Open thread: Sunday morning talking heads

posted at 8:01 am on March 2, 2014 by Allahpundit

I figured Kerry, Susan Rice, or maybe even Biden would be available this morning to chat about Ukraine. Nope: Just Hagel on “Face the Nation,” and he was likely booked earlier in the week to discuss military downsizing, not Crimea and the future of NATO. The White House must have concluded that there’s no way to spin “uncontested arrival” with a straight face so they might as well limit the damage to Hagel, whom no one takes very seriously in the first place. Good thinking, I hate to admit.

Elsewhere, Lindsey Graham will be on “State of the Union” to explain why America’s not being nearly bellicose enough and Ben Affleck will drop by “This Week” to answer questions on Congo and why on earth he thinks he can get away with playing Batman. The full line-up is at Politico.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2

WTF?

Arrrrgh…

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 8:01 AM

I’m so sick of the news being filtered through the all absorbing mirror of Obamaworld.

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 8:03 AM

Looks like they’ve already thrown in the towel . . . doesn’t it make you proud?

rplat on March 2, 2014 at 8:06 AM

Wow chuckie…..

Sunday talking heads will have their wh talking points…..lsm will throw out their softball questions and focus on the ‘fractured gop’ and the Az bill

Sb1062 will be front and center methinks

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 8:09 AM

The focus group results aren’t back yet, so they’ll talk about Crimea next week.

Flange on March 2, 2014 at 8:11 AM

A quick review of the shows from the perspective of “who’s views are being aired by whom?”
Rating Guide:

Kook Left – Democrat Fringe
Liberal – “Conservative” Democrat
RINO – Liberal Republican
Conservative – You know
D.C. Pensioner – Administration Schuck who may have come from either party, now just hanging on to income, willing to say anything. Part of the permanent D.C. rabble; disreputable in every aspect.
Other – Other

Let’s see what the DNC Media wants you to hear today, and remember – even among the “moderators” there is exactly One legitimate journalist – the rest are activist liberal Democrats.

“Meet the Press” on NBC

• John Kerry Kook Left
• Marco Rubio Conservative (I know)
• Saxby Chambliss RINO
• Claire McCaskill Kook Left
• California Gov. Jerry Brown Kook Left
• Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake Kook Left

Startlingly bad, even for NBC (the worst).

“Face the Nation” on CBS

• Kerry Kook Left
• Hagel Former RINO, now a Liberal Democrat
• Kirsten Gillibrand Former Liberal, now Kook Left

No need to hear from anyone outside the Liberal/DNC/Beltway Bubble, right? Here, four liberals talk about what to have for lunch.

“This Week” on ABC

• Kerry Kook Left
• Adam Kinzinger RINO
• Ben Affleck Kook Left

ABC chooses a celebutard as qualified spokesman on a foreign policy issue. Need one say more?

“Fox News Sunday” on Fox

• Mike Rogers RINO
• Darrell Issa Conservative (I know)
• Rob Portman RINO
• Chris Van Hollen Kook Left
• Scott Brown RINO
• Evan Bayh D.C. Pensioner

Like their host, Chris Wallace (a liberal who is, imo, the only true journalist working on Sunday), Fox has chosen to stay mostly in the middle here. Bayh occupies the right edge of the increasingly kook left Democrat party, Brown the left edge of GOP, and Rogers, Issa and Portman have all joined with Dems when the spirit hit them. Only Van Hollen occupies the fringe in this show. He is a true kook.

“State of the Union” on CNN

• Dick Durbin Kook Left
• Lindsey Graham RINO
• Yuriy Sergeyev Other
• Tom Donilon D.C. Pensioner
• Rick Santorum Conservative
• Bill Burton Kook Left
• John Beyrle D.C. Pensioner

A range of views aired, almost all left of center. Santorum is their token. Moderator is a liberal activist, willing to ruin a presidential debate to advance the agenda of the left. Soulless.

“Political Capital” on Bloomberg TV

• John Dingell Kook Left
• Kevin Brady Conservative

Fair enough.

“Newsmakers” on C-SPAN
• Tom Harkin Kook Left

Un-moderated show looks at one player, in this case one of the kookiest of the Kook Left. Harkin is little known outside Iowa, it seems to me, but he is among the very worst of the bad.

“Al Punto” on Univision (Racist TV)
• Michelle Obama Kook Left moocher
• Enrique Peña Nieto Other, presumably Socialist (anyone know this guy?)
• Roni Kaplan Other

Racist TV allows non-Hispanic guests, for an extraordinary change of pace. Is Kaplan somehow Mexican?

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:11 AM

Love these posts jail bones

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 8:14 AM

The White House knows it’s not going to do anything of substance in the Ukraine, so why send out people to draw attention to it and talk about it? Like every other scandal dogging this administration, just forget about it and hope it goes away. And with a boot-licking mainstream media willing to go along with whatever the administration does, you will not hear much about the Ukraine on TV. Sad, really, because this is just another opportunity to stick it to Moscow, just like they are sticking it to us in Syria, Iran, Venezuela, Cuba, and lots of other “fun” places around the world.

Libertyship46 on March 2, 2014 at 8:14 AM

Note: something I just noticed today in the ACU Ratings for Congress has me wondering. If you look at the rating guide, there are ratings for Life, the number of years rated (served), and the most recent full year of 2013.

The 2013 ratings are completely out of whack, giving every Republican I looked at a lower-than-lifetime rating. My guess is that there were so few votes last year and that of those almost half were unappealing/no win votes for conservatives, that it skewed the numbers dramatically.

Case in point: I campaigned for Adam Kinzinger in Illinois, former Air Force Captain and pilot. Not a bad guy, Tea Party supported, mostly conservative. But with only 3 years rated, his 55% 2013 rating has left him with a 66% lifetime rating. His district is farm rural, and he has predictably gone RINO on farm votes, but I don’t think there were any in 2013.

Anyone else have an idea on this?

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:18 AM

Love these posts jail bones

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 8:14 AM

You said “Jail Bones”. :-)

I’m curious to see how much of the commentary from the show hosts is designed to deflect criticism that obama dithered or Hagel sent the wrong signals at the wrong time.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 8:18 AM

Thanks, cm.

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:18 AM

Obama must be racking his brain over his next move. Being president is such a stressful job. But in the end he has to decide …………… Does watching the Oscars take precedence over watching Putin’s troops slaughter innocent Ukrainians?

I say he’s already told his staff not to bother him with trivial news about a Russian invasion. After all his BFFs Jay Z and Beyonce have promised to give him a shout out.

fogw on March 2, 2014 at 8:20 AM

“Hundreds of unidentified gunmen have arrived outside Ukraine’s infantry base in Privolnoye in its Crimea region, Associated Press journalists said.

The convoy includes at least 13 troop vehicles each containing 30 soldiers and four armored vehicles with mounted machine guns. The vehicles — which have Russian license plates — have surrounded the base and are blocking Ukrainian soldiers from entering or leaving it.

Ukrainian soldiers, with clips in their weapons, have positioned a tank at the gate.

Ukraine’s acting Prime Minister said Sunday that his country was “on the brink of disaster” and called for world leaders to take “real steps” to defuse the ongoing crisis in the Crimean Peninsula even as Russian troops appeared to be advancing toward the provincial capital.

Arseniy Yatsenyuk spoke after a closed session of his new parliament in Kiev, calling on Russian President Vladimir Putin to “pull back his military.”

Earlier Sunday, Andriy Paruby, Secretary of Ukraine’s Security Council, which is made up of Ukraine’s top security and defense chiefs, announced that all military reservists were being called up to active duty and added that it was vital to ensure that the Ukrainian armed forces were combat-ready as soon as possible. Paruby also said that Ukraine’s Foreign Ministry had been ordered to seek assistance from the U.S. and Great Britain in guaranteeing the country’s safety.

Associated Press journalists witnessed a convoy of 12 military trucks carrying troops, a Tiger vehicle armed with a machine gun, and two ambulances traveling along the road from Sevastopol, the home of Russia’s Black Sea Fleet, to the regional capital, Simferopol. There have been no reports of Russian troops meeting any resistance in either landing or moving through Crimea.

NATO’s North Atlantic Council, the alliance’s political decision-making body, and the NATO-Ukraine Commission were to meet on Sunday. NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said the allies will “coordinate closely” on the situation in Ukraine, which he termed “grave.”

