NYT: Let’s offer Snowden amnesty

posted at 11:31 am on January 2, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

So far, the call to halt prosecution of Edward Snowden for the theft and dissemination of highly-classified data from the NSA and Britain’s GCHQ have mainly come from anti-establishment voices.  Yesterday, the New York Times editorial board chimed in on their behalf, although not quite demanding amnesty. Perhaps a plea bargain for a reduced sentence would be enough, they suggested, in honor of the great service he performed for his nation:

All of this is entirely because of information provided to journalists by Edward Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor who stole a trove of highly classified documents after he became disillusioned with the agency’s voraciousness. Mr. Snowden is now living in Russia, on the run from American charges of espionage and theft, and he faces the prospect of spending the rest of his life looking over his shoulder.

Considering the enormous value of the information he has revealed, and the abuses he has exposed, Mr. Snowden deserves better than a life of permanent exile, fear and flight. He may have committed a crime to do so, but he has done his country a great service. It is time for the United States to offer Mr. Snowden a plea bargain or some form of clemency that would allow him to return home, face at least substantially reduced punishment in light of his role as a whistle-blower, and have the hope of a life advocating for greater privacy and far stronger oversight of the runaway intelligence community.

This is just whistling in the wind, really. The NYT’s editors start with clemency and then quickly retreat to a position that Snowden will never accept — prison time. He’s looking for asylum or amnesty, not a few years at Club Fed.

In order to justify a lighter sentence, the editors don’t take very seriously the notion that Snowden has damaged national security:

The shrill brigade of his critics say Mr. Snowden has done profound damage to intelligence operations of the United States, but none has presented the slightest proof that his disclosures really hurt the nation’s security. Many of the mass-collection programs Mr. Snowden exposed would work just as well if they were reduced in scope and brought under strict outside oversight, as the presidential panel recommended.

That’s only true if the review of damage is limited to just those programs exposed, and even that’s arguable. The problem with this argument is the broad spectrum of information that came out of the Snowden cache. Domestic data collection has only been part of that. Other data has damaged relations with allies, especially key intelligence-sharing partners like the UK, Germany, and Israel, at least in the short run.  The leaks have done serious damage to American diplomacy in South America with regimes whose track record on privacy and snooping hardly put them in a position for sanctimony. That kind of damage can keep us from discovering legitimate intelligence that could prevent attacks in the future.

Had Snowden used appropriate and available channels for whistleblowing rather than theft and exposure, much of that damage could have been avoided. The Times’ editorial shrugs that off by ignoring those channels:

More important, Mr. Snowden told The Washington Post earlier this month that he did report his misgivings to two superiors at the agency, showing them the volume of data collected by the N.S.A., and that they took no action. (The N.S.A. says there is no evidence of this.) That’s almost certainly because the agency and its leaders don’t consider these collection programs to be an abuse and would never have acted on Mr. Snowden’s concerns.

In retrospect, Mr. Snowden was clearly justified in believing that the only way to blow the whistle on this kind of intelligence-gathering was to expose it to the public and let the resulting furor do the work his superiors would not.

The editorial presents a false binary choice — NSA officers or going on the lam. There are other channels, including presenting the evidence of wrongdoing to members of Congress. Snowden shrugged that off as well in his interview last month with the Washington Post’s Barton Gellman, claiming that Congressional intel chairs’  “softball questions” to NSA and other intel leaders showed they wouldn’t do anything with the evidence if he provided it. That’s a dodge, though, especially since Dianne Feinstein and Mike Rogers aren’t the only two members of Congress. Senators Ron Wyden and Rand Paul were well-known opponents of domestic surveillance; why not go to them, or anyone else first before taking the cache elsewhere, especially to China and then Russia? The fact that the Times’ editors never even address that channel shows how weak their argument is — which is why they don’t really try to make the amnesty argument in the end.

There is one argument for offering amnesty, which is to secure what’s left unexposed of the cache. If it can be established that the cache is secure and no one else has the data, it might be worth a trade in purely practical terms. It’s difficult to see how that could be established, though, especially with Snowden’s travels taking him through two of the less-friendly states to American security concerns. Otherwise, a deal would suggest to people still within secured-data environments that stealing a little data is dangerous, but stealing massive amounts of it might be their ticket to fame and fortune. It’s a bad precedent to set, and we’d be better off spending our time improving our legitimate whistleblowing channels and hardening security.


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Thank you Mr. Snowden. Made 2013 a cool year.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:38 AM

“There are other channels, including presenting the evidence of wrongdoing to members of Congress.”

The same congress that gives itself subsidies for Obamacare, passes budgets that are trillions in deficits and is working towards amnesty? Yeah, I see why Snowden doesn’t trust them either.

DanMan on January 2, 2014 at 11:38 AM

It’s gon’ be a cool thread.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:38 AM

Mr. Snowden, if you value your life, whatever you do, do NOT go to the USA during the pajama-obama-reign.

Syria
NSA
obama’care’

…brought the goon to level. The narcissist will have you killed. This is the only thing you should always keep in mind.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:40 AM

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _________
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nobar on January 2, 2014 at 11:40 AM

Mr. Snowden carries the constitution with him, always, something the congress doesn’t do, from both sides. Heck, they couldn’t even quote passages from it.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:41 AM

What is the right to do. They clearly are happy this happened under Obama’s term so they can pretend that surveillance and security state is an invention of this President and the Democrats. On the other hand, they want the surveillance and security state firmly intact when (if) they ever get control of the White House again. What is a hypocritical Republican to do?

libfreeordie on January 2, 2014 at 11:41 AM

Hotair: the new yes men for abusive government.

thirtyandseven on January 2, 2014 at 11:42 AM

What is a hypocritical Republican to do?

libfreeordie on January 2, 2014 at 11:41 AM

Or, to be fair, what is a hypocritical Democrat to do?

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 11:44 AM

nobar on January 2, 2014 at 11:40 AM

I’ve translated your Morse code post.

So, you’re fluent in Urdu?

