Gallup: Only “state” with positive economic confidence is … Washington DC

posted at 2:41 pm on February 10, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

Feeling chipper about the economy? Think the future looks so bright, you gotta wear shades? Chances are, you’re either stuck in a 1980s time warp or … you live in Washington, DC. Gallup published its polling on economic confidence by state, and the only “state” to have a positive rating is the one where all the cash is going. Instapundit refers to this as a “Hunger Games update,” and it’s difficult to dispute that characterization:

Although scores on Gallup’s Economic Confidence Index improved in most U.S. states in 2013, the index remained negative in all 50. Only the District of Columbia had a positive index. Indexes were least negative in Massachusetts, Minnesota, and California. They were most negative in West Virginia, followed by Alaska. …

Most of the top 10 states in economic confidence in 2013 were the same as in 2012, but the rankings changed. Massachusetts (index score of -1) climbed five spots to top the list in 2013. California, Connecticut, Nebraska, and Wisconsin were new to the top 10, replacing Hawaii, South Dakota, and Virginia (because of ties, there were 12 states on the list in 2013, vs. 11 in 2012). Hawaii (-12 index score) and South Dakota (-21) were among the few states to experience decreases in their index scores last year. Hawaii’s index, though still above the national average of -16, dropped three points and South Dakota’s index dropped 10 points.

The District of Columbia (+19) is the clear outlier in economic confidence, having the only positive reading for 2013 and well above the readings for even the most optimistic states. Its confidence has taken a hit, however, since 2012, when its index was +29. Likely factors in the 10-point drop include October’s federal government shutdown as well as the sequestration spending cuts that occurred earlier in the year.

Other states with indexes significantly above the national average were Minnesota (-2), California (-5), and Texas (-8), as well as Nebraska, Maryland, and Iowa (all at -9). Connecticut, North Dakota, Washington, and Wisconsin, at -10, also made the top 10.

Even that wan level of confidence appears misplaced, according to the Associated Press. After two bad jobs reports in a row and nearly five years of stagnation as recovery, Josh Boak wonders if this is as good as it gets:

In the 4½ years since the Great Recession ended, millions of Americans who have gone without jobs or raises have found themselves wondering something about the economic recovery:

Is this as good as it gets?

It increasingly looks that way.

Two straight weak job reports have raised doubts about economists’ predictions of breakout growth in 2014. The global economy is showing signs of slowing — again. Manufacturing has slumped. Fewer people are signing contracts to buy homes. Global stock markets have sunk as anxiety has gripped developing nations.

Some long-term trends are equally dispiriting.

Boak notes that last week’s CBO report predicts growth remaining in the 2% range over the next ten years, declining from the current annual level of 2.7% to 2.4% in 2024. That might have some relation to the production disincentives of ObamaCare, which the White House and its allies continue to spin as positive news about the elimination of “job lock.” Its actual impact will be a trillion dollars less in the economy over that same period, as Republicans on the Senate Budget Committee declared:

senate-cbo-compensation

As the chart shows, the lost compensation increases every year from an estimated $108 billion in 2017 to an estimated $147 billion 2024. The analysis is based on numbers provided in a recent Congressional Budget Office report on Obamacare.

“The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that Obamacare will “cause a reduction of roughly 1 percent in aggregate labor compensation [wages, salaries, and fringe benefits] over the 2017-2024 period, compared with what would have been otherwise” (see page 117 of appendix C of CBO’s February 2014 Budget and Economic Outlook). CBO also suggests that the largest effect will occur among lower-wage workers who were the target of the law’s subsidized coverage expansion,” says a statement from the Republican-side of the Senate Budget Committee, explaining their methodology.

“CBO’s February 2014 baseline contains projections for total worker compensation under current law; i.e., with the President’s health law in place. Senate Budget Committee Republican staff took these nominal dollar estimates and adjusted them to account for the 1 percent reduction that CBO attributes to the health care law, in order to determine what total compensation would have been if the law had not been enacted. The difference between the status quo and the status quo ante amounts to $1.016 trillion in reduced compensation over the 2017–2024 period.”

