Cashing in on that hot “politics and culture of food” degree

posted at 9:31 am on January 19, 2014 by Jazz Shaw

Randye Hoder (yes, that’s the actual spelling) has a bit of navel gazing at Time this week regarding her daughter’s choice of schools and academic pursuits. On the surface it looks like a fairly valid discussion of an important topic; what sort of education should your child pursue and how will it help them establish a career and a shot at success? But as you read through it the real substance of the article is quite different, though college grads are forced to deal with it every year.

The bright spot, according to the Fed analysis, students who majored in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics—areas in which recent graduates “have tended to do relatively well, even in today’s challenging labor market.” But Emma is a student of the much-maligned humanities—an American Studies major with a focus on the politics and culture of food at a small liberal arts school.

For quite a while, I tripped all over myself to describe how her field of study is so trendy right now that I’m not the least bit worried she will find a decent job. “Emma’s concentration and interests could lead her in any number of directions,” I would tell people. “Writing for a food blog. Working at a nonprofit that improves health and nutrition for the urban poor. Managing social media for a food-related startup.”

Hoder’s biggest concern, expressed in her own essay, was how people would judge her and her parenting skills if her daughter wound up stocking shelves at Best Buy after spending a significant fortune on her American Studies humanities degree. This is rationalized by explaining that the real benefit of this college experience was to ensure that she learned, “to think critically and analytically, read widely and write well.”

Stacy McCain found it all a bit rife with sniffing one’s own gaseous emissions, particularly after reading that the Hoders will be paying off their daughter’s college loans and even having her move back home if she can’t land a job with that sheepskin.

Oh, now I see! Mommy and Daddy will pay the bill for their daughter’s luxurious four-year-vacation — “the kind of education we value” — because their Special Snowflake (a) didn’t have the scores to get into Berkeley, and (b) Cal State’s for losers.

See, this is the niche that “small liberal arts schools” fill: The offspring of permissive parents who will give their Special Snowflakes whatever their selfish hearts crave. The kid isn’t smart enough or hard-working enough to get into a genuinely elite school, but they’re just too doggone special to attend a state school (let alone community college), and so there’s always that trendy little campus that will charge them $35,000 a year to pretend that they’re better than those disgusting low-brow slobs at State U.

This is not about education, it’s about aspiration.

The “small liberal arts school” is a luxury that the rich can afford, but borrowing money to attend one? That’s just crazy.

I don’t have enough data on the Hoders’ personal finances or their daughter’s high school transcripts to know how much that applies, but for many families around the country it certainly has the ring of truth. Hoder’s “explanation” for the decisions they made certainly has the ring of an entitlement mentality and a general disdain for the realities of life. That really comes through in this brief snippet:

But from the beginning, we never urged her to pick a college or a major with an eye on its expected return on investment, as more and more families are doing.

That rather sarcastic, chiding jab at the idea of students (and parents) seeking a reasonable “return on investment” for the child’s college education says a lot. How is it in any way a negative mark on the family to expect that they get something of lasting value out of their college degree? For the majority of graduate students, the amount of money they will spend on a four year degree will be the largest single investment they will ever make, greater than the cost of their nicest car or their first home. And if you want your children to be critical thinkers who read a lot and write well, aren’t these personality traits which you should be instilling in them from their earliest years, rather than expecting some set of professors to suddenly hammer these proclivities into them after they are fully formed adults?

Some people will benefit greatly from college, particularly if their field of study is in demand in the marketplace after they graduate. But not everyone has to get a particular set of letters after their signature to be a success. Both the military and the trades are still perfectly viable options which should garner a lot more respect than they do in the media, and you come out of them with a lot less (or no) debt. Want to be out of the red and building a career early on? Learn to weld. Or to service heating and air conditioning systems. For those who don’t look down their nose at getting a little dirty during a hard day’s work, opportunity still exists out there. And when your pipes freeze and blow out on a cold frozen night, you’re not going to be cruising the yellow pages looking for somebody with expertise in the politics and culture of food .


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What did the Humanities major say to the STEM major after graduation?

“Do you want fries with that?”

myiq2xu on January 19, 2014 at 9:35 AM

American Studies major with a focus on the politics and culture of food at a small liberal arts school

In a sane world, no one would string the words above together except in a tasty piece of satire. In this world, delusional people write such things seriously, with no sense of the screamingly obvious absurdity and hilarity of what they have written.

