Russia: Ukraine in state of “armed mutiny”

posted at 9:21 am on February 24, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

Now that the Olympics in Sochi have closed, the real games will now begin. Just hours after the international community celebrated the end of the athletic spectacle, Russian Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev blasted the regime change in neighboring Ukraine, calling it an “armed mutiny.” He also questioned the EU for recognizing “Kalashnikov-toting people in black masks who are roaming Kiev” as a legitimate government:

Russian news agencies quoted Medvedev as saying the new authorities in Ukraine have come to power as a result of “armed mutiny.” He lashed out at what he called the EU’s recognition of the new authorities as an “aberration of consciousness.”

He said Russia would be ready to resume relations with Ukraine once it sees a “normal, modern government based on laws and constitution of Ukraine.”

“If you consider Kalashnikov-toting people in black masks who are roaming Kiev to be the government, then it will be hard for us to work with that government,” he said.

Russia recalled its ambassador in Ukraine, citing threats to “the life and health of our people in the embassy.” That is an ominous move under any circumstances, and especially at this moment when Russia no longer needs to keep up Olympic pretenses.

Meanwhile, the new government in Kyiv has transferred presidential power to the speaker of the parliament until elections can be held in May. They have issued an arrest warrant for deposed president Viktor Yanukovich, who tried to flee the country but was stopped by alert border guards. Activists want him tried for mass murder after 82 protesters died in shootings by police last week:

Ukraine’s acting government issued a warrant Monday for the arrest of President Viktor Yanukovych, last reportedly seen in the pro-Russian Black Sea peninsula of Crimea, accusing him of mass crimes against protesters who stood up for months against his rule.

Calls are mounting in Ukraine to put Yanukovych on trial, after a tumultuous presidency in which he amassed powers, enriched his allies and cracked down on protesters. Anger boiled over last week after snipers attacked protesters in the bloodiest violence in Ukraine’s post-Soviet history. …

Ukraine’s acting interior minister, Arsen Avakhov, said on his official Facebook page Monday that a warrant has been issued for the arrest of Yanukovych and several other officials for the “mass killing of civilians.” At least 82 people, primarily protesters, were killed in clashes in Kiev last week.

Avakhov says Yanukovych arrived in Crimea on Sunday, relinquished his official security detail and then drove off to an unknown location, turning off all forms of communication. “Yanukovych has disappeared,” he said.

Initially, people thought Yanukovich would hole up in Kharkiv, farther north but still in his presumed power base in the east. A move to the Crimean peninsula may mean that Yanukovich’s support may not be as strong as he’d thought in that region. It will remain strong in Crimea to the bitter end, though, as the region is heavily Russian rather than Ukraine, and dependent on the Russian navy for its economy. As the Financial Times reports, it may be the pretext for Russian intervention, too:

As Ukraine’s opposition leaders consolidate power over Kiev’s parliament, some of them privately admit they are worried over the fate of Crimea. They fear it could be most susceptible to secession or at least a useful tool for Russia, which has used separatist regions in Georgia, Moldova and Armenia to exert its influence in the post-Soviet geopolitical space.

A law passed by Ukraine’s parliament on Sunday removing Russian as an official languages risks further stoking tensions between the Russian-speaking eastern Ukraine and Crimea, and the largely Ukrainian-speaking [west].

“We’re not going to let someone come in and say you’re going to speak in Ukrainian and send your children to these kinds of schools,” said Samvel Martyan as he collected signatures of Simferopol locals ready to defend the peninsula’s autonomy.

“We are defending our Crimea from our comrades [the western Ukrainians] who in 1941 let the fascists in,” he added.

The memories of World War II hang heavily over this near-civil war. Long memories of bitter division are reawakening in Ukraine, and it may make a compromise impossible. But more recent memories are taking precedence in Kyiv and the west, as John Fund reports on a remarkable moment on Ukrainian television:

But for many Ukrainians, there was another moment when they realized the ground was shifting beneath them. It came last Friday evening, during one of the most popular talk shows on Inter, the most-watched Ukrainian network. Lidia Pankiv, a 24-year-old television journalist, was invited on by host Andriy Danylevych to discuss the need for reconciliation following the agreement signed by Yanukovych and dissidents earlier that day. While reporting on the Maidan protests, Pankiv had helped persuade the Berkut riot police not to use further violence against the activists, and she had disclosed that one of the Berkut officers was now her fiancé. But reconciliation was not what Pankiv wished to discuss. Asrelayed by journalist Halya Coynash, Pankiv had a different message:

You probably want to hear a story from me about how with my bare hands I restrained a whole Berkut unit, and how one of the Berkut officers fell in love with me and I fell in love with him. But I’m going to tell you another story. About how with my bare hands I dragged the bodies of those killed the day before yesterday. And about how two of my friends died yesterday. . . . I hate Zakharchenko, Klyuev, Lukash, Medvedchuk, Azarov. I hate Yanukovych and all those who carry out their criminal orders. I came here today only because I found out that this is a live broadcast. I want to say that I also despise Inter because for three months it deceived viewers and spread enmity among citizens of this country. And now you are calling for peace and unity. Yes, you have the right to try to clear your conscience, but I think you should run this program on your knees. I’ve brought these photos here for you, so that you see my dead friends in your dreams and understand that you also took part in that. And now, I’m sorry, I don’t have time. I’m going to Maidan. Glory to Ukraine.

