The failures of Obamacare implementation have been so many and so varied that nearly lost in the coverage is the near-criminal (In Oregon, maybe literally criminal) amount of money spent on both federal and state exchanges that don’t work. Fox News’ Wendell Goler asks Jay Carney today about accountability for these failures and the amount of money, much of it federal, wasted on these projects. Carney claims to have no information about this, despite the fact it’s his job to have information about this, and suggests Goler call CMS. In reaching for something to fill the time, Carney sites California’s exchange, which could perhaps be characterized as the least dysfunctional of the state exchanges, but is no picnic.

The Free Beacon notes how very low this bar is. Do the Limbo Rock!

“California hit its target in the middle of February in terms of enrollees. So that’s one working pretty well, I guess,” Carney said.

Apparently Carney’s bar for “working pretty well” is incredibly low. Maybe Carney forgot California’s online exchange was shut down for five days last week due to software problems, or the lingering problems consumers encounter when trying to sign up for Covered California.

California has also faced problems enrolling enough Latinos. Latinos comprise 50% of the uninsured population in California, but only accounted for 21% of signups through mid-February.

Elsewhere in Great Moments in ObamaCare Success That Never Were, a new study suggests even Medicaid enrollments aren’t what the White House has claimed. This is because the White House is playing the same games with those numbers as private insurance enrollments— counting a determination you’re eligible for Medicaid enrollment as enrollment.

A new analysis of Medicaid enrollments is challenging the Obama administration’s account that nearly 10 million people are in the process of signing up for the program under ObamaCare.

Figures released Monday by consulting firm Avalere Health found that only 2.4 to 3.5 million people have newly registered for Medicaid since October under the healthcare law.

The disparity highlights the cloudiness of Medicaid numbers released by the administration, which counts those who have been “determined eligible” for the program rather than those who have actually signed up.

Some of the 8.9 million people counted by the administration were also eligible before the healthcare law expanded access to the program.