CNN poll on legalizing marijuana: We’re all in the Choom Gang now

posted at 11:21 am on January 7, 2014 by Allahpundit

Well, not quite all. But most.

There’s nothing unusual about the topline numbers here, although the timeliness of the poll vis-a-vis Colorado’s experimentation with legalization will attract more attention than similar findings from Pew, Quinnipiac, and Gallup. The mind-boggling trendline isn’t news either: It’s on page 2 here if you want the hard numbers, but if you’ve seen one of these polls before, you already know how much things have changed since the early 90s. What makes CNN’s poll interesting is the extensive crosstabs. Most pollsters are usually content with a few basic questions about legalization but CNN went deeper. For instance:

danger

That tells you a lot more about why attitudes are changing than most barebones polls on this topic do. Decades of effort from pro-legalization forces (and personal observation of illegal use) have convinced a majority that weed’s just not that harmful. And that’s not all:

moral

There’s a double-digit difference in the number who see porn as immoral versus pot, to the point where marijuana use is now roughly as acceptable as living with someone without being married. Which, actually, should give you a sense of which demographic is driving most of the opposition. It is indeed grandma and grandpa:

age

That’s the age split on the basic question of whether using marijuana should or shouldn’t be illegal. The 65+ demographic is not only the sole group to say no, there’s roughly 20 points’ difference between them and the next closest age demographic. That pattern repeats on a slew of weed-related questions. The 50-64 group is usually fairly evenly divided but seniors give the drug thumbs down overwhelmingly. To take one example, when asked whether marijuana use in America is a “very serious” problem, a plurality of seniors (38 percent) say that it is. No other group drew more than 18 percent for that answer. Big, biiiig age gap here, which of course explains the trendlines over the last few decades. As older anti-legalization voters die, they’re replaced in the population by younger pro-legalization ones. David Brooks described “aging out” of pot use in his op-ed last week, but ironically, the country at large is aging out of its opposition to prohibition.

But why? It boils down, I think, to experimentation. Fifty-two percent overall told CNN that they’d tried marijuana in the past. Even among the 50-64 age group, 56 percent copped to having tried it. Among seniors, just 21 percent did. That’s not surprising but it is revealing. The taboo against weed was much stronger before the 1960s, when seniors came of age. They didn’t try it, they accepted that it was banned for a good reason, and those opinions stuck. For just that reason, I’d be curious to see an even deeper subsample showing the split on this issue between younger and older Republicans specifically. GOP voters remain opposed to weed on balance but I suspect that’s more a function of the party skewing older than some firm ideological principle that Republicans of every age adhere to. In fact, when asked whether smoking weed is morally wrong, Republicans now split at a razor-thin 50/49. Given that seniors tilt heavily towards the “immoral” view, it can only mean that younger Republicans disagree.

By the way, lest you think that views of marijuana are part and parcel of lax social views generally, here are two more interesting data points among different age groups from CNN. The first table reflects people’s views on whether having an abortion is moral, the second reflects their views on the morality of homosexuality:

abortion

gay

Seniors aren’t always all by their lonesome on “values” issues. It’s young adults who are the outlier in accepting homosexuality as moral on balance. And there’s no significant disparity on abortion at all: You might expect seniors to be adamantly opposed and millennials to be much more permissive, but everyone’s within 10 points of each other. A majority of every age group thinks abortion is immoral, which of course is why even Democratic leaders take care to say that the practice should be “safe, legal — and rare.” They may not believe that last part but most Americans do.


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and personal observation of illegal use

Teen use? Or adult use?

BKeyser on January 7, 2014 at 11:24 AM

Lowrider War

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ro4yhp9L6Ok

canopfor on January 7, 2014 at 11:24 AM

Cherry Coke is bad for children. Better start putting adults in jail for unlawful imbibing of a controlled substance.

Jeddite on January 7, 2014 at 11:25 AM

Aw, the smell of tax dollars has become too strong to resist. Can’t let Colorado or Washington get all the money.

iamsaved on January 7, 2014 at 11:26 AM

Which, actually, should give you a sense of which demographic is driving most of the opposition. It is indeed grandma and grandpa:

Which is why the numbers have and will continue to keep going up. Most people in their 30′s and 40′s have been around marijuana use. They’ve seen guys get stoned and sit on the couch and do nothing.

