California energy companies are getting the heck outta’ dodge and moving to Texas

posted at 7:21 pm on March 7, 2014 by Erika Johnsen

Texas Gov. Rick Perry‘s cross-country campaign to promote his state’s favorable tax and regulatory conditions and attract businesses and jobs throughout his tenure hasn’t been based on him just talking the talk; Texas can absolutely walk the economic walk, too, as WaPo reports:

Texas experienced stronger job growth than the rest of the nation from 2000 to 2013, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. Not only that, a pair of researchers note in a Thursday research publication, but Texas leads the nation in creation of jobs at all pay levels, too.

“Texas has also created more ‘good’ than ‘bad’ jobs,” they write. “Jobs in the top half of the wage distribution experienced disproportionate growth. The two upper wage quartiles were responsible for 55 percent of net new jobs. A similar pie chart cannot be made for the rest of the U.S., which lost jobs in the lower-middle quartile over the period.”

As we noted above, Texas does have a larger share of its population earning the federal minimum wage or less  than any state but Idaho, but it helps that things are cheap.

Bam. And what, do we suppose, might be one of the hugely driving factors behind this robuster-than-everyone-else level of equitable job creation? It couldn’t possibly be that Texas has been conscientiously developing their energy reserves — like, for example, the Eagle Ford Shale, could it? While other states — like, say, California — have been quixotically ignoring their own resources in favor of their politically preferred pet projects? Joel Kotkin has yet another great piece out today detailing that very conspicuous phenomenon:

The recent decision by Occidental Petroleum to move its headquarters to Houston from Los Angeles, where it was founded over a half-century ago, confirms the futility and delusion embodied in California’s ultragreen energy policies. By embracing solar and wind as preferred sources of generating power, the state promotes an ever-widening gap between its declining middle- and working-class populations and a smaller, self-satisfied group of environmental campaigners and their corporate backers. …

In all but forcing out fossil-fuel firms, California is shedding one of its historic core industries. Not long ago, California was home to a host of top 10 energy firms – ARCO, Getty Oil, Union Oil, Oxy and Chevron; in 1970, oil firms constituted the five largest industrial companies in the state. Now, only Chevron, which has been reducing its headcount in Northern California and is clearly shifting its emphasis to Texas, will remain.

These are losses that California can not easily absorb. Despite all the hype about the ill-defined “green jobs” sector, the real growth engine remains fossil fuels, which have added a half-million jobs in the past five years. If you don’t believe it, just take a trip to Houston, where Occidental is moving.

And the beat goes on.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Heheheheh.*takes deep breath* HEHEHEHEH.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 7, 2014 at 7:21 PM

Tesla is also moving to Texas. A green company goes to red Texas, LOL!

PattyJ on March 7, 2014 at 7:22 PM

Heh…

OmahaConservative on March 7, 2014 at 7:24 PM

If they are smart, they are.

Jaibones on March 7, 2014 at 7:26 PM

I’m building an eco-friendly airplane for the greenies. It’s powered by wind and solar.

GarandFan on March 7, 2014 at 7:29 PM

And………it begins.

tommy71 on March 7, 2014 at 7:32 PM

…of course…Rick Perry has nothing to do with it!…

KOOLAID2 on March 7, 2014 at 7:34 PM

Chasing Detroit.

Kaffa on March 7, 2014 at 7:35 PM

PattyJ – I used to work for Elon, many years and a few startups ago. He got filthy rich, I only did okay, but that’s life.

I give him vast credit for taking his money and stepping outside the software comfort-zone to build real hardware. He doesn’t suffer fools (well, non-family fools) gladly.

I’m pretty sure he’s got a good handle on the deal-with-the-devil he made in setting up Model S manufacturing in California, he knows to a reasonably number of decimal points just what he’s gaining and losing with that deal. He got huge short-term benefit (perhaps necessary to the company’s survival) by bending Jerry over for substantial baksheesh in taking over enough of the NUMMI plant to look good politically, but he’s far too smart to think that’s a long-term solution.