As long as we keep passing policies that disincentivize work and investment, this will be as good as it gets — and it might not even be that good, as Steve Eggleston argued at DaTechGuy:

The news is worse on the actual number of people employed. That only increased by an unseasoned 3,090,000 between January 2009 and January 2014, and is over 1 million below what it was in January 2008. As a percentage of population, the unseasoned employment-population ratio dropped from 59.8% in January 2009 to 58.1% in January 2014. That is, other than the other 4 Januarys of the Obama Presidency, the worst January since 1984 (57.7%). On a sesonally-adjusted basis, the 58.8% employment-population ratio in January 2014 is worse than every month between January 1984 (58.8%) and September 2009 (58.7%).

Of course, you and your party see that as a good thing considering your response to the Congressional Budget Office report finding that over 2 million full-time equivalent positions won’t exist in 2024 because of PlaceboCare.

The younger generations took the past 5 years directly in the shorts. The number of employed among the “prime workforce”, those between the ages of 25 and 54, decreased by 1,409,000 on an unseasoned basis over those 5 years to 94,512,000. That is, other than the prior four Januarys, the lowest January employment number since 1998 (94,196,000). As a percentage of the population, the 75.94% employment-population ratio among 25-54 year olds is a drop of 0.51 percentage points from January 2009′s 76.45%, and is, other than the 4 Januarys in between, the lowest January since 1985 (75.7%). On a seasonally-adjusted basis, the 76.5% employment-population ratio among 25-54 year olds is the lowest between June 1985 (76.4%) and March 2009 (76.2%).

Job lock, or job block?


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Two straight weak job reports have raised doubts about economists’ predictions of breakout growth in 2014.

Green Shoots!!

Errr … Grey Shoots!!!

Shoots, nonetheless.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on February 10, 2014 at 2:47 PM

Is that one of 57..?

d1carter on February 10, 2014 at 2:47 PM

DC as a single entity is really kind of an outlier.

It would be interesting to see a reformulation with the DC Metropolitan Area (which includes 7 of the top 10 most affluent counties) grouped together as a unit. Then take a look at the rest of VA and MD and see just how much economic confidence they have in Western Maryland or Southern VA (where coal was also king).

Happy Nomad on February 10, 2014 at 2:50 PM

Green Shoots!!

Errr … Grey Shoots!!!

Shoots, nonetheless.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on February 10, 2014 at 2:47 PM

Nevermind. Just a stick poking up out the mud.

Happy Nomad on February 10, 2014 at 2:51 PM

Is that one of 57..?

d1carter on February 10, 2014 at 2:47 PM

Beat me to it.

aunursa on February 10, 2014 at 2:53 PM

Les “Hunger Games” than Imperial China, where the only chance of advancement in a rigidly-stratified society was the government bureaucracy.

When an American version of the Chinese classic, “Dreaming Of The Capital While The Rice Is Cooking” hits the New York Times bestseller list, you’ll know we’ve arrived at The One, Krugman, et al’s definition of Utopia.

clear ether

eon

eon on February 10, 2014 at 2:54 PM

Chances are, you’re either stuck in a 1980s time warp Radio Shack Commercial

FIFY

aunursa on February 10, 2014 at 2:55 PM

D.C. WINNING! Send moar taxpayer cheese!!

The rest of America, ObamaDepression.

Isn’t Marxism great?!?!

Left_is_Wrong on February 10, 2014 at 2:58 PM

Boak notes that last week’s CBO report predicts growth remaining in the 2% range over the next ten years, declining from the current annual level of 2.7% to 2.4% in 2024.

That folks is not growth, it is losing ground.

Johnnyreb on February 10, 2014 at 2:58 PM

Let the games begin!
The last survivor gets to see a doctor about whatever ailments they might have….

dentarthurdent on February 10, 2014 at 2:59 PM

Boak notes that last week’s CBO report predicts growth remaining in the 2% range over the next ten years, declining from the current annual level of 2.7% to 2.4% in 2024.


OR
it might be worth pointing out the disastrous track record the CBO has when it comes to prediting economic outcomes especially those predicated on using the GDP which has had its method of calculation turned on its head by the Obama administration.

You might also point out the CBO’s idiotic penchant for ALWAYS forecasting consistent growth (NEVER ANY RECESSIONS) for a ten year period.

Factor REALITY into the calculations (i.e. Actual outcomes vs CBO projected outcomes) and instead of 2.3 million jobs lost over the next decade … somewhere in the neighborhood of 10 million jobs lost to Obamacare is a more likely outcome.