Conversely, they’ve also seen people get drunk as hell and do some extremely idiotic things.

So the questions becomes, why is one illegal when the other is not?

VinceOfDoom on January 7, 2014 at 11:28 AM

Marijuana laws are great for big government proponents, but this administration is going to have a hard time not sounding incredibly hypocritical if they argue to retain them.

Socratease on January 7, 2014 at 11:29 AM

It’s an absurd situation. The very same stoners who would have tobacco smokers stand out in sub-freezing temps to keep the air clean in the office or bar have no problem with smoking pot in public as a legitimate drug of choice. The very same people who think smoking tobacco is a nasty habit and look as if you are clubbing a baby seal if you light up a cigar want their smoking of pot to be tolerated in a completely different way.

Happy Nomad on January 7, 2014 at 11:29 AM

Freelancer said it perfectly in the MKH thread, and we’re seeing the effect but not acknowledging it.

Hopefully, the ability to aggregate large data so quickly now will give us very fast results.

If child ER visits spike, I’m going to love how Shrillary tries to square that circle, Ms. “Takes A Village”, won’t want to send all her left-libertarians and aged hippies running to Rand.

budfox on January 7, 2014 at 11:31 AM

It’s an absurd situation. The very same stoners who would have tobacco smokers stand out in sub-freezing temps to keep the air clean in the office or bar have no problem with smoking pot in public as a legitimate drug of choice. The very same people who think smoking tobacco is a nasty habit and look as if you are clubbing a baby seal if you light up a cigar want their smoking of pot to be tolerated in a completely different way.

Happy Nomad on January 7, 2014 at 11:29 AM

There are people who sit there with a glass of scotch arguing that these people can’t smoke a joint. Isn’t that just as hypocritical?

VinceOfDoom on January 7, 2014 at 11:32 AM

The good ol’e USofA is now the pothead capitol of the world. Doesn’t it make you proud to be an American?

rplat on January 7, 2014 at 11:33 AM

I find he questions kind of strange. I have always been rather wishy washy on the legalization of pot although on balance I think it probably ain’t good. I have never considered it morally wrong though. I don’t consider cocaine or heroin use morally wrong either, just incredibly stupid.

I am perplexed by the 56% of people who don’t think smoking weed is physically harmful. What do they think it does, make you grow big and strong?

Rocks on January 7, 2014 at 11:33 AM

Legalize it all and the druggies will do themselves in and that in turn will save a bunch of unfunded liability moneys. Plus the illegal drug trade and all of the baggage that comes along with it will disappear in an instant which will free up funds going to law enforcement. It may even become so affordable that people won’t be ripping the cutters and siding off of your house to pay for a bag of dope. I see no down side to legalizing all drugs and making people responsible for their own behavior and decisions.

Deano1952 on January 7, 2014 at 11:34 AM

Puff, Puff …cough
Puff, Puff…cough

(Oh don’t you know)
that’s the sound of the men
working on the choom gang
(Oh don’t you know)
that’s the sound of the men
working on the choom gang

All day long they don’t work so hard
till the sun’s comin’ down
workin on the xbox and playstations
and wearin a frown

I hear them pissin’ their lives away
and then you hear somebody say

Puff, Puff …cough
Puff, Puff…cough

HumpBot Salvation on January 7, 2014 at 11:36 AM

Can anyone social cons explain to me why someone should be imprisoned for consuming a drug?

antifederalist on January 7, 2014 at 11:36 AM

Legalize Nature!!!

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bwc9pBSsr7k

antifederalist on January 7, 2014 at 11:39 AM

Dave’s Not Here.

Del Dolemonte on January 7, 2014 at 11:41 AM

America the Vegetative State.

Varchild on January 7, 2014 at 11:43 AM

I wonder how much of my taxes are going towards government welfare for the stoners getting high on medical / recrestional marijuana?

Varchild on January 7, 2014 at 11:44 AM

It’s an absurd situation. The very same stoners who would have tobacco smokers stand out in sub-freezing temps to keep the air clean in the office or bar have no problem with smoking pot in public as a legitimate drug of choice. The very same people who think smoking tobacco is a nasty habit and look as if you are clubbing a baby seal if you light up a cigar want their smoking of pot to be tolerated in a completely different way. Happy Nomad on January 7, 2014 at 11:29 AM

Yes, as we all know, the most vociferous and numerous anti-tobacco ninnies are pot heads. Thanks for posting all that data that backs it up.