Shy Guy on January 2, 2014 at 11:45 AM

Edward Snowden is not a constitutional lawyer. But his public statement explaining his decision to blow the whistle on what he and Congress both know to be only the “tip of the iceberg” of state snooping secrets expresses a belief in the meaning of the Constitution: in a democracy, the people – not his defense contractor employers or the government that hires them – should ultimately determine whether mass surveillance interfering with everyone’s privacy is reasonable.

Some have tried to minimize the import of the snooping exposed by Snowden on the grounds that the government is just storing the information it gathers, and has not yet searched it. The Fourth Amendment of the Constitution prohibits “unreasonable searches and seizures.” Seizure – the taking of private information – is what the government has now been forced to admit in its decision to prosecute Snowden for telling the truth about their secret seizures. Whether or not the state ever chooses to “search” the seized information, the universal, non-consensual seizure itself of what used to be called “pen register” data grossly invades individual privacy and vastly empowers government, all in violation of the Constitution if “unreasonable.”

The Supreme Court reads the Fourth Amendment’s “unreasonable” test to mean not “objectively reasonable,” United States v. Leon, 468 U.S. 897, 922 (1984). This would mean “reasonable” as viewed by ordinary citizens – like Snowden. The Fourth Amendment is a unique exception to the Constitution’s general choice of representative democracy (“a Republican Form of Government,” Art. IV, §4) over direct democracy. The term “reasonable” appears nowhere in the Constitution except in the Fourth Amendment, although it is a concept well-known to law. For example, legal negligence is a breach of what a jury determines a “reasonable man” would do in the same circumstances. A similar standard has been imported into Fourth Amendment determinations. The Supreme Court long ago said that “probable cause for a search exists when the facts and circumstances within the police officer’s knowledge provide a reasonably trustworthy basis for a man of reasonable caution to believe that a criminal offense has been committed or is about to take place.” Carroll v. United States, 267 U.S. 132 (1925). So what the public deems reasonable is what the Constitution means by reasonable. Though public opinion is always relevant to interpretations of the Constitution, this is the only context where the Constitution directly assigns to the people the power to determine what the Constitution means.

By definition, the people cannot deem to be “reasonable” what they do not know about. Snowden uniquely did know. So like a digital era Paul Revere he decided to share his knowledge with his fellow citizens to test his hypothesis that they would not consider dragnet surveillance of their private electronic communications any more reasonable than he did, and like him, as citizens, they might choose to act upon that knowledge.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:45 AM

In retrospect, Mr. Snowden was clearly justified in believing that the only way to blow the whistle on this kind of intelligence-gathering was to expose it to the public and let the resulting furor do the work his superiors would not.

Okay fine, lets pretend for a minute that the traitor is some kind of hero for illegally disclosing means and methods……..

Snowden can never justify fleeing the country to China and then Russia with that material. He can never justify shopping for amnesty in Brazil. Actions have consequences and in this case that means jail time no matter how large the group of kooks calling you a hero for gutting the NSA.

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 11:45 AM

It no longer matters if he is a hero or a traitor. He c/b either or neither, or both.

Thank you Mr. Snowedn, every day. You exposed the thugs to the world.

Some of us knew but you made it known to all the world.

That so many are still sheepleton, who NO longer deserve to live free, is now up to them.

The last line informs them well
Otherwise they can be the anti-advice-Orwell.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:48 AM

Snowden exposed to America and the world what a thug obama is. It’s the only thing that cooled the world’s love affair with a hued fascist socialist thug. You should send him thank you notes.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:50 AM

But seriously, if he takes it, he deserves what’s coming down the pipe. No remorse for stupid.

nobar on January 2, 2014 at 11:50 AM

What is a hypocritical Republican to do?

libfreeordie on January 2, 2014 at 11:41 AM

It’s not hypocrisy to distrust the rat-eared coward and his henchmen. They use the IRS for partisan means. They let black racists go free for voter intimidation even as they push to marginalize white voters in the South. They run guns to Mexican drug cartels resulting in the deaths of hundreds if not thousands. They openly lie about terrorist attacks abroad.

There isn’t one thing about this administration that has been honest or transparent. Obama just shucks and jives from one lie to another and hopes that nobody will engage in follow-up the the lazy stupid bastard’s lies. The ability of the NSA to snoop has been abused by this administration. There really is no getting around that fact.

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 11:51 AM

What is the right to do. They clearly are happy this happened under Obama’s term so they can pretend that surveillance and security state is an invention of this President and the Democrats. On the other hand, they want the surveillance and security state firmly intact when (if) they ever get control of the White House again. What is a hypocritical Republican to do?

libfreeordie on January 2, 2014 at 11:41 AM

Oh look, the shuck-and-jive pedophile who shrieked that asking librarians for assistance was the implementation of fascism now runs away from the fact that his Obama is doing worse.

No one seriously believes you’re anything other than a liar, libfreeordie. As your Barack Obama says, you and your fellow Obama supporters are all liberal f*cks — you have no morals and all you do is a attack.

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 11:51 AM

What is a hypocritical Republican to do?

libfreeordie on January 2, 2014 at 11:41 AM

Pardon?

It was Obama and his fellow Democrats bemoaning the Bush “police state” and then the Democrats expanded it to exorbitant proportions.

sentinelrules on January 2, 2014 at 11:51 AM

What is the right to do. They clearly are happy this happened under Obama’s term so they can pretend that surveillance and security state is an invention of this President and the Democrats. On the other hand, they want the surveillance and security state firmly intact when (if) they ever get control of the White House again. What is a hypocritical Republican to do?

libfreeordie on January 2, 2014 at 11:41 AM

I’ll volunteer for the firing squad… just tell me “when” and “where”…

Khun Joe on January 2, 2014 at 11:51 AM

No one would take guys like Wyden and Paul seriously. “Those guys are always complaining.” The only thing that could get the NSA to pay attention was the release to the public.

I don’t know if it was the right thing to do. I am inclined to think not, but facile suggestions about alternatives Snowden didn’t really have don’t help the discussion.

fadetogray on January 2, 2014 at 11:52 AM

Snowden exposed to America and the world what a thug obama is. It’s the only thing that cooled the world’s love affair with a hued fascist socialist thug. You should send him thank you notes.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:50 AM

Sorry, at best that is a mitigating factor at sentencing for his crimes. And no matter how much you love the guy, Snowden is a criminal.