PolAgnostic on February 10, 2014 at 3:00 PM

One of these is not like the others…

Murphy9 on February 10, 2014 at 3:01 PM

It’s obviously a good time to be in government.

Tater Salad on February 10, 2014 at 3:01 PM

PolAgnostic on February 10, 2014 at 3:00 PM

Gubmint economists – about the only career field where you can be wrong more than weather forecasters and less trustworthy than used car salesmen – and still keep your job.

dentarthurdent on February 10, 2014 at 3:03 PM

It’s obviously a good time to be in government.

Tater Salad on February 10, 2014 at 3:01 PM

You forgot the other part of that. Anytime it’s obviously good to be in Government, it’s obviously BAD to be in the rest of the country.

But hey, it’s all good, we got ObamaGlitch and all the legal pot we can smoke.

Left_is_Wrong on February 10, 2014 at 3:04 PM


D.C. WINNING! Send moar taxpayer cheese!!

The rest of America, ObamaDepression.

Isn’t Marxism great?!?!

Left_is_Wrong on February 10, 2014 at 2:58 PM

Kind of like the Kremlin and…. the rest of the Soviet Union. Bejing and … the rest of China….Fidel’s House in Havana and….. the rest of Cuba….well, all of NORKville.

HomeoftheBrave on February 10, 2014 at 3:06 PM

But hey, it’s all good, we got ObamaGlitch and all the legal pot we can smoke.

Left_is_Wrong on February 10, 2014 at 3:04 PM

Yup – one to take your money and make you think you’ll have healthcare when you need it, and the other so you really just don’t give a shiite when reality hits…

And communists say religion is the opiate of the masses…
How about the false promise of free healthcare combined with access to pot so you don’t care any more?

dentarthurdent on February 10, 2014 at 3:09 PM

Washington DC, the Sochi olympics of the US. A lot of money goes in and we never see anything that’s worth that much money come out. My guess in both cases is there’s a lot of Swiss and Caribbean banks involved.

Annielou on February 10, 2014 at 3:11 PM

It’s obviously a good time to be in government.

Tater Salad on February 10, 2014 at 3:01 PM

It’s always better to be IN the castle.
That’s why establishment RINOs like Beaner and McLame don’t want to rock the boat.

dentarthurdent on February 10, 2014 at 3:11 PM

There is one way to fix the problem of DC. Term limits.
Having new ideas after two terms would do America good. There is no reason for a politician to become rich by governing.

Pickle on February 10, 2014 at 3:11 PM

My collie says:

The parallels with the western Roman Empire are chilling, donchathink’?

Yes. And we all know how that turned out for them, don’t we?

CyberCipher on February 10, 2014 at 3:13 PM

The new normal.

supernova on February 10, 2014 at 3:13 PM

Job lock, or job block?

It’s all about intended consequences…and never letting a crisis go to waste, even if you have to not only create the crisis, but exacerbate it in order to drive the intended result.

Want to expand the power and control of the federal government?

Want to expand the dependency on the federal government – and lock it into place for decades? (Focus on the young adult / worker..)

The younger generations took the past 5 years directly in the shorts…

Want to ‘fundamentally change’ the United States?

Implement Alinksy + Cloward & Piven….

The Obama Administration is replete with many who are incompetent when it comes to bureaucracy, administration, and implementation of complex initiatives…but extremely well versed and loyal to their ideology seeped in ‘the ends justifies the means’. They are focused on implementing their utopian ‘kingdom of heaven on earth’ – via their expanding dependency web / trap.

Athos on February 10, 2014 at 3:14 PM

There is one way to fix the problem of DC. Term limits.
Having new ideas after two terms would do America good. There is no reason for a politician to become rich by governing.

Pickle on February 10, 2014 at 3:11 PM

The ONLY way we’ll ever get Congressional Term Limits (or a balanced budget amendment for that matter), is if the states pass an amendment, bypassing Congress and the President.

I know, I know, but I can always dream.

Left_is_Wrong on February 10, 2014 at 3:15 PM

Yes. And we all know how that turned out for them, don’t we?

CyberCipher on February 10, 2014 at 3:13 PM

0barky already has his fiddle out….

dentarthurdent on February 10, 2014 at 3:15 PM

There is one way to fix the problem of DC. Term limits.
Having new ideas after two terms would do America good. There is no reason for a politician to become rich by governing.