Ukraine is not a NATO member, meaning the U.S. and Europe are not obligated to come to its defense. But Ukraine has taken part in some alliance military exercises and contributed troops to its response force.

On Saturday, Putin sought and received unanimous consent from the Russain parliament to mobilize the country’s military in Ukraine. But while sometimes-violent pro-Russian protests broke out Saturday in a number of Russian-speaking regions of eastern Ukraine, Moscow’s immediate focus appeared to be only Crimea.

Ukraine’s interim President, Oleksandr Turchynov said in an address to the Ukrainian nation Saturday that he had also ordered increased security at nuclear power plants, airports and other strategic infrastructure, because of the threat of “potential aggression.” Appearing beside him, Yatsenyuk said: “I am convinced that Russia will not launch an intervention as this would mean war.” Yatsenyuk added that he had urged withdrawal of Russian troops in a phone conversation with his Moscow opposite, Dmitry Medvedev.

Lawmakers in Moscow also asked that the country’s ambassador in Washington be recalled after earlier statements by President Obama.

After Russia’s parliament approved Putin’s motion, U.S. officials held a high-level meeting at the White House to review Russia’s military moves in Ukraine. The White House said Obama spoke with Putin by telephone for 90 minutes and expressed his “deep concern” about “Russia’s clear violation of Ukrainian sovereignty and territorial integrity.”

Putin said that the mobilization is needed to protect ethnic Russians and the personnel of a Russian military base in Ukraine’s strategic region of Crimea. But the request came a day after Obama warned Moscow that “there will be costs” if it intervenes militarily in Ukraine.

The White House said Obama told Putin that the United States is calling on Russia “to de-escalate tensions by withdrawing its forces back to bases in Crimea and to refrain from any interference elsewhere in Ukraine.”

A statement from the Kremlin said Putin emphasized to Obama the existence of “real threats” to the life and health of Russian citizens and compatriots who are in Ukrainian territory. The statement indicated that Russia might send its troops not only to the Crimea but also to predominantly ethnic Russian regions of eastern Ukraine.

“Vladimir Putin emphasized that, in the case of a further spread in violence in eastern regions (of Ukraine) and Crimea, Russia maintains the right to protect its interests and the Russian-speaking population that lives there,” the Kremlin statement said.

Obama told Putin that he would support sending international monitors to Ukraine to help protect ethnic Russians. He said the U.S. will suspend its participation in preparatory meetings for June’s G-8 summit in Sochi, Russia, the site of the recently concluded Winter Olympics, warning that Russia’s “continued violation of international law will lead to greater political and economic isolation.”

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius agreed, saying on French radio Europe that planning for the summit should be put on hold. France “condemns the Russian military escalation” in Ukraine, and Moscow must “realize that decisions have costs,” he said Sunday.

WATCH: Is it too late to warn Russia to stay out of Ukraine?

The U.N. Security Council met in an open, televised session for about a half hour on Saturday afternoon after closed-door consultations, despite initial objections from Russia to an open session. The council heard speeches from a U.N. deputy secretary-general and several ambassadors, but did not take any action.

Ukraine’s Ambassador to the U.N. Yuriy Sergeyev asked the Security Council “to do everything possible now” to stop what he called Russian “aggression.” Russia’s U.N. ambassador, Vitaly Churkin, said the government in Kiev needs to get away from “radicals” and warned, “such actions they’re taking could lead to very difficult developments, which the Russian Federation is trying to avoid.” He said Russia was intervening at the request of pro-Russian authorities in the autonomous Crimea region that is part of Ukraine.

Calling the situation in Ukraine “as dangerous as it is destabilizing,” U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Samantha Power said, “It is time for the Russian military intervention in Ukraine to end.” She warned that “Russia’s provocative actions could easily push the situation beyond the breaking point.” She asked that Russia directly engage the Ukraine government and called for international monitors to be sent to Ukraine to observe the situation.

“Russia and the West find themselves on the brink of a confrontation far worse than in 2008 over Georgia,” Dmitri Trenin, the director of Carnegie Moscow Center, said in a commentary posted on its website. In Georgia, Russian troops quickly routed the Georgian military after they tried to regain control over the separatist province of South Ossetia that has close ties with Moscow.

WATCH: Krauthammer ‘shocked’ by Obama Ukraine statement

The latest moves followed days of scripted, bloodless turmoil on the peninsula, the scene of centuries of wars and seen by Moscow as a crown jewel of the Russian and Soviet empires. What began Thursday with the early-morning takeover of the regional parliament building by mysterious troops continued Saturday afternoon as dozens of those soldiers — almost certainly Russian — moved into the streets around the parliamentary complex and seized control of regional airports, amid street protests by pro-Russian Crimeans calling for Moscow’s protection from the new government in Kiev.

That government came to power last week in the wake of months of pro-democracy protests against the now-fugitive president, Viktor Yanukovych, and his decision to turn Ukraine toward Russia, its longtime patron, instead of the European Union. Despite the calls for Moscow’s help, there has been no sign of ethnic Russians facing attacks in Crimea or elsewhere in Ukraine.

Obama on Friday called on Russia to respect the independence and territory of Ukraine and not try to take advantage of its neighbor’s political upheaval.

He said such action by Russia would represent a “profound interference” in matters he said should be decided by the Ukrainian people. He has not said, however, how the U.S. could pressure Moscow to step back from its intervention.

The Russian parliament urged that Moscow recall its ambassador in Washington in response to Obama’s speech.

On Friday, Ukraine accused Russia of a “military invasion and occupation” in the Crimea, where Russia’s Black Sea fleet is based. Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseny Yatsenyuk called on Moscow “to recall their forces, and to return them to their stations,” according to the Interfax news agency. “Russian partners, stop provoking civil and military resistance in Ukraine.”

U.S. officials told Fox News Friday that they saw “evidence of air and maritime movement into and out of Crimea by Russian forces,” although the Pentagon declined to officially “characterize” the movement.

Ukraine’s population of 46 million is divided in loyalties between Russia and Europe, with much of western Ukraine advocating closer ties with the European Union while eastern and southern regions look to Russia for support. Crimea, a semi-autonomous region that Russia gave to Ukraine in the 1950s, is mainly Russian-speaking.

In his address to parliament, Putin said the “extraordinary situation in Ukraine” was putting at risk the lives of Russian citizens and military personnel stationed at the Crimean naval base that Moscow has maintained since the Soviet collapse.

Despite Putin’s sharp move, there were possible signs Saturday that the Russian leader could soften his approach. Former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, who was freed a week ago after more than 2 ½ years in prison, was reported to be heading to Moscow for a meeting with Putin on Monday, though her spokeswoman denied that. Putin has had good ties with Tymoshenko in the past, and he may look to her for a possible compromise.

In a statement posted on her party’s web site, Tymoshenko urged the U.N. Security Council to meet in Kiev and asked the EU leaders to convene a meeting in Crimea. She urged the West to help protect Ukraine’s territorial integrity, asked Ukrainians to remain calm and voiced hope that diplomacy will succeed.

Putin’s parliamentary motion loosely refers to the “territory of Ukraine” rather than specifically to Crimea, raising the possibility that Moscow could use military force in other Russian-speaking areas in eastern and southern Ukraine, where many detest the new authorities in Kiev.

But in a note of restraint, Deputy Foreign Minister Grigory Karasin said the motion doesn’t mean the president would immediately send additional troops to Ukraine. “There is no talk about it yet,” he said.

Pro-Russian protests were reported Saturday in the eastern cities of Kharkiv, Donetsk and Luhansk and the southern port of Odessa. In Kharkiv, 97 people were injured in clashes between pro-Russia demonstrators who flushed supporters of the new Ukrainian government out of the regional government building and hoisted the Russian flag on top of it, according to the Interfax news agency.

Trenin, of Moscow’s Carnegie office, said that Putin could be seeking to “include Crimea within the Russian Federation and eastern and southern regions of Ukraine forming a separate entity integrated with Russia economically and aligned with it politically.”

“It is not clear at this point whether Kiev will be left to build a rump Ukraine with the western regions or whether it will be swayed to join the eastern regions,” he wrote.

In Crimea, the new pro-Russian prime minister — who came to power after the gunmen swept into parliament on Thursday — claimed control of the military and police and asked Putin for help in keeping peace. There was no visible presence of Ukrainian troops Saturday.