Rational Thought on January 19, 2014 at 9:49 AM

I dunno, Jazz. Look how many people start out as food critics and then move on to opinion for big papers.

Blake on January 19, 2014 at 9:52 AM

I kinda feel sorry for the kid. And not just because her last name sounds like the Spanish word joder (“to f*ck”).

pat buchanatar on January 19, 2014 at 9:53 AM

Oh, now I see! Mommy and Daddy will pay the bill for their daughter’s luxurious four-year-vacation — “the kind of education we value” — because their Special Snowflake (a) didn’t have the scores to get into Berkeley, and (b) Cal State’s for losers.

Think about this: if Newt Gingrich had won the GOP nomination in ’12, we’d have had an election pitting a former professor at the University of West Georgia–a public school where the 99% send their kids–against a former professor from the University of Chicago, an elite private school founded with Rockefeller money and an annual tuition well over 40K. And the Left would have used all kinds of little coded words to mock Gingrich’s academic career.

radjah shelduck on January 19, 2014 at 9:59 AM

For those who don’t look down their nose at getting a little dirty during a hard day’s work, opportunity still exists out there.

*Plenty* of opportunity out there; the trades are hurting for skilled people.

As for her degree, that’s good enough to get her into OCS (barring other disqualifications), but I think Mummy and Daddy will be scandalized if she chose so gauche a career as the military.

Jeff Weimer on January 19, 2014 at 10:00 AM

When you read the ramblings of the moronic mother, you can understand the daughter’s failure.

crash72 on January 19, 2014 at 10:12 AM

Something I didn’t see addressed is the ability to speak Spanish. Here in Northern Mexico (California), being bilingual is one of the first things an employer looks for on a job application.

No abla espanol….No trebajo….

repvoter on January 19, 2014 at 10:12 AM

Hoder’s biggest concern, expressed in her own essay, was how people would judge her and her parenting skills if her daughter wound up stocking shelves at Best Buy after spending a significant fortune on her American Studies humanities degree.

And we will, because it was an absurd degree choice.

nobar on January 19, 2014 at 10:13 AM

The Army employs a lot of “food scientists” They call them cooks. I understand that is the up and coming thing under obama. Here is a list of potential employers: Sonic, MacDonalds, KFC, Burger King, Whataburger, Chic-fil-a. I suspect the political part will be quite valuable at Starbucks.

Old Country Boy on January 19, 2014 at 10:18 AM

The upper classes have always sought to segregate themselves to maintain their privileges. Does the plumber’s daughter get to go to the debutantes ball?

At the fancy-schmancy second-rate private school she’ll make friends whose parents can help her get that entry level job at the Ford Foundation or Natural Resources Defense Council. (How I long for the old days when the young wealthy simply wanted to get drunk and smash their Porsches! But there’s no going back.) And when people of her class ask her where she went to school, she can proudly say where and not have to mumble South Dakota State.

Here’s the thing. The aspiring middle middle class spends all their time trying to be upper middle class. Then when they achieve that, they want to pass it along to their kids. But maybe their offspring don’t have that much upstairs. So why put the parents down for trying to “give their kids the better life” they’ve worked so hard for? Let them send their brats to elitish colleges.

bobs1196 on January 19, 2014 at 10:22 AM

It has become practically quaint these days to think of institutions of higher learning as places that teach students to think critically and analytically, read widely and write well.

The humanities are failing to teach kids to think analytically or critically. I started out in college as an English major, and all I was learning was how to regurgitate my professors’ ideas in a 5 point essay. I got a lot more practice thinking analytically and critically in the Natural Sciences, AND I gained skills that actually got me a job when I got out.

bitsy on January 19, 2014 at 10:23 AM

What is the fate of the small, undistinguished liberal arts colleges, of which there are many?

The elite, selective, highly expensive ones (Grinnell, Oberlin, Macalester, etc.) attract a national student body and they will likely survive.

But what about the second- and third-tier places? It’s hard to envision any future at all for them, isn’t it?

Byron on January 19, 2014 at 10:31 AM

Then they take that crap degree and go into Law School and get into deeper debt with another crappier degree

TexasJew on January 19, 2014 at 10:40 AM

How many food critics are there in media, how many job openings are actually available. Only an idiot would choose a major based apparently on how cool and hip the degree sounds rather than the prospects of a career.