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 11:53 AM

What is the right to do. They clearly are happy this happened under Obama’s term so they can pretend that surveillance and security state is an invention of this President and the Democrats. It IS All Bush’s Fault, after all!

libfreeordie on January 2, 2014 at 11:41 AM

Fixed.

Sorry, but the problem you O’bama Cultists have with this is your Cult Leader’s “paper trail”, which include the following promises:

“We reject the use of national security letters to spy on citizens who are not suspected of a crime.” (2008)

“We will revisit the Patriot Act and overturn unconstitutional executive decisions issued during the past eight years.” (2008)

“We reject sweeping claims of ‘inherent’ presidential power.” (2008)

“We support constitutional protections and judicial oversight on any surveillance program involving Americans.” (2008)

“We reject the tracking of citizens who do nothing more than protest a misguided war.” (2008)

“We will not ship away prisoners in the dead of night to be tortured in far off countries, or detain without trial or charge prisoners who can and should be brought to justice for their crimes, or maintain a network of secret prisons to jail people beyond the reach of the law.” (2008)

“We will not use signing statements to nullify or undermine duly enacted law.” (2008)

“We will review the current Administration’s warrantless wiretapping program.” (2008)

And finally, this one for you to choke on…

“[W]e’ve seen an Administration put forward a false choice between the liberties we cherish and the security we demand. The Democratic Party rejects this dichotomy. We will restore our constitutional traditions, and recover our nation’s founding commitment to liberty under law.”

Bush Lite.

Del Dolemonte on January 2, 2014 at 11:53 AM

What is the right to do. They clearly are happy this happened under Obama’s term so they can pretend that surveillance and security state is an invention of this President and the Democrats. On the other hand, they want the surveillance and security state firmly intact when (if) they ever get control of the White House again. What is a hypocritical Republican to do?

libfreeordie on January 2, 2014 at 11:41 AM

Or, to be fair, what is a hypocritical Democrat to do?

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 11:44 AM

Verbie, thank you. I wanted to rebut the gnat-brained assistant professor with fact about obama’s GWB hypocrisy, videos and all…and you summed it up brilliantly in this short sentence. It’s why you’ll always be one of the cooler trolls, er Ds :)

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:55 AM

Since Iceland was his first choice,can someone explain to me why he just didn’t fly to Iceland instead of China?

BallisticBob on January 2, 2014 at 11:56 AM

Say, now that you mention it, you supported these guys too, didn’t you?
 
How about libfreeordie? Was it because you were uninformed or because there was a (D) next to his name on the ballot?
 
Those are your only two choices. Although I suppose it could be both.
 
rogerb on June 6, 2013 at 12:07 PM

 
You’re not that dumb rogerb. There was/is no evidence that Mitt Romney would have taken a different approach on national security issues, surveillance or civil liberties….
 
libfreeordie on June 6, 2013 at 12:28 PM

 

Thanks. I appreciate you acknowledging my point. Your “no evidence” works the other way as well, especially when there was plenty of evidence (and from the ACLU) of what Obama was definitely doing.
 
And yet you willingly voted for the current administration. Meaning you either knew and supported their actions or you were an uninformed voter and just made a choice because of the (D).
 
Again, there are no other choices. And you made yours.
 
You chose this administration.
 

You chose these actions with your vote.
 
You encouraged these “government abuses rationalized under the “War on Terror” with your vote.
 
You directly supported these infringements with your vote.
 
We did not.
 
Congratulations.
 
rogerb on June 6, 2013 at 1:06 PM

rogerb on January 2, 2014 at 11:57 AM

I don’t know if it was the right thing to do. I am inclined to think not, but facile suggestions about alternatives Snowden didn’t really have don’t help the discussion.

fadetogray on January 2, 2014 at 11:52 AM

I too think that the idea that Congressional intervention is a weak idea. If stealing 1.2M documents was the “right” thing to do. Fleeing to and sharing that information with China and Russia was not. Snowden should come back to the US and stand in the docket for his crimes. Going to jail is the consequence of what he did.

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 11:57 AM

AlGore needs you here, liblikeaslave.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:57 AM

And when Republicans come along, they should simply do what Barack Obama does:

- Prosecute people based on skin color. Libfreeordie, especially given his statements here about his pedophilia and the fact that he has sex with underage children, should have the Justice Department sicced on him

- Use the IRS against Obama supporters. All Obama supporters and donors should be immediately audited for the previous ten years and jailed for any tax irregularities

- Use the EPA and DOL against Obama-supporting businesses. Again, full audits of all business records, with jail time for any irregularities.

The only way the fascists like libfreeordie will ever stop is when their own fascism is turned against them and used to put them in prison.

Once that’s done, we can return to life as a civilized nation.

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 11:58 AM

Since Iceland was his first choice,can someone explain to me why he just didn’t fly to Iceland instead of China?

BallisticBob on January 2, 2014 at 11:56 AM

Easy peasy…only one congresswoman in Iceland was for his trip there…he never received permission to go there.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:58 AM

Perhaps you weren’t a member of the Bush/Cheney apology choir during the time they were actually (not hypothetically)subverting the constitution. Maybe you expressed your disgust at the legal reasoning of John Yoo. Maybe you weren’t out there making ‘ticking bomb’ arguments in support of torture. Maybe you were outraged by the NSA’s warrantless wiretapping.
But maybe, like so many here, you were a full throated cheerleader then?
 
verbaluce on March 7, 2013 at 5:54 PM

 
Say, have you noticed which which current events and which administration you’ve been absolutely silent about during all of these threads?
 
Don’t worry if not. Everyone else has.
 
rogerb on March 8, 2013 at 6:59 AM

rogerb on January 2, 2014 at 11:59 AM

What is the right to do. They clearly are happy this happened under Obama’s term so they can pretend that surveillance and security state is an invention of this President and the Democrats. On the other hand, they want the surveillance and security state firmly intact when (if) they ever get control of the White House again. What is a hypocritical Republican to do?

libfreeordie on January 2, 2014 at 11:41 AM

Or, to be fair, what is a hypocritical Democrat to do?