The deputy premier in the Crimean government told Russian news agency RIA Novsti that Ukrainian troops were disarmed and others joined the Crimean people to help patrol the territory. The report couldn’t immediately be confirmed.

Crimean Tatars, the historic hosts of the land who make up 12 percent of the island’s population and stand strongly for Crimea remaining part of Ukraine, didn’t put up any visible resistance Saturday.

“The last two or three days have turned around the life of all the people in Crimea,” said Refat Chubarov, a Crimean Tatar leader. “They’ve taken over military bases and civil institutions. That’s why Crimean society is filled with fear. People are afraid of everyone and everything.”

Crimea only became part of Ukraine in 1954 when Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev transferred jurisdiction from Russia, a move that was a mere formality when both Ukraine and Russia were part of the Soviet Union. The Soviet breakup in 1991 meant Crimea landed in an independent Ukraine.

Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt summed the situation up simply: “What’s happening in Crimea is a Russian takeover. There is no doubt about that,” he told Swedish Radio. “Russian military forces are involved and there has been a local takeover of power.”

Russia put pressure on Ukraine from another direction when a spokesman for state gas company Gazprom said that Ukraine owed $1.59 billion in overdue bills for imported gas. Sergei Kuprianov said in a statement carried by Russian news wires that the gas arrears would endanger a recent discount granted by Russia.

The Russian payment demand and loss of the discount would accelerate Ukraine’s financial crisis. The country is almost broke and seeking emergency credit from the International Monetary Fund.

The tensions barely touched everyday life in Simferopol, the regional capital of Crimea, or anywhere on the peninsula. Children played on swings a few blocks from the parliament building, and most of the city’s stores were open. Couples walked hand-in-hand through parks. Crimea’s airports — civilian and military — were closed to air traffic, but trains and cars were moving to and from the Ukrainian mainland. The civilian airport in Simferopol was reopened late Saturday night.

“Things are normal,” said Olga Saldovskaia, who was walking through town with her son and grandson. While she doesn’t like having gunmen in the streets, like many people in this overwhelmingly ethnic Russian city, she also found their presence reassuring.

“If anyone tries to hurt the people here, they will protect us,” said Saldovskaia. She said she sympathized with the pro-democracy protesters in Kiev, but also worries that turmoil in the capital could lead to violence against ethnic Russians. She added, though, that she definitely doesn’t want Crimea to become part of Russia.

“Russia is not just all flowers and candy,” she said.

Moscow has remained silent on claims that Russian troops are already in control of much of the peninsula, saying any troop movements are within agreed-upon rules governing the semi-autonomous Ukrainian region.

Meanwhile, flights remained halted at Simferopol’s airport. Dozens of armed men in military uniforms without markings patrolled the area. They didn’t stop or search people leaving or entering the airport, and refused to talk to journalists.

Associated Press journalists crossing into Crimea from mainland Ukraine were briefly stopped at a checkpoint manned by troops in unmarked camouflage uniforms as well as officers in uniforms of the Berkut, the feared riot police that cracked down on anti-Yanukovych protesters before he fled the capital a week ago.

The Associated Press contributed to this report…”

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2014/03/02/crimean-leader-claims-control-asks-russia-for-help-in-restoring-peace/

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 8:22 AM

You said “Jail Bones”. :-)

Never gets old…

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:23 AM

I’m guessing that once again Venezuela will be completely ignored.

Flora Duh on March 2, 2014 at 8:25 AM

I’m curious to see how much of the commentary from the show hosts is designed to deflect criticism that obama dithered or Hagel sent the wrong signals at the wrong time.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 8:18 AM

Hawk, or anyone — think America will see anyone laugh at the Democrats/Media over Ukraine, from the Palin pantses Obama viewpoint?

Me neither.

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:27 AM

Ben Affleck will drop by “This Week” to answer questions on Congo

What does he know about world affairs. Who does he think he is. George Clooney? Matt Damon? Sean Penn? Bono?

LashRambo on March 2, 2014 at 8:29 AM

I’m so sick of the news being filtered through the all absorbing mirror of Obamaworld.

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 8:03 AM

Interesting point. Thanks for the thought.

HonestLib on March 2, 2014 at 8:32 AM

I bet we’ll hear about Bridgegate in one of these shows.

renalin on March 2, 2014 at 8:33 AM

Who does he think he is. George Clooney? Matt Damon? Sean Penn? Bono?

LashRambo on March 2, 2014 at 8:29 AM

Yes.

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:34 AM

Enrique Peña Nieto Other, presumably Socialist (anyone know this guy?)
Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:11 AM

President of Mexico (co-president of US)
PRI politician (So socialist corruptocrat)
Capturer of “El Chapo”

kcewa on March 2, 2014 at 8:35 AM

cm, you know I’m teasing right?

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 8:18 AM

Hawk, or anyone — think America will see anyone laugh at the Democrats/Media over Ukraine, from the Palin pantses Obama viewpoint?

Me neither.

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:27 AM

Well, they have covered the 2008 comment, sort of. I posted a Breitbart Article about it on Facebook and Cindy Munford’s hubby posted a politico article in comments. Their angle wasn’t that she was right but that she was saying I told you so.

They’re slick, you have to admit.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 8:36 AM

I’m guessing that once again Venezuela will be completely ignored.
Flora Duh on March 2, 2014 at 8:25 AM

If the rule of 3 holds, we are next for a major anti government uprising/revolution after Venezuela and Ukraine.

Obamacare alone is Cassius Belli, not to mention his denunciation of his oath.

ConstantineXI on March 2, 2014 at 8:36 AM

You said “Jail Bones”. :-)

Never gets old…

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:23 AM

Auto correct I’m sure. Since it came up, any insights to your nic?

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 8:39 AM

I’ve never had a cat as lazy as Obama.

ConstantineXI on March 2, 2014 at 8:39 AM

Stan Hjerleid @StanHjerleid
Deer in the headlights: Dem Rep Ann Kuster dodges #Benghazi question http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jEeX8q1NQ4w #PJNET

When asked her position about what really happened in Benghazi, Kuster responds, “I’m not here to discuss Benghazi, we’re here to talk about the Middle East”.

*facepalm*

Flora Duh on March 2, 2014 at 8:41 AM

Oops. Sorry jaibones

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 8:42 AM

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:11 AM

Well done… awesome!

Key West Reader on March 2, 2014 at 8:43 AM

Ben Affleck will drop by “This Week” to answer questions on Congo
>

The guy doesn’t even realize he was raised a Communist.

Cleombrotus on March 2, 2014 at 8:44 AM

If I’m not mistaking, this is the second consecutive week that Fox News isn’t mentioned. Thanks “Jaibones” for your rundown.

ThePainfulTruth on March 2, 2014 at 8:45 AM

‘Weak’ Obama is blasted for his ‘laughable’ response to Putin as both parties say President is letting Russia push him around

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2571095/UN-Security-Council-meets-openly-Ukraine.html#ixzz2uoSM9ADU
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 8:46 AM

Autocorrect gets me every time

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 8:46 AM

Flora I wish some of the gop would say the same thing when asked about Christie or Nugent

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 8:47 AM

Enrique Peña Nieto Other, presumably Socialist (anyone know this guy?)
Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:11 AM

President of Mexico (co-president of US)
PRI politician (So socialist corruptocrat)
Capturer of “El Chapo”

kcewa on March 2, 2014 at 8:35 AM

He also pushed for Mexico to amend it’s constitution to open up energy investment to foreign capital.

PEMEX at an all time low in production…infrastructure deteriorating and Drug Cartels siphoning from the pipelines to sell on the black market.

so there’s that…

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 8:49 AM

“As Ukraine and Russia inch towards all-out war, hundreds of unidentified gunmen were pictured surrounding a Ukrainian infantry base, with troops on the inside guarding the entrance with a tank.
On Sunday morning Russian forces moved deeper into Crimea and amassed on the Ukrainian border, while Ukrainian leaders mobilised all its forces and placed them in a state of combat-readiness.
Ukraine called on Sunday for ‘real steps’ by world leaders for help. Ukrainian prime minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk said ‘we are on the brink of disaster’ and the actions of Russian President Vladimir Putin were said to amount to a declaration of war…”

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2571309/Ukraine-calls-military-reservists-Russian-troops-mass-close-Ukrainian-borders-regional-capital-Simferopol.html#ixzz2uoU3psz4

But hey….Oscars Tonight!

*facepalm*

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 8:53 AM

When asked her position about what really happened in Benghazi, Kuster responds, “I’m not here to discuss Benghazi, we’re here to talk about the Middle East”.