Danylevych immediately tried to return to the night’s topic of reconciliation. But he was stopped by guest Konstantin Reutsky, a human-rights activist from Luhansk. Reutsky agreed with Pankiv, saying that Inter journalists had “lied and distorted information about Maidan over the last three months.” Danylevych tried to interrupt Reutsky, who went on to say that the protestors had tried for months to avoid bloodshed. “But what happened yesterday is a point of no return,” Reutsky continued. “After that you can no longer say, ‘Sorry, we got carried away, let’s turn the page and start afresh without offense.’ What happened yesterday is impossible to forget.” Danylevych, after shouting down Reutsky’s further attempt to discuss the crimes committed by the government, changed the topic. But a chief media mouthpiece of the regime, owned by the president’s oligarch backers, had been exposed. Hours later, the president fled his palace.

Partition might end up being the least of the evils left on the table.

ABC News has a good update on developments this morning. Events are moving fast, though, and even quick posts risk turning obsolete in a hurry.


ABC Entertainment News|ABC Business News


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Russia: Ukraine in state of “armed mutiny”

Pfft. It’s called tending the tree of liberty.

Here’s hoping we get a hankering for some gardening soon.

Dusty on February 24, 2014 at 9:25 AM

It’s only a question of WHEN the Soviet tanks roll in, I am afraid.

ConstantineXI on February 24, 2014 at 9:30 AM

Is using the Ukrainian Kyiv instead of the Russian Kiev some sort of political statement?

Happy Nomad on February 24, 2014 at 9:32 AM

We have nothing to worry about. Barack Obama will soon be deploying new tactical Red Lines. No one would dare cross one of those.

trubble on February 24, 2014 at 9:32 AM

“If you consider Kalashnikov-toting people in black masks who are roaming Kiev to be the government, then it will be hard for us to work with that government,” he said.

But if they’re doing it in Damascus then hey, Russia will bend over backwards to help.

Bishop on February 24, 2014 at 9:33 AM

It’s only a question of WHEN the Soviet tanks roll in, I am afraid.

ConstantineXI on February 24, 2014 at 9:30 AM

Russia isn’t going to let their attempts at reconstituting the old Soviet Union sphere of influence easily.

I’m less interested in when the Russian tanks roll in than I am in what the American response will be. Joe Biden expressing concern isn’t going to cut it.

Happy Nomad on February 24, 2014 at 9:33 AM

From The Guardian:

As a new regime consolidated its grip over power in Kiev on Sunday, calls for secession in the pro-Russian south of Ukraine were growing louder.

At a protest attended by thousands in the port city of Sevastopol on Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula, the crowd voted to establish a parallel administration and civil defence squads.

Please note the “civil defence squads” part.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 9:36 AM

How many lives will it take to restore government here?

flicker on February 24, 2014 at 9:36 AM

Is using the Ukrainian Kyiv instead of the Russian Kiev some sort of political statement?

Happy Nomad on February 24, 2014 at 9:32 AM

I, too, noticed the spelling difference. I wondered if that was the difference (one being Russian, the other Ukrainian).

Bitter Clinger on February 24, 2014 at 9:37 AM

But if they’re doing it in Damascus then hey, Russia will bend over backwards to help.

Bishop on February 24, 2014 at 9:33 AM

You forget the wise statesmanship of John McCain. The rebels in Syria are really Jeffersonian Democrats.

Happy Nomad on February 24, 2014 at 9:39 AM

There’s a lesson to be learned, (by the people here in the U.S.) in watching the people of Ukraine rejecting Russia’s “influence”/intrusion in their free market economy. No one likes to be governed by an outside foreign power, or by proxy with its leadership. Likewise, our own central government shouldn’t have such a controlling grip on the free market enterprises—private businesses—that are now not allowed to grow or flourish.

Comrade Barack Obama’s personal war on U.S. energy producers, and the free market in general, is quite similar to a “foreign power” injecting its will on the people.

Rovin on February 24, 2014 at 9:40 AM

I hope the Soviets (or Russians, or whatever else they call themselves these days) are smart enough to restrain themselves.

Probably a false hope, but I keep it nonetheless.

unclesmrgol on February 24, 2014 at 9:42 AM

From The Guardian:

At a protest attended by thousands in the port city of Sevastopol on Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula, the crowd voted to establish a parallel administration and civil defence squads.

Demonstrators waved Russian flags – there was not a Ukrainian flag to be seen – and chanted “Russia, Russia, Russia” during the gathering.

Please note the “civil defence squads” part. It will be ugly.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 9:45 AM

I wonder how many times we’ll see that pic this week.

I say 3.