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 11:44 AM

Verbie, thank you. I wanted to rebut the gnat-brained assistant professor with fact about obama’s GWB hypocrisy, videos and all…and you summed it up brilliantly in this short sentence. It’s why you’ll always be one of the cooler trolls, er Ds :)

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:55 AM

Well, thanks. But I’d imagine libfreeordie might agree.
This admin has made little change to the national security policies of the previous one. Maybe they have a reason…or maybe they have an excuse. What they desperately seem to want to avoid is an explanation.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:01 PM

As William Pitt the Younger observed, “necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves.”

The world is an inherently dangerous place. The idea that the government can protect us is patently absurd. All the government can do is to destroy our liberties while promoting the illusion of safety.

President Dwight Eisenhower acknowledged this fact when he said that if you wanted real safety, go to prison. You get three meals and a bunk. Heck, you even get government health care. The only thing missing is freedom.

What Ike did not say is that in prison you are at the mercy of those guarding you.

roflmmfao

donabernathy on January 2, 2014 at 12:03 PM

Sorry, at best that is a mitigating factor at sentencing for his crimes. And no matter how much you love the guy, Snowden is a criminal.

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 11:53 AM

I don’t love the guy and I don’t care what he is. I admire what all he risked so we shall be free, alas.

No subject is more interesting than the Snowden topic. None of what he told the world is/was news to me. Nada. I just love that now the entire world talks/writes about it.

Also, I don’t care at all what I’m called in the process. More grins. I know obama, the NSA and thugs, and Putin too well.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:03 PM

Clapper is one of the biggest thugs in DC.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:04 PM

This admin has made little change to the national security policies of the previous one. Maybe they have a reason…or maybe they have an excuse. What they desperately seem to want to avoid is an explanation.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:01 PM

fact = facts, but you knew that.

Oh yes, they did make chances, many, and waaaaay more thuggery than under the misguided GWB. Way more.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:05 PM

This admin has made little change to the national security policies of the previous one. Maybe they have a reason…or maybe they have an excuse. What they desperately seem to want to avoid is an explanation.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:01 PM

But this administration has allowed the NSA snooping to go unchecked. They’ve used the provisions in place to keep tabs on foreign terrorists to spy on journalists in DC. We have had the nation’s top spies openly lie to Congress.

The intelligence community wants to avoid explanation because that gets into methods. The real kicker here is that those doing the snooping see themselves as the good guys. I see them as just a little less reprehensible than Snowden.

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:06 PM

changes, alas.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:08 PM

Also, I don’t care at all what I’m called in the process. More grins. I know obama, the NSA and thugs, and Putin too well.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:03 PM

So what do you think should happen to Snowden?

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:08 PM

I don’t love the guy and I don’t care what he is. I admire what all he risked so we shall be free, alas.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:03 PM

I find it nauseating that he went to Putin.
Think he did that so we ‘shall all be free’?
I’m fine if Snowden spends the rest of his life in exile, as I don’t think he should be the story here.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:09 PM

But this administration has allowed the NSA snooping to go unchecked. They’ve used the provisions in place to keep tabs on foreign terrorists to spy on journalists in DC. We have had the nation’s top spies openly lie to Congress.

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:06 PM

Yup.

Which shows clearly that Obama is a liar, because he screamed he would abolish all of it.

And that, unless Obama has ulterior motives, Bush was correct in arguing that all of these are necessary for “national security”.

That’s why the minstrel shuck-and-jive artist libfreeordie is here on the attack, screaming, trying to hit Republicans. Logic and rational thought reveals those answers immediately — and they both make libfreeordie and all Obama’s supporters out to be craven, manipulative liars.

The other reason the NYT wants amnesty for Snowden is a bit more prosaic: part of his haul includes evidence on how much Barack Obama has perverted government agencies to spy on and punish his political enemies.

And that would be the death knell for “progressivism”.

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 12:11 PM

I don’t love the guy and I don’t care what he is. I admire what all he risked so we shall be free, alas.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:03 PM

While the outcome has been partly good, I doubt that Snowden’s motives were even a little bit pure.

ElectricPhase on January 2, 2014 at 12:13 PM

So what do you think should happen to Snowden?

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:08 PM

Nothing. He should stay where he is, if he wants to live. It’s one of the greatest global ironies of our times, that he is safer in Russia today than he w/b in the USA.

It’s my biggest joy against the obama admin. Think it through. You’ll get to it all. It’s the coolest story of our times, and by far not over.

obama knows what all Snowden has, and hasn’t given up to anyone. Mark this, take it to the bank – Snowden is a genius. He is way smarter than he looks. The fear of obama and his thugs, about what Snowden could give up, is why I sleep better.

That Putin, the thug, is able to claim moral authority over obama, is entirely obama’s doing. It’s truly schadenfreudig.

Syria – Putin ‘saved’ obama, but owns him totally on the ME and N. Afica.

Snowden – Putin pretends it’s nothing, because he can.

obama’care’ takes care of the exposed thugs. They wanted to destroy the private healthcare but in 10-12 years. obama’s stupidity and thuggery exposed them all, in months…if the Rs wouldn’t be so stupid it would never be, alas.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:13 PM

While the outcome has been partly good, I doubt that Snowden’s motives were even a little bit pure.

ElectricPhase on January 2, 2014 at 12:13 PM

It doesn’t matter what they were. It matters what is.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:13 PM

I find it nauseating that he went to Putin.
Think he did that so we ‘shall all be free’?

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Of course.

Putin has made Obama his b*tch on several occasions and has completely and utterly humiliated the ignorant and immature black child. Hence you hate Putin.

Snowden has proof of just how politicized and destructive the White House is. He is carrying the Nixon tapes times ten, and you are quite aware of the fact that exposing Barack Obama’s mendacity and perversion of government would not only wipe out Barack Obama, but would discredit “progressivism” for a couple of generations.

You are all in on the stupid black child. And that’s why you’re screaming for his amnesty now.

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 12:14 PM

Oh yes, they did make chances, many, and waaaaay more thuggery than under the misguided GWB. Way more.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:05 PM

Meh.
The ‘thuggery’ line is just a catch phrase the right uses instead of ‘defeat’.
Sell that one to Malkin…she’s buying.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:14 PM

I find it nauseating that he went to Putin.

