Quotes of the day

posted at 10:31 pm on December 17, 2013 by Allahpundit

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden has offered to collaborate with a Brazilian investigation into the NSA surveillance program he revealed earlier this year, according to a letter published in a local newspaper on Tuesday.

In “An Open Letter to the Brazilian People,” published by newspaper Folha De S. Paulo, Snowden said he would like to assist in a congressional probe into the NSA’s spying program, which monitored the personal communications of President Dilma Rousseff and other Brazilians.

“I have expressed my willingness to assist wherever appropriate and lawful, but unfortunately the United States government has worked very hard to limit my ability to do so,” the letter said…

“Until a country grants permanent political asylum, the U.S. government will continue to interfere with my ability to speak,” Snowden said.

***

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden stole vastly more information than previously speculated, and is holding it at ransom for his own protection.

“What’s floating is so dangerous, we’d be behind for twenty years in terms of access (if it were to be leaked),” a ranking Department of Defense official told the Daily Caller.

“He stole everything — literally everything,” the official said…

“Everything you don’t want the enemy to know, he has,” the official said. “Who we’re listening to, what we’re after — they’d shut us down.”

***

***

“It is an astounding day when a federal judge says a government surveillance practice would leave James Madison aghast,” Wyden told reporters. “The idea of collecting all these phone records is not inoffensive data collection as some of the proponents have said. It is digital surveillance.”

[T]hough Wyden’s colleagues don’t yet have the numbers to pass an NSA crackdown bill in the Senate, his coalition is growing.

It includes Republicans like Sens. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) and Mike Lee (R-Utah) as well as Democrats like Heinrich, who joined the Intelligence Committee this year and promptly sided against Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Vice Chairman Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.) on the issue of digital government surveillance.

“The judge got it right. I think that we have strayed from what the framers had in mind when they wrote the Fourth Amendment and were dealing directly with government overreach,” Heinrich said in an interview.

***

Reflecting on the dramatic changes that have taken place since the first newspaper stories based on Snowden’s leaked materials began appearing back in June, one U.S. official noted that the NSA’s once-solid support inside the White House and on Capitol Hill has waned since the panel was created in August, and that the once cordial relationship between the White House and NSA has become distinctly “chilly” over the past two months.

NSA officials became concerned this fall when their memos were increasingly ignored and their phone calls to key officials in Washington, especially at the State Department, were not returned. And more ominously, rumors began to reach NSA headquarters at Fort Meade, Maryland, that the review panel had been given new marching orders to be robust and searching in its report.

“We got the distinct impression that we were now lepers in Washington,” a senior NSA official recalled, adding, “Putting as much distance as possible between the White House and us was the order of the day.”

***

The NSA’s biggest strategic communications problem, however, is that they’ve been so walled off from the American body politic that they have no idea when they’re saying things that sound tone-deaf. Like expats returning from a long overseas tour, NSA staffers don’t quite comprehend how much perceptions of the agency have changed. The NSA stresses in its mission statement and corporate culture that it “protects privacy rights.” Indeed, there were faded banners proclaiming that goal in our briefing room. Of course, NSAers see this as protecting Americans from foreign cyber-intrusions. In a post-Snowden era, however, it’s impossible to read that statement without suppressing a laugh.

It might be an occupational hazard, but NSA officials continue to talk about the threat environment as if they’ve been frozen in amber since 2002. To them, the world looks increasingly unsafe. Syria is the next Pakistan, China is augmenting its capabilities to launch a financial war on the United States, and the next terrorist attack on American soil is right around the corner. They could very well be correct — except that the American public has become inured to such warnings over the past decade, and their response has been to tell politicians to focus on things at home and leave the rest of the world alone. A strategy of “trust us, the world is an unsafe place” won’t resonate now the way it did in the immediate wake of the Sept. 11 attacks.

The NSA’s attitude toward the press is, well, disturbing. There were repeated complaints about the ways in which recent reportage of the NSA was warped or lacking context. To be fair, this kind of griping is a staple of officials across the entire federal government. Some of the NSA folks went further, however. One official accused some media outlets of “intentionally misleading the American people,” which is a pretty serious accusation. This official also hoped that the Obama administration would crack down on these reporters, saying, “I have some reforms for the First Amendment.” I honestly do not know whether that last statement was a joke or not. Either way, it’s not funny.

***

Voters aren’t enthusiastic about granting NSA leaker Edward Snowden amnesty to halt his release of U.S. intelligence secrets, even though most agree the continued disclosures are hurting national security.

Just 21% of Likely U.S. Voters think the federal government should grant Snowden full amnesty from prosecution in exchange for his return of all classified information that he still possesses. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that twice as many (41%) oppose full amnesty for Snowden, although nearly as many (39%) are undecided.

Sixty-two percent (62%) still think it’s at least somewhat likely that the continuing disclosure of National Security Agency phone and e-mail surveillance programs is hurting U.S. national security.