You don’t have to post every pretend fact you make up. Just be content to lie to yourself and not harsh our mellow, man.

Akzed on January 7, 2014 at 11:45 AM

Wow. Americans have amazing values.

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 11:47 AM

Can anyone social cons explain to me why someone should be imprisoned for consuming a drug? antifederalist on January 7, 2014 at 11:36 AM

Social conservatism is not a synonym for busy body.

Akzed on January 7, 2014 at 11:47 AM

OT, or not

Schadenfreude on January 7, 2014 at 11:48 AM

Of course we are – just look around.

Schadenfreude on January 7, 2014 at 11:48 AM

Can anyone social cons explain to me why someone should be imprisoned for consuming a drug? antifederalist on January 7, 2014 at 11:36 AM

right because our prisons are full of occasional marijuana users.

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 11:49 AM

There are people who sit there with a glass of scotch arguing that these people can’t smoke a joint. Isn’t that just as hypocritical?

VinceOfDoom on January 7, 2014 at 11:32 AM

No, it’s not.

GWB on January 7, 2014 at 11:49 AM

Decades of effort from pro-legalization forces (and personal observation of illegal use) have convinced a majority that weed’s just not that harmful. And that’s not all:

And where in your editorializing do you prove otherwise?

Walter L. Newton on January 7, 2014 at 11:50 AM

Thanks, Dr. Dre and Snood Dog.

AScott on January 7, 2014 at 11:52 AM

Can anyone social cons explain to me why someone should be imprisoned for consuming a drug?

antifederalist on January 7, 2014 at 11:36 AM

Can anyone explain why the legalization advocates insist on perpetuating the myth that people are imprisoned just for consuming marijuana?

JannyMae on January 7, 2014 at 11:52 AM

I wonder how much of my taxes are going towards government welfare for the stoners getting high on medical / recrestional marijuana? Varchild on January 7, 2014 at 11:44 AM

There should be no welfare. But as we all know, there are people on welfare right now watching soaps and getting high. There’s no reason to expect that will be any worse once we stop locking those people up in order to punish them for bothering you in any way other than being social cyphers.

Akzed on January 7, 2014 at 11:53 AM

The sexual revolution and drug culture is killing our society. Thanks 1960s!

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 11:54 AM

I mean “Snoop” Dog.

AScott on January 7, 2014 at 11:54 AM

What my generation has accomplished:

Gay marriage and legal marijuana!

YAY! We are bunch of winners!!!!

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 11:55 AM

Meh, never had a problem getting my work don in college while smoking it, and never had a problem once I dropped it. Don’t miss it one bit, but I really had the militarized police and the nasty civil forfeiture scheme.

rbj on January 7, 2014 at 11:56 AM

Therefore, any person who uses or is addicted to marijuana, regardless or whether his or her State has passed legislation authorizing marijuana use for medicinal purposes, is an unlawful user of or addicted to a controlled substance, and is prohibited by Federal law from possessing firearms or ammunition.
 
http://www.atf.gov/files/press/releases/2011/09/092611-atf-open-letter-to-all-ffls-marijuana-for-medicinal-purposes.pdf

 
Hello?
 
Mr. President?
 
Didn’t you claim you wanted to do something about guns? It was right after Sandy Hook if I remember correctly.
 
Now’s your chance, Mr. President.

rogerb on January 7, 2014 at 11:57 AM

There are people who sit there with a glass of scotch arguing that these people can’t smoke a joint. Isn’t that just as hypocritical?

VinceOfDoom on January 7, 2014 at 11:32 AM

The problem I have with pot is threefold. Unlike alchohol, pot changes one’s brain chemistry. I don’t want children (including teens) to have ready access to pot for this reason because their brains are still “cooking” at that age.

Secondly, pot is a gateway drug.

Finally, it’s not an either or situation. Stoners are not going to be tea totalers. Meaning, of course, they get on the road but impaired by alcohol and pot.

Happy Nomad on January 7, 2014 at 11:57 AM

Next on the agenda:

FREE abortions!

WE CAN DO THIS!

We are such winners!