Pickle on February 10, 2014 at 3:11 PM

Ed, I believe this one’s been compromised by a conservative – not that I mind.

Mark Boabaca on February 10, 2014 at 3:22 PM

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light.

In the near end, Obama and Dems created ObamaCare. And Obama said, “The product is good..”

Electrongod on February 10, 2014 at 3:24 PM

There is one way to fix the problem of DC. Term limits.
Having new ideas after two terms would do America good. There is no reason for a politician to become rich by governing.

Pickle on February 10, 2014 at 3:11 PM

Ed, I believe this one’s been compromised by a conservative – not that I mind.

Mark Boabaca on February 10, 2014 at 3:22 PM

I have never been so insulted. Seriously, though, there is corruption on both sides. Henry Waxman is going to retire after forty years. Youse guys cheered. Chuck Grassley has been in congress just as long, but he’s not retiring. Not a chirp from the birds here.

Pickle on February 10, 2014 at 3:29 PM

…Chuck Grassley has been in congress just as long, but he’s not retiring. Not a chirp from the birds here.

Pickle on February 10, 2014 at 3:29 PM

I’ll be the first to chirp. He should be gone too. Everyone with over 2 terms, maybe 4 for the House, should be done and gone.

I would even go a step further. I think we should not only have Congressional term limits, but we need an Amendment making it illegal for Congress to give themselves pay increases. That should be voted on by America every two years.

Let’s see how they feel about their 7% approval rating if their pay rates reflect that.

Left_is_Wrong on February 10, 2014 at 3:35 PM

Boak notes that last week’s CBO report predicts growth remaining in the 2% range over the next ten years, declining from the current annual level of 2.7% to 2.4% in 2024.

WOW!! 2 whole percent?!! And that’s with federal borrowing upwards of 8% ANNUALLY (not including the phantom money printed up by the Fed and dumped in the economy through insanely low – truly insane – faux interest rates) … all done to give this rousing 2% “growth”. ROFLMAO. I mean, you really have to laugh at this.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on February 10, 2014 at 3:40 PM

Gubmint economists – about the only career field where you can be wrong more than weather forecasters and less trustworthy than used car salesmen – and still keep your job.

dentarthurdent on February 10, 2014 at 3:03 PM

.
Add in a talent for world class azz-kizzing and you can serve on the Board of the Federal Reserve!

PolAgnostic on February 10, 2014 at 3:40 PM

“Attention tributes, attention! Commencing at sunrise, there will be a feast tomorrow at the Cornucopia. This will be no ordinary occasion. Each of you needs something. Desperately. And we plan to be… generous hosts.”

Obamacare.

Trouble in Capitol City :
All the schoolgirls are wearing their hair like Katniss Everdeen Sarah Palin. ;)

MichaelGabriel on February 10, 2014 at 3:41 PM

There is one way to fix the problem of DC. Term limits.

Pickle on February 10, 2014 at 3:11 PM

Orange jumpsuits.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on February 10, 2014 at 3:41 PM

Is anybody surprised?

crankyoldlady on February 10, 2014 at 3:41 PM

28 Signs That the Middle Class is Heading Towards Extinction

#2 Some of the largest retailers in the United States that once thrived by serving the middle class are now steadily dying. Sears and J.C. Penney are both on the verge of bankruptcy, and now we have learned that Radio Shack may be shutting down another 500 stores this year.

#3 Real disposable income in the United States just experienced the largest year over year drop that we have seen since 1974.

#4 Median household income in the United States has fallen for five years in a row.

#5 The rate of homeownership in the United States has fallen for eight years in a row.

#6 In 2008, 53 percent of all Americans considered themselves to be “middle class”. In 2014, only 44 percent of all Americans consider themselves to be “middle class”.

#7 In 2008, 25 percent of all Americans in the 18 to 29-year-old age bracket considered themselves to be “lower class”. In 2014, an astounding 49 percent of them do.

#8 Incredibly, 56 percent of all Americans now have “subprime credit”.

#9 Total consumer credit has risen by a whopping 22 percent over the past three years.

#10 The average credit card debt in the United States is $15,279.

#11 The average student loan debt in the United States is $32,250.

#12 The average mortgage debt in the United States is $149,925.