***

The letter affirms for me, for whatever it’s worth, my own sense that Snowden and his actions are probably not well captured by either the “hero” or “traitor” archetypes. Those archetypes, after all, almost never satisfactorily explain the actions of actual human beings, who tend to be just too complicated. And Snowden certainly seems to be that. Some of his actions, like the initial decision to release the leaks despite facing a life in exile, certainly appear motivated by an earnest desire to make the world a better place, or at least better conform to certain ideals of liberty as he sees them. Other actions, though, have been much tougher to explain without allowing for the real possibility that he may have other motivations as well.

Snowden’s quid-pro-quo offer to Brazil seems to serve his ideals and his self-interest so interchangeably that we just can’t answer which is primarily driving him, nor we can fully dismiss either. The young leaker and his headline-grabbing actions continue to be, in many ways, mirrors for our own American process of thinking through the larger issues he’s helped to raise.

***

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a lead supporter of the National Security Agency’s domestic surveillance, said on Tuesday the Supreme Court should weigh in the constitutionality of the programs

“Only the Supreme Court can resolve the question on the constitutionality of the NSA’s program. I welcome a Supreme Court review since it has been more than 30 years since the court’s original decision of constitutionality, and I believe it is crucial to settling the issue once and for all. In the meantime, the call records program remains in effect,” Feinstein said in a statement. “Those of us who support the call records program do so with a sincere belief that it, along with other programs, is constitutional and helps keep the country safe from attack. I believe the program can benefit from additional transparency and privacy protections.”///

Majority Leader Harry Reid said it was necessary to have a “good public debate” on the NSA programs but that other judges had disagreed with Leon’s ruling.

“We know that senators, both Democrats and Republicans, would like to change the law as it relates to some of the collection activities and I think that’s good,” he said.

***

Six months ago, I revealed that the NSA wanted to listen to the whole world. Now, the whole world is listening back, and speaking out, too

My act of conscience began with a statement: “I don’t want to live in a world where everything that I say, everything I do, everyone I talk to, every expression of creativity or love or friendship is recorded. That’s not something I’m willing to support, it’s not something I’m willing to build, and it’s not something I’m willing to live under.”

Days later, I was told my government had made me stateless and wanted to imprison me. The price for my speech was my passport, but I would pay it again: I will not be the one to ignore criminality for the sake of political comfort. I would rather be without a state than without a voice.

If Brazil hears only one thing from me, let it be this: when all of us band together against injustices and in defense of privacy and basic human rights, we can defend ourselves from even the most powerful systems.

***

***

***



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B9!

KCB on December 17, 2013 at 10:31 PM

“He stole everything — literally everything,” the official said…

Shame on you, for being so stupid.

——-
Meanwhile

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 10:35 PM

Well, Snowden is at thee very top of Santa’s being naughty sh*t-List,
no doubts!!

canopfor on December 17, 2013 at 10:36 PM

Dear Leader does not need the NSA anymore…

d1carter on December 17, 2013 at 10:37 PM

“He stole everything — literally everything,” the official said…

I really doubt that but if true then why did you leave the front door, the back door and all the widows open, you incompetent perverts?

VorDaj on December 17, 2013 at 10:40 PM

Edward Snowden’s asylum-seeking letter to Brazil – in full

Summary: Read the letter from the NSA whistleblower to the Brazilian people
December 17, 2013 — 12:25 GMT (04:25 PST)
*****************************************

NSA former contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden has written an open letter to the people of Brazil, published by newspaper Folha de São Paulo today (17). Read the full text of the letter below, where Snowden attempts to ask the country for asylum for the second time.

“Six months ago, I stepped out from the shadows of the United States Government’s National Security Agency to stand in front of a journalist’s camera. I shared with the world evidence proving some governments are building a world-wide surveillance system to secretly track how we live, who we talk to, and what we say. I went in front of that camera with open eyes, knowing that the decision would cost me family and my home, and would risk my life. I was motivated by a belief that the citizens of the world deserve to understand the system in which they live.

My greatest fear was that no one would listen to my warning. Never have I been so glad to have been so wrong. The reaction in certain countries has been particularly inspiring to me, and Brazil is certainly one of those.

At the NSA, I witnessed with growing alarm the surveillance of whole populations without any suspicion of wrongdoing, and it threatens to become the greatest human rights challenge of our time. The NSA and other spying agencies tell us that for our own “safety” — for Dilma’s “safety,” for Petrobras’ “safety” — they have revoked our right to privacy and broken into our lives. And they did it without asking the public in any country, even their own.

Today, if you carry a cell phone in Sao Paolo, the NSA can and does keep track of your location: they do this 5 billion times a day to people around the world. When someone in Florianopolis visits a website, the NSA keeps a record of when it happened and what you did there. If a mother in Porto Alegre calls her son to wish him luck on his university exam, NSA can keep that call log for five years or more. They even keep track of who is having an affair or looking at pornography, in case they need to damage their target’s reputation.

