSA must know something.

NRO does.

HonestLib on March 10, 2014 at 11:04 AM

Mulder?? Scully??

TarheelBen on March 10, 2014 at 11:07 AM

This is truly peculiar….

If it exploded, or broke apart in mid-air, there would be debris scattered over a wide area. Lot’s of plane parts float. So far the ‘debris’ found is not from the plane, and the oil slicks were determined to be naval in origin.

Even if the plane was intentionally flown into the sea, the fuel tanks would likely have broken open at some point – the water is just too shallow – it’s actually shallower than the plane is long at it’s greatest depth. The fuel would of course rise to the surface.

There is an indication of a turn, just before it was lost on radar. Makes we wonder if the transponders were intentionally shut off and the plane diverted somewhere else, either to be deliberately crashed elsewhere for the expressed reason of creating a diversion, or landed in a secret location, perhaps to be used at a ‘later’ time.

Just some thoughts.

cktheman on March 10, 2014 at 11:08 AM

or landed in a secret location, perhaps to be used at a ‘later’ time.

Just some thoughts.

cktheman on March 10, 2014 at 11:08 AM

What would they do with all those people?

crankyoldlady on March 10, 2014 at 11:12 AM

The NSA is too busy spying on us to know what’s going on elsewhere.

crankyoldlady on March 10, 2014 at 11:13 AM

What would they do with all those people?

crankyoldlady on March 10, 2014 at 11:12 AM

they are all part of jacks dream.

t8stlikchkn on March 10, 2014 at 11:17 AM

What would they do with all those people?

crankyoldlady on March 10, 2014 at 11:12 AM

No clue, but if you’re up to no good….

cktheman on March 10, 2014 at 11:20 AM

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19850812-1

Flight 123 Japan 1985 (Boeing 747 repaired in 1978)

this is an amazing read.

gracie on March 10, 2014 at 11:01 AM

Amazing and sad. I’m a big fan of Boeing, but you have to be perfect at 600 MPH and 6 miles high.

I find it highly unlikely that it is just a coincidence that the only 777 to fall out of the sky in over 20 years is the (only??) one to have a major wing repair. And since (even factory) repairs have been an issue before, I would think Boeing is looking at this very carefully. No need for conspiracy theories.

fred5678 on March 10, 2014 at 11:25 AM

This is so bizarre. Ten countries out looking and haven’t even found a single shred of a Boeing jet or any of its passengers is pretty creepy. Like a Twilight Zone episode. My heart goes out to the families, I can’t even imagine how horrifying that would be.

scalleywag on March 10, 2014 at 11:34 AM

A couple of other points:

By now, some group – it would seem would have claimed responsibility. Those guys thrive on their ‘success’ and want everyone to know about it, usually immediately. Look to the Air France flight for a confirmation of that.

Were the pilots ‘rogue’ or working for someone else? We have at least one incident off Nova Scotia of that happening, but perhaps they flew the plane somewhere else as part of another plot? It would seem to me that the transponders were deliberately turned off, about the same time the plane appeared to ‘change course’.

Right now, I am just not thinking it’s where they are looking??

All speculation of course.

cktheman on March 10, 2014 at 11:38 AM

All you’re doing is throwing yourself with that tiny lot.
Maybe y’all can start a club and hang out together.
Kindred spirits that you are.
You wouldn’t need too big a space to handle a gathering.

verbaluce on March 10, 2014 at 10:12 AM

But your beloved lefty hero, Noam Chomskey, says the Holocaust never happened.

sentinelrules on March 10, 2014 at 10:41 AM

sentinel rules to the rescue deflection.

Norm ain’t my beloved – though seems he spends time in your head.
And if he said that, he’s an idiot.

verbaluce on March 10, 2014 at 11:39 AM

Intelligent people speculate.

crankyoldlady on March 10, 2014 at 11:01 AM

Bored people speculate, intelligent people collate.

cozmo on March 10, 2014 at 11:41 AM

a/c can’t just “disappear” unless it had sudden and fully catastrophic failure OR crew turned all nav/acars/tcas/comms off (flipped breakers on avionics panel) and took the plane somewhere. And you can’t land a 777 in a pasture….well you can but its the last landing ever for it.

dmacleo on March 10, 2014 at 8:50 AM

Totally agree. And the logical explanation is a catestrophic decompression, because if the transponders had been turned off, there would have been some landing or targeting (using the plane as the weapon) by now, as the fuel has clealy been expended. Add to it the fact that apparently some debris has been found and there is little question that some structural failure resulted in and explosive decompression, destroying the plane at 38,000 feet. What caused that to happen is another question, still unanswered.

TKPedersen42 on March 10, 2014 at 11:59 AM

Norm ain’t my beloved – though seems he spends time in your head.
And if he said that, he’s an idiot.

verbaluce on March 10, 2014 at 11:39 AM

That doesn’t negate the fact that Chomsky is a hero to the Left. Perhaps Bill Ayers is more to your liking. Or Jeremiah Wright.

And let’s not forget other liberal nutty theories you scribe to:

Trig Palin is not Sarah Palin’s daughter
DieBold machines were used to steal the 2004 election for Bush

sentinelrules on March 10, 2014 at 12:01 PM

Radar won’t pick up on any explosion…it relies on the plane’s transponder.

JetBoy on March 10, 2014 at 9:29 AM

That’s the newfangled ‘radar’.

Certainly, in that area of the world, someone had the old style radar sweeping – the kind that bounces a signal off the target. If so, a debris cloud may have been briefly visible.

Spidey Senses noted that it disappeared during what normally would have been a relatively brief track over water…

Tsar of Earth on March 10, 2014 at 12:07 PM

sentinelrules on March 10, 2014 at 12:01 PM

I am not the drone you are looking for.

verbaluce on March 10, 2014 at 12:14 PM

I am not the drone you are looking for.

verbaluce on March 10, 2014 at 12:14 PM

How about when Rick Warren helped John McCain cheat at the Forums debate with Obama back in 2008?

sentinelrules on March 10, 2014 at 12:17 PM

Right now, I am just not thinking it’s where they are looking??

All speculation of course.

cktheman on March 10, 2014 at 11:38 AM

could have been the ground crew from terrorist infested Malaysia that planted a bomb on the plane and are keeping a low profile util they get outta dodge.
if the plane blew up at 7 miles high i don’t think the debris would be coming strait down…it could even be mistaken for all the stuff we dropped on vietnam 40-45 years ago or end up in some rice paddie near ho chi min city aka saigon…..surreal isn’t it?

gracie on March 10, 2014 at 12:18 PM

NKSOF, Un is pissed that China wants him to act right, so he decided to kill a bunch of Chinese, because he really is frickin crazy and doesn’t understand the bite the hand that feeds you thing.

Wallythedog on March 10, 2014 at 12:33 PM

Reporters corrected him asking, “Mario Balotelli?” and asked whether the man with the stolen passport was black. Balotelli, who is black, is an Italian soccer player.

“Yes,” Rahman replied.

sentinelrules on March 10, 2014 at 10:40 AM

Why always him?

One compeltely unrelated thing that I keep thinking about is whether these passports were actually stolen. If one or the other of these fellows actually sold their passport and then reported it stolen, I would imagine they’re feeling a little sick to their stomachs right now.

KGB on March 10, 2014 at 1:05 PM

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