22044 on February 24, 2014 at 9:46 AM

Athletes leave Sochi today. Tomorrow Putin’s tanks roll. Wednesday Dear Liar puts out a mealy mouthed, gutless statement.

rbj on February 24, 2014 at 9:49 AM

The European Union and the United States need to get on the ball and make it known that Russian interference in Ukraine will not be tolerated, especially if Russian tanks begin to roll into Ukraine. But the current western leaders do not have the will to do a what needs to be done. What needs to be done? Inform Putin that strict sanctions will be placed on Russia and the possibly that even western ambassadors will be recalled.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 9:52 AM

in Egypt we started with democratic movement and ended up with muslim borthers in charge, in ukraine, they started with democratic discontent and protest, and may end up with very quaintly named “Svoboda” aka “social-national” party in charge (love their symbol, reminds me of something, just can’t place it…) europe screwed up, trusted their proteges to deliver on the agreements, and ended up with a coup. who will they talk to now ? and for all the freedom loving euros who applaud self determinations everywhere, why are they now so concerned with self determination of the russian population in ukraine? if they could split serbia into serbia and montegro, why are they so concerned with territorial integrity of ukraine ? because they don’t need the western part. the riches are in the russian speaking east.

runner on February 24, 2014 at 9:55 AM

Maybe Russia surprises everyone and supports partition? They avoid getting involved in another military conflict, and they get to keep the Crimea. Out of the question?

NotCoach on February 24, 2014 at 9:56 AM

Ukrainian political crisis
6m
Russia says Ukraine peace deal being used as cover for power grab, Foreign Ministry says – @Reuters
end of alert
===============

Ukrainian political crisis
10m
Russia criticizes Western support for Ukrainian snap presidential election in May, says constitutional reforms should be put to referendum – Foreign Ministry via @Reuters

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 9:59 AM

About time for a new “Charge of the Light Brigade”?

The Crimean War(October 1853 – February 1856)was a conflict in which Russia lost to an alliance of France, Britain, the Ottoman Empire, and Sardinia. While neutral, Austria played a role in stopping the Russians.

The immediate issue involved the rights of Christians in the Holy Land, which was controlled by the Ottoman Empire. The French promoted the rights of Catholics, while Russia promoted those of the Orthodox. The longer-term causes involved the decline of the Ottoman Empire.

http://www.victoryinstitute.net/blogs/utb/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Charge-of-the-Light-Brigade-by-Thomas-Jones-Barker.jpg

Viator on February 24, 2014 at 10:01 AM

Ruh Roh !!!! Does that mean we are about to see Russian tanks and Spetsnaz units, roll into the Ukraine?

kjatexas on February 24, 2014 at 10:01 AM

Inform Putin that strict sanctions will be placed on Russia and the possibly that even western ambassadors will be recalled.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 9:52 AM

Not going to happen. It is more likely that the Russian State Police Choir will go on a road tour after their hit rendition of “Get Lucky” during the Sochi opening ceremony.

Happy Nomad on February 24, 2014 at 10:02 AM

Obama is a wimp exerting his energy to weaken America internally and externally.
Europe is weak.
Putin is probably in angry panic mode.

albill on February 24, 2014 at 10:02 AM

I dare you to cross that red line………..I dare you to cross that red line…………I dare you to cross that red line………………..

kjatexas on February 24, 2014 at 10:02 AM

Russian Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev blasted the regime change in neighboring Ukraine, calling it an “armed mutiny.”
====================================================

Ukraine is,..and never was part USSR..(Russia),..they were free,
and Independant.

Like Israel,…for over hundreds of years(..yes Israel it was thousands),
they were rape/pillaged and occupied, and in a never/ending state of
bloodshed!!

Ukraine is not going to give back there country,…EVER!!!

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 10:06 AM

From Breitbart:

It is finally calm in Ukraine’s capital Kiev after three months of active protests, but the Crimean peninsula is heating up. Protesters gathered in Sevastopol in Crimea to demonstrate against the actions of parliament in Kiev and declare their plans of secession.

When Crimea secedes from Ukraine, Russia can recognize it as a separate country and move to protect it.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 10:07 AM

What’s happening in Ukraine shows why firearm ownership is so important

petefrt on February 24, 2014 at 10:06 AM

petefrt: Amen on that!!:)

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 10:08 AM

Is using the Ukrainian Kyiv instead of the Russian Kiev some sort of political statement?

Happy Nomad on February 24, 2014 at 9:32 AM

I, too, noticed the spelling difference. I wondered if that was the difference (one being Russian, the other Ukrainian).

Bitter Clinger on February 24, 2014 at 9:37 AM

“The Ukrainian parliament has voted that Ukrainian is the only official language. Ethnic Russians make up 17 per cent of the population and more than 50 per cent in the Crimea where Russia’s Black Sea fleet is based. Russia has a 20-year lease on its base of Sevastopol which must be renewed in three years.

Ukraine also has a small Muslim Tatar population of around 300,000, most of whom live in Crimea…”

Russian-speaking Crimeans signing up to brigades in Simferopol to defend Crimea if necessary #Ukraine pic.twitter.com/NxZzvNsYv4

— Paul Sonne (@PaulSonne) February 23, 2014

Rally of Crimean Tatars in Simferopol. #Ukraine pic.twitter.com/XemnfP6lt9

— Paul Sonne (@PaulSonne) February 23, 2014

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/23/ukraine-crisis-yanukovych-tymoshenko-live-updates

workingclass artist on February 24, 2014 at 10:14 AM

Now we will get to see some of that famous leeway that Obama talked to Medvedev about when he thought the mic was off.

ajacksonian on February 24, 2014 at 10:16 AM

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 10:08 AM

Yanukovich and his boys could have saved themselves all this trouble with a little better gun control.

petefrt on February 24, 2014 at 10:17 AM

President Stompyfoot will issue a stern declaration and send in Nobel Peace Prize next winner John Kerry to make peace.