American Senators tell us that Brazil should not worry, because this is not “surveillance,” it’s “data collection.” They say it is done to keep you safe. They’re wrong. There is a huge difference between legal programs, legitimate spying, legitimate law enforcement — where individuals are targeted based on a reasonable, individualized suspicion — and these programs of dragnet mass surveillance that put entire populations under an all-seeing eye and save copies forever. These programs were never about terrorism: they’re about economic spying, social control, and diplomatic manipulation. They’re about power.

Many Brazilian senators agree, and have asked for my assistance with their investigations of suspected crimes against Brazilian citizens. I have expressed my willingness to assist wherever appropriate and lawful, but unfortunately the United States government has worked very hard to limit my ability to do so — going so far as to force down the Presidential Plane of Evo Morales to prevent me from travelling to Latin America! Until a country grants permanent political asylum, the US government will continue to interfere with my ability to speak.

Six months ago, I revealed that the NSA wanted to listen to the whole world. Now, the whole world is listening back, and speaking out, too. And the NSA doesn’t like what it’s hearing. The culture of indiscriminate worldwide surveillance, exposed to public debates and real investigations on every continent, is collapsing. Only three weeks ago, Brazil led the United Nations Human Rights Committee to recognize for the first time in history that privacy does not stop where the digital network starts, and that the mass surveillance of innocents is a violation of human rights.

The tide has turned, and we can finally see a future where we can enjoy security without sacrificing our privacy. Our rights cannot be limited by a secret organization, and American officials should never decide the freedoms of Brazilian citizens. Even the defenders of mass surveillance, those who may not be persuaded that our surveillance technologies have dangerously outpaced democratic controls, now agree that in democracies, surveillance of the public must be debated by the public.

My act of conscience began with a statement: “I don’t want to live in a world where everything that I say, everything I do, everyone I talk to, every expression of creativity or love or friendship is recorded. That’s not something I’m willing to support, it’s not something I’m willing to build, and it’s not something I’m willing to live under.”

Days later, I was told my government had made me stateless and wanted to imprison me. The price for my speech was my passport, but I would pay it again: I will not be the one to ignore criminality for the sake of political comfort. I would rather be without a state than without a voice.

If Brazil hears only one thing from me, let it be this: when all of us band together against injustices and in defence of privacy and basic human rights, we can defend ourselves from even the most powerful systems.”

http://www.zdnet.com/edward-snowdens-asylum-seeking-letter-to-brazil-in-full-7000024393/
====================

http://www.breakingnews.com/topic/report-of-us-mining-internet-company-data/

canopfor on December 17, 2013 at 10:43 PM

Snowden has brought forth some interesting info…

OmahaConservative on December 17, 2013 at 10:43 PM

“The judge got it right. I think that we have strayed from what the framers had in mind when they wrote the Fourth Amendment and were dealing directly with government overreach,” Heinrich said in an interview.

Pharoah Hussein Obama ants to get rid of all ten of the Bill of Rights. He says they are all just negative rights anyway. If his ObamaCare kills you off you won’t care anyway.

VorDaj on December 17, 2013 at 10:45 PM

Oh Sh*t:

Hopey/Changey is getting Even with the USSR,..no help
sending back to the US of A BLOWBACK of Snowden:

War in Afghanistan
4m
====
Obama administration considering a military trial in US for Russian detained in Afghanistan – @washingtonpost
read more on washingtonpost.com
===============================

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/foreign-detainees-from-afghanistan-are-being-considered-for-military-trial-in-us/2013/12/17/d38f9254-6723-11e3-a0b9-249bbb34602c_story.html

canopfor on December 17, 2013 at 10:46 PM

The entire world does data mining, the FSB, GHCQ, NSA, whatever the Brasilian equivalent is, who is he kidding,

narciso on December 17, 2013 at 10:46 PM

Snowden has brought forth some interesting info…

OmahaConservative on December 17, 2013 at 10:43 PM

Inside word is that Snowden has Obama’s IQ score, but it’s so low that he thinks it might be Biden’s or Bo’s.

VorDaj on December 17, 2013 at 10:47 PM

Pompous, narcissistic terrorist. Needs to be dead. Soon.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 10:48 PM

Obama administration considering a military trial in US for Russian detained in Afghanistan

canopfor on December 17, 2013 at 10:46 PM

What was his crime that so offended Obama? Did he want to see Obama’s hard copy BC like LTC Lakin did?

VorDaj on December 17, 2013 at 10:50 PM

Pompous, narcissistic terrorist. Needs to be dead. Soon.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 10:48 PM

I don’t think the Secret Service would appreciate that.

VorDaj on December 17, 2013 at 10:52 PM

canopfor on December 17, 2013 at 10:46 PM

What was his crime that so offended Obama? Did he want to see Obama’s hard copy BC like LTC Lakin did?

VorDaj on December 17, 2013 at 10:50 PM

VorDaj: Rooskie gots caught in the Tolly-Bon camp!:)

canopfor on December 17, 2013 at 10:54 PM

I don’t think the Secret Service would appreciate that.

VorDaj on December 17, 2013 at 10:52 PM

+ millions of good thinkers

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 10:58 PM

“He stole everything — literally everything,” the official said…

…thief’s…steal from thieves?