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 11:57 AM

Kevin Sabet is PISSED.

libfreeordie on January 7, 2014 at 11:59 AM

There’s a big zone between throwing users in jail and legalization. But the loudest voices only seem to favor one POV…or the other.

22044 on January 7, 2014 at 11:59 AM

There’s a big zone between throwing users in jail and legalization. But the loudest voices only seem to favor one POV…or the other.

22044 on January 7, 2014 at 11:59 AM

Why should non violent businessmen be jailed?

libfreeordie on January 7, 2014 at 11:59 AM

Can anyone social cons explain to me why someone should be imprisoned for consuming a drug?

antifederalist on January 7, 2014 at 11:36 AM

It’s a myth and a lie to suggest that those imprisoned for pot got there by merely gettig caught smoking a joint. Put another way, the crime that put those stoners behind bars is distribution of an illegal drug or some other charge. Not because they smoke pot.

Not that I expect an honest representation of the facts by addicts so desperate for the legalization of pot they lie about the truth.

Happy Nomad on January 7, 2014 at 12:00 PM

Aw, the smell of tax dollars has become too strong to resist. Can’t let Colorado or Washington get all the money.

iamsaved on January 7, 2014 at 11:26 AM

But it is so easy to grow. How many tax dollars will be lost to home growers? How will they police the home growing? They think they will pull a lot of tax dollars but at almost 500 and once pre tax who can afford it? As with most tax predictions any pot tax will be far less than they think.

Dr. Frank Enstine on January 7, 2014 at 12:01 PM

The problem I have with pot is threefold. Unlike alchohol, pot changes one’s brain chemistry. I don’t want children (including teens) to have ready access to pot for this reason because their brains are still “cooking” at that age.

…alcohol damages the dendrites located in the cerebellum and reduces the communication between neurons. Researchers discovered that alcohol use not only disrupts communication between neurons; it can also alter their structure. One thing it does not do, they found, was actually kill off cells.

http://psychology.about.com/od/biopsychology/f/does-drinking-alcohol-kill-brain-cells.htm

Walter L. Newton on January 7, 2014 at 12:02 PM

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 11:55 AM

I’m guessing that was sarcasm. Too bad because if it is sincere I could agree :-)

Where is the poll asking if the War on Weed is worth the blood, treasure, wholsale incarcerations and irreparable harm to our civil liberties?

MJBrutus on January 7, 2014 at 12:02 PM

Well I’ll be damned.

I got a call for this poll last week.

I thought it was about Bark’s job approval.

Jived them on the rest.

As far as they know, I’m a 30-40 year old Hispanic woman.

Please, nobody tell my wife…

Bruno Strozek on January 7, 2014 at 12:02 PM

Why should non violent businessmen be jailed?

libfreeorgan on January 7, 2014 at 11:59 AM

…I know…it should be reserved…for professors!

KOOLAID2 on January 7, 2014 at 12:03 PM

1940s = Americans defeated Nazism

1960s = Americans finally got rid of evil segregation

1980s = Ended the Cold War

2010s = Americans fought for gay marriage and weed

PROGRESS my friends! PROGRESS.

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:04 PM

Finally, it’s not an either or situation. Stoners are not going to be tea totalers. Meaning, of course, they get on the road but impaired by alcohol and pot.

Happy Nomad on January 7, 2014 at 11:57 AM

Not true. I’ve known pot smokers who did not drink any alcohol. And Carl Sagan is another one who didn’t drink but did smoke.

rbj on January 7, 2014 at 12:04 PM

Can anyone explain why the legalization advocates insist on perpetuating the myth that people are imprisoned just for consuming marijuana?

JannyMae on January 7, 2014 at 11:52 AM

I’m told our prisons are full of marijuana users. I wasn’t told about the climate scientists stuck in ice around Antarctica, but that was for a good reason I was told.

Oh, President Barry is on talking about inequality! I’m told this is important.

Punchenko on January 7, 2014 at 12:05 PM

PCP users will soon be a repressed minority.

Free the Angel Dust 5!

Bishop on January 7, 2014 at 12:05 PM

PCP users will soon be a repressed minority.

Free the Angel Dust 5!

Bishop on January 7, 2014 at 12:05 PM

Crack addicts UNITE!

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:06 PM

I’ve never seen so many people complain about expanded freedom and restrained government. Have I landed on a liberal website?