JEM on March 7, 2014 at 7:49 PM

Just let California return to the horse and buggy days. Oops, I almost forgot-methane gas.

mobydutch on March 7, 2014 at 7:54 PM

What the greenies always ignore suppress, is that “fossil” fuel is probably self-renewing anyway. Sigh.

Freedom led to the scientific renaissance that lead to our modern day cheap energy and unimaginably fantastic technology. Leftists seek to squash that freedom at every turn.

Leftists are not about “equality”, “justice”, or “the environment”. They are all about coercive power.

RushBaby on March 7, 2014 at 7:56 PM

Similar story in the news, how only 2 out of the most recent couple dozen highest grossing movies were made in California. That is, that industry is also fleeing the state. What’s next, oranges grown in North Dakota? (I joke)

LashRambo on March 7, 2014 at 8:01 PM

Just let California return to the horse and buggy days. Oops, I almost forgot-methane gas.

mobydutch on March 7, 2014 at 7:54 PM

Enslaving animals is eviiiilll!!

///California PETA member

Think bicycles and rikshas, you’re closer to the mark. And they’ll have to be imported, because you can be sure that the green elite’ won’t let a factory to make them be built in their Utopian La-La Land.

I’m imagining caterers arriving at a party in the Hollywood Hills with everything hauled on carts pulled behind tandem bicycles.

The elites’ will be O-ing themselves at seeing the “help” forced into such conditions.

Naturally, they will still have their limos.

clear ether

eon

eon on March 7, 2014 at 8:03 PM

I’m building an eco-friendly airplane for the greenies. It’s powered by wind and solar.

GarandFan on March 7, 2014 at 7:29 PM

The Chinese beat you to that by a couple of thousand years. It’s called a kite.

Oldnuke on March 7, 2014 at 8:09 PM

Jobs, we don’t need no stinkin’ jobs!

We’ve got FOOD STAMPS, baby!!!

climbnjump on March 7, 2014 at 8:17 PM

GTT

Grammar Nazi on March 7, 2014 at 8:23 PM

Bu bu but, Great weather! Pretty coasts!

Regarding all those movie companies and high tech companies: where’s “The Walking Dead” being filmed, where was “Breaking Bad” filmed, and does anyone still use MySpace anymore (cough, cough, Facebook)?

Ruckus_Tom on March 7, 2014 at 8:24 PM

I’m beginning to think that this socialism thing doesn’t work.

307wolverine on March 7, 2014 at 8:24 PM

I heart Oil! It is helping our family get out of the hole we’ve been in for the past 4 years. Drill here, drill now. Cheap gas for everyone!

kringeesmom on March 7, 2014 at 8:24 PM

Being a 5th Gen Texan I know just a tad ’bout the diff between Texas and the Yankee nation. 1500′s – Cabeza de Vaca reared his ugly head on the Coast. The Tonkawa and Karankawa disappeared. Cortez pissed on Mexico, while the Franciscans spread Christianity as an adjunct – ‘frankly’, not a bad thang. 1718 – my hometown, San Antonio, founded, with the construction of the Alamo (de Valero). The missions of Espada (my ol’ stompin’ grounds- swimmin’ in the old aquaducts) and San Jose (romped alot there in mah yute) followed. BTW, ‘Alamo” means, Cottonwood, a tree well known to real Texians. Texas was settled by Mexicans, Spaniards, French, Germans, Czechs, Poles, Swedes, and Southrons. ALL became Texans first, Southrons next, Americans, last, although being ‘American’ was the ‘glue’ that bound them all to ‘Washington’. Moses Austin (1829) tried to bind the ‘original 300′ and, later, the thousands of Southrons to the agreement with Mexico that all immigrants would learn Spanish and bind themselves to loyalty to Mexico and the Catholic Church, but with the the many immigrants (overwhelming) and his own death, things got out of control and to the extent that the ‘new’ dictator Santa Anna (heretofore, a ‘democrat’)arrested Austin when he went to Mexico City to seek a ‘compromise’ between the ‘Province’ of Texas and Mexico ( ref Mexico’s abrogation of the Constitution 0f 1824 and refusal to admit any more Norteamericanos to Texas). Upon his release and return to Texas, Austin, who was heretofore all in favor of union with Mexico, ‘saw the light’ and recommended rebellion. The rest is history. War was fought, the Alamo was lost, the massacre at Goliad went down, which REALLY pissed off the Texians and to the extent that Santa Anna’s army was annihilated at San Jacinto, at which he was celebrated in NYC and ‘invented’ chewing gum. Go figger. Texas came into the union in 1845 (same as Florida, our sister state!) and the US fought a war to solidify the change and extend Manifest Destiny (another screed). Bottom line: Texas was an Independent Nation from 1836-1845. We came into the union, only after ceding most of New Mexico and parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nevada and Oregon to the US, in exchange for the fact that Texas would maintain sovereignty over its lands with NO Federal ownership, unless sold/agreed upon by the SOVEREIGN state of Texas. Texans have ALWAYS viewed ourselves as a breed apart from the grasping, efette, Socialist communalist, big city, cave dwelling Yankee POS that seem to be spreading their hedonistic filth nationwide. I hope I’m not being obscure…