KOOLAID2 on December 17, 2013 at 11:02 PM

3 reps won’t run again, shaking 2014

The most significant departure came in Utah, where Democratic Rep. Jim Matheson said he would be vacating a conservative seat, almost certainly handing it to Republicans in next year’s midterms. But Democrats got good news in Iowa, where GOP Rep. Tom Latham declared that he would be retiring from the swing district he’s held for 10 terms, and in Virginia, where another veteran congressman, GOP Rep. Frank Wolf, announced that he wouldn’t be running for reelection in an up-for-grabs district.

Tom Latham, a senior Appropriations Committee member, is vacating a district in which Obama received 51 percent of the vote.

Wolf’s decision to leave his Northern Virginia seat brings an end to a 17-term congressional career in a state that has been increasingly trending Democratic. Romney only narrowly won the 10th District seat in 2012, while President Barack Obama won it in 2008.

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/12/frank-wolf-virginia-2014-election-101243.html#ixzz2nnNi5JVA

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:02 PM

If You Don’t Know Me By Now – Simply Red

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:04 PM

I don’t think the Secret Service would appreciate that.

VorDaj on December 17, 2013 at 10:52 PM

lol. If you’re listening NSA (and I’m sure you are) let me clarify – I was talking about the Russian spy, not the traitor in the White House.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:06 PM

3 reps won’t run again, shaking 2014

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/12/frank-wolf-virginia-2014-election-101243.html#ixzz2nnNi5JVA

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:02 PM

kcewa:Yups,..sent in three hours ago:)
======================================

http://wolf.house.gov/

Wolf Won’t Seek Re-Election In 2014
Tuesday December 17, 2013

WOLF WON’T SEEK RE-ELECTION IN 2014

Washington, D.C. (December 17, 2013) – Rep. Frank Wolf (R-10th) today announced that he would not seek election to an 18th term in 2014.

He released the following statement announcing his decision:

“I have decided not to seek re-election to the U.S. Congress in 2014. It has been an honor to serve the people of northern Virginia and the Shenandoah Valley. I thank my constituents for giving me the privilege of representing them in Congress for 34 years.

“As a follower of Jesus, I am called to work for justice and reconciliation, and to be an advocate for those who cannot speak for themselves. I plan to focus my future work on human rights and religious freedom – both domestic and international – as well as matters of the culture and the American family. My passion for these issues has been influenced by the examples of President Ronald Reagan, former Congressmen Jack Kemp and Tony Hall, Chuck Colson, and the life of 18th century Member of Parliament William Wilberforce.

“I want to thank the many excellent former and current members of my staff who have helped me serve the people of the 10th District. I am also grateful to my wife, Carolyn, and my family, who have faithfully stood by me all these many years.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: Wolf was first elected in 1980 and is the dean of the Virginia congressional delegation. He has represented all or parts of the following counties and cities since being elected: Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, Fauquier, Clarke, Frederick, Warren, Shenandoah, Rockingham, Rappahannock, Page, Winchester, Manassas and Manassas Park.

http://wolf.house.gov/press-releases/wolf-wont-seek-reelection-in-2014/

canopfor on December 17, 2013 at 11:07 PM

Love that tune, Jackie…

PointnClick on December 17, 2013 at 11:08 PM

+ millions of good thinkers

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 10:58 PM

“I’ve got to confess, though, I found this result surprising,” he wrote. “As I pushed the button to run the analysis on my computer, I fully expected I’d be shown a modest negative correlation between identifying with the Tea Party and science comprehension.”

Kahan also admitted that his pre-conceived notions about the Tea Party were based on what he heard from liberal media sources, such as MSNBC, the Huffington Post and the New York Times.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:09 PM

This has become an ugly cluster where there are no good guys and Snowden may yet be the least bad among them; that is a very sad commentary on where we’ve allowed ourselves to sink.

alchemist19 on December 17, 2013 at 11:12 PM

kcewa:Yups,..sent in three hours ago:)

canopfor on December 17, 2013 at 11:07 PM

Interesting that it would be three in one day. Getting a jump on their colleagues in cashing in their votes on the budget deal for lobbying jobs?

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:14 PM

I’m glad he did what he did, this government is a corrupt police state that is increasingly overstepping its bounds.

WisCon on December 17, 2013 at 11:16 PM

Pompous, narcissistic terrorist. Needs to be dead. Soon.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 10:48 PM

Not once did he condemn American citizens or his country, just the government and government officials operating in secret.

Daemonocracy on December 17, 2013 at 11:18 PM

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:04 PM

Evening J. Last night I missed your Armstrong-linked note. Saw it after you left. I replied that I’d have lunch with L. Armstrong, in Hell :)

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:19 PM

Snowden is an anarchic symptom of the laughable NSA security that allowed this catastrophic folly.

Heads should roll.

profitsbeard on December 17, 2013 at 11:21 PM

Obama administration considering a military trial in US for Russian detained in Afghanistan

canopfor on December 17, 2013 at 10:46 PM

What was his crime that so offended Obama? Did he want to see Obama’s hard copy BC like LTC Lakin did?