#13 Overall, U.S. consumers are $11,360,000,000,000 in debt.

#14 The U.S. national debt is currently sitting at $17,263,040,455,036.20, and it is being reported that is has grown by $6.666 trillion during the Obama years so far. Most of the burden of servicing that debt is going to fall on the middle class (if the middle class is able to survive that long).

Athos on February 10, 2014 at 3:47 PM

Athos on February 10, 2014 at 3:47 PM

In a socialist revolution, the first goal is to destroy the middle class.

slickwillie2001 on February 10, 2014 at 4:06 PM

That is funny.
Washington DC is also famous for how good the Kool-aid and crack is, a coincidence I think not.

John21 on February 10, 2014 at 4:08 PM

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light.

In the near end, Obama and Dems created ObamaCare. And Obama said, “The product is good..You didn’t create that.

Electrongod on February 10, 2014 at 3:24 PM

FIFY

Effay5 on February 10, 2014 at 4:11 PM

The United States has become a corporate oligarchy, with a healthy dose of crony capitalism thrown in for good measure. In either case, tyranny is right around the corner.

America: Dumb all over, and maybe even a little ugly on the side.

dinahmoehumm on February 10, 2014 at 4:15 PM

Please don’t be too condemnatory of Gubmint employees. With my husband having lost a 25-year career in the crash and a much lower-paying job in the “recovery,” my son unable to find any work, and my daughter still in school, my municipal job is the only thing keeping us fed & sheltered…

werewife on February 10, 2014 at 4:20 PM

Please don’t be too condemnatory of Gubmint employees. With my husband having lost a 25-year career in the crash and a much lower-paying job in the “recovery,” my son unable to find any work, and my daughter still in school, my municipal job is the only thing keeping us fed & sheltered…

werewife on February 10, 2014 at 4:20 PM

Don’t take it personal. We curse federal employees excepting the military, and employees in some of the ruined greedy-union states like Illinois and California.

Many government employees at the state and lower level in well-run states are by no means overpaid.

Statistics on pay and benefits for government employees tend to be tilted by the former.

slickwillie2001 on February 10, 2014 at 4:27 PM

OK, I give up: What’s the significance of that picture on the main page for this article?

Socratease on February 10, 2014 at 4:34 PM

Although scores on Gallup’s Economic Confidence Index improved in most U.S. states in 2013, the index remained negative in all 50. Only the District of Columbia had a positive index.

I looked at some previous years just for giggles.

DC has had the most positive view of the economy dating all the way back to 2008. In 2008 their economic confidence was middle of the pack of states.

It is almost as if something major happened in DC starting in 2009 (Like maybe around Jan. 20th) that made the politicians and lobbyists think that their economic situation was doing so much better.

This also shows how disconnected DC is from the rest of the country, as if we didn’t know already.

airupthere on February 10, 2014 at 4:39 PM

OK, I give up: What’s the significance of that picture on the main page for this article?

Socratease on February 10, 2014 at 4:34 PM

It’s Stanley Tucci as the host of the Hunger Games in the movie version.

werewife on February 10, 2014 at 4:43 PM

Youse guys cheered. Chuck Grassley has been in congress just as long, but he’s not retiring. Not a chirp from the birds here.

Pickle on February 10, 2014 at 3:29 PM

Tell you what snowflake, Why don’t you bookmark your comments here and come back when Grassley announces his retirement. Frank Wolf was a wonderful Congressman for 30+ years but nobody was happier than I when he announced his retirement. Mandatory term limits are never going to happen so take your victories where you can.

Happy Nomad on February 10, 2014 at 4:44 PM

Youse guys cheered. Chuck Grassley has been in congress just as long, but he’s not retiring. Not a chirp from the birds here.

Pickle on February 10, 2014 at 3:29 PM

Tell you what snowflake, Why don’t you bookmark your comments here and come back when Grassley announces his retirement. Frank Wolf was a wonderful Congressman for 30+ years but nobody was happier than I when he announced his retirement. Mandatory term limits are never going to happen so take your victories where you can.

Happy Nomad on February 10, 2014 at 4:44 PM

Sure, peaches, but I highly doubt when Grassley retires that there will be a collective sigh from here. But, there will be a lot of good lucks and Grassley 2020.

Pickle on February 10, 2014 at 4:52 PM

Mandatory term limits are never going to happen so take your victories where you can.