vnvet on March 7, 2014 at 8:26 PM

My family has been in California since the early 1920s in that time we’ve seen the rise and subsequent departure of:
Oil Companies, Aircraft manufacturing, auto manufacturing, banking, telecom, computer chip mfg, computer disk mfg, printers mfg, rail transport, and now agriculture and entertainment. Oh, and the Navy is pretty much gone, too.

Moose Dung on March 7, 2014 at 8:27 PM

Leftists are not about “equality”, “justice”, or “the environment”. They are all about coercive power.

RushBaby on March 7, 2014 at 7:56 PM

And nihilism.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on March 7, 2014 at 8:38 PM

Before everyone gets too cocky, what California was Texas can easily become. Wave after wave of indocumentados– whose kids Gov. Perry is so eager to educate with his Dream Act– completely changed California politics forever, and once there are enough of them in Texas– you’d be “heartless” to turn them away– the Austin elites will manipulate them into voting exactly the way they do in California. And you’ll still be stuck with sucky weather.

de rigueur on March 7, 2014 at 8:38 PM

I’m beginning to think that this socialism thing doesn’t work.

307wolverine on March 7, 2014 at 8:24 PM

It’ll work. It’s just that the right people haven’t implemented it yet.

Oldnuke on March 7, 2014 at 8:42 PM

These are losses that California can not easily absorb.

Good. They do not deserve California.

vityas on March 7, 2014 at 8:47 PM

The guy who came out today to hook up my cable/internet/phone thingy said he was from Texas. His wife is from here which is why he’s in Ohio. He said he misses it.

crankyoldlady on March 7, 2014 at 8:51 PM

I’m beginning to think that this socialism thing doesn’t work.

307wolverine on March 7, 2014 at 8:24 PM

It works. We just haven’t spent enough money on it Those mean Republicans won’t let us have all the invisible money we need.

crankyoldlady on March 7, 2014 at 8:52 PM

De Rigger – You scare me, but alas and alack, I do believe you are on to sumthin’. That’s one reason I now live in WNC.

vnvet on March 7, 2014 at 8:52 PM

My family has been in California since the early 1920s in that time we’ve seen the rise and subsequent departure of:
Oil Companies, Aircraft manufacturing, auto manufacturing, banking, telecom, computer chip mfg, computer disk mfg, printers mfg, rail transport, and now agriculture and entertainment. Oh, and the Navy is pretty much gone, too.

Moose Dung on March 7, 2014 at 8:27 PM

I was born in California, as were both of my parents. We moved away in ’06.