VorDaj on December 17, 2013 at 10:50 PM

He has evidence that Obama cheats on his golf scores. The official charge is lese majeste.

malclave on December 17, 2013 at 11:24 PM

If you’re listening NSA (and I’m sure you are) let me clarify – I was talking about the Russian spy, not the traitor in the White House.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:06 PM

If you read this, NSA, fluke you into oblivion, or royally, then let us pour lemon juice on all of you, you unconstitutional morons who work for Clapper and obama, two liars and morons to the world.

To kcewa:

1. Mr. Snowden is not a “Russian spy”.

2. You and yours should thank you, not condemn him.

3. If he’d have had a save whistle-blowing venue, the kind obama ran for office on, in 2008, he’d have used it, alas.

4. He is a highly intelligent man, who carried the constitution with him, always. YOU should never forget this, no matter what the media tell you, the weasels. They are NO better than obama and his other Clapper-like weasels.

5. Snowden didn’t do what he did for money.

6. Snowden didn’t do anything for glory.

7. Snowden risked his life for your and the world’s remnants of freedom.

Wake up America. The world finally did wake up, thanks to Snowden.

NO muzzies can ever do the damage which this gov’t inflicts on the once free people.

Yes, NSA, do read this. Internalize what it is you follow, you little nazis. It’s how it all begins.

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:25 PM

Well the tree is assembled and it looks real. Except for the green dowel going straight up the middle. Also the twisted wire branches with green plastic bristles fool no one.

Well I watered the botton so people will think it’s real and it won’t dry out and drop pine needles on the carpet.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:26 PM

PointnClick on December 17, 2013 at 11:08 PM

Good evening, PointnClick.:)

Thanks. :)

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:27 PM

Russian bailout wins Ukraine economic respite but deepens political rift

Putin attempts to buy Ukraine. Obama retaliates by sending gay athletes to Sochi.

Ukraine’s President Viktor Yanukovich has secured a $15 billion bailout from Russia,

Moscow, accused by European officials of bullying Kiev into dropping the EU deal last month with the threat of economic retaliation, now has great financial leverage over Ukraine,

Putin wants to bring Ukraine’s large, mineral-rich market into a Eurasian Union he plans to build with Kazakhstan, Belarus and other ex-Soviet republics to match the economic might of the United States and China.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:28 PM

save = safe

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:28 PM

lol. If you’re listening NSA (and I’m sure you are) let me clarify – I was talking about the Russian spy, not the traitor in the White House.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:06 PM

I believe you but I’m not so sure they will and they won’t want to take any chances. I think you best hope that Snowden does get asylum in Brazil and then befriend him and ask for pointers.

VorDaj on December 17, 2013 at 11:29 PM

Of course the giant hollow plastic Santa with a light bulb in his head doesn’t look remotely like a person. If it gets any colder it might crack in half.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:30 PM

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:19 PM

Good evening, Paladin. :) Wonderful to see you, as always.

I’m glad you enjoyed it. I know you’re partial to his music.:)

I agree with your assessment of Snowden. We have very few facts about Snowden and the information he took or what he did with it, much less his intent. We do have a great deal of conjecture.

As for me, I’m not inclined to believe anything the NSA has to say, particularly in light of their activities, regarding the information or Snowden.

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:31 PM

What the media won’t tell you, nor the NSA.

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:31 PM

You can take a coconut doughnut and knock off the coconut and it looks like snow falling on the little train circling the green dowel tree.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:32 PM

It’s funny. I think I just want to be happy this Christmas.

Ya know? Make the most of it.

wolly4321 on December 17, 2013 at 11:32 PM

no doubt some whacko leftist will take the VA slot. Let’s hope that Mia Love gets the UT district.

I don’t understand the hyperbole over the Snowden stuff…biblical proportions? Really?

Obviously names are very bad…hopefully the government is gathering in its spies, at least those at severe risk. That will not be the first time that names have been leaked. And..really…one guy can steal everything in just a few months? Sounds to me like a cell.

and this country’s rep is shot to hell anyway..Arresting and strip searching an Indian diplomat..really? Listening to Angela’s
personal phone? Hmmmm.

r keller on December 17, 2013 at 11:32 PM

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:32 PM

I think your tree and Christmas display looks wonderful, Spark. :)

Good evening. :)

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:33 PM

Not that the fireplace looks real either. It’s a tin foil rotisserie with red flames painted on it and a light bulb inside.

If you use you imagination you can here popping sounds like real fire wood.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:33 PM

wolly4321 on December 17, 2013 at 11:32 PM

There’s a man with the right idea. :)

Good evening, wolly. :) Merry Christmas to you and yours. :)

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:34 PM

LOL! Santa’s cracked. ^^^

Made me laugh. :)

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:35 PM

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:33 PM

Thanks MG. I’m going to submit pictures to Martha Stewart home decorating. I might win a award unless she sees your tree.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:36 PM

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:36 PM

I’ll vote for your tree, Spark. It sounds much better than mine. :)

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:36 PM

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:31 PM

Armstrong was a very complicated man. I like his music, of course, but I’d have liked to talk to him.