*facepalm*

Flora Duh on March 2, 2014 at 8:41 AM

Ben Gaze (Rude Boys) or Ben Gazzara (The Bridge at Remagen)…..What difference, at this point, does it make? Meet one actor name Ben and you have met them all.

Not good at that snark thing like you guys.

HonestLib on March 2, 2014 at 8:53 AM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jEeX8q1NQ4w #PJNET

When asked her position about what really happened in Benghazi, Kuster responds, “I’m not here to discuss Benghazi, we’re here to talk about the Middle East”.

*facepalm*

Flora Duh on March 2, 2014 at 8:41 AM

That … should be featured. Forget for a second she didn’t know where Benghazi was. Her constituents, it sounded like, knew what was on or coming to the floor before her. Or she was directly lying about it.

This person votes on life or death issues in our lives.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 8:53 AM

Me neither.

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:27 AM

Agreed. They will never go there. Not even Republicans.

TarheelBen on March 2, 2014 at 8:53 AM

Patton: [referring to Rommel's book, 'Infantry Attacks' or 'Infanterie greift an'] Rommel… you magnificent bastard, *I read your book*!

I guess Putin read Obama’s college paper on the Soviet Union

J_Crater on March 2, 2014 at 8:53 AM

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:11 AM

As always , thank you very much for the run down. Sorry for the whole Saxby thingy, he isn’t too hard of hearing though, being replaced here directly. ; ) Your guess is as good as any on the rating thingy.

Bmore on March 2, 2014 at 8:57 AM

HD @8:18….deflect is their middle name…I’m sure it will be the gops fault

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 8:59 AM

They’re slick, you have to admit.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 8:36 AM

Oh, they’re slick alright. Did you notice that article didn’t mention that Palin was mocked by Foreign Policy magazine’s editor Blake Hounshell, who is NOW one of the editors of Politico magazine?

ConstantineXI on March 2, 2014 at 8:36 AM

As a mother and grandmother, that’s what scares me the most.

Flora Duh on March 2, 2014 at 8:59 AM

HD @8:18….deflect is their middle name…I’m sure it will be the gops fault

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 8:59 AM

It’s like we could write this stuff.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 9:01 AM

Yup…Gregory is going after SB 1062…..the rest will follow suit

Here is there deflection

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 9:02 AM

Not good at that snark thing like you guys.

HonestLib on March 2, 2014 at 8:53 AM

Stick around, you’ll learn from some of the best here. :-)

Flora Duh on March 2, 2014 at 9:02 AM

Indeed HD

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 9:04 AM

There their….. I’m going to get more coffee anyone need a refill?

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 9:05 AM

There their….. I’m going to get more coffee anyone need a refill?

Not me. Two cups of Kuala K-Cup brand and I am currently able to smell colors.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 9:08 AM

FoxNewsSunday @FoxNewsSunday
.@RepMikeRogers: I would cancel U.S. participation in Sochi G8 summit – make clear that we will aid Ukraine financially. #FNS

Flora Duh on March 2, 2014 at 9:09 AM

USA Today, 3/2/14, Russia might invade Ukraine: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/03/02/ukraine-crimea-russia-putin/5944117/

forest on March 2, 2014 at 9:10 AM

“Ukraine’s leader has accused Russia of declaring war on his country and warned the nation was on the “brink of disaster”.

Appealing to the international community for help Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk said: “This is the red alert, this is not a threat, this is actually a declaration of war to my country.”

Ukraine has mobilised its military and called up all its reserves after Russia gave the go-ahead to send more troops into the country, in what has become the biggest confrontation between Moscow and the West since the Cold War.

It came amid warnings the deepening crisis is just “a pace away from catastrophe”, where the smallest act could take it “over the edge”.

Nato’s Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen has called on Russia to de-escalate tensions.

“What Russia is doing now in Ukraine violates the principles of the United Nations charter. It threatens peace and security in Europe,” he said.

In response to the military action in Ukraine, Britain and France have pulled out of preparations for a summit of world leaders in the Russian resort of Sochi in June.

UK Foreign Secretary William Hague, who is visiting the Ukrainian capital Kiev, said: “Our response is diplomatic and peaceful.”

He said he was very concerned about escalating tensions.

Russian forces have taken over the Ukraine’s southeast Crimea region where Moscow has a naval base, and more troops are on their way, prompting accusations of a “military invasion”…

In a sign of how fast-moving and volatile the crisis has become, it is reported hundreds of unidentified gunmen have surrounded a Ukraine military base, preventing soldiers form leaving.

The convoy blockading the site near the region’s capital Simferopol includes at least 17 military vehicles, which have Russian registration plates.

Speaking about the Ukraine, former Liberal Democrat leader Paddy Ashdown, who served in the special forces, told Sky’s Murnaghan programme: “I think we are a pace away from catastrophe at the moment.

“It would require one foolish act, I don’t know, a trigger happy Russian soldier, a Ukrainian guard who acts aggressively at one of these institutions that has been taken over by Russia or Russian supporters.

“A foolish act now could tip us over the edge.

“The one thing that is absolutely essential now is that the West speaks with a single voice.”

“The smallest tremor, the smallest act now could take us over the edge.”

This was echoed by Sir Tony Brenton, the former British ambassador to Russia, who told Murnaghan: “It only requires one person to make a mistake for things to go very badly wrong.”

Former Foreign Secretary Sir Malcolm Rifkind also warned of the dangers posed by the deepening crisis.

He told Dermot Murnaghan: “There is no doubt this is probably the most serious crisis since the Cold War.

“This has to be a defining moment in the West’s relationship with Russia.

“There are very serious implications for the whole of Europe.”

Ukraine’s population is divided in loyalties between Russia and the West.

Much of western Ukraine advocating closer ties with the European Union. However, the eastern and southern regions look to Russia for support.

Crimea has 2.3 million inhabitants, most of whom identify themselves as ethnic Russians and speak Russian…”

http://news.sky.com/story/1219658/ukraine-accuses-russia-of-declaring-war

Strength of Ukraine forces:

“But the Ukrainian military has only a token force in the autonomous region — a lightly armed brigade of about 3,500 people, equipped with artillery and light weapons but none of the country’s advanced battle tanks, said Igor Sutyagin, a Russian military expert at the Royal United Services Institute in London. The forces also have only one air squadron of SU-27 fighters deployed at the air base near Belbek.

A senior NATO official said that Ukraine’s small naval fleet, which was originally part of the Black Sea Fleet, had been boxed in by Russian warships…

The Russian takeover of Crimea was relatively easy, in part because the Ukrainian military was careful not to respond to a provocation that would excuse any larger intervention. The military — which has seen its top leader change constantly with the political situation — has also made a point of staying out of the internal political conflict in Ukraine.

The current military chief of staff, Lt. Gen. Mykhailo Kutsyn, was named to the job only on Friday, after Adm. Yuriy Ilyin, 51, was relieved of his post after traveling to Crimea and, reportedly at least, having a heart attack. Admiral Ilyin had only been in the post for a short time himself, appointed by Mr. Yanukovych on Feb. 19 after Col. Gen. Volodymyr Zamana was fired for being unwilling to attack protesters in Kiev. All these changes have been an object lesson for the military to try to stay out of politics and civil unrest.

Even so, Ukraine had no realistic contingency plan for a Russian takeover of Crimea, given the size of the Russian forces legitimately based there, said Mr. Sutyagin, the military analyst. But he also said that he doubted that Russian forces would intervene elsewhere in Ukraine, because Russian forces would be too stretched to control much territory and even in the largely pro-Russia east, Ukrainian forces would be expected to fight back, aided by self-defense militias and partisans.

Ukraine had accomplished some military reform with NATO advice, but since President Yanukovych said that Ukraine was not interested in full NATO membership, cooperation has lagged, the NATO official said. Ukraine has, however, taken part in some military exercises with NATO, contribute some troops to NATO’s response force and helped in a small way in Libya.

In general, the Ukrainians are considered to have excellent home-produced tanks, but have also relied in part on the BMP-1, an infantry fighting vehicle that is a combined armored personnel carrier and light tank dating from the early 1970s. Ukrainian air defenses, all produced in Russia and a generation behind, are considered weak.