Panther on January 7, 2014 at 12:07 PM

What do we want?

METH!

When do we want it?

NOW!

Bishop on January 7, 2014 at 12:07 PM

But it is so easy to grow.

Why do people keep repeating this canard. It is *not* easy to grow. If you want it to grow quickly you have to set up an indoor or outdoor grow room. If you grow naturally it takes months. There’s no guarantee you’ll get female plants. Then you have to know how to properly cure and treat it. If people are used to smoking weed grown by professionals they (like most home brewers) are going to find that there’s too much of a learning curve when they can just go to the store. This notion is just dumb.

libfreeordie on January 7, 2014 at 12:07 PM

…I know…it should be reserved…for professors!

KOOLAID2 on January 7, 2014 at 12:03 PM

Heh. Michael Eric didn’t responded to my post but didn’t read it.

22044 on January 7, 2014 at 12:08 PM

The problem I have with pot is threefold. Unlike alchohol, pot changes one’s brain chemistry. I don’t want children (including teens) to have ready access to pot for this reason because their brains are still “cooking” at that age.
Secondly, pot is a gateway drug.
Finally, it’s not an either or situation. Stoners are not going to be tea totalers. Meaning, of course, they get on the road but impaired by alcohol and pot.
Happy Nomad on January 7, 2014 at 11:57 AM

These are good reasons for you not to use them. Also, if as an employer you wanted to subject your employees to random drug testing as a condition of employment, that is also to your right. However, these are not reason why the government should be given the authority to fine, imprison, or sanction anyone for possessing and consuming a substance.

For you who claim to be for “limited government,” the basis for how governed should be limited is the non aggression principle. For determining what should be legitimate crimes, the first question is if a person’s actions resulted in

1. Another person being subjected to physical harm
2. Another person’s property has been stolen or damaged
3. Not honoring the terms and conditions of a contract.

Personal recreational drug use involved none of these. That’s why it should be decriminalized.

antifederalist on January 7, 2014 at 12:08 PM

Michael Eric didn’t responded to my post but didn’t read it.

22044 on January 7, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Why should non violent businessmen be jailed?

libfreeordie on January 7, 2014 at 11:59 AM

Now exhale.

NotCoach on January 7, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Never smoked pot and never will.

Jack_Burton on January 7, 2014 at 12:10 PM

Pro-legalists don’t help their argument by supporting libertinism in general.

22044 on January 7, 2014 at 12:11 PM

Can anyone explain why the legalization advocates insist on perpetuating the myth that people are imprisoned just for consuming marijuana?

JannyMae on January 7, 2014 at 11:52 AM

Because they are: https://www.aclu.org/sites/default/files/assets/1114413-mj-report-rfs-rel1.pdf

Take the time to read the entire report. We spend 3.6 billion dollars on marijuana enforcement *alone.*

libfreeordie on January 7, 2014 at 12:11 PM

It’s a myth and a lie to suggest that those imprisoned for pot got there by merely gettig caught smoking a joint. Put another way, the crime that put those stoners behind bars is distribution of an illegal drug or some other charge. Not because they smoke pot.
Not that I expect an honest representation of the facts by addicts so desperate for the legalization of pot they lie about the truth.
Happy Nomad on January 7, 2014 at 12:00 PM

The basis for my question is why is pot illegal in the first place?

antifederalist on January 7, 2014 at 12:12 PM

Welcome to Adolf’s USA

A tactic used by the federal government to gather information for anti-drunken and drugged driving programs is coming under criticism in cities around the country, and some local police agencies say they will no longer take part.

Schadenfreude on January 7, 2014 at 12:12 PM

Data released Monday by the Federal Bureau of Investigation show there were an estimated 1,552,432 arrests for drug-related crimes in 2012 – a slight uptick from the 1,531,251 drug arrests in 2011. Marijuana offenses accounted for 48.3 percent of all drug arrests, a slight reduction from 49.5 percent in 2011, which itself was the highest rate since before 1995.

We are going to save a lot of money.

Panther on January 7, 2014 at 12:13 PM

Mescalin!

“They can’t see you, azzhole, we’re in the spirit world.”

A signed copy of Michael Moore’s book to anyone who can name the movie.