My brother is still there… he gets SSI, State disability, food stamps, subsidized housing, Medicaid, and an Obama phone. He likes hanging out at the park and going to the library.

kringeesmom on March 7, 2014 at 9:25 PM

vnvet on March 7, 2014 at 8:26 PM

Great post. I’m a San Antonio girl. This time of year always gets me to thinking about 1836.

de rigueur on March 7, 2014 at 8:38 PM

The danger is also from all the Californians and yankees moving here for jobs–1000/day. too many bring their failed politics with them. We more than WELCOME those who come here and vote the right way though.

juliesa on March 7, 2014 at 9:29 PM

A writer called Noel Perrin wrote books called Second Person Rural, First Person Rural, etc. He lived in Vermont/ He said city people were always moving to the country and screwing things up. He said they should be give a temporary visa and after five years if they haven’t done anything stupid they get to stay.

crankyoldlady on March 7, 2014 at 9:40 PM

Yeah, I’m tangentially involved in energy, and I’m contemplating a move to Texas. Texas or North Dakota. Don’t worry Texans, I won’t be bringing the northeast with me. I’ll learn to be a Texan, promise. I’m rabidly pro-Texas.

WhatSlushfund on March 7, 2014 at 9:49 PM

Similar story in the news, how only 2 out of the most recent couple dozen highest grossing movies were made in California. That is, that industry is also fleeing the state. What’s next, oranges grown in North Dakota? (I joke)

LashRambo on March 7, 2014 at 8:01 PM

No joke. Can’t grow those oranges with no water. But maybe Obaka’s $160 million will sweeten the juice. Maybe not.

NOMOBO on March 7, 2014 at 9:50 PM

WhatSlushfund on March 7, 2014 at 9:49 PM

As we’ve discovered-Texans welcome conservative northerners.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 7, 2014 at 9:58 PM

The interesting thing is that these blue states seem to be genuinely surprised that the industries they legislate against take offense to it and leave for more hospitable locations.

They seem incapable of making the connection. It reminds me of the scene in Rocky III where Apollo takes Rocky & company to his old gym in South LA. All the fighters and trainers are black, which makes Paulie visibly uncomfortable.

Paulie: C’mon, Rock, I got a reputation to uphold.
Rocky: What reputation?
Paulie: You know, I don’t like these people.
Rocky: Well maybe they don’t like you either.
Paulie: What’d I do to them?

Adjoran on March 7, 2014 at 10:03 PM

As we’ve discovered-Texans welcome conservative northerners.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 7, 2014 at 9:58 PM

Texas may be our last hope. The mere fact that Rick Perry is making these sorts of appeals just goes to show that. This type of campaign of his should be a no-brainer to leaders of every state. But as far as I know, he’s the only one doing it.

WhatSlushfund on March 7, 2014 at 10:10 PM

Julie, hang in there, girl! I grad from Harlandale in 1865, er, 1965, played futbol at Blinn and Sul Ross and played out my ‘option’ in VN. Met my wife while spending my last months in the Army at Ft Meade, Md. The VA paid for my last year at Sul Ross and I flew my fiance to Midland (nearest ap to Alpine – 150 miles) in ’73 for my graduation. Poor thang had never been west of Frederick, Md. Culture shock. She ’bout prayed for Jesus to come while we were trudging across the Llano Estacado. I’m still laughin’, but, wanting to keep mah Honey happy with this Good Ol’ Boy, I compromised to the hills in WNC…

vnvet on March 7, 2014 at 10:11 PM

Before everyone gets too cocky, what California was Texas can easily become. Wave after wave of indocumentados– whose kids Gov. Perry is so eager to educate with his Dream Act– completely changed California politics forever, and once there are enough of them in Texas– you’d be “heartless” to turn them away– the Austin elites will manipulate them into voting exactly the way they do in California. And you’ll still be stuck with sucky weather.

de rigueur on March 7, 2014 at 8:38 PM

Before YOU get too cocky, there is simply too much rural real estate in Texas when compared to California for this to happen. You make it sound like Austin controls the entire state – which they don’t. California was NEVER the traditional conservative state that Texas has been and that transition would take at least 100 years. So suck it!