Mr. Pukhov, at the military research institution in Moscow, said that the Ukrainian military inherited a vast supply of legacy weapons from three Soviet military districts. “But 22 years have gone by during a state of near continuous economic decline and the Ukrainian military has received practically no new equipment,” he said. “Now the force is somewhat pathetic.”

He said the forces in Crimea were there less to defend Crimea than to prevent Crimean Tatar separatism and even more unofficially, Russian separatism. During Ukraine’s recent military reforms, contract soldiers were allowed to serve near their homes, meaning that many of the junior officer corps on the peninsula are also residents of Crimea, which is majority ethnic-Russian, so they are possibly more pro-Russian in their views.

On Saturday, Pyotr N. Mekhet, a reserve colonel offered a top position in Ukraine’s Ministry of Defense, said the government should mobilize, or “the people will form militias,” suggesting a partisan movement could emerge.

Yuri Lutsenko, an opposition leader, reached out on Saturday to residents of eastern Ukraine who might be watching on television, saying the protesters who had populated the Maidan, or Independence Square, in Kiev had never harbored anger at those in the east.

“We reach out our hands from Maidan to Donetsk, to Kharkiv, to Dnepropetrovsk and to Simferopol,” he said, talking in Russian, which is spoken by many in the eastern part of the country.

Mr. Lutsenko also discouraged street fighters from arming themselves immediately. “The hour for a partisan movement has not yet come,” he said…”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/02/world/europe/ukraine-finds-its-forces-are-ill-equipped-to-take-crimea-back-from-russia.html

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 9:13 AM

On “This Week”, Kerry just said the Ukrainian invasion is a 19th century action in a 21st century world. How naive and off point that is. Does it go against the Pax Kerryana? Does it mess up his sense of feng shui? He needs to do better than to say this doesn’t fit his understanding of the world. This is the 21st century world in which we live.

LashRambo on March 2, 2014 at 9:13 AM

If the rule of 3 holds, we are next for a major anti government uprising/revolution after Venezuela and Ukraine.

Obamacare alone is Cassius Belli, not to mention his denunciation of his oath.

ConstantineXI on March 2, 2014 at 8:36 AM

It’s in the works search “Operation American Spring”.

Who is John Galt on March 2, 2014 at 9:14 AM

FoxNewsSunday @FoxNewsSunday
.@RepMikeRogers on #Ukraine: Putin is playing Chess and we’re playing marbles. #FNS

Breaking News @BreakingNews
John Kerry says Russia could face visa bans, asset freezes, trade and investment penalties over actions in Crimea – @meetthepress, @AP

Stephen Hayes @stephenfhayes
On #FNS, @RepMikeRogers “We got our fannies handed on us” by Russians on tactical nukes. “They’ve been running circles around us.”

Flora Duh on March 2, 2014 at 9:14 AM

But more important, AP at 0800? Must have been a fantastically long night!

Who is John Galt on March 2, 2014 at 9:15 AM

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:11 AM

Thank you, Jailbones, for the great rundown. Now, I don’t have to wonder if I missed anything (although I probably will watch Fox). I think MLB.TV is running taped spring training games, or maybe there is a Matlock marathon somewhere.

polly2150 on March 2, 2014 at 9:16 AM

What’s interesting about all of this is the sizable Russian minority, within Ukraine, loyal to Russia, and clamoring for Atzlan, er, Russian rule.

Punchenko on March 2, 2014 at 9:16 AM

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 9:08 AM

Meant to ask yesterday…..did you post that you were learning a PF song…..if so which one. Only PF song I can play…..Is There Anybody Out There.

I now play nylon more than steel stringed guitars.

HonestLib on March 2, 2014 at 9:16 AM

Since it came up, any insights to your nic?

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 8:39 AM

Saw both pieces (Politico and Breibart). Politico is pathetically biased and proved it here. Normal people are laughing at Hounshell, but Politico? They hired him! Losers.

The nickname is from childhood…just one of those goofy things.

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 9:16 AM

FoxNewsSunday @FoxNewsSunday
.@DarrellIssa on #IRS targeting: Lois Lerner’s attorney indicates that she will testify on Wednesday. #FNS

Flora Duh on March 2, 2014 at 9:17 AM

The Reacquisition, let’s begin
The Reacquisition, let us in
We have a mission in the Crimea to convert
We’re gonna teach them Soviet might
We’re gonna help them see the light
And into the Soviet Union we’ll revert

The Reacquisition, what a show
The Reacquisition, here we go
We know you’re wishing
That we’d go away
But the Reacquisition here and it’s here to stay
The Reacquisition, oh boy
The Reacquisition, what a joy
The Reacquisition, oy oy

Flange on March 2, 2014 at 9:18 AM

As weak and gutless as Obama is, the financial approach could be effective against an economic weakling like Russia. Maybe.

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 9:18 AM

Ukraine needs to be more like the U.S. and ban the waving of the Ukrainian flag. Such a display only antagonizes the Ukrainian Russian population on Cinco de Mayo, er, St. Putin’s Day.

Punchenko on March 2, 2014 at 9:18 AM

Why doesn’t the “Messiah” do anything at all against Russia? How are we going to get our stuff and personnel back and forth from the ISS?? Another mess to thank O for, the lousy state of our space program compared to Russia. JFK must be spinning at near light speed in his grave about now.

Mini-14 on March 2, 2014 at 9:18 AM

“The challenges for Ukraine’s new leaders are many and varied. With President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia now openly intent on a military showdown over control of Crimea, the government faces a powerful test of Ukraine’s territorial integrity. Demonstrations are growing in the Russian-speaking east of the country, underscoring the tenuous nature of the government’s control there. Washington and Brussels, Kiev’s only hopes at this point for the aid necessary to avert economic collapse, are scrambling to deliver and have shown no desire for an armed confrontation with Russia.

“You have a revolution, with unelected guys seizing power,” said Andrew Wilson, a Ukraine expert at the European Council on Foreign Relations.

“The people on the Maidan might be right, they might be martyrs, and they have good arguments, but no one elected them,” he said. “You need to get real politics and competition and more legitimacy. Of course, the counterargument is just concentrate on economy. But the credibility question is tearing the country apart, and the transfer of power cut a lot of corners constitutionally.”

Reaching out to the Russian-speaking east, the industrial heartland of the country, is crucial, all agree, even by a new government that has very few representatives of what was regularly the country’s largest and most popular party, the Party of Regions, led by the ousted president, Viktor F. Yanukovych. Instead, the government is currently dominated by those associated with a former prime minister, Yulia V. Tymoshenko, who is widely blamed for the failure of the 2004 Orange Revolution to change Ukraine’s corrupt political system, and by Ukrainian nationalists.

An early triumphalist mistake, Mr. Wilson said, was the quick overturning of a 2012 law on languages that allowed regions to make Russian a second official language, needlessly offending, even goading Russian-dominated regions like the Donbass and Crimea.

Whether Egypt or Libya, post-Soviet Georgia or Ukraine itself a decade ago, recent history is littered with failed or broken dreams of new democratic beginnings. The forces of the old order retreat, regroup and capitalize on the instability or inefficiency of the new.

As Russian forces appear to be establishing their control of Crimea in the name of a seemingly manufactured local cry for aid, Ukraine today is a good example of how deep, domestic, centrifugal forces can be easily manipulated from the outside to keep a new, inexperienced government shaken and destabilized.

Kiev itself is not a dominant capital like Paris, said Bruce P. Jackson, president of the Project on Transitional Democracies, which has been working in Ukraine for 15 years.

“Kiev has always been more of a compromise than a capital, and if it loses the ability to compromise, it loses its credibility as a capital,” he said.

What worries him, Mr. Jackson said, is that the new government is too beholden to the people’s movement on the Maidan. He is also concerned that it is not reaching out sufficiently to the east and needs the credibility of both presidential and parliamentary elections to answer Mr. Yanukovych’s charge, echoed in Moscow, that those politicians of western Ukraine, who have regularly lost elections, have seized power instead.

In essence, he suggested, the revolutionaries “have knocked out the foundations of modern Ukraine,” and they need to be restored in a way that recognizes the diversity of the country…”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/02/world/europe/after-initial-triumph-ukraines-leaders-face-battle-for-credibility.html?action=click&contentCollection=Europe&region=Footer&module=TopNews&pgtype=article

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 9:19 AM

HonestLib on March 2, 2014 at 9:16 AM

Both the lead and rhythm pieces for “Wish You Were Here”.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 9:22 AM

What’s interesting about all of this is the sizable Russian minority, within Ukraine, loyal to Russia, and clamoring for Atzlan, er, Russian rule.