On the NSA, Snowden has tons of info. It w/b interesting to see lots more released. They are peeing their pants, daily, from obama on down, in fear.

What destroyed the oaf in chief are not the myriad of scandals, but these 3 items:

Syria

Snowden

obam’care’

The rebels just executed 80 people and obama sides with the terrorists now.

Snowden and obama’care’ have only unfolded 1%.

obama knows the 99% of both :)

It’s what keeps me going.

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:36 PM

PointnClick on December 17, 2013 at 11:08 PM

Write something! You have to have some new stories.

KCB on December 17, 2013 at 11:36 PM

PointnClick on December 17, 2013 at 11:08 PM

Write something! You have to have some new stories.

KCB on December 17, 2013 at 11:36 PM

*cough* This is when you start charging them for you work. *cough*:)

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:37 PM

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:36 PM

Indeed. I saw an article today relating that those ‘rebels’ had shoved people into ovens.

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:38 PM

Well to simulate ObamaCare I made the little train run smack into the green dowel and burst into a flaming wreck that triggered the ear shattering smoke alarm while the plastic pine needles melt into the carpet.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:39 PM

HotAir is doing a full-court press to make the issue Edward Snowden rather than the fact that the NSA is spying on everyone.

Edward Snowden blew the whistle on them. That makes him a whistlebower.

David Blue on December 17, 2013 at 11:39 PM

Most traitors do what they do for financial or ideological reasons.

No one paid him and he hasn’t displayed any ideology, aside from carrying the constitution.

If that is held against him, burn the ones who do.

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:40 PM

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:39 PM

But, Spark, to really simulate Obamacare you have to have the train hit the tree and set it alight over and over and over again… until the little Christmas village scene is completely destroyed. :(

Don’t do it, Spark… save Christmas. :)

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:40 PM

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:25 PM

Yes.

David Blue on December 17, 2013 at 11:41 PM

Holding Back The Years – Simply Red

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:41 PM

You and yours too Jack.

God knows we deserve just a small break.

wolly4321 on December 17, 2013 at 11:42 PM

The plastic green ObamaCare blob is emitting a nasty dark smoke that smells like burning tires.

Meanwhile ObamaCare carves a swath of destruction through the economic landscape leaving no one secure.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:42 PM

HotAir is doing a full-court press to make the issue Edward Snowden rather than the fact that the NSA is spying on everyone.

Edward Snowden blew the whistle on them. That makes him a whistlebower.

David Blue on December 17, 2013 at 11:39 PM

This too.

He may be many things, but he is a hero to liberty and freedom.

Every still free ‘merican should thank him. So should every free citizen of any other country.

That he had to take refuge in Russia, by default, makes Putin, the thug, claim moral superiority.

That obama enabled Putin to be ‘superior’ on Snowden’s ‘freedom’ and on Syria is not Putin’s fault. obama knows this. It burns, burns, burns…see puerile reaction toward the Olympics :)

I hate Putin and commies 100%. I just love how it played out.

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:43 PM

Most traitors do what they do for financial or ideological reasons.

No one paid him and he hasn’t displayed any ideology, aside from carrying the constitution.

If that is held against him, burn the ones who do.

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:40 PM

Indeed. The political affiliation Snowden had felt for the Democrats and Obama melted away in light of the evidence he saw before him in those documents and the excess of the NSA. He’s said that much. I think that leaves him, effectively, a man without a political affiliation, and nothing but the constitution to hold onto as he stands in the breath of the leviathan.

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:44 PM

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:40 PM

So true. (: When the three Wisemen saw the burnt ObamaCare village they hopped on their camel and went over to Scrumpy’s place.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:46 PM

it turns out that Iowahawk wins the best tweet on the pajama hipster award

https://twitter.com/iowahawkblog/status/413107847581286400

propaganda in 1943 vs 2013..compare and contrast

r keller on December 17, 2013 at 11:46 PM

Thanks MG. I’m going to submit pictures to Martha Stewart home decorating. I might win a award unless she sees your tree.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:36 PM

Stay away from that witch.

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:47 PM

wolly4321 on December 17, 2013 at 11:42 PM

Indeed. Close the castle gates, throw a log on the fire, break out the Christmas cheer, let everyone be merry. :)

( I’d have written ‘make merry’… but you know this crowd. lol!)

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:47 PM

ObamaCare. Because beaurocrats passing laws has such a phenomenal track record in reducing heart disease.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:47 PM

Moonage 15 days Illuminated 99.28%

Bmore on December 17, 2013 at 11:48 PM

ObamaCare. Because beaurocrats want to play God while selling their souls to the devil.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:50 PM

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:46 PM

Very wise men, indeed, Spark. :)

Say… you will clean up the pool house and clear away that Obamcare Christmas train wreck disaster won’t you? I’ll get you a new tree. A real live six foot fir tree…in a planter…so you can keep it and plant it in the spring. :)

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:51 PM

I was snooping around BMore’s shed and pilfered a couple whirligigs for B9.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:51 PM

Oh thanks for the moonage BMore.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:51 PM

Bmore, the phantom, just arrived :)

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:51 PM

ObamaCare. Because beaurocrats want to play God while selling their souls to the devil.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:50 PM

Best one yet, Spark. :)

The devil’s going to be irate when he realizes they’ve got no souls to sell to him… but that’s his problem. A deal is a deal.

