For the record, my daughter is only five months old. I wouldn’t even trust her to pack a bowl properly.

In this segment, I felt called upon to defend the glory of the Internet on top of articulating the argument for rethinking the drug war. Bill equates being for legalization with being for all the pot-smoking all the time by all the people. I just don’t think the issue of smoking a bunch of weed (or doing a bunch of texting, which is also at issue, here) need to be law enforcement issues. Not everything I think is inadvisable for my future teen daughter has to be illegal for everyone. I’d rather her not get a tattoo, but tattoos don’t need to be illegal to prevent the downfall of society. Not everything that’s potentially dangerous when abused has to be prohibited by law. Marijuana will be illegal for minors in legalization states, just as alcohol is now. We spend entirely too much money putting too many nonviolent drug offenders in jail, which ironically, can make them into bigger criminals by preventing their reintegration into society after their time in lock-up. Lachlan Markay puts my thoughts on this succinctly.

Yes, there are downsides to marijuana use and possible downsides for society, with which Colorado and Washington will wrestle. That’s how things work in a system of federalism. I don’t usually post myself, but this is a sufficiently interesting generational and philosophical schism on the Right, it’ll be fun to see you guys discuss in comments. Bill says I’m outside the conservative box, and while mine is a pretty libertarian position, I’m not sure my negative take on the drug war is as outside the conservative box as he suggests.

Click to watch:

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