Punchenko on March 2, 2014 at 9:16 AM

Depending on the location/region, the ethnic Russians hold a slim majority. Most of the region of Eastern Ukraine and Crimea voted for Yakunovich.

Not like this is a new development…this dates back to the middle ages.

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 9:24 AM

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 8:11 AM

Nicely presented, as usual.

Thank you.

Franklin100 on March 2, 2014 at 9:25 AM

The nickname is from childhood… just one of those goofy things.

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 9:16 AM

I was going to guess it was from J’ai bones, as in “I have bones.”

LOL

Fallon on March 2, 2014 at 9:28 AM

Van Hollen and Portman on FNC right now to talk about the PresBud. They’re talking (and quibbling) over deficit reduction and not the fact that the filthy rat-eared dictator is proposing to gut the military. Talk about misplaced priorities, given the events in Ukraine.

Happy Nomad on March 2, 2014 at 9:36 AM

As weak and gutless as Obama is, the financial approach could be effective against an economic weakling like Russia. Maybe.

Jaibones on March 2, 2014 at 9:18 AM

Hmmm…

“China’s top newspaper criticized the West on Thursday for remaining locked in a “Cold War mentality” against Russia in the contest for influence over Ukraine, calling for the shackles of such outmoded thinking to be cast off to deal with the crisis.

The commentary published in the People’s Daily, the flagship newspaper of the ruling Communist Party, was the strongest reaction yet in Beijing to the rift between the West and Russia that has been growing since the ouster of Moscow’s ally Viktor Yanukovich as president following weeks of protests.

“The theories related to politics, economics and security during the Cold War period are still influencing many people on their concept of the world, and some Western people are still imbued with resentment towards Russia,” the paper said.

It called on Western countries to “abandon their outdated thinking” and expand cooperation.

“Ridding the shackles of the Cold War mentality will reduce unnecessary confrontation, thereby allowing for a smoother transition in international relations.”

The commentary was published under the pen name “Zhong Sheng”, meaning “Voice of China”, which is often used to give the paper’s view on foreign policy issues.

China and Russia have close ties and see eye-to-eye on many international diplomatic issues, such as the crisis in Syria.

China has so far shown little public interest in participating in any financial aid for Ukraine, or getting involved diplomatically, in line with the low key approach it takes to many international crises.

China’s foreign ministry has said it will not interfere in what it considers an internal affair and that it respects the Ukrainian people’s decisions, adding that it would like to continue to develop “friendly cooperation” with the country.

East-West tensions over Ukraine have risen further since Russian President Vladimir Putin put 150,000 combat troops on high alert for war games near Ukraine, Moscow’s boldest gesture since the ouster of Yanukovich.

The United States warned Russia on Wednesday it would be a “grave mistake” to intervene militarily in Ukraine and said it was considering $1 billion in U.S. loan guarantees and additional funding to help Kiev.

Yanukovich visited China in December in the hope of winning much-needed financial aid, but China did not say it would provide any loans. Yanukovich said deals signed with China may bring Ukraine about $8 billion in investment.

State news agency Xinhua said in December that Western powers should stop meddling in Ukraine’s affairs and manipulating the “opinions of the people” about a trade pact with the European Union, just days after Yanukovich’s visit to China…”

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/02/27/us-ukraine-crisis-china-idUSBREA1Q06J20140227

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 9:36 AM

We have to get over it….its 2014 re lgbt issues
some liberal hack on mtp just now

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 9:39 AM

should we be worried ? yes we should

runner on March 2, 2014 at 9:44 AM

We have to control spending
-jerry brown

Lol

Gregory asking every guest about sb1062….enough

Geez

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 9:44 AM

“At the moment, Putin is doing very well in Ukraine. Clueless arrogance by both US and EU policymakers gave Putin a heaven-sent opportunity to block a worst-case scenario for Russia in Ukraine last fall. Then-President Yanukovych, a man of the east long associated with Russia, was moving toward signing an Association Agreement with the EU that offered a historic opportunity for a united Ukraine to move firmly west. But both Washington and the EU underestimated Putin’s determination to block that outcome and failed to ensure that Yanukovych went all the way. Putin seized the opportunity and with a combination of official and perhaps unofficial, more personal incentives, was able to keep Yanukovych from finalizing the deal.

Yanukovych’s obvious yielding to Moscow’s blandishments touched off the unrest that would ultimately bring him down and set the current crisis afoot. When pro-European street protesters overthrew Yanukovych, there were plenty of Western analysts (some, unfortunately, working for governments) who drew the comforting but deeply false conclusion that these events represented a triumph of the West. Instead, the revolution (Kiev’s third since 1990), unleashed the chaos that gave Putin his chance for his Crimean gambit. Now Putin seems to be seizing the most important military assets Russia holds in the country and can reasonably hope to increase Russia’s influence throughout the country as a weak government struggles with intractable problems. Meanwhile, he is probably licking his chops over the unpalatable choices Western statesmen now face. If the West doesn’t ship billions of dollars to Ukraine, the current government will fail and national unity will fray. If the West comes across with the dough, Putin has a number possibilities for working the situation to his benefit. He can, for example, raise the natural gas price to a Ukraine flush with Western aid dollars, or demand repayment of Ukraine’s existing debts to Moscow, transferring Western aid money into Russian pockets.

We’ll have to see, but without a sharp turn, neither President Obama nor his chief European partner Chancellor Merkel will do anything but seek to defuse the crisis as quickly and painlessly as possible. If Putin offers a face-saving solution that leaves him with some visible gains in exchange for some mostly cosmetic concessions, they will have a hard time saying no even as they wrestle with the ugly financial and political arithmetic that a Ukrainian bailout involves…”

http://www.the-american-interest.com/wrm/2014/02/28/red-lines-in-crimea/

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 9:44 AM

We have to get over it….its 2014 re lgbt issues
some liberal hack on mtp just now

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 9:39 AM

That does seem to be the prevailing attitude. Hey all of you who have problems with the LBGT lifestyle, just STFU- it’s 2014! I wonder what the reaction would be if those of us who do reject this lifestyle choice start screaming at them to STFU and stop pushing their perverted values on decent society.

Happy Nomad on March 2, 2014 at 9:44 AM

how is obama propaganda working for you all ?

runner on March 2, 2014 at 9:45 AM

should we be worried ? yes we should

runner on March 2, 2014 at 9:44 AM

“Russia Says It’s Building Naval Bases in Asia, Latin America
Russia’s defense minister says the country will soon build military bases everywhere from Vietnam to Cuba.

A senior Russian defense official has announced that Moscow is looking to build military bases throughout different countries in Asia and the Western Hemisphere.

According to RIA Novosti, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu said Russia is looking to build military bases in Vietnam, Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua, the Seychelles, Singapore and several other countries.

“The talks are under way, and we are close to signing the relevant documents,” Shoigu said, according to RIA Novosti. The newspaper noted that “Moscow currently has only one naval base outside the former Soviet Union – in Tartus, Syria, but the fate of this naval facility is uncertain because of the ongoing civil war in that country.”

The comments are probably intended in part to shore up domestic support for Vladimir Putin among Russian nationalists who are likely reassessing his leadership abilities in light of the events in the Ukraine in past weeks.

However, the timing and substance of the comments also suggest that Russia is trying to antagonize the United States because of the collapse of the Russian-backed Ukrainian government last week.

The bases, as noted above, are largely focused in Asia and the Western Hemisphere. Asia is the region that the U.S. has identified as the most important one for its national security in the decades ahead. Moscow is likely to trying to remind Washington that it has some ability to frustrate U.S. objectives in that theatre should Washington continue to press its claims in countries Russia views as vital to its security.

The parallel to Ukraine is even more apparent with regards to the Latin American countries, particularly Cuba which is just 90 miles from the United States. Much like Ukraine itself, Cuba and Nicaragua also immediately harken back to the Cold War era as both served as battleground states between the U.S. and the Soviet Union, or at least were perceived as such by leaders in Washington. Russia’s message to the United States couldn’t be clearer: “if you start meddling in our neighborhood, we’ll start meddling in your neighborhood.”

Still the threat is largely hollow, as the RIA Novosti article subtly eludes too. The article begins by reporting that “Russia is planning to expand its permanent military presence outside its borders by placing military bases in a number of foreign countries.” However, later it notes in passing: “The minister added that the negotiations cover not only military bases but also visits to ports in such countries on favorable conditions as well as the opening of refueling sites for Russian strategic bombers on patrol.”