Bishop on January 7, 2014 at 12:13 PM

Why should non violent businessmen be jailed?

libfreeordie on January 7, 2014 at 11:59 AM

Wow, dummy, I thought that you hated the 1%rs, Wall Street, bankers, the Jews, and such…

Schadenfreude on January 7, 2014 at 12:13 PM

Where is the poll asking if the War on Weed is worth the blood, treasure, wholsale incarcerations and irreparable harm to our civil liberties?

MJBrutus on January 7, 2014 at 12:02 PM

Bwahaha!

The war on weed…..

blood?

Yes I’m sure plenty Mexican lives have been taken so American drug users can get high.

What a selfish generation.

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:14 PM

In case anyone is dismissive of legalization as an issue of the loony Leftists who want to subvert this great nation of our, I urge you to look at the Cato Institute report on the damage to our civil liberties.

MJBrutus on January 7, 2014 at 12:15 PM

My comment from the MKH thread:

If you removed the older people from the polling sample, the numbers in support of legalization would be overwhelming. The younger folk … younger than 65 … realize that the costly brutal authoritarian solution doesn’t work, and they don’t want it. “Young people under 65,” that sounds good to some of those later middle agers that haven’t thought of themselves as that young lately.

Consider this. When pot is legal, and the dark “allure of the illicit” fades, it won’t be so cool anymore to smoke it. With it legal, more and more attention is going to be paid to an open discussion of pot’s adverse effects. Education now has been compromised by youth having suspicions that the educators are part of a kind of authoritarian conspiracy, and considering all the overblown “Reefer Madness” type scare mongering appeals, the kids suspicions are almost warranted. Now kids are going to be serious about hearing the downsides of pot. We have to wait for the hype in CO to calm down, but over the long term, just watch, pot use is going to drop, especially among the youth.

So, we can have a crazy police state with higher levels of pot use, or we can scrap the dog shooting SWAT teams and prison guard union$, and see pot use drop. If you think what I’m saying sounds insane, it isn’t. Look at some videos on what happened in Portugal, where they decriminalized ALL drugs over 10 years ago, and drug use and addiction had been reduced: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Porgugal+drug+decriminalization&sm=3

anotherJoe on January 7, 2014 at 12:15 PM

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:14 PM

Consider all of the deaths of police officers and suspects in the smuggling and interdiction contest. Consider all of the deaths related to gang activity due to the high profits for illegal weed. Yes sir, plenty of blood has been spilled because of pot prohibition.

MJBrutus on January 7, 2014 at 12:17 PM

Welcome to Adolf’s USA

A tactic used by the federal government to gather information for anti-drunken and drugged driving programs is coming under criticism in cities around the country, and some local police agencies say they will no longer take part.

Schadenfreude on January 7, 2014 at 12:12

PMWelcome to Adolf’s USA

You forgot the explanation. I guess the Nazi took over 40 years ago and there are asking nicely if you want to participate.

The NHTSA has conducted the surveys for more than 40 years, in cities across the USA and usually at roughly 10-year intervals. In many cases, off-duty, uniformed police officers randomly wave motorists over; they are then asked by workers for subcontractor Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation if they will participate in the voluntary survey. Drivers who decline are allowed to leave.

Another wasted outrage of the day.

Walter L. Newton on January 7, 2014 at 12:18 PM

Consider all of the deaths of police officers and suspects in the smuggling and interdiction contest. Consider all of the deaths related to gang activity due to the high profits for illegal weed. Yes sir, plenty of blood has been spilled because of pot prohibition.

MJBrutus on January 7, 2014 at 12:17 PM

So your solution is to legalize drugs?

How people just grow the f-up stop doing drugs and take care of their kids?

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:19 PM

Personal recreational drug use involved none of these. That’s why it should be decriminalized.

antifederalist on January 7, 2014 at 12:08 PM

I’m okay with decriminalized (as opposed to legalized). Decriminalized essentially keeps pot something that one does in one’s home without the legitimacy of state-sanctioned use. It essentially is the situation that most jurisdictions follow already.

Happy Nomad on January 7, 2014 at 12:19 PM

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:19 PM

I’ll settle for advocating the legalization of pot in this thread.

How about people be allowed to live their own lives without the authoritarian boot of the state on their throats?

