Perhaps it takes retirement for Democrats to be honest about the status of ObamaCare, and about its unsustainable structure. Rep. Jim Moran (D-VA), who recently announced his retirement from the House, told American University Radio last week that the dearth of enrollments from young, healthy Americans in ObamaCare would “unravel” the whole system — and that furthermore, they’d be right to avoid it:

“I’m afraid that the millennials, if you will, are less likely to sign up. I think they feel more independent, I think they feel a little more invulnerable than prior generations,” Moran says. “But I don’t think we’re going to get enough young people signing up to make this bill work as it was intended to financially.”

If Moran’s prediction is correct, the whole law could unravel. He says there just isn’t enough incentive for healthy young people to sign up for insurance.

“And, frankly, there’s some legitimacy to their concern because the government spends about $7 for the elderly for every $1 it spends on the young,” Moran says.

Yes, frankly, there has always been substantial legitimacy to their concerns. The law requires young and healthy consumers to buy expensive comprehensive insurance for thousands of dollars a year, far exceeding their likely expenditures on health-related services and products. It then imposes ridiculous deductibles which all but guarantee that they won’t see any benefit at all from those policies. That money will instead benefit older Americans by subsidizing their premiums. It’s one of the most perverse wealth transfers of all time.

The report from Matt Laslo includes the complaint from Democrats that Republicans won’t help fix the law that Democrats shoved through Congress over their objections. Jim Geraghty answers that charge:

First, why is it outrageous for Republicans to attempt to repeal a law that even its supporters are now saying isn’t working, as Moran says, or that has “glaring flaws”?

Secondly, what Democrat bill to reform some of the “glaring flaws” are Republicans blocking?

Thirdly, what “reform” would get millennials to sign up for a product that they already must purchase, or else pay a special tax of one percent of their income?

There is no “fix” bill on these “glaring flaws” for Republicans to debate, let alone support. The White House and Democrats are trying to pretend that everything’s working well, and that there is no legitimacy to any concerns over the structure, performance, or security risks in ObamaCare. Moran is just letting the cat out of the bag.