The Big Data White House. The most advanced data operation in the history of American politics. The most sophisticated manipulators of vast swaths of information evah:

Almost three months after the launch of the Obamacare website and enrollment period, the Obama administration still cannot provide enrollment numbers for young American’s.

Asked by a reporter at Tuesday’s White House Briefing how many young people have successfully enrolled in Obamacare, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney was tight lipped, only saying that he did not have “any data specifically broken down by age” and encouraged the reporter to ask CMS for that data, but cautioned that he did not know what kind of information CMS currently has available. He attempted to justify the lack of records by saying that young people will most likely “wait until the last minute to get their paperwork done or their online applications done.”

The reporter pressed Carney and informed him that CMS will not release the requested statistics. Carney admitted again “I don’t have it, so I would refer you to CMS. I don’t have the data.”

Since the White House has so very little in the way of specific figures, let me see if I can find them some, via Kelly Maher’s Compass Colorado:

DENVER (Dec. 17, 2013) — Colorado’s newest Obamacare exchange numbers are still far below worst-case projections. The exchange has enrolled only 23,009 individuals and Medicaid enrollees are up to 114,192. The exchange had hoped to enroll at least 36,900 individuals by mid-December…

Below is a chart of enrollment demographics from Colorado Connect for Health’s website showing that young people are not signing up at the percentages necessary to finance this health care scam engineered by Obama, Udall, and the rest of the Democrats in power. Most notably, nearly 50 percent of enrollees are over the age of 45.

Colorado stats

Ahem, “45 states still haven’t hit 10 percent of enrollment goals for Obamacare”:

We can skip the scoffing over Oregon and Washington exchanges, as their ludicrously embarrassing failures have been extensively discussed. Oregon’s at 44, with a state goal of 237,000; Washington’s at 17,780… with a goal of 340,000.

Illinois, the president’s home state! Surely they’re ahead of the curve in getting folks enrolled and paid, right? They’re at 7,043… out of a goal of 143,000.

Even Kentucky, often cited as one of Obamacare’s shining success stories, is at 20,951… about 10 percent of the way to their goal of 220,000 enrolled.

All of those “M” states with their own state exchanges, ambitious Democratic governors and