MJBrutus on January 7, 2014 at 12:20 PM

I’m guessing another demographic in the anti-freedom crowd are the socons attempting to impose their moral beliefs on the rest of the county.

Panther on January 7, 2014 at 12:22 PM

Panther on January 7, 2014 at 12:22 PM

There’s too much freedom goin’ on out there.

- Rush

MJBrutus on January 7, 2014 at 12:24 PM

How about people be allowed to live their own lives without the authoritarian boot of the state on their throats?

MJBrutus on January 7, 2014 at 12:20 PM

Allowed to the live their lives?

I’m curious who steps in when dad isn’t around and doesn’t have a job because he spends his day getting high as a kite?

The American taxpayer.

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:25 PM

LSD is a human and civil right!

Bishop on January 7, 2014 at 12:25 PM

Because they are: https://www.aclu.org/sites/default/files/assets/1114413-mj-report-rfs-rel1.pdf

Take the time to read the entire report. We spend 3.6 billion dollars on marijuana enforcement *alone.*

libfreeordie on January 7, 2014 at 12:11 PM

No, they aren’t. The numbers in that ACLU advocacy piece have been massaged more than Al Gore on a Chakra binge. That figure you quoted says nothing about incarceration SOLELY for marijuana possession which is almost non existent.

Rocks on January 7, 2014 at 12:27 PM

Allowed to the live their lives?

I’m curious who steps in when dad isn’t around and doesn’t have a job because he spends his day getting high as a kite?

The American taxpayer.

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:25 PM

And what about the American taxpayer that steps in to take care of all the drunks on the street? Do you drink? If you do, do you want it to be made illegal to help out the American taxpayer?

If you don’t, do you want it to be made illegal to help out the American taxpayer?

Walter L. Newton on January 7, 2014 at 12:27 PM

I don’t want to breathe in or smell the awful stench of Marijuana. I went to college where pot smokers smoked and the smell lasted days stinking up the whole building.

But go ahead and pretend Marijuana foesn’t hurt abyone except the person smoking.

Varchild on January 7, 2014 at 12:28 PM

Allowed to the live their lives?

I’m curious who steps in when dad isn’t around and doesn’t have a job because he spends his day getting high as a kite?

The American taxpayer.

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:25 PM

Somebody saw Reefer Madness one too many times.

Panther on January 7, 2014 at 12:28 PM

The problem I have with pot is threefold. Unlike alchohol, pot changes one’s brain chemistry. I don’t want children (including teens) to have ready access to pot for this reason because their brains are still “cooking” at that age.

Secondly, pot is a gateway drug.

Finally, it’s not an either or situation. Stoners are not going to be tea totalers. Meaning, of course, they get on the road but impaired by alcohol and pot.

Happy Nomad on January 7, 2014 at 11:57 AM

As pointed out above, alcohol most definitely does alter the brain. Anyone with a modicum of thought could surmise as such.

antisense on January 7, 2014 at 12:28 PM

That said, I like bourbon, craft beer, cognac, ciders, mead, and wine.

antisense on January 7, 2014 at 12:29 PM

Somebody saw Reefer Madness one too many times.

Panther on January 7, 2014 at 12:28 PM

Pot smokers are the most productive people in the world!!!!

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:30 PM

I don’t want to breathe in or smell the awful stench of Marijuana. I went to college where pot smokers smoked and the smell lasted days stinking up the whole building.

But go ahead and pretend Marijuana foesn’t hurt abyone except the person smoking.

Varchild on January 7, 2014 at 12:28 PM

You don’t have an issue to stand on, even though you think you do. You won’t smell it in Colorado. The law doesn’t allow it to be smoked in public, only on or in private property (with the owner permission), private pot clubs are illegal and Colorado is treating it the same way (actually stronger) as the anti-cigarette smoking laws.

Your problem is solved in Colorado

Walter L. Newton on January 7, 2014 at 12:31 PM

I am a NO vote for medical marijuana and will be a NO vote for recreational.

What values are we promoting by legalizing harmful.substance after harmful substance?

Varchild on January 7, 2014 at 12:31 PM

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:25 PM

You just provided the justification for every liberal initiative invented to subjugate us to the whims of our masters in government.

MJBrutus on January 7, 2014 at 12:31 PM

No, they aren’t. The numbers in that ACLU advocacy piece have been massaged more than Al Gore on a Chakra binge.