I’ve told every one of my kids: I’ll assist in some college funding but you’re starting at the community or tech college to get your feet wet, there isn’t a chance in hell you’ll be attending Gustavus or St. Thomas at $500/credit starting off if I’m helping pay for it.

Bishop on January 19, 2014 at 10:45 AM

…wish I had been handy enough to go into some kind of trade…I would have liked to work with my hands…and not be 9 to 5.

KOOLAID2 on January 19, 2014 at 10:46 AM

What did the Humanities major say to the STEM major after graduation?

“Do you want fries with that?”

myiq2xu on January 19, 2014 at 9:35 AM

What did the Humanities major say to the STEM major/plumber/welder/electrician/mechanic/soldier after graduation?

“Do you want fries with that?”

FIFY. :-)

flipflop on January 19, 2014 at 11:03 AM

Hoder’s biggest concern, expressed in her own essay, was how people would judge her and her parenting skills if her daughter wound up stocking shelves at Best Buy after spending a significant fortune on her American Studies humanities degree.

How revealing that Hoder cares more about her Yuppy friends’ opinion of Hoder rather than what happens to her daughter in life.

Hoder apparently thinks of the kid as just another project that is an extension or reflection of herself, and not a person of independent worth.

Wethal on January 19, 2014 at 11:08 AM

I am truly surprised that liberal arts colleges and many Catholic universities are still in business.

I graduated from two Catholic colleges (Detroit-Mercy and Dayton) long ago. Today many Catholic colleges and universities try to be as liberal and secular as state universities, so what’s the reason for their existence?

I sent my kids to Catholic high school but when it came time for college, Catholic colleges and universities weren’t even a consideration.

bw222 on January 19, 2014 at 11:13 AM

“liberal arts” says it all………

ultracon on January 19, 2014 at 11:20 AM

I graduated from two Catholic colleges (Detroit-Mercy and Dayton) long ago. Today many Catholic colleges and universities try to be as liberal and secular as state universities, so what’s the reason for their existence?

bw222 on January 19, 2014 at 11:13 AM

Coasting along on the fumes of the “brand.” A “Jesuit education,” for example? Seen how PC Georgetown is today?

It’s also the alumni network, which actually might help the kids get a job, although “politics and culture of food” might be a hard sell even to a loyal alumnus.

Wethal on January 19, 2014 at 11:20 AM

You old scoo Jazz,we be new scoo.

celtic warrior on January 19, 2014 at 11:24 AM

And when people of her class ask her where she went to school, she can proudly say where and not have to mumble South Dakota State.

bobs1196 on January 19, 2014 at 10:22 AM

Funny you should mention this. I have a young relative at SDSU in engineering. When I asked his parents last fall if he had started his job search, I got a laugh, and “He can wait ’til spring. The jobs will come looking for him.”

The old land grant colleges have gotten pretty PC in the humanities, but a STEM degree is a STEM degree. (If the bridge falls down, the bridge falls down, so build it right.)

Sad the Hoder-type parents don’t see the bragging rights of a kid with multiple job offers and little (if they had resident tuition) college debt. That’s snob appeal for you.

Wethal on January 19, 2014 at 11:25 AM

It has become practically quaint these days to think of institutions of higher learning as places that teach students to think critically and analytically, read widely and write well

News flash to the author-if liberal arts colleges actually taught critical thinking,the global warming cult would have gained no traction whatsoever.

talkingpoints on January 19, 2014 at 11:28 AM

I went to a small, liberal arts college in Charleston SC called The Citadel and it was the most mature decision if my life.

Gender Studies wasn’t available there, so I majored in biology.

guinneach on January 19, 2014 at 11:52 AM

Tell your kids to study welding of every sort, it’s still a skill that needs a human to do it and the nation is on the verge of losing a huge number of welders, the job openings are pretty good now and will only improve.

Bishop on January 19, 2014 at 11:57 AM

The “small liberal arts school” is a luxury that the rich can afford, but borrowing money to attend one? That’s just crazy.

Hmmm… Paid my way through a small, liberal arts school. I benefitted greatly from the size and academic rigor (Phi Beta Kappa). Granted, it was conservative leaning, had an emphasis on classical learning and an academic honor code that was enforced. And, it did not accept federal money while I was there. My oldest daughter was ten and remembers when I finally paid off my college loans. When in high school, daughter read Suze Orman’s financial books on her own and is so wise about money, it scares me. She graduated from a private, liberal arts college with very little debt and is now having her grad school classes mostly paid for by her employer.