I love the irony. Aside from the global warming ship stuck in the ice, rescued fools…by the polluting Chinese, this is the irony of the century. It’ll be hard to surpass.

Think he did that so we ‘shall all be free’?

Yes

I’m fine if Snowden spends the rest of his life in exile, as I don’t think he should be the story here.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:09 PM

The only bigger exposure if hypocrisy would have been if obama would have droned the private plane, should Snowden have taken it, from HK to Moscow. It as planned. I wished for it to happen. obama would have killed Snowden and all in the jet…to save themselves they flew commercial, because they had to :)

This is very cool story and will make a wonderful movie one day.

btw – Snowden is NOT the story.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:17 PM

Putin has made Obama his b*tch on several occasions and has completely and utterly humiliated the ignorant and immature black child. Hence you hate Putin.

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 12:14 PM

Sure…what other reason could anyone have to be critical of Putin, right?
/
So you’re Putin’s little babooshka…and you’re just not able to consider any.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:17 PM

Many like to call Snowden a traitor even stating he committed treason against the United States.

There are many similarities of whats happening today and prior to September 3, 1783. However one must not forget John Adams and 55 other signatories of the Declaration of Independence were also traitors to the crown, committing and treason against the established government in power by signing that document in 1776.

Snowden may not be a John Adams and his method to expose tyranny may not be that honorable, but it seems his intentions to preserve liberty are the same as those who signed that document many years ago.

veni vidi vici on January 2, 2014 at 12:18 PM

Meh.
The ‘thuggery’ line is just a catch phrase the right uses instead of ‘defeat’.
Sell that one to Malkin…she’s buying.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:14 PM

Meh, this is when I go “I redeemed verbie, now it lets me down, again”. I’m very tolerant, though.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:18 PM

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:13 PM

I’m not buying for a minute that Snowden hasn’t shared his cache of stolen documents with his protectors in China and Russia. I don’t think he would have been afforded asylum had he not shared.

But you’re right about the fact that Obama/Clapper know now what hasn’t been disclosed yet. What has been released has been damning, what’s still out there?

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:19 PM

I find it nauseating that he went to Putin.
Think he did that so we ‘shall all be free’?
I’m fine if Snowden spends the rest of his life in exile, as I don’t think he should be the story here.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:09 PM

That is also where I draw the line. Choosing prison over becoming Putin’s boy should have been a no brainer.

fadetogray on January 2, 2014 at 12:19 PM

The only bigger exposure if hypocrisy would have been if obama would have droned the private plane, should Snowden have taken it, from HK to Moscow. It as planned. I wished for it to happen. obama would have killed Snowden and all in the jet…to save themselves they flew commercial, because they had to :)

This is very cool story and will make a wonderful movie one day.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:17 PM

Sure…a movie.
Like Capricorn One.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:19 PM

Who here thinks they can find an ideology delta between the Democrats and Republicans who run this country?

I can’t. It has become nothing more than two competing sports teams, who have different players and plays, but they’re still playing the same game.

And that game isn’t what we believe it should be.

BobMbx on January 2, 2014 at 12:20 PM

Putin has made Obama his b*tch on several occasions and has completely and utterly humiliated the ignorant and immature black child. Hence you hate Putin.

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 12:14 PM

No one can phrase it better!!!

Sure…what other reason could anyone have to be critical of Putin, right?
/
So you’re Putin’s little babooshka…and you’re just not able to consider any.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:17 PM

verbie, no…I regret so much that so many people can’t hold two thoughts, concurrently, in one brain.

Putin is a thug.

obama is a thug.

That this big thug, Putin, can claim moral authority over thug obama, who’s supposed to be the anti-thug, is the beauty of this story. The irony is so schadendfreudig that it’s hardly possible to contain.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:21 PM

Meh, this is when I go “I redeemed verbie, now it lets me down, again”. I’m very tolerant, though.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:18 PM

I know.
But it was a nice 4 minutes, right?

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:22 PM

what’s still out there?

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:19 PM

Therein lies the beauty. It’s the reason obama is so down and depressed. obama’care’ is the front puppy :)

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:22 PM

Sure…what other reason could anyone have to be critical of Putin, right?
/
So you’re Putin’s little babooshka…and you’re just not able to consider any.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:17 PM

None that couldn’t be applied to a) Venezuela, b) Cuba, c) Iran, d) the Palestinian Authority, and e) the Muslim Brotherhood, all of which have your complete and total support.

The way to deal with leftists like yourself, verbaluce, is again to realize that you are liberal f*cks — you have no morals and you do nothing but attack.

Your attacks are geared to exploit the fact that other people do have morals. But when one realizes that you yourself are a hypocrite who has none, then your attacks are blunted.

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 12:22 PM

But it was a nice 4 minutes, right?

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:22 PM

No minutes. You know already that I’m a loyal friend. It irritates some on the right too.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:23 PM

But you’re right about the fact that Obama/Clapper know now what hasn’t been disclosed yet. What has been released has been damning, what’s still out there?

The likely fact that the NSA intensely surveilled all communications of the Romney campaign and large contributors to the Romney campaign, and passed the results of that surveillance on to the Obama campaign.

Realist on January 2, 2014 at 12:23 PM

But you’re right about the fact that Obama/Clapper know now what hasn’t been disclosed yet. What has been released has been damning, what’s still out there?

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:19 PM

Proof of Obama’s illegal electioneering, donations, use of government agencies to harass political opponents, etc.

Remember that Greenwald and Snowden are leftists. Were they to release that type of information, they would fatally undermine their own ideology. Hence why the spigot has slowed down so much — they’re right on the edge of giving “progressives” an irreparable injury.

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 12:25 PM

What they desperately seem to want to avoid is an explanation.
 
verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:01 PM

 
Wait, so telling them you supported their actions up to 2012 and that you personally desired their continued and similar expansions for another presidential term didn’t help, verbaluce?

rogerb on January 2, 2014 at 12:27 PM

what’s still out there?

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:19 PM

The fags in the government don’t know exactly what he has, so they have to assume he has it all. And they know what he might have is dangerous enough, to them and their programs, that they’re willing to offer him amnesty.