philw1776 on February 24, 2014 at 10:18 AM

Now we will get to see some of that famous leeway that Obama talked to Medvedev about when he thought the mic was off.

ajacksonian on February 24, 2014 at 10:16 AM

We know that that will be, don’t we. Obama’s reaction when Putin storms Ukraine: *crickets*

petefrt on February 24, 2014 at 10:20 AM

huge demo in Sevastopol w/ Russian flags, burning of Ukrainian flag.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdafhMpREj8

Viator on February 24, 2014 at 10:21 AM

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 10:06 AM

ok….except under treaty of pereyaslav (1654) a borderless hetmanate became a part of russia. ukraine is not Georgia.

runner on February 24, 2014 at 10:22 AM

What’s happening in Ukraine shows why firearm ownership is so important – petefrt on February 24, 2014 at 10:06 AM

I am all for our second amendment rights, but small arms are no good against tanks, airplanes and an organized military. Hopefully, the Ukrainian military will go over and support those who want real reform. And, if Russia does move on Ukraine, they put up a good fight.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 10:22 AM

When Crimea secedes from Ukraine, Russia can recognize it as a separate country and move to protect it.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 10:07 AM

Maybe.

“It looks like there is a real mess there and that the leaders of Ukraine proved unable to reach a kind of consensus in the country, in Ukrainian society. And that’s why those issues became so acute,” Gorbachev said. “There’s a new Ukraine and it should find its own niche.”

Gorbachev suggested Monday that no single outside power could dominate Ukraine’s future…” AP

Map:

http://images.travelpod.com/users/leah.burcat/1.1220924640.ukraine-map_.gif

workingclass artist on February 24, 2014 at 10:25 AM

Rally of Crimean Tatars in Simferopol. #Ukraine pic.twitter.com/XemnfP6lt9

workingclass artist on February 24, 2014 at 10:14 AM

Who are the tartars supporting?

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 10:26 AM

ok….except under treaty of pereyaslav (1654) a borderless hetmanate became a part of russia. ukraine is not Georgia. – runner on February 24, 2014 at 10:22 AM

Countries come and go in Europe over time. Poland reappeared after World War I. Ireland became part of Great Britain when Cromwell conquered it. Ireland only reappeared after WWi. The Austro-Hungarian Empire was defeated in WWI and host of nations reappeared on the map of Europe.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 10:29 AM

Huge pro-Russian demonstration on Odessa, Ukraine reportedly shows a rally today against the new government in Kiev (note that not only are some symbols Russia, they are specifically Soviet):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VsmGvP_UVE

Viator on February 24, 2014 at 10:30 AM

Gorbachev suggested Monday that no single outside power could dominate Ukraine’s future…” AP

Good for Gorbachev.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 10:31 AM

Hopefully, the Ukrainian military will go over and support those who want real reform.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 10:22 AM

Yes, ultimately the guys with the tanks and airplanes win. Just not so easily.

petefrt on February 24, 2014 at 10:32 AM

This same scene will play out when Texas leaves the United States.

redguy on February 24, 2014 at 10:32 AM

Yes, ultimately the guys with the tanks and airplanes win. Just not so easily.

petefrt on February 24, 2014 at 10:32 AM

You mean like the US in Afghanistan???

redguy on February 24, 2014 at 10:32 AM

So people rise up to change their government, even in the face of a more powerful military, and they succeed?

Don’t tell that to the anti-gunners.

bossmanham on February 24, 2014 at 10:34 AM

I am all for our second amendment rights, but small arms are no good against tanks, airplanes and an organized military.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 10:22 AM

Ever hear of the Vietcong?

Viator on February 24, 2014 at 10:35 AM

Countries come and go in Europe over time. Poland reappeared after World War I. Ireland became part of Great Britain when Cromwell conquered it. Ireland only reappeared after WWi. The Austro-Hungarian Empire was defeated in WWI and host of nations reappeared on the map of Europe.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 10:29 AM

Two words (important in 2014):

FREE SCOTLAND!

Happy Nomad on February 24, 2014 at 10:39 AM

Russian Citizen Elected Sevastopol Mayor Amid Pro-Moscow Protests in Crimea

Pro-Moscow demonstrators in the Crimea have named a Russian citizen as the new mayor of Sevastopol, underscoring fears that the region may try to break away from turmoil-gripped Ukraine.

About 20,000 demonstrators carrying Russian flags gathered in Sevastopol for a rally on Sunday, electing businessman Alexei Chalov, a Russian citizen, as their new mayor, the Crimea’s Navigator news agency reported

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 10:49 AM

“Armed mutiny”? Got a nice ring to it.

Cleombrotus on February 24, 2014 at 10:50 AM

One of its biggest cities, Sevastopol, is home to a Russian naval base that houses around 25,000 troops, and most Crimean residents identify themselves as Russians, not Ukrainians.

Note: Russia already has 25,000 troops in Crimea. There are 30 -40,000 in Sochi about 300 miles away.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 11:00 AM

I am all for our second amendment rights, but small arms are no good against tanks, airplanes and an organized military.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 10:22 AM
Ever hear of the Vietcong?