Meh.

Fallon on January 19, 2014 at 12:02 PM

Randye worked for Diane Feinstein in the mid-90′s. With this on her resume, I’m not surprised at her attitude toward her Special Snowflake’s future debt load and lack of employment.

“Food blogger”. Yeah, that’ll pay the bills.

Ygritte on January 19, 2014 at 12:03 PM

Tell your kids to study welding of every sort, it’s still a skill that needs a human to do it and the nation is on the verge of losing a huge number of welders, the job openings are pretty good now and will only improve.

Bishop on January 19, 2014 at 11:57 AM

Youngest son hated college, dropped out, but he can weld. He can also operate fork and scissor lifts but he no longer does, as he’s been promoted to management at 24 years old. I hope his lack of a college degree won’t hurt him in the future. So far, it has actually gone in his favor.

Fallon on January 19, 2014 at 12:08 PM

Something I didn’t see addressed is the ability to speak Spanish. Here in Northern Mexico (California), being bilingual is one of the first things an employer looks for on a job application.

No abla espanol….No trebajo….

rep voter on January 19, 2014 at 10:12 AM

Learning another language is work, something many college students abhor.

rob verdi on January 19, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Youngest son hated college, dropped out, but he can weld. He can also operate fork and scissor lifts but he no longer does, as he’s been promoted to management at 24 years old. I hope his lack of a college degree won’t hurt him in the future. So far, it has actually gone in his favor.

Fallon on January 19, 2014 at 12:08 PM

If he is reliable and good people (which I assume he is), he will be fine.

rob verdi on January 19, 2014 at 12:10 PM

If they have the money, they have the right to spend it anyway they want to. Even if it is viewed as foolish. (Like the old movie star said, “I blew most of what I made on fast cars, fancy liquor, and hot women. The rest I spent foolishly.”)

If they are willing to shoulder the debt, again. no problem.

If their objective is to turn their daughter into a student loan serf (bound to the debt, like a medieval serf), again, it is their daughter. Better her than one of mine. Besides, if the daughter has enough debt she won’t breed and pass on the stupid (or selfish) genes of her parents. (Or she might get smart and sue them.)

That’s the thing about freedom. You are not really free unless you are free to make truly stupid (heck, horrendously stupid) choices.

They. Are. Fools. Mother, father and daughter. So what? Their stupid choices make it easier for those that make smart choices to get ahead. Otherwise the daughter may be competing with you or your child for some job.

No Truce With Kings on January 19, 2014 at 12:11 PM

Imagine if when you applied for a student loan you had to pick from a limited number of in-demand majors. If you want to pick a major that is not on the list you have to pay cash or get the money from your parents.

About half the college majors would cease to exist because nobody would pay cash to earn a degree in Useless Crap.

myiq2xu on January 19, 2014 at 12:16 PM

I don’t care if Mummy and Dadsy wanna buy their kids a degree in politics with a minor in transgender food criticism. It’s their dime.

But student loans should be tied in with the earning potential of the major field of study. Get a STEM major and you get reasonable and generous loan terms. Get the food culture criticism major, well, lots of luck getting a loan for THAT.

PackerBronco on January 19, 2014 at 12:18 PM

Fallon on January 19, 2014 at 12:08 PM

I have welding wizards working for me but one guy left a while ago to work for a company which makes high-tech gas piping, he got himself an AA degree in business and industrial project management and has a bright future. Dude has to live in a man-camp in the Dakotas right now but he’s single and raking in so much cash his bank account is bursting.

Bishop on January 19, 2014 at 12:20 PM

If their objective is to turn their daughter into a student loan serf (bound to the debt, like a medieval serf), again, it is their daughter. Better her than one of mine

No Truce With Kings on January 19, 2014 at 12:11 PM

Except that she and her parents will be voting for the politicians who promise to forgive and forget the loan payments that precious little snowflake must make.

PackerBronco on January 19, 2014 at 12:20 PM

Paid my way through a small, liberal arts school. I benefitted greatly from the size and academic rigor (Phi Beta Kappa). Granted, it was conservative leaning, had an emphasis on classical learning and an academic honor code that was enforced. And, it did not accept federal money while I was there. My oldest daughter was ten and remembers when I finally paid off my college loans.