This is Russian diplomatic spin at its best. The way the sentence is phrased leaves readers with the impression that along with building new military bases in all these countries, Russia is also gaining access to certain additional ports to refuel and repair some of its vessels and aircraft. In reality, in many of the countries Shoigu mentioned Russia is likely only gaining some greater access rights to make port calls, refuel, and possibly even make repairs to its military equipment. It is almost certainly not building actual Russian military bases in most of these countries. For example, Russia will likely be once again granted access to Vietnam’s Cam Ranh Bay port, but will not command the port exclusively as it once did. Indeed, the U.S. may very well also re-gain some access to the port. In addition, Russia has announced its hope of gaining greater access to naval ports in many of these places before, so this is less of an announcement than a reiteration in light of events in Ukraine.

In any case, Russia is living on borrowed time as its economy remains almost entirely dependent on revenue for oil and natural gas exports, which is likely to drop off significantly in the years ahead as a result of lower demand growth from the emerging markets and new sources of supplies in places like North America. Thus, while Russian state-run newspapers carry daily reports on all the future vessels, aircraft and missiles the country is fielding as part of Putin’s military modernization, most of these aren’t likely to see the light of day….”

http://thediplomat.com/2014/02/russia-says-its-building-naval-bases-in-asia-latin-america/

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 9:50 AM

Dated Feb. 28,2014

“Russian media have been reporting that China is seeking the return of $3 billion in loans. The reports, also picked up by the South China Morning Post, cite an unnamed Ukrainian official as saying that China has filed a complaint against Ukraine for reneging on a deal where $3 billion in loans from China would be repaid in corn exports from Ukraine. According to the official, Kiev only provided a little over $150 million of worth of grain to China.

The original deal was signed in the fall of 2012. At the time, Ukraine’s agriculture minster, Mykola Prysyazhnyuk, told Financial Times that in return for access to $3 billion in loans, Kiev would export about 3 million tons of corn to China each year. Although China has in the past used a similar arrangement in oil-for-loans deals, the arrangement with the Ukraine was a first for China. The loan money was supposed to be mostly put back into the agricultural sector, including a $3 billion irrigation plan for the southern part of Ukraine.

The Foreign Ministry of Ukraine issued a statement denying the reports that China is seeking a return of the loan money. The news release cited a meeting between Victor Mayko, Ukraine’s Deputy Foreign Minister and Chinese Ambassador Zhang Xiyun. Zhang reportedly “emphasized the absence of claims from official Beijing as to the implementation of this contract and the willingness of the Chinese side to continue its realization.” Zhang also told Mayko that “currently there were no problems between Ukraine and China that could negatively affect further development of the two states interaction.”

China’s Foreign Ministry has downplayed the reports, with spokesperson Hua Chunying telling the press that “relevant reports are inconsistent with the facts.” However, she also said that China hopes “the Ukrainian side will ensure the effective implementation,” not exactly a full vote of confidence. Given the political turmoil in Ukraine, China is likely worried about the continuance of its grain imports from the Ukraine. But by the same token, the Chinese government would likely want to avoid adding to Ukraine’s troubles by asking for $3 billion to be returned. An Eastern European specialist at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences told the Global Times that China would never file such a claim in the midst of such political uncertainty.

China’s food security strategy is a constant concern to Beijing, which must feed 1.3 billion people even while encouraging urbanization and facing the problem of polluted land and water. China’s leadership recently decided to relax its customary emphasis on grain self-sufficiency, allowing for more imports. The Financial Times reported that Chinas’ new guidelines for grains would “stabilize” grain production at around 550 million tons in 2020, 50 million tons less than the 2013 harvest.

Rather than abandoning its emphasis on self-sufficiency, though, it seems China is changing the definition. A January Xinhua article on self-sufficiency in grain production mainly focused on the “key grain supplies” of wheat and rice, which are used for food, rather than grains like corn and soybeans that are typically used as animal feed. A leading government official predicted that China’s corn imports in particular would continue to grow.

As China’s grain imports grow, its connection to Ukraine will also increase. Ukraine is one of the world’s leading exporters of grain, and is hoping to increase production in coming years. In 2013, Ukraine exported 18.5 million tons of grain, and hopes to more than double that amount, reaching 40 million tons by 2020. Ukraine’s plans for its agricultural industry, coupled with China’s need to increase grain imports, will make Kiev an attractive target for increased economic cooperation with Beijing.

Provided, of course, that the political situation in Ukraine doesn’t continue to worsen. Recent reports are not optimistic. Should the political chaos substantially affect Ukraine’s crop production, it could have a major impact on global food supplies, and on China’s food security…”

http://thediplomat.com/2014/02/chinas-agricultural-deals-with-ukraine-in-jeopardy/

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 9:56 AM

We have to get over it….its 2014 re lgbt issues
some liberal hack on mtp just now

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 9:39 AM

That does seem to be the prevailing attitude. Hey all of you who have problems with the LBGT lifestyle, just STFU- it’s 2014! I wonder what the reaction would be if those of us who do reject this lifestyle choice start screaming at them to STFU and stop pushing their perverted values on decent society.

Happy Nomad on March 2, 2014 at 9:44 AM

I just read a very heartwarming piece by a father writing a letter to his very young daughter about understanding who the right man will be when she gets old enough to date/marry and so on. Very well written and full of old fashion common sense about being yourself etc. One of the comments below was a woman blowing a gasket over the fact that he assumed his little girl was going to grow up to be hetero.

Struck me as another indicator that, it’s what’s next. Demands for you to not only expose your children to the gay community lifestyle but it almost seemed like a demand you include the gay lifestyle as an alternative choice.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 9:58 AM

EU and oabama’s gambit backfired. i wonder what russia is telling china now. can’t wait to see the markets tomorrow

runner on March 2, 2014 at 10:02 AM

We have to get over it….its 2014 re lgbt issues
some liberal hack on mtp just now

cmsinaz on March 2, 2014 at 9:39 AM

Yeah.. that was what the mobs were shouting at Lot just before the fire fell. “It’s 1620BC, get over it!”

JellyToast on March 2, 2014 at 10:05 AM

“Ukraine isn’t a country: it’s a Frankenstein monster composed of pieces of dead empires, stitched together by Stalin. It has never had a government in the Western sense of the term after the collapse of the Soviet Union gave it independence, just the equivalent of the family offices for one predatory oligarch after another–including the “Gas Princess,” Yulia Tymoshenko. It has a per capital income of $3,300 per year, about the same as Egypt and Syria, and less than a tenth of the European average. The whole market capitalization of its stock exchange is worth less than the Disney Company. It’s a basket case that claims to need $35 billion to survive the next two years. Money talks and bullshit walks. Who wants to ask the American taxpayer for $35 billion for Ukraine, one of the most corrupt economies on earth? How about $5 billion? Secretary of State Kerry is talking about $1 billion in loan guarantees, and the Europeans are talking a similar amount. That’s not diplomacy. It’s a clown show.

Ukraine’s revolution is odd, even by recent standards. The deposed premier Viktor Yanukovych won the 2010 presidential election against Yulia Tymoshenko, after Tymoshenko’s “Orange Revolution” regime made a ghastly mess of everything. Yanukovich made matters worse. Clearly a lot of Ukrainians got together at Maidan square, ranging from democratic idealists to rent-a-mob demonstrators paid by Ukrainian oligarchs to the sort of hoodlums who think the other side should have won the Second World War. What sort of regime do we have now? As CNN reported Feb. 27, there is

Arseniy Yatseniuk, 39, named as Prime Minister and a practiced politician who has been the chief opposition voice at Maidan Square. While closely associated with former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko — who was freed from prison in the wake of last week’s protests — he can at least do business with the West and talk tough with hard-nosed IMF suits. A realist, on Wednesday he warned that the new government will need to invoke some very unpopular decisions, given the dire state of the economy. “We are a team of people with a suicide wish — welcome to hell,” he said.