Viator on February 24, 2014 at 10:35 AM

As Viator alludes to, IEDs, Moltov cocktails, and other forms of guerrilla warfare have been highly effective against large millitary forces across the ages. The Afgans drove out the Soviets, the Vietcong drove out the U.S., Al Queda inflicted massive damage to U.S. forces in the Middle East. Large armys need to fight large armys…and are far less effective against highly motivated and elusive patriot guerrilla fighters.

Sadly, we constantly hear this same refrain from all spineless gun-grabber types. They usually end up being the turn-coat traitors that help the invaders.

Wyznowski on February 24, 2014 at 11:01 AM

“Kalashnikov-toting people in black masks ”

Since when are axe handles and two-by-fours described as “Kalashnikovs”?

The only guns I saw on the side of the demonstrators were in the hands of the (too few) Police who changed sides after they were ordered to shoot the unarmed protesters.

This will be the crock of crap the the media runs with as Putin cracks down. Because the media are happy to fellate Putin just as much as they do The One.

PoliTech on February 24, 2014 at 11:02 AM

Two words (important in 2014):

FREE SCOTLAND!

Happy Nomad on February 24, 2014 at 10:39 AM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmGe_66BZxA

workingclass artist on February 24, 2014 at 11:06 AM

Countries come and go in Europe over time. Poland reappeared after World War I. Ireland became part of Great Britain when Cromwell conquered it. Ireland only reappeared after WWi. The Austro-Hungarian Empire was defeated in WWI and host of nations reappeared on the map of Europe.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 10:29 AM

thanks for the history lesson..but what does that have to do with anything i said ? i responed to a claim that ukraine was never part of russia. it was. happened centuries ago, and been part of it for about as long as n. ireland been part of UK. it is different than the Baltic states.

runner on February 24, 2014 at 11:11 AM

I am all for our second amendment rights, but small arms are no good against tanks, airplanes and an organized military.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 10:22 AM

Evidently not:

In Ukraine, protests resemble Medieval battle

/I see others have already given the Viet Cong, and Afghanistan tribesmen a mention.

//Oh! Let’s not forget the Continental Army.

PoliTech on February 24, 2014 at 11:12 AM

Surprise surprise!

The Ukraine Gun Owners Association wants the new government to add their own right to bear arms to the country’s constitution.

Now I wonder why they need this kind of “guarantee”? /

Rovin on February 24, 2014 at 11:14 AM

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 10:06 AM

ok….except under treaty of pereyaslav (1654) a borderless hetmanate became a part of russia. ukraine is not Georgia.

runner on February 24, 2014 at 10:22 AM

runner: Exactly:)

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 11:14 AM

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 10:08 AM

Yanukovich and his boys could have saved themselves all this trouble with a little better gun control.

petefrt on February 24, 2014 at 10:17 AM

petefrt:Double yups:)

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 11:16 AM

Personal reports from Sevastopol indicate that the ATM machines are out of money and there are long lines at the banks. The grocery stores are running low and only accepting cash.

Most of the internet cafes have been closed. international phone lines appear to have been cut off – we cannot get through and there is a message in Ukrainian that basically says “not available”.

Note: along with our gun rights in America we need to make sure that the government does not have a “kill switch” on the internet like Obama wants.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 11:24 AM

Reuters Politics ‏@ReutersPolitics 31m

Economic advisers to go with State Department’s Burns to Kiev http://reut.rs/1cHVj5c
Expand
=========

Economic advisers to go with State Department’s Burns to Kiev
WASHINGTON Mon Feb 24, 2014 11:12am EST
****************************************

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/02/24/us-ukraine-crisis-burns-idUSBREA1N19420140224?feedType=RSS&feedName=politicsNews&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter&dlvrit=574655

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:01 PM

Expect Russian tanks to start rolling into eastern Ukraine in the next day or so. Russia will never let the Crimea go, let alone the big naval base there. Partition is the best the Ukrainians can hope for. The worst would be a complete Russian takeover of Ukraine. The west will do nothing at all, as usual.

Libertyship46 on February 24, 2014 at 12:05 PM

Economic advisers to go with State Department’s Burns to Kiev http://reut.rs/1cHVj5c

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:01 PM

Who is going to foot this bill? The EU?

Ukraine says it needs $35 BILLION to avoid economy collapsing…

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 12:12 PM

Ukrainian political crisis
26s
Father, son political prisoners among 23 being freed by bill passed by parliament in Ukraine – @KyivPost
read more on kyivpost.com
===========================

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:16 PM

Ukrainian political crisis
3m
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., says US must be ready to provide additional assistance to Ukraine – @Reuters

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:17 PM

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm, ……………..

Retweeted by KyivPost
Katya Gorchinskaya ‏@kgorchinskaya 16m

diver about to dive into freezing Kyiv Sea to keep looking for Yanukovych files in #Mezhyhirya pic.twitter.com/PajSkwj2rx
================================================

https://twitter.com/kgorchinskaya/status/437995218244472832/photo/1/large

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:18 PM

I am all for our second amendment rights, but small arms are no good against tanks, airplanes and an organized military.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 10:22 AM

Tanks and airplanes are not real power, at least not in terms of maintaining a state.

Real power in that case takes the form or men. On the ground. Carrying guns. Telling people what they may and may not do.