If you are old enough to have a daughter that graduated from college, you are probably roughly the same age I am.

I attended the University of Michigan, a public university, albeit pricey when I attended (back in the 1970s). It took me approx 11 semesters to graduate. (I was slow. Sue me.) A little while back I added up the cost of my education over those five years – tuition, books, fees, and living expenses. Then I compared them to my first year’s salary. (I got an engineering job with a NASA contractor in 1979.) Turned out what I earned in one year was half of what I paid to get the education qualifying me for that job (actually seven month’s gross pay.)

My youngest son, who is attending UT-Dallas, is paying between $24,000 to $30,000 a year for everything. He is getting an engineering degree. Starting salaries for engineers are $60-70K annually. In other words, he is paying as much for one year’s education as I paid in five years if you normalize it by income.

Back then someone could go to a private, Liberal Arts college without busting the bank. Not so much today.

No Truce With Kings on January 19, 2014 at 12:22 PM

Youngest son hated college, dropped out, but he can weld. He can also operate fork and scissor lifts but he no longer does, as he’s been promoted to management at 24 years old. I hope his lack of a college degree won’t hurt him in the future. So far, it has actually gone in his favor.

Fallon on January 19, 2014 at 12:08 PM
If he is reliable and good people (which I assume he is), he will be fine.

rob verdi on January 19, 2014 at 12:10 PM

And his employer might have a tuition reimbursement program so he could get the financial courses he might need in the future.

Wethal on January 19, 2014 at 12:24 PM

Majored in Philosophy and went to law school myself. Have run my own business for decades and have enjoyed employing many hands on types to fix my plumbing. Lots of ways to make good money out there if you have the skills. My liberal arts education was well worth the price.

Ted Torgerson on January 19, 2014 at 12:34 PM

The old land grant colleges have gotten pretty PC in the humanities,

I only know about northeastern private schools. I don’t think it’s much worse — I mean it couldn’t be much worse — than it was 40 years ago.

We didn’t have all the gender stuff (though it was starting) and the queer (that apparently is what young gays now say) literature.

But we had plenty of nonsense: self-grading of courses, courses where you read comic books, Marxist teachers who droned on for the entire class about the perfidy of the US, the professor of Chinese history who thought the Cultural Revolution might be just the ticket for the Chinese (in fairness, I doubt all the facts were out then).

In some ways, because the world is more competitive and the students less rebellious, I imagine things have improved.

bobs1196 on January 19, 2014 at 12:42 PM

Cashing in on that hot “politics and culture of food” degree

Sure, suck up to the right people in the DNC, ACORN, etc. and they’ll take care of you.

The bright spot, according to the Fed analysis, students who majored in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics—areas in which recent graduates “have tended to do relatively well, even in today’s challenging labor market.”

For now. As the worldwide economic system continues to collapse, there will be less to design and build. One of my coworker’s sons is an engineer for Siemens and apparently he’s been contemplating going into the Army (Corps of Engineers I suspect)…and Siemens has indeed laid off people.

Dr. ZhivBlago on January 19, 2014 at 12:45 PM

I went to a small, liberal arts college in Charleston SC called The Citadel and it was the most mature decision if my life.

Gender Studies wasn’t available there, so I majored in biology.

The Ashley River is the arse hole of the South and The Citadel is two miles up it. BTDT.

wukong on January 19, 2014 at 12:59 PM

True, she should remember that winter is coming but in the meantime…

HODER! HODER! HODER!

Wait. Did I spell that right?

Hucklebuck on January 19, 2014 at 1:03 PM

Turned out what I earned in one year was half of what I paid to get the education qualifying me for that job (actually seven month’s gross pay.)

No Truce With Kings on January 19, 2014 at 12:22 PM

Hmmm… When I attended college in the late 70′s, early 80′s, tuition, room and board was between $6,000 and $7000/year. I was out in three and a half years. (I took a couple of classes at night while working full-time after graduating a semester early from high school and I figured out you could take 17 credit hours [18 with the Dean's permission] a semester without financial penalty.) My first job was in an ad agency, $11,000/year. Second job, the second year out, paid $12,500/year. I never missed a loan payment.

Fallon on January 19, 2014 at 1:06 PM

My total student debt was 15K and my first legal job paid 12.5K. Still paid it off early.

One problem is that too many of today’s grads won’t scrimp in the early years.