Happy Nomad on February 10, 2014 at 4:44 PM

At the Federal level.

Term Limits:

In fifteen states across America, citizens have voted overwhelmingly to place term limits on their state legislatures. Two of these states have used activist judges to remove term limits. (This link will provide you details on specific states term limits)

Thirty-seven states place some form of term limits on their governor and other constitutional offices. (This link will provide you details)

airupthere on February 10, 2014 at 4:53 PM

At the Federal level.

airupthere on February 10, 2014 at 4:53 PM

I thought that was the topic was, federal politicians that stay too long and what could be done about it (nothing unless the feds vote to term limit themselves).

Happy Nomad on February 10, 2014 at 5:01 PM

I thought that was the topic was, federal politicians that stay too long and what could be done about it (nothing unless the feds vote to term limit themselves).

Happy Nomad on February 10, 2014 at 5:01 PM

Agreed, but I am a firm believer in states being the testing ground for specific things like term limits.

If we can continue to move more and more state legislatures to the “term limit” column without activist judges throwing them out, our ability of one day getting them on the Federal level are much easier.

Heck, if we can get a supermajority of the states to institute term limits, it would be easier to get them to join together and pass a constitutional amendment without the involvement of Congress whatsoever.

The fact that term limits poll as high or higher now as they did when passed in the states that have done so is telling. People like term limits on politicians and they are not likely to go away once established (without judicial intervention).

airupthere on February 10, 2014 at 5:10 PM

Please don’t be too condemnatory of Gubmint employees. With my husband having lost a 25-year career in the crash and a much lower-paying job in the “recovery,” my son unable to find any work, and my daughter still in school, my municipal job is the only thing keeping us fed & sheltered…

Does your job produce anything? Is it a good use of our money, worth someone threatening us with prison if we don’t pay your salary? Is it not duplicated in any other part of the bureaucracy? If you can tell me your job is completely worthwhile, that your pension and salary and benefits aren’t out of line with private jobs, it’s not reproduced in some other area of gubmint, that it’s actually helping the economy perhaps I won’t be too condemnatory.

Annielou on February 10, 2014 at 5:21 PM

America’s District of Columbia thrives off the 50 States. Their only export – laws and regulation, their primary import – taxes.

lel2007 on February 10, 2014 at 6:19 PM

The younger generations took the past 5 years directly in the shorts.

The data presented hardly supports that contention, 25-54 year olds are the younger generations? It is, however, partially true (depending on what more realist definition “younger generation” is employed). I drilled down into the employment statistics and found the point change in NSA (sorry, “unseasoned”) employment to population for each decadal group from 01’2009 to 01’2014:

16-24: -1.8 (ok, it’s not a full decade, darn child labor laws)
25-34: +0.1
35-44: +0.2
45-54: -1.7
55-64: -1.0

Yes, the youth cohort outside of the 25-54 year old category has seen a large drop off in working, but that trend began in 2000, slowed around 2006 and resumed in earnest in 2009 (no doubt Obama policies are playing a role, just there are other factors at play). The 2 youngest groups in the 25-54 year old category have seen slight improvements in the last 5 years. And at the bottom, the group really taking it “directly in the shorts” are the middle aged and above. Those most likely to vote Republican, hmmm, wonder why Obama isn’t too concerned about their plight.

jarodea on February 10, 2014 at 7:17 PM

May the odds be ever in your favor.

Myron Falwell on February 10, 2014 at 8:17 PM

Does your job produce anything? Is it a good use of our money, worth someone threatening us with prison if we don’t pay your salary? Is it not duplicated in any other part of the bureaucracy? If you can tell me your job is completely worthwhile, that your pension and salary and benefits aren’t out of line with private jobs, it’s not reproduced in some other area of gubmint, that it’s actually helping the economy perhaps I won’t be too condemnatory.

Annielou on February 10, 2014 at 5:21 PM

I’m a public librarian. I think that meets the standards you set, but understandably, it’s not as if I’m disinterested!

werewife on February 10, 2014 at 8:25 PM

The counties around DC are full of government employees and part of the 1300 federal agencies and the 23,000 appointed staff of the Congress, so it’s not rocket science claiming it’s the most positive so called State.

mixplix on February 11, 2014 at 8:13 AM