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:52 PM

Snowden document shows Norway works with U.S. to spy on Russia

What does this have to do with our constitutional freedoms? I’ll give Snowden the benefit of the doubt and say he hasn’t been proven to be a spy. But you have to admit that what he did was irresponsible and harmful to American security.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:53 PM

Bmore on December 17, 2013 at 11:48 PM

Good evening, Bmore. :) Merry Christmas to you and yours. :)

Excellent tune, too. :)

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:53 PM

Little Lies – Fleetwood Mac

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:55 PM

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:51 PM

Lolz. Ok will do. I’ll need a freaking Zamboni to get rid of the ObamaCare mess.

ObamaCare. Because your whole family should suffer economically even after health rationing kills you.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:56 PM

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:37 P

True!!! I do like his writing style.

KCB on December 17, 2013 at 11:57 PM

What does this have to do with our constitutional freedoms?

Nothing. Every land spies on every other. It’s a given. Anyone who assumes otherwise, is naive, at best.

The unconstitutional part has to do with all of us, not the Russians, or any other country.

I’ll give Snowden the benefit of the doubt and say he hasn’t been proven to be a spy. But you have to admit that what he did was irresponsible and harmful to American security.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:53 PM

Multi-task-think.

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:58 PM

What does this have to do with our constitutional freedoms? I’ll give Snowden the benefit of the doubt and say he hasn’t been proven to be a spy. But you have to admit that what he did was irresponsible and harmful to American security.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:53 PM

what the hell does the nsa listening to me talk to my wife, kids, grandkids, etc on the phone have to do with nat’l security?????

Fred

jrsrigmvr on December 17, 2013 at 11:59 PM

ObamaCare. Because those actuarial tables were too long.

SparkPlug on December 17, 2013 at 11:59 PM

*cough* This is when you start charging them for you(r) work. *cough*:)

thatsafactjack on December 17, 2013 at 11:37 PM

We’ll all get bills from you now? :)

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:59 PM

I’ll give Snowden the benefit of the doubt and say he hasn’t been proven to be a spy. But you have to admit that what he did was irresponsible and harmful to American security.

kcewa on December 17, 2013 at 11:53 PM

We only have the NSA’s word on that. Until such time as Snowden’s fate is adjudicated in a court of law, I am reserving judgement.

gryphon202 on December 17, 2013 at 11:59 PM

KCB on December 17, 2013 at 11:57 PM

Good evening, Ken. :) Merry Christmas to you and yours. :)

I was actually sort of trying to give PnC a hint about taking the leap and publishing some of his stuff. A full quarter of authors selling their work on Amazon, for instance, are self published. The days when a writer had to beg an agent to represent them, and the major publishing houses to publish, distribute, and market their work are over. I think this is the best thing to happen to literature since the invention of paper. :)

thatsafactjack on December 18, 2013 at 12:00 AM

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:59 PM

lol! This isn’t work. If you recall, I said that I come here to unwind. I enjoy the assembled company very much. :)

thatsafactjack on December 18, 2013 at 12:02 AM

Multi taskthink.

Schadenfreude on December 17, 2013 at 11:58 PM

What I think is that he’s giving away American intelligence secrets. He deserves to go to jail for that. It’s a crime and isn’t justified by any good he may have done.

kcewa on December 18, 2013 at 12:02 AM

We only have the NSA’s word on that. Until such time as Snowden’s fate is adjudicated in a court of law, I am reserving judgement.

gryphon202 on December 17, 2013 at 11:59 PM

OSLO, Norway, Dec. 17 (UPI) — A document leaked by former U.S. security contractor Edward Snowden shows Norway cooperated with the United States in spying aimed at Russia.
Norway’s alleged espionage activities were reported by the Oslo newspaper Dagbladet, The Local.no reported Tuesday. The leaked document, a memorandum written by a U.S. National Security Agency officer April 17, summarized Norwegian cooperation with the United States, suggesting the espionage was aimed at both Russian nuclear weapons and its oil exploitation of the arctic. It cites “Russian targets in the Kola Peninsula” and “civilian targets … especially Russian energy policy,” Dagbladet said.

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2013/12/17/Snowden-document-shows-Norway-works-with-US-to-spy-on-Russia/UPI-35421387318218/#ixzz2nneS7Nyp

kcewa on December 18, 2013 at 12:04 AM

I think this is the best thing to happen to literature since the invention of paper. :)

thatsafactjack on December 18, 2013 at 12:00 AM

Paper
Gutenberg’s printing press
Typewriters
Word and such
Al Gore’s internet invention
Self-publishing
Amazon and such

Schadenfreude on December 18, 2013 at 12:05 AM

HotAir is doing a full-court press to make the issue Edward Snowden rather than the fact that the NSA is spying on everyone.