And a well-armed populace makes any attempt to use that real power tyrannically… well, let’s say it makes it problematic, at best…

JohnGalt23 on February 24, 2014 at 12:21 PM

Expect Russian tanks to start rolling into eastern Ukraine in the next day or so. Russia will never let the Crimea go, let alone the big naval base there. Partition is the best the Ukrainians can hope for. The worst would be a complete Russian takeover of Ukraine. The west will do nothing at all, as usual.

Libertyship46 on February 24, 2014 at 12:05 PM

They may not want the whole of Ukraine. They’d have to finance the place. Let the EU have at it.

They will protect the strategically important port of Sevastopol and the ethnic Russians in Crimea.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 12:21 PM

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., says US must be ready to provide additional assistance to Ukraine – @Reuters

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:17 PM

Why does Sen McCain want the US to get involved in a Second Crimean War…?

JohnGalt23 on February 24, 2014 at 12:26 PM

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:01 PM

Who is going to foot this bill? The EU?

Ukraine says it needs $35 BILLION to avoid economy collapsing…

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 12:12 PM

Kaffa:

Good point, it won’t be the USSR!

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:37 PM

Step 1. Wait for Olympics to close. CHECK. Step 2. Step up rhetoric about concerns of Russians in Crimea. CHECK. Step 3. Send troops to the border and claim that they are there to protect Russia’s interest. Step. 4. Invade Crimea claiming it was on the request of the legitimate government of Ukraine. Step 5. Occupy entire country. Rinse and repeat where necessary. Its the Soviet way.

simkeith on February 24, 2014 at 12:39 PM

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:17 PM

Why does Sen McCain want the US to get involved in a Second Crimean War…?

JohnGalt23 on February 24, 2014 at 12:26 PM

JohnGalt23: Captain Queeg,…..from the Mc..Cains Mutiny works in mysterious
ways,..me thinks!:)

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:42 PM

KyivPost ‏@KyivPost 2h

Restrictions on cash withdrawals will continue ‘for foreseeable future’ http://www.kyivpost.com/content/business/restrictions-on-cash-withdrawals-will-continue-for-foreseeable-future-337504.html … #ukraine
============================================================

http://www.kyivpost.com/content/business/restrictions-on-cash-withdrawals-will-continue-for-foreseeable-future-337504.html

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:43 PM

Step 1. Wait for Olympics to close. CHECK. Step 2. Step up rhetoric about concerns of Russians in Crimea. CHECK. Step 3. Send troops to the border and claim that they are there to protect Russia’s interest. Step. 4. Invade Crimea claiming it was on the request of the legitimate government of Ukraine. Step 5. Occupy entire country. Rinse and repeat where necessary. Its the Soviet way.

simkeith on February 24, 2014 at 12:39 PM

Good analysis. The only thing I might take exception to is #5. I’m not sure they want the whole country.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 12:44 PM

Rinse and repeat where necessary. Its the Soviet way.

simkeith on February 24, 2014 at 12:39 PM

simkeith:)
=========

KyivPost ‏@KyivPost 1m

MP alleges Yanukovych administration planned even greater bloodbath to suppress #Kyiv protests http://www.kyivpost.com/content/kyiv/ukraine-averted-greater-bloodbath-moskal-alleges-337526.html … pic.twitter.com/Mb7SgtFXrm
============================

https://twitter.com/KyivPost/status/438006575672741888/photo/1/large

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:48 PM

From the Kyiv Post:

…On top of fees charged by my Canadian bank for each withdrawal, I had to pay the Ukrainian banks an additional 1% fee, whereas for the past 4 years throughout the country I have never before paid a fee. What is the explanation from the banks? I haven’t been able to find one.

I guess the banks are taking advantage of the situation and charging fees for withdrawing your own money.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 12:50 PM

The Crimean question is the next in line after solving the constitutional, amnesty and new-election issues. This is the most important question of the entire revolution: How can Ukraine become independent without becoming an active threat to Russian national security?
Geography is what it is, and Russia needs full Black Sea access. The US retained and still operates Guantanamo naval base in Cuba. The Cuban government hates us, but geography and national security make it necessary for the US to have a naval base there, so we have it.
The Russian interest in Sevastopol is like the US interest in Guantanamo, times a thousand. Lease or no lease: when you weigh the strategic factors, Russia must have full Black Sea access, or go to war and get it.
In the simplest possible terms, Ukraine must make Russia’s Black Sea access secure, or long-standing Russian military grand strategy will force Russia to crush you. And nobody will show up to help Ukraine (See: Hungary 1956). Obama simply doesn’t care about you, and the EU (amoral weasels that they are) does not present a military threat to Russia in the Black Sea.
This is simple stuff. I know the details are difficult, but Ukrainian survival requires that Ukraine be a Black Sea Ally of Russia.

ShadrachSmith on February 24, 2014 at 12:53 PM

Obama simply doesn’t care about you, and the EU (amoral weasels that they are) does not present a military threat to Russia in the Black Sea.

ShadrachSmith on February 24, 2014 at 12:53 PM

I know of no country in Europe that represents a Military threat to Russia. European countries pulled down their military spending and turned socialist spending all their money on domestic programs.

Europe was depending on the United States to protect them. Now the United States under Obama wants to pull down our military spending to pre-World War II levels.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 1:04 PM

KyivPost ‏@KyivPost 4m

.@PeaceCorps Ukraine evacuates volunteers over safety concerns http://www.kyivpost.com/content/ukraine/peace-corps-ukraine-evacuates-volunteers-over-safety-concerns-337531.html
============================================

Feb. 24, 2014, 7:58 p.m. | Ukraine — by Christopher J. Miller

The U.S. Peace Corps on Feb. 24 said it had evacuated its volunteers from Ukraine.