RMCS_USN on March 7, 2014 at 10:11 PM

Californians moving to Texas will do for Texas what they did for Colorado. Screw it up. We used to think they couldn’t have a big enough effect here either but, they did. We are now Colofornia. Texas will be next.

boomer on March 7, 2014 at 10:34 PM

RMCS – You give me hope! When I was a trompin’ around Texas in the early 60′s, Austin, San Marcos and New Braunfels (Landa Park) were great. Yer right, the Yankee, Socialist leftist Commie, anti-American carpet baggin’ sob’s from LGBT Land have taken over. I suggest a small yield nuclear device be expended about 1000 feet above the Tower. Don’t git me stahtid!

vnvet on March 7, 2014 at 10:43 PM

WhatSlushfund on March 7, 2014 at 10:10 PM

As of December-I think it was December-Lubbock had something like a 4.5% unemployment rate.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 7, 2014 at 10:50 PM

vnvet on March 7, 2014 at 10:43 PM

When we moved to Lubbock my husband and I heard the same thing about Illinois. Now-my friends ask me if I have any Illinois friends that would like to move here.
Actually-I do. They’re also conservative.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 7, 2014 at 10:53 PM

Wow! A story about smart people doing something smart! Imagine that!

RoadRunner on March 7, 2014 at 10:59 PM

Wow, a great story. I’m so proud to be from Texas (my mother’s family from East Texas goes back to the days of the Republic), and so proud of all the smart, talented, hard-working people here.

Ward Cleaver on March 7, 2014 at 11:33 PM

Bottom line: Texas was an Independent Nation from 1836-1845. We came into the union, only after ceding most of New Mexico and parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nevada and Oregon to the US, in exchange for the fact that Texas would maintain sovereignty over its lands with NO Federal ownership, unless sold/agreed upon by the SOVEREIGN state of Texas. Texans have ALWAYS viewed ourselves as a breed apart from the grasping, efette, Socialist communalist, big city, cave dwelling Yankee POS that seem to be spreading their hedonistic filth nationwide. I hope I’m not being obscure…

vnvet on March 7, 2014 at 8:26 PM

We should have kept all the land and told the US to deal with it, if they wanted us in.

AesopFan on March 7, 2014 at 11:48 PM

Yeah, I’m tangentially involved in energy, and I’m contemplating a move to Texas. Texas or North Dakota. Don’t worry Texans, I won’t be bringing the northeast with me. I’ll learn to be a Texan, promise. I’m rabidly pro-Texas.

WhatSlushfund on March 7, 2014 at 9:49 PM

Attaboy!
Come on ahead.

gordo on March 8, 2014 at 12:28 AM

Before YOU get too cocky, there is simply too much rural real estate in Texas when compared to California for this to happen.

RMCS_USN on March 7, 2014 at 10:11 PM

Check out the Central Valley the next time you visit the left coast. Proportionately, the Central Valley, Mojave, Colorado, and Great Basin Deserts, and the various mountain ranges comprise far more of the land mass than than the Bay Area and Southern California coastal regions. But the former are also far less densely populated than the latter (which is where the immigrant waves congregate), so guess who runs the state?

You’re actually describing your state’s own Achilles heel.

I’ll grant you this: Texas has a much stronger tradition of independence than California– Alamo, Independent Republic, all that– but I wouldn’t count on that holding everything in check for 100 years. The hotbed of the American independence movement was Boston– and look what happened to them in less than 100 years– in 200 their Revolutionary War history is almost unimaginable.

When the wave moves in, demography is destiny.

de rigueur on March 8, 2014 at 12:35 AM

The danger is also from all the Californians and yankees moving here for jobs–1000/day. too many bring their failed politics with them. We more than WELCOME those who come here and vote the right way though.

juliesa on March 7, 2014 at 9:29 PM

Californians moving to Texas will do for Texas what they did for Colorado. Screw it up. We used to think they couldn’t have a big enough effect here either but, they did. We are now Colofornia. Texas will be next.

boomer on March 7, 2014 at 10:34 PM

Truth to tell, you’ve described the greater immediate danger to the state than la amnistía. It’s truly a puzzlement why, a couple of years ago, billboards went up all over the state inviting California teachers to resettle in… Texas.

de rigueur on March 8, 2014 at 12:50 AM

When the wave moves in, demography is destiny.

de rigueur on March 8, 2014 at 12:35 AM

My father and uncles killed a lot of people a long time ago. The last 70 years have been quiet in comparison.