David Blue on December 17, 2013 at 11:39 PM

This is correct and in doing so they might as well be on the Obama payroll. It’s such an old Obama MO now – make the messenger the issue and attack him hoping that everyone will forget about what has been reveled.

VorDaj on December 18, 2013 at 12:05 AM

kcewa on December 18, 2013 at 12:04 AM

So what?

Schadenfreude on December 18, 2013 at 12:05 AM

jrsrigmvr on December 17, 2013 at 11:59 PM

Good evening, Fred. :)

Your point is valid and well stated. I have no choice, due to time constraints, than to send my work over the internet. It’s all intellectual property. As you can imagine, I’m less than pleased that some fat, greasy little bureaucrat is reading it and thinking about how much he/she would like to have their name on something like it, or listening to my conversations on the phone outlining proposed work or pitching something I’ve written. I take this opportunity for rank theft very seriously, indeed.

thatsafactjack on December 18, 2013 at 12:07 AM

VorDaj on December 18, 2013 at 12:05 AM

Indeed.

Yesterday Brit Hume, the RINO weasel, squirted out “it’s high time that Boehner shut the TEA partiers and conservatives up”.

Faux is a more appropriate name. They are openly pro amnesty and RINO squishes…not much different then obama and his thugs.

Schadenfreude on December 18, 2013 at 12:08 AM

What I think is that he’s giving away American intelligence secrets. He deserves to go to jail for that. It’s a crime and isn’t justified by any good he may have done.

kcewa on December 18, 2013 at 12:02 AM

If he had given away the information he had, it would be all over the news that he did. Every reasonable indication is that he is in posession of the information, in control of the information, and holding it close to his vest. The only certainty in any of this is in the speculation coming from the commentariat.

gryphon202 on December 18, 2013 at 12:08 AM

I have spent Christmas naked. Eating chinese food.

wolly4321 on December 18, 2013 at 12:09 AM

Is Fox News really as beholden to the military/industrial complex and fascist surveillance-state as that last clip suggests? Do we know whether or not former Bush AG Mukasey is on the payroll of the military/industrial complex, their “think tanks” or anybody else who profits from the police-state? Did Fox News vet him? Is Mukasey a computer and technology expert who is qualified to comment on the technical aspects of the NSA’s capabilities, as he pretends in the clip? I don’t think Mukasey is even remotely qualified to comment on the technology involved, yet he does anyway. That makes me doubt his impartiality and question his motives. It makes me wonder if maybe in the years since he was Bush’s AG if he’s been working for various think tanks and what have you that work for the military/industrial complex. If so then that means Fox News is being used as a propaganda arm of the military/industrial complex as well.

FloatingRock on December 18, 2013 at 12:10 AM

What I think is that he’s giving away American intelligence secrets. He deserves to go to jail for that. It’s a crime and isn’t justified by any good he may have done.

kcewa on December 18, 2013 at 12:02 AM

No, he’s not. It w/b cool to see all he’s got, but that won’t happen, soon.

What is most cool is that he’s got lots on the goons in charge and they are scared sh*tless.

Schadenfreude on December 18, 2013 at 12:11 AM

kcewa on December 18, 2013 at 12:04 AM

If I may, we’re discussing the NSA. How do we even know that this document is one that Snowden possessed? I certainly don’t put it past the NSA to leak documents in a cynical and calculated bid to further vilify Snowden and thus try to mitigate their own culpability. I’d like independent confirmation of who leaked that document, preferably an admission by Snowden that wasn’t made under duress.

thatsafactjack on December 18, 2013 at 12:11 AM

wolly4321 on December 18, 2013 at 12:09 AM

lol! That sounds absolutely decadent, wolly.

thatsafactjack on December 18, 2013 at 12:12 AM

OSLO, Norway, Dec. 17 (UPI) — A document leaked by former U.S. security contractor Edward Snowden shows Norway cooperated with the United States in spying aimed at Russia.
Norway’s alleged espionage activities were reported by the Oslo newspaper Dagbladet, The Local.no reported Tuesday. The leaked document, a memorandum written by a U.S. National Security Agency officer April 17, summarized Norwegian cooperation with the United States, suggesting the espionage was aimed at both Russian nuclear weapons and its oil exploitation of the arctic. It cites “Russian targets in the Kola Peninsula” and “civilian targets … especially Russian energy policy,” Dagbladet said.

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2013/12/17/Snowden-document-shows-Norway-works-with-US-to-spy-on-Russia/UPI-35421387318218/#ixzz2nneS7Nyp

I stand by my statement. We have only the NSA’s word that it was Snowden who leaked that memorandum. That it is out there, and that it is a (debatable) threat to American security is not necessarily an indictment of Edward Snowden. Diplomats and spooks discover spy rings all the time. Or did you really think that embassies are established in foreign countries as genuinely friendly gestures?

gryphon202 on December 18, 2013 at 12:13 AM

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