The U.S. Peace Corps announced on Feb. 24 that it had evacuated its volunteers from Ukraine, citing the deteriorating security climate in the country.

A statement posted to the U.S. government organization’s website said “all Peace Corps Ukraine volunteers are safe and accounted for, and have been successfully evacuated out of the country.”

The agency will continue to assess the safety and security climate in Ukraine, it said, adding that it hopes volunteers can return.

“The safety and security of its volunteers are the agency’s top priority,” reads the statement.

Calls to the agency’s Kyiv headquarters went unanswered on Feb. 24.

More than 200 Peace Corps Ukraine volunteers were working in the areas of education and youth and community development around the country, the statement said, adding that volunteers will participate in a transition conference this week.

Since the Peace Corps Ukraine program was established in 1992, more than 2,740 Peace Corps volunteers have served in Ukraine, according to the agency

http://www.kyivpost.com/content/ukraine/peace-corps-ukraine-evacuates-volunteers-over-safety-concerns-337531.html

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 1:16 PM

From Ace:

And, of course, neither NATO nor the EU nor Obama is going to war with Russia over the Crimea. Any impulse for “toughness” must be tempered by this obvious fact– very few people would support any kind of US action against Russia in Crimea. So, we can’t really pretend that there is some 100%-win solution out there, if only we had the guts for it.

I don’t see any way Ukraine keeps Crimea, if Russia wants to take it away. What I see is an invasion, and lots of dead Ukrainians, and Russia holding on to the Crimea — and, given that they’ve already invaded one part of Ukraine, I see them maybe invading the whole of it.

You will have to scroll down to see the article. Emphasis is mine.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 1:20 PM

Have no fear, the Sternly Worded Letter, no doubt containing a Red Line, has been deployed.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/feb/23/us-warns-russia-to-keep-its-military-out-of-ukrain/

Are we not truly blessed to have the Lightworker as our leader, at whose command the oceans retreat and from whose Sternly Worded Letters (escalating to the TV Frowney Face) foreign powers shrink, like demons from a crucifix?

What’s that you say? The real world doesn’t work like that? Somebody better tell State that, I don’t think they got the memo.

pendell2 on February 24, 2014 at 1:22 PM

Retweeted by Reuters Top News
Reuters World ‏@ReutersWorld 2h

Ukraine parliament accepts central bank governor’s resignation #breaking
Expand

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 1:24 PM

Putin is mad that Yanukovych released the snipers two days too soon.

Schadenfreude on February 24, 2014 at 1:34 PM

After they prosecute Yanukovych, they need to execute him and all his henchmen and their families. A purge is the only way to keep these thugs from coming back.

When will the US prosecute Clinton and his administration for the mass murder of the Branch Davidians in Waco? (Never. I know. The US is a hypocrite nation when it comes to human rights. Only other countries violate them – never our government. Oh no, NEVER!)

earlgrey on February 24, 2014 at 1:52 PM

Ukrainian political crisis
2m
White House: US ready to give financial support to Ukraine to complement IMF aid – @Reuters
read more on trust.org
=========================

U.S. ready to give financial support to Ukraine to complement IMF aid -White House
Source: Reuters – Mon, 24 Feb 2014 06:58 PM
Author: Reuters

WASHINGTON, Feb 24 (Reuters) – The United States is ready to provide financial support to Ukraine to complement IMF aid, the White House said on Monday, in the aftermath of the ouster of Ukraine’s Russian-backed president, Viktor Yanukovich.

“The United States, working with partners around the world, stands ready to provide support for Ukraine as it takes the reforms it needs to, to get back to economic stability,” White House spokesman Jay Carney told a news briefing.

“This support can complement an IMF program by helping to make reforms easier and by putting Ukraine in a position to invest more in health and education to help develop Ukraine’s human capital and strengthen its social safety net,” Carney added.
=================================

http://www.trust.org/item/20140224183734-k5p11

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 2:06 PM

After they prosecute Yanukovych, they need to execute him and all his henchmen and their families. A purge is the only way to keep these thugs from coming back.

earlgrey on February 24, 2014 at 1:52 PM

Even the Mafia stays away from murdering peoples families. Murdering children just doesn’t do it for me.

Perhaps we could try to elevate our moral standards to the same level as organized crime?

sharrukin on February 24, 2014 at 2:07 PM

Ukrainian political crisis
43s
Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks with French counterpart Hollande, voices concern over situation in Ukraine, Kremlin says – @Reuters

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 2:09 PM

After they prosecute Yanukovych, they need to execute him and all his henchmen and their families. A purge is the only way to keep these thugs from coming back.

earlgrey on February 24, 2014 at 1:52 PM

How about purging all those who enabled him? Maybe that would be everyone who voted for him? Purges get out of hand real quick e.g. the French Revolution, the Russian Revolution, et al.

This new government is same as the old government. From the Daily Mail:

Don’t be fooled by her angelic looks, she’s as ruthless as she’s corrupt: A withering portrait of Ukraine’s ‘saviour’ by EDWARD LUCAS, a Russia expert who knows her well

To the people it is just the change of one corrupt government for another corrupt government. New boss same as the old boss.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 2:09 PM

Putin is mad that Yanukovych released the snipers two days too soon.