He’s got to know as soon as the US Marshalls get their hands on him, he’s gone.

BobMbx on January 2, 2014 at 12:28 PM

None that couldn’t be applied to a) Venezuela, b) Cuba, c) Iran, d) the Palestinian Authority, and e) the Muslim Brotherhood, all of which have your complete and total support.

The way to deal with leftists like yourself, verbaluce, is again to realize that you are liberal f*cks — you have no morals and you do nothing but attack.

Your attacks are geared to exploit the fact that other people do have morals. But when one realizes that you yourself are a hypocrite who has none, then your attacks are blunted.

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 12:22 PM

Oh go blow on a leftover noisemaker.
That’s the only thing that has my complete and total support.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:31 PM

Realist on January 2, 2014 at 12:23 PM

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 12:25 PM

I think beyond the activities associated with spying on Romney and using our national intelligence machine as a political cudgel against his opponents is just the tip of what we may find.

Remember that OFA database that they were constantly crowing about in 2012. They claimed they could micro-target neighborhoods or even streets based on the information provided by volunteers reporting on their neighbors. What if it wasn’t volunteers spying on us but, rather, professional spys? NSA being used for such partisan activity would be like Watergate on a thermo-nuclear level.

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:33 PM

No politician has ever won office by saying that he was going to eliminate the Bill of Rights. They have won office by promising to protect us, and portraying the Bill of Rights as an impediment to that sacred duty. Unfortunately, after many years of exposure to such propaganda, many Americans have now come to view their liberties as a luxury to be discarded when their safety is threatened.

We are at a very dangerous point in our history. The traditional bulwarks against tyranny have been degraded or eliminated, and a police state infrastructure has been erected in the shadows. All it takes is the right crisis, and this infernal machine roars to life, probably to the cheers of the masses.

roflmmfao

donabernathy on January 2, 2014 at 12:35 PM

Remember that OFA database that they were constantly crowing about in 2012. They claimed they could micro-target neighborhoods or even streets based on the information provided by volunteers reporting on their neighbors.

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:33 PM

That’s insane.
And you need to clean those gutters.
But don’t do it in the new jeans you got for Christmas.
And it’s fine to finish your coffee first.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:38 PM

NSA being used for such partisan activity would be like Watergate on a thermo-nuclear level.

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:33 PM

It would be like the Stasi or SS or KGB.

Murphy9 on January 2, 2014 at 12:38 PM

That’s insane.
And you need to clean those gutters.
But don’t do it in the new jeans you got for Christmas.
And it’s fine to finish your coffee first.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:38 PM

Huh?

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:44 PM

President Barack Obama’s appointees won an early prison release for a progressive lawyer who collaborated with the Muslim jihadi leader of the 1993 attack on New York’s Twin Towers.

The 1993 attack failed to topple the building, but it did kill six Americans. The jihadi plotters had hoped the first tower would collapse and destroy the second tower in the process, killing all the Americans in both structures.

The failed attack was a model for Osama bin Laden’s successful atrocity in 2001, when his Muslim jihadis killed 3,000 New Yorkers.

The released left-wing lawyer, Lynne Stewart, 74, was sentenced in 2005 to a decade-long sentence for acting as a courier for her jihadi client, Omar Abdel-Rahman, who was jailed in 1995 for urging the Twin Towers attack.

http://dailycaller.com/2014/01/01/obamas-aides-release-leftist-collaborator-with-twin-towers-jihadis/

Murphy9 on January 2, 2014 at 12:46 PM

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:44 PM

A joke…that you were being spied on….
a not so good one, I guess.
Nvrmnd.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:48 PM

Once that’s done, we can return to life as a civilized nation.

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 11:58 AM

Tracinski’s Rule of American Politics, which states that “the left must be suppressed, hounded, mocked, vilified, and made to feel ashamed of itself. The idea is that we need to keep their heads down and keep them on the defensive, because the moment they feel confident and emboldened, they will attempt to take away all of our liberties.”

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:51 PM

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:38 PM

They used census data too.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:56 PM

. So what the public deems reasonable is what the Constitution means by reasonable. Though public opinion is always relevant to interpretations of the Constitution, this is the only context where the Constitution directly assigns to the people the power to determine what the Constitution means.
By definition, the people cannot deem to be “reasonable” what they do not know about.Snowden uniquely did know. So like a digital era Paul Revere he decided to share his knowledge with his fellow citizens to test his hypothesis that they would not consider dragnet surveillance of their private electronic communications any more reasonable than he did, and like him, as citizens, they might choose to act upon that knowledge.
Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 11:45 AM

Too bad so many conservatives Don’t get the nut of this. Security can never trump my right to be secure in my digital possessions and or papers without warrant.

AH_C on January 2, 2014 at 1:07 PM

That’s insane.

verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:38 PM

Not really. Standard Chicago technique, use every bit of government resources to punish your political opponents.

Barack Obama is a Chicago thug. His wife is a Chicago thug. His Valerie Jarrett is a stupid and malicious Chicago thug. His handlers like Penny Pritzker are Chicago thugs. The black child and all those around him have no morals and no values, and use the government to enrich themselves and their cronies.

northdallasthirty on January 2, 2014 at 1:19 PM

Adding salt to the wound: Obama has little to offer for the slow-motion crisis of joblessness that continues to squander human potential.

A 7% unemployment rate and monthly job creation now in excess of 200,000 conceals a labor participation rate — meaning, the percentage of working-age Americans who are an active part of the workforce — of just 63%. That’s near a generational low.

Obama can explain the problem. He can excoriate Republicans. But he cannot actually do anything to change the reality on the ground, and that is the ultimate measure of a President.

There are times when a President’s global stature buoys his standing at home. Not now.

As a civil war raged in Syria, fueled by the blistering brutality of Bashar Assad’s regime, Obama has looked worse than disinterested. He has seemed indecisive, if not bamboozled.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 1:41 PM

Not least, but last, the administration failed a test with implications both at home and abroad:

After a thief of American secrets made off with thousands upon thousands of classified documents, Obama could not seem to credibly explain the surveillance powers the U.S. has wielded for years.