Ukraine’s economy is close to Egypt’s in per capital GDP, and its governance is similar: desperately poor people can’t make it through the day without government subsidies, especially for energy. The oligarchs have looted the country so that it has to borrow money from foreigners to maintain the subsidies, leaving Ukraine with $137 billion in foreign debt, and a need to borrow an additional $20 billion a year. Putin offered just under $20 billion in cash and subsidies, and Yanukovych accepted his offer. The alternative was maybe $15 billion from the IMF provided that Ukraine cut subsidies first. Yanukovych, who is neither a Ukrainian patriot nor a Russian stooge, but a man on the make, decided he couldn’t sell the austerity package. That’s why he went with Russia. For the demonstrators at Maidan square, staying in the Russian orbit meant more of the same misery. Some of them decided they would rather die than live that way, which is perfectly understandable. But what precisely to they expect to get from the Europeans, let alone the U.S.? Finding $35 billion of taxpayers’ money has a vanishingly small probability.

Putin bungled things badly: he thought a bailout would solve the problem. That blew up in his face. The West bungled things badly: it has a $35 billion bill on its desk and no intention of paying it. John McCain went to Maidan in December and said the American people were with the Ukrainian demonstrators. He meant in spirit, not in their capacity as taxpayers. The Ukrainian opposition didn’t bungle so much as take a collective bungee jump without a cord. Just what do they propose to do now?

As for the Crimea: Did anyone seriously think that Vladimir Putin would let the main port of Russia’s Black Sea fleet fall into unfriendly hands? Russia will take the Crimea, and the strategic consequences will be nil. We couldn’t have a strategic confrontation if we wanted it. How would we get troops or ships into the Black Sea area in the first place in order to have a confrontation? Perhaps the Belgiums will send in their army instead. I suppose we need to denounce the Russians for violating Ukraine’s territorial integrity.

What should we do (or what should we have done)? It’s obvious that the Ukrainians have no faith in their democratic institutions, having staged a coup against a democratically elected president. In that case, the next step is constitutional reform. The existing system has broken down and the people should choose a new one. But constitutional reform has to take into account the prospect of partition. Lviv and Sevastopol have about as much in common as, say, Bogota and Montreal. The West should encourage the Ukrainians to amend their democratic institutions in order to achieve a national consensus, which might mean a different sort of nation. I

If Crimea, for example, were to vote for partition, why object?
If it voted against partition, that would put Putin on the spot. The West would have come off better by getting in front of the events rather than chasing them…”

http://pjmedia.com/spengler/2014/03/01/ukraine-is-hopeless-but-not-serious/?singlepage=true

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 10:14 AM

EU and oabama’s gambit backfired. i wonder what russia is telling china now. can’t wait to see the markets tomorrow

runner on March 2, 2014 at 10:02 AM

We’ll help you get bread comrade?

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 10:15 AM

Putin stares down Obama over a game of chess. (another bk photoshop)

BKeyser on March 2, 2014 at 10:23 AM

“There are hints Morell has higher political ambitions, such as a post in a Clinton administration. As the line goes, he had the motive and opportunity to lie about Benghazi. Soon he’ll have a chance to finally tell the truth…”

Read More At Investor’s Business Daily: http://news.investors.com/ibd-editorials/022814-691717-cia-director-mike-morell-altered-talking-points.htm#ixzz2uorJqDsz

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 10:24 AM

Ramirez cartoon on defense cuts…

Beating swords into foodstamps

http://www.investors.com/editorial-cartoons/michael-ramirez/691808

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 10:26 AM

Putin stares down Obama over a game of chess. (another bk photoshop)

BKeyser on March 2, 2014 at 10:23 AM

*snicker*

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 10:28 AM

Putin stares down Obama over a game of chess. (another bk photoshop)

BKeyser on March 2, 2014 at 10:23 AM

*snicker*

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 10:28 AM

and here

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 10:29 AM

We’ll help you get bread comrade?

workingclass artist on March 2, 2014 at 10:15 AM

don’t forget to do your homework

runner on March 2, 2014 at 10:30 AM

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 9:58 AM

This is exactly the type of thing I’ve been warning about for years when well-meaning people would say,”what difference does it make? Their SSM doesn’t affect my marriage.” Well, maybe not theirs personally, but you can’t unleash this kind of untested social experiment on society and not expect to have major unintended consequences for future generations.

ncinca on March 2, 2014 at 10:32 AM

Issa saying on FNS that Lerner will testify Wednesday before House Oversight on her IRS crimes.. Apparently they have enough evidence from other sources on her actions to put her behind the 8-ball.

We’ll see. From a legal standpoint, I don’t see any reason for her to testify at this point. Why not force the committee to find her in contempt and take her to court to enforce it? It’s a long shot, but she might win her argument over asserting the privilege (5th Am). I don’t know why other evidence in the committee hands would change that.

novaculus on March 2, 2014 at 10:33 AM

Putin stares down Obama over a game of chess. (another bk photoshop)

BKeyser on March 2, 2014 at 10:23 AM

Check mate indeed!

ncinca on March 2, 2014 at 10:36 AM

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 9:58 AM

This is exactly the type of thing I’ve been warning about for years when well-meaning people would say,”what difference does it make? Their SSM doesn’t affect my marriage.” Well, maybe not theirs personally, but you can’t unleash this kind of untested social experiment on society and not expect to have major unintended consequences for future generations.

ncinca on March 2, 2014 at 10:32 AM

And therein lies another component in all of this. There are people reading and wanting/may comment that we’re homophobes or intolerant for preferring our children end up in a traditional heterosexual relationship.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 10:41 AM

I just read a very heartwarming piece by a father writing a letter to his very young daughter about understanding who the right man will be when she gets old enough to date/marry and so on. Very well written and full of old fashion common sense about being yourself etc. One of the comments below was a woman blowing a gasket over the fact that he assumed his little girl was going to grow up to be hetero.

Struck me as another indicator that, it’s what’s next. Demands for you to not only expose your children to the gay community lifestyle but it almost seemed like a demand you include the gay lifestyle as an alternative choice.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 9:58 AM

How many gay adoptive parents are steering their children into homosexual lifestyles?

Some gays are determined to create more gays by introducing children to the concept of homosexuality as early in their lives as possible, and influencing them to accept the notion that they themselves might be homosexual, all before they have the capacity to understand what sex is and long before it is appropriate. Of course these types are infuriated that people might want to have control over their own children’s upbringing, and might not choose to follow the gay blueprint for a future society.

novaculus on March 2, 2014 at 10:48 AM

Struck me as another indicator that, it’s what’s next. Demands for you to not only expose your children to the gay community lifestyle but it almost seemed like a demand you include the gay lifestyle as an alternative choice.

hawkdriver on March 2, 2014 at 9:58 AM

Not just the gays but all the menu choices. Bisexual, transgender, questioning, those who require gender re-assignment, etc.

Happy Nomad on March 2, 2014 at 10:49 AM

Ben Gaze (Rude Boys) or Ben Gazzara (The Bridge at Remagen)…..What difference, at this point, does it make? Meet one actor name Ben and you have met them all.

Not good at that snark thing like you guys.

HonestLib on March 2, 2014 at 8:53 AM

heh heh, I’d say that one was pretty good actually.

dmacleo on March 2, 2014 at 10:56 AM

Not just the gays but all the menu choices. Bisexual, transgender, questioning, those who require gender re-assignment, etc.

Happy Nomad on March 2, 2014 at 10:49 AM

GAYYYZ!

Lanceman on March 2, 2014 at 11:00 AM

I’m guessing that once again Venezuela will be completely ignored.

Flora Duh on March 2, 2014 at 8:25 AM

I have two trains of thought on this. One, the media doesn’t think the people stand a chance of changing anything. Two, they don’t have to worry about covering The Won’s azz since he has been ignoring it and they don’t have any tough guy comments to prop up.

Cindy Munford on March 2, 2014 at 11:13 AM

How many gay adoptive parents are steering their children into homosexual lifestyles?

Some gays are determined to create more gays by introducing children to the concept of homosexuality as early in their lives as possible, and influencing them to accept the notion that they themselves might be homosexual, all before they have the capacity to understand what sex is and long before it is appropriate. Of course these types are infuriated that people might want to have control over their own children’s upbringing, and might not choose to follow the gay blueprint for a future society.

novaculus on March 2, 2014 at 10:48 AM

Have a few lesbian couples as friends who have children. But I must point out that one of the ladies in each case is the natural born mother of the child. They are raising their kids just like the wife and I are raising ours. Maybe adoptive gay couples are raising their children like you wrote, and to be honest I know of no example either way.

HonestLib on March 2, 2014 at 11:34 AM

Comment pages: 1 2