How so?

That figure you quoted says nothing about incarceration SOLELY for marijuana possession which is almost non existent.

Rocks on January 7, 2014 at 12:27 PM

Table 16 in the report lists the costs for marijuana possession enforcement and has three columns. One for “police” costs, one for “judicial and legal fees” and one for “corrections.” We spend 450 million + on corrections for marijuana possession. If you can prove there’s something faulty with that report, than do it.

libfreeordie on January 7, 2014 at 12:31 PM

And what about the American taxpayer that steps in to take care of all the drunks on the street? Do you drink? If you do, do you want it to be made illegal to help out the American taxpayer?

If you don’t, do you want it to be made illegal to help out the American taxpayer?

Walter L. Newton on January 7, 2014 at 12:27 PM

That’s not what I’m saying. Just people that advocate for legalization make it seem harmless and innocent. It’s not.

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:32 PM

Pot smokers are the most productive people in the world!!!!

terryannonline Henny Penny on January 7, 2014 at 12:30 PM

A small piece of sky just fell on my head.

Panther on January 7, 2014 at 12:32 PM

I am a NO vote for medical marijuana and will be a NO vote for recreational.

What values are we promoting by legalizing harmful.substance after harmful substance?

Varchild on January 7, 2014 at 12:31 PM

Freedom. I would have thought I wouldn’t have had to explain that to you?

Walter L. Newton on January 7, 2014 at 12:32 PM

That’s not what I’m saying. Just people that advocate for legalization make it seem harmless and innocent. It’s not.

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:32 PM

I don’t think so. I think you need to investigate how this was legalized in Colorado and the steps taken to promote the facts about pot.

Ok… and if everyone knows it’s not harmless and innocent (same as alcohol) then should both be made illegal?

Walter L. Newton on January 7, 2014 at 12:34 PM

Freedom. I would have thought I wouldn’t have had to explain that to you?

Walter L. Newton on January 7, 2014 at 12:32 PM

So that is what freedom means to you? Getting high.

You belittle freedom.

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:35 PM

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:32 PM

So then don’t use it!

- Big sodas are bad for you.
– Conservative Answer: don’t drink them.
– Liberal Answer: criminalize it.

- Tobacco is bad for you.
– Conservative Answer: don’t smoke it.
– Liberal Answer: criminalize it.

MJBrutus on January 7, 2014 at 12:35 PM

Free condoms and free syringes for all!

BarkyCare might be on to something here.

Bishop on January 7, 2014 at 12:36 PM

Free condoms and free syringes for all!

Woohoo!

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:38 PM

Life will become mighty interesting when meth houses go mainstream in the neighborhood.

I feel justified in overpaying for my particular parcel of land, I’m plenty far away in case my neighbor’s house explodes after he adds a bit too much ether to the recipe.

Bishop on January 7, 2014 at 12:38 PM

Table 16 in the report lists the costs for marijuana possession enforcement and has three columns. One for “police” costs, one for “judicial and legal fees” and one for “corrections.” We spend 450 million + on corrections for marijuana possession. If you can prove there’s something faulty with that report, than do it.

libfreeordie on January 7, 2014 at 12:31 PM

Easily, where in that report does it state that those numbers are for pot AND only for pot? It doesn’t, because they don’t exist. They are including all numbers for people who have a possession charge and have other charges at the same time. When you see “The
ACLU estimates” you can pretty much ignore what comes after. If someone is busted for Disturbing the peace and possession they are counting that. It’s BS. They still would have been arrested for Disturbing the peace with legal pot.

Rocks on January 7, 2014 at 12:39 PM

So then don’t use it!

- Big sodas are bad for you.
– Conservative Answer: don’t drink them.
– Liberal Answer: criminalize it.

- Tobacco is bad for you.
– Conservative Answer: don’t smoke it.
– Liberal Answer: criminalize it.

My fear is that we enabling a disgusting drug culture we have in the U.S.

I get your logic but I don’t want to be an enabler.

terryannonline on January 7, 2014 at 12:39 PM

Bishop on January 7, 2014 at 12:38 PM

Funny, but I thought we were discussing pot legalization. Are you afraid of your neighbors potted plant exploding too?

MJBrutus on January 7, 2014 at 12:40 PM

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