In a technologically complex landscape in which Islamist terrorists are plotting to kill, it is necessary for the nation to maintain an elaborate and sophisticated foreign intelligence apparatus.

But the President has acted haltingly as, month after month, the leaks have revealed the unimagined powers and practices of the National Security Agency. His potent powers of persuasion failed him, and us.

May the President find his way to effective leadership in the year ahead. May he cut his losses, and ours, with newfound humility.

Heh, good luck with his humility…however, with Snowden he’s in fear.

Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 1:44 PM

I love how Ed always drones on about how Snowden should have gone through the “proper channels”, completely ignoring the NSA people that have done it the “proper” way in the past with ZERO to show for it. So basically what Ed wants is Snowden to be just as ineffective at enacting any meaningful change as those who have “exposed” the government’s abuses the “proper” have.

thphilli on January 2, 2014 at 1:50 PM

I don’t think he should be the story here.
verbaluce on January 2, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Amen.

notropis on January 2, 2014 at 1:54 PM

I’m not buying for a minute that Snowden hasn’t shared his cache of stolen documents with his protectors in China and Russia. I don’t think he would have been afforded asylum had he not shared.

But you’re right about the fact that Obama/Clapper know now what hasn’t been disclosed yet. What has been released has been damning, what’s still out there?

Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 12:19 PM

.
I’m just going to keep posting my earlier “thought experiment” for all those damning Snowden …

… well, excluding the Hot Air editors who are know fully in the GOPe-media propaganda division charged with supporting the GOPe talking points

*******************************************************

Point of fact: No one has proved HOW many documents Snowden accessed.

Originally, it was considered to be selected documents detailing the scope of the “surveillance empire”.

Then, in pursuit of Greenwald’s partner, the British government went into court and declared, but did not prove, it was 50,000 documents

At the beginning of December, the “anonymous sources” upped the ante to 1.7 million.

But nomore than two weeks later … another anonymous source went fully hyperbolic and claimed “he got everything”.
.
.
So … the Obama administration, the most repressive administration with regard to leaks BEFORE Snowden said a word, is now overrun with “anonymous sources” doing there absolute best to paint Snowden as a modern day Moriarity.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Here’s the thought experiment question.

WHY are you believing these “anonymous sources” from an administration which will live in infamy for the lies of its leader – much less his underlings?

Note: I’m not arguing Snowden is a hero or a villain. I am asking WHY you are taking the anonymous word of a group of villains as gospel?

From everyone wanting to “hang” Snowden, I’d appreciate your reasoning.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Two other takeaways:

1) Here is a quote from June about the Verizon FISA court warrant. It helps to put back in perspective the virtual impossibility of Snowden having obtained the FISA court document by himself. Note the last paragraph I have emphasized – these were standalone FISA court systems, not NSA systems.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/06/18/fbi-looks-for-leaks-at-foreign-intelligence-surveillance-court.html

The officials say phone companies like Verizon are not allowed to store a digital copy of the warrant, and that the documents are not accessible on most NSA internal classified computer networks or on the Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications System, the top-secret internet used by the U.S. intelligence community.

The warrants reside on two computer systems affiliated with the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and the National Security Division of the Department of Justice. Both systems are physically separated from other government-wide computer networks and employ sophisticated encryption technology, the officials said. Even lawmakers and staff lawyers on the House and Senate intelligence committees can only view the warrants in the presence of Justice Department attorneys, and are prohibited from taking notes on the documents.

“The only time that our attorneys would have gotten to read one was if Justice Department lawyers came over with it in a secure pouch and sat there with them when they read them,” said Pete Hoekstra, a former Republican chairman and ranking member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. “There was never one in the intelligence-committee spaces, never one left there without someone from the Justice Department. It would not have been left there overnight.”

U.S. intelligence officials were careful to say investigators have not yet concluded there is a mole inside the FISA Court or that the secure databases that store the court warrants have been compromised, only that both prospects were under active investigation.

.
2) Somebody REALLY important is setting up Snowden to take the fall for stealing massive amounts of American intelligence data. Far more than is remotely credible – HOW MANY thumb drives or USB external drives are we supposed to believe he “walked” in and out of a NSA facility? To take 1.7 million documents … did he somehow talk EVERYBODY into letting him set up his own personal server base “for backups”?

Or has Snowden provided an “crisis opportunity” for the Obama administration to explain away a massive intelligence ‘disruption’ done by a mole in the administration who, if revealed, would bring about the inevitable impeachment of Barack Obama?

PolAgnostic on January 2, 2014 at 2:09 PM

no matter how much you love the guy, Snowden is a criminal.
Happy Nomad on January 2, 2014 at 11:53 AM

I don’t love the guy
Schadenfreude on January 2, 2014 at 12:03 PM

Must you ruin a good strawman-building?

whatcat on January 2, 2014 at 2:10 PM

thphilli on January 2, 2014 at 1:50 PM

Well said.”William Drake,” “Thomas Binney” – hardly household names, and what little result they achieved was only thanks to Snowden’s “publicity stunt.”

notropis on January 2, 2014 at 2:22 PM

Well said.”William Drake,” “Thomas Binney” – hardly household names, and what little result they achieved was only thanks to Snowden’s “publicity stunt.”

notropis on January 2, 2014 at 2:22 PM

Exactly. And Ed Morrissey wants to either act like those people don’t exist or that THIS TIME it would be different and that Snowden should have risked his life and freedom and career going down the same path that has failed multiple times in the past. Its almost like Ed is mad that Snowden has actually affected change in some meaningful manner. . . . .

This is at least the fifth or sixth post I have read from him that has whined about Snowden not going through the proper channels for whistleblowing, when he knows full well that if he had gone through those channels nothing would have come of it.

thphilli on January 2, 2014 at 2:26 PM

This is at least the fifth or sixth post I have read from him that has whined about Snowden not going through the proper channels for whistleblowing, when he knows full well that if he had gone through those channels nothing would have come of it.

thphilli on January 2, 2014 at 2:26 PM

Or have been disappeared by Obama into a cell with the YouTube videomaker.

whatcat on January 2, 2014 at 2:33 PM

Exactly. And Ed Morrissey wants to either act like those people don’t exist or that THIS TIME it would be different and that Snowden should have risked his life and freedom and career going down the same path that has failed multiple times in the past. Its almost like Ed is mad that Snowden has actually affected change in some meaningful manner. . . . .