Tell them no cable, no car (if there is public transportation), one-bedroom apartment furnished in Early Thrift Shop or at most Ikea (K-Mart has some furniture, too). Buy as much as you can on eBay. Find Tuna Helper in the grocery. Learn to make meatloaf. Brown bag lunch. Eat out at McDonald’s. Go to free musuems and cultural events. Get movie videos at the public library. Only vacation with relatives or friends.

For those of us with Depression-era parents, this was a matter of course. Special Snowflakes have rarely heard “We can’t afford it,” so can’t say it to themselves.

Wethal on January 19, 2014 at 1:24 PM

I think you guys are taking this wrong. That was some hilarious satire, fight? RIGHT?

jukin3 on January 19, 2014 at 1:31 PM

Hmmm… Paid my way through a small, liberal arts school. I benefitted greatly from the size and academic rigor (Phi Beta Kappa). Granted, it was conservative leaning, had an emphasis on classical learning and an academic honor code that was enforced. And, it did not accept federal money while I was there. My oldest daughter was ten and remembers when I finally paid off my college loans. When in high school, daughter read Suze Orman’s financial books on her own and is so wise about money, it scares me. She graduated from a private, liberal arts college with very little debt and is now having her grad school classes mostly paid for by her employer.

Meh.

Fallon on January 19, 2014 at 12:02 PM

Sounds like the small liberal arts college my eldest is attending. It’s a real liberal arts school –mostly conservative and emphasizes the Western Canon (the only “studies” major is classical studies) and writing and speaking well. He had to wear a jacket and tie when he signed the honor code, and he’s expected to abide by it for the rest of his life.

He’s a chemistry major. Yeah, he’d almost certainly make more if he went to a state university and majored in chemical engineering, but he thought this school would challenge him as both a student and as a man. He earned enough in scholarships to cover most of his tuition (leaving us with just a bit of tuition and room and board), so it’s actually costing us less than the state schools. Of course, to keep the scholarship (and stay at the school), he has to keep a high GPA, so we’re not worried about him turning the experience into a four-year vacation. He should graduate with no loans.

A lot of college is what you make of it. People who work hard tend to do better than those who don’t.

CJ on January 19, 2014 at 3:00 PM

I have wondered out loud for the longest time why in the world we were supposed to care a whit about what some “pundit” said. The only qualification to enter “punditry” seemed to be having an opinion. I have asked many times, “Where do you go to school and what do you study in order to get a degree in punditry?”

Now I know.

American Studies major with a focus on the politics and culture of food

I expect to see Ms. Hoder on MSNBC in the near future, touting the many benefits of a liberal latte and slamming libertarian lasagna.

IndieDogg on January 19, 2014 at 3:10 PM

Back in the late 80s I had a finance teacher who would substitute “liberal arts student” for “blonde” in jokes and would use them as examples of bad decisions, failure, etc.

At the time it was funny, but a little unnerving how little respect he had for liberal arts and the students.

I see he was way ahead of the curve.

kim roy on January 19, 2014 at 3:31 PM

Youngest son hated college, dropped out, but he can weld. He can also operate fork and scissor lifts but he no longer does, as he’s been promoted to management at 24 years old. I hope his lack of a college degree won’t hurt him in the future. So far, it has actually gone in his favor.

Fallon on January 19, 2014 at 12:08 PM

If his employers have half a wit it shouldn’t. However, he could always put away the money he would have been spending on college/loans and use it to start his own business or get a new trade one day. :)

kim roy on January 19, 2014 at 3:43 PM

Youngest son hated college, dropped out, but he can weld. He can also operate fork and scissor lifts but he no longer does, as he’s been promoted to management at 24 years old. I hope his lack of a college degree won’t hurt him in the future. So far, it has actually gone in his favor.

Fallon on January 19, 2014 at 12:08 PM

May I suggest you read this.

No Truce With Kings on January 19, 2014 at 4:27 PM

For those of us with Depression-era parents, this was a matter of course. Special Snowflakes have rarely heard “We can’t afford it,” so can’t say it to themselves.

Wethal on January 19, 2014 at 1:24 PM

Yes.

May I suggest you read this.

No Truce With Kings on January 19, 2014 at 4:27 PM

And, thank you.

Fallon on January 19, 2014 at 5:03 PM

The politics of food?? What is the politics of a Tri Tip? If you can tell me you wasted your education.

Dollayo on January 19, 2014 at 11:10 PM