I think the point is that this is the new normal, and no one knows what it is yet. There is no giving up, even for the pale souls of Connecticut. Texas is not going anywhere, thx.

And FYI, and OT, the “hispanic” demo is not democrat – they just don’t all know it yet. The democrats want to take you guns. The “hispanics” are not OK w/that.

bbhack on March 8, 2014 at 2:15 AM

bbhack on March 8, 2014 at 2:15 AM

No one’s giving up. Nor is the demographic wave all “hispanics.” It’s any group that has not assimilated American history, and the nation’s foundational ideals of ordered liberty and individual freedom and responsibility– like a lot of Californianos fleeing the economic ravages of their own state to Colorado and Arizona (two states that, as a result, are no longer much like what they were only 10-20 years ago)… and to Texas. Just a head’s up, which probably isn’t needed over your way. And if things get rowdy again before another 70 years, you can be sure it won’t just be in Texas.

de rigueur on March 8, 2014 at 2:35 AM

de rigueur on March 8, 2014 at 2:35 AM

About “hispanics” – the left believes they own that demographic. It’s part of my mission to insist otherwise.

About “guns” – the democrats want to confiscate your guns. It’s part of my mission to repeat, repeat, repeat.

About thought pollution in Texas – I’ve given up on the union. There are 1000 places for bedwetters to go, and here is not going to be that friendly.

bbhack on March 8, 2014 at 2:49 AM

and individual freedom and responsibility– like a lot of Californianos fleeing the economic ravages of their own state to Colorado and Arizona (two states that, as a result, are no longer much like what they were only 10-20 years ago)… and to Texas. Just a head’s

de rigueur on March 8, 2014 at 2:35 AM

I used to think “welcome to Texas, leave your failed politics at the door”.

Now I think the polite politics of the last 150 years are not going to matter much.

bbhack on March 8, 2014 at 2:57 AM

I’ll grant you this: Texas has a much stronger tradition of independence than California– Alamo, Independent Republic, all that– but I wouldn’t count on that holding everything in check for 100 years. The hotbed of the American independence movement was Boston– and look what happened to them in less than 100 years– in 200 their Revolutionary War history is almost unimaginable.

When the wave moves in, demography is destiny.

de rigueur on March 8, 2014 at 12:35 AM

Texas has a citizen legislature that meets every other year and have to get the states business done within 140 days unless the governor calls a special session. The legislators are paid $600.00 per month while they are in session.

The legislators live and work under the laws they pass…just like very other texan.

California legislators salary – $95,271/yr

NY – $79,500/yr

PA $ 82,026/yr

TX $ $7,200/yr (In session)

workingclass artist on March 8, 2014 at 6:29 AM

I know that places like Austin are becoming hotbeds for tech jobs as well. Qualcomm has opened up some new offices there, to name one that I know of first hand.

MJBrutus on March 8, 2014 at 6:32 AM

By September there will only be 6 abortion mills left in the state of Texas…

““The majority of the rural providers in Texas are now closed,” Miller said. “I’m stubborn or stupid to have kept mine open this long, but I can’t keep my doors open when I can’t see any patients.”

The anti-abortion law signed by Gov. Rick Perry (R) last summer, known as HB 2, also bans abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy and restricts how doctors can administer abortions with medication. Republican supporters of the bill said it was intended to protect women’s health.

The number of Texas abortion clinics has dropped by more than half since the state legislature began passing new restrictions on pregnancy termination in 2011. There were 44 clinics in 2011. With the closing of Miller’s two clinics, there are now 20. Only six of the remaining facilities are ambulatory surgical centers, which means that the remaining 14 will soon have to close unless they can comply with the new building requirements by the September 2014 deadline….”

http://weaselzippers.us/178517-two-more-texas-abortion-mills-shut-down-because-of-new-pro-life-law/

related:

LAREDO, TEXAS–Texas Democratic gubernatorial hopeful Wendy Davis woke to some unsettling numbers along the Texas/Mexico border today. Of the 14 counties along the Rio Grande, Davis lost seven—including heavily Hispanic Webb and Hidalgo Counties. Davis Challenger Reynaldo “Ray” Madrigal’s prediction may have come true to an extent—Wendy has a pro-life Catholic problem and may not hold the support of motivated Latino voters by default.

http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-Texas/2014/03/5/Wendy-Davis-Loses-Half-of-Border-Counties-to-Pro-Life-Democrat

workingclass artist on March 8, 2014 at 7:38 AM

But, but I don’t FEEL that oil companies are good for California.

philoise65 on March 8, 2014 at 8:41 AM

workingclass artist on March 8, 2014 at 6:29 AM

That’s the way it should be nationally. Maybe a bit higher pay but the rest is great.