Schadenfreude on February 24, 2014 at 1:34 PM

Schadenfruede:Lol,….ahems,..

…I was wondering about Yulia’s safety,..when she gave her speech
at the Protest a few days ago!:)

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 2:11 PM

This support can complement an IMF program …

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 2:06 PM

The austerity requirements of the IMF was one of the reasons that the EU offer was rejected and they turned to Russia for help. IMF loans do not come without a lot of strings attached.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 2:17 PM

Retweeted by Reuters Top News
Reuters Politics ‏@ReutersPolitics 5m

U.S. is considering a range of options to support Ukraine, could complement an IMF lending program: State Department official

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 2:36 PM

Russia will hold the Crimea for the reasons noted – it will be interesting to see exactly where the line gets drawn as Russian influence wanes rapidly as you move out of the naval base town of Sevastopol. I’m sure Putin doesn’t really want the muslims.

Putin will go no further than that – and it would behoove the Ukraine to get out front and allow a referendum in the Crimea for their desires going forward. The Russians will not roll into the entire country for three reasons:

1) The west will nod their heads over the Crimea region recognizing the reality of the military base there and the Russians not wanting to lose the asset.

2) Putin would be foolish to to provoke Obama such that he has to wake up – remember, they are fellow travelers of the left, and once riled they will fight. Obama is lazy and distracted, why force him to focus. Take the part you want – like the Georgia situation – leave the rest.

3) Putin does not need to wake up Europe to the reality that gas from Russia is not in your best interest. And Obama. The US could with minimal investment create the supply to meet all of Europes LNG requirements and end Russia’s money supply within about 5 years. While we often look at Russia as a first world country – it is not – it has a pretty strong military – but a completely commodity based economy based upon geographic extortion and Europe’s green energy fantasy. What would you buy from Russia? Nothing. It is a kleptocracy, ruled by ex-Russian bureacrats, where foreign investment continues to lag versus its potential. It has a shrinking population with exceeding low life expectancies in comparison to the West. Putin cannot afford that.

One other note – neo-nazis, communists, socialists. To those who use the terms they are all the same – left wing authoritarian totalitarianist political designations. And we all know how they like to fight among themselves for failing to understand the true cause of the left.

Zomcon JEM on February 24, 2014 at 2:41 PM

Russian APC’s are already in the Crimea

Just posted to YouTube, it seems to show Russian APCs. No other information is given.

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 2:44 PM

That would make sense – I expect them to be all over the base areas.

Zomcon JEM on February 24, 2014 at 3:22 PM

Russian APC’s are already in the Crimea

Just posted to YouTube, it seems to show Russian APCs. No other information is given. – Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 2:44 PM

If so, the west should demand that Putin turn them around and leave Ukraine. The Ukrainian people should decide what happens to their country. Both sides in Ukraine should make the best attempt possible to keep a lid on the violence. Hopefully, the Ukrainian military will be able to keep the peace.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 3:28 PM

Hopefully, the Ukrainian military will be able to keep the peace.

SC.Charlie on February 24, 2014 at 3:28 PM

I’m wondering what percentage of the Ukrainian military is pro-Russia?

Last I read (a couple of days ago) the Ukrainian military was going to remain neutral. Has that changed?

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 3:33 PM

Amid crisis, Ukrainian military’s neutrality hangs in the balance

NATO has courted the Ukrainian generals for years but their ties to the Red Army are historically and culturally entrenched.
[...]
But he knows full well the connection to the Russian military is still like an umbilical cord. The generals and admirals in both armies [Russia and Ukraine] trained and served together in the Red Army.
[...]
Despite the recurring tensions between the two nations [Russia and Ukraine], their militaries have remained close – comrades in arms, developing weapons systems together and reminiscing on the days when their grandfathers fought the German invaders together. If the day comes, when Russian troops enters the Crimean peninsula, invited perhaps by the local parliament with its ethnic-Russian majority, it is far from certain that the Ukrainian officers, with a large number of ethnic-Russians within their own ranks, will be able to stand in their way.

It appears that it is Kiev that fears the Ukrainian military and wants them to stay neutral. (Emphasis is mine.)

Kaffa on February 24, 2014 at 4:45 PM

MP alleges Yanukovych administration planned even greater bloodbath to suppress #Kyiv protests http://www.kyivpost.com/content/kyiv/ukraine-averted-greater-bloodbath-moskal-alleges-337526.html … pic.twitter.com/Mb7SgtFXrm
============================

https://twitter.com/KyivPost/status/438006575672741888/photo/1/large

canopfor on February 24, 2014 at 12:48 PM

From the article:

Road access to the center was to be tightly controlled or blocked, as it was on Feb. 18-20, with [when] people spotted traffic police armed with Kalashnikov rifles.

Meddling Medley is right:

Russian Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev blasted the regime change in neighboring Ukraine, calling it an “armed mutiny.” He also questioned the EU for recognizing “Kalashnikov-toting people in black masks who are roaming Kiev” as a legitimate government:

The EU should certainly not recognize the K-toters as legitimate.

AesopFan on February 24, 2014 at 4:49 PM

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