This is at least the fifth or sixth post I have read from him that has whined about Snowden not going through the proper channels for whistleblowing, when he knows full well that if he had gone through those channels nothing would have come of it.

thphilli on January 2, 2014 at 2:26 PM


Ed’s hypocrisy is even greater than you are suggesting.

Senators Wyden and Rand have both been vocal opponents of NSA practices and policies but are constrained by the same laws as Edward Snowden.

Don’t hold your breath expecting Mr. Morrissey to explain HOW anyone would be able to “go through proper channels” under the Orwellian laws that prohibit ANY legal public discussion of the excesses being committed by the intelligence agencies.

PolAgnostic on January 2, 2014 at 2:43 PM

Don’t hold your breath expecting Mr. Morrissey to explain HOW anyone would be able to “go through proper channels” under the Orwellian laws that prohibit ANY legal public discussion of the excesses being committed by the intelligence agencies.
PolAgnostic on January 2, 2014 at 2:43 PM

Not to pick on Ed at all, it’s frosty enough already in Gopherland, but maybe that catch-22 didn’t occur to him.

whatcat on January 2, 2014 at 2:54 PM

This is just whistling in the wind, really. The NYT’s editors start with clemency and then quickly retreat to a position that Snowden will never accept — prison time. He’s looking for asylum or amnesty, not a few years at Club Fed.

I’m all for it…Promise Snowden clemency then prosecute him anyway. When he complains about an oath being broken, respond: “irony, lol’.

jimver on January 2, 2014 at 3:16 PM

The last thing we need is Snowden back in this country, unless it’s at the end of a rope.

fleiter on January 2, 2014 at 3:31 PM

The NSA officials who have repeatedly lied in public and to Congress aught to be the ones going to jail.

Clark1 on January 2, 2014 at 3:33 PM

NYT: Let’s offer Snowden amnesty

*

*But only when he claims Hilary had nothing to do with Benghazi.

Dr. Charles G. Waugh on January 2, 2014 at 3:42 PM

No Amnesty for Snowden! I want the rest of the story revealed! Tell us about Obama please? Where did he come from? What about his travel and academic records? SS number? Draft records? What was he up to in Benghazi? Tell us more about old Shillary? Make no deal that will cover up for this bunch in office now! Tell it all Snowden and let the people decide!

Marco on January 2, 2014 at 4:03 PM

Had Snowden used appropriate and available channels for whistleblowing rather than theft and exposure, much of that damage could have been avoided

So your view is if he’d given this information to say Harry Reid or Nancy Pelosi (or John McCain) that they’d have done something useful and made this problem less… and wouldn’t have worked with the government agencies to railroaded his butt into prison?

Care to explain why you’d think that?

Sorry Ed, I don’t think you’ll find a lot of agreement there.

Every “available channel” either wouldn’t do anything, or would actively harm him to shut him up. IF the goal is getting something done, which channel do you believe would have been effective?

I’m not seeing one.

gekkobear on January 2, 2014 at 4:09 PM

Maybe the NSA can intercept the flight he is on, grab Snowden, shove a chip up HIS backdoor, and then set the flight back on course.

Damn Traitor!(/, \, whatever.)

WryTrvllr on January 2, 2014 at 4:59 PM

Had Snowden used appropriate and available channels for whistleblowing rather than theft and exposure, much of that damage could have been avoided

Dear Mr. Capone,

I just wanted to make you aware that many of the people in your employ are breaking the law. I know this because I work in a speakeasy and am exposed to the law-breaking as a matter of business.

I’m sure you’ll do the right thing and put an end to all this lawlessness.

Thanks,

John Q. Public

BobMbx on January 2, 2014 at 5:00 PM

Marco on January 2, 2014 at 4:03 PM

Amen.

WryTrvllr on January 2, 2014 at 5:09 PM

No Amnesty. Snowden’s a traitor!

annoyinglittletwerp on January 2, 2014 at 5:11 PM

This is what SHOULD be happening to Snowden, once we get a real preznit, since this award ceremony was obvious a cynical joke.

http://www.frontpagemag.com/2012/dgreenfield/warren-buffett-owes-1-billion-in-back-taxes/warrenbuffettpresidentobamahonorsmedalw9hg3jrzkepl/

WryTrvllr on January 2, 2014 at 5:15 PM

NSA seeks to build quantum computer that could crack most types of encryption

BallisticBob on January 2, 2014 at 5:21 PM

Long paper, index cards, pencils, erasers.

Gore may have invented the internet. Snowden may save it. Prob not though.

WryTrvllr on January 2, 2014 at 5:27 PM

MeanWhile, ……………………………….

NSA surveillance programs leaked
25m
Snowden docs: NSA seeking to build quantum computer that could crack most encryption – @washingtonpost
read more on washingtonpost.com
===============================

NSA seeks to build quantum computer that could crack most types of encryption
***********

By Steven Rich and Barton Gellman,
Updated: Thursday,
January 2, 5:00 PM
******************

In room-size metal boxes, secure against electromagnetic leaks, the National Security Agency is racing to build a computer that could break nearly every kind of encryption used to protect banking, medical, business and government records around the world.

According to documents provided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, the effort to build “a cryptologically useful quantum computer” — a machine exponentially faster than classical computers — is part of a $79.7 million research program titled, “Penetrating Hard Targets.” Much of the work is hosted under classified contracts at a laboratory in College Park.

The development of a quantum computer has long been a goal of many in the scientific community, with revolutionary implications for fields like medicine as well as for the NSA’s code-breaking mission. With such technology, all forms of public key encryption would be broken, including those used on many secure Web sites as well as the type used to protect state secrets.(MORE….)
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http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/nsa-seeks-to-build-quantum-computer-that-could-crack-most-types-of-encryption/2014/01/02/8fff297e-7195-11e3-8def-a33011492df2_story.html

canopfor on January 2, 2014 at 5:33 PM

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