Cindy Munford on March 8, 2014 at 9:12 AM

vnvet on March 7, 2014 at 8:26 PM

Bravo, from a native Californian who just returned from a relaxing vacation in beautiful, friendly San Antonio.

FireBlogger on March 8, 2014 at 9:42 AM

As someone that lives less than 5 miles from the Chevron headquarters I predict they will be out of CA in less than 5 years. A significant number of jobs have already moved to Texas. My husband and are counting the months till we retire and get out of CA.

DanvilleMom on March 8, 2014 at 10:03 AM

JEM, yes, Musk is a businessman so of course he eventually leaves CA.

PattyJ on March 8, 2014 at 10:03 AM

Do you think Silicon Valley is next?

TheNakedEye on March 8, 2014 at 10:05 AM

Be careful Texas and don’t let the Californians californicate your state. Back in the 70′s “Don’t Californicate Oregon” was a popular bumper sticker but they came anyway and brought their liberal ideas with them. Oregon used to be a right of center state but now is controlled by the liberals living in the Willamette valley. High unemployment, corrupt government (Cover Oregon) and to many voters that seem to think Totalitarianism is just an old word.

Jackson on March 8, 2014 at 10:37 AM

Californians moving to Texas will do for Texas what they did for Colorado. Screw it up. We used to think they couldn’t have a big enough effect here either but, they did. We are now Colofornia. Texas will be next.

boomer on March 7, 2014 at 10:34 PM

Indeed, they’re like locusts….

BigWyo on March 8, 2014 at 11:01 AM

TX $ $7,200/yr (In session)

workingclass artist on March 8, 2014 at 6:29 AM

Keep it that way. And the length of the legislative sessions. Only in the 2000s did Texas reach the population size that California had in the 1970s, the period most cite as the beginning of California’s serious decline. The pressure to increase the size and length of legislative sessions (and of course the salaries of the legislators) in your state will undoubtedly intensify, it will be argued, to match the state’s growing “diversity and complexity.”

And keep your eye on the gerrymanders when that begins to happen. Although Texas is nowhere near the condition that California was already sinking into when CA State Assemblyman Henry Waxman gerrymandered the state in the late 70s, the CA-GOP sold its birthright to Waxman to secure a few “safe” GOP districts rather than insist on a larger number of equally-divided districts (for which they’d have to fight each election), thus insuring increasing GOP isolation in a sea of overwhelmingly Dem-controlled state assembly and senate districts. Result is that today the Dems hold super-majorities in both houses of the CA Legislature. And every single state-wide elected office.

There are a myriad other reasons for California’s decline– but it begins with the people voted into office who enabled the lobbying groups who raised the money to elect the people who are voted into office who… and of course with the kind of people who vote.

de rigueur on March 8, 2014 at 12:51 PM

The legislators live and work under the laws they pass…just like very other texan.

California legislators salary – $95,271/yr

NY – $79,500/yr

PA $ 82,026/yr

TX $ $7,200/yr (In session)

workingclass artist on March 8, 2014 at 6:29 AM

You have no idea how badly this irritates me as a citizen of Pennsylvania. All of the government officials on the state level are very entrenched and beholden to just about everybody who matters in the state. The GOP here is not much better and is about as RINO as it is nationally. I know of a couple politicians and/or chairpersons who are only Republican because the Dem slot was already taken.

It’s a major outrage to me and a lot of other Pennsylvanians that we’re the second most expensive in what our “legislators” are paid.

PatriotGal2257 on March 8, 2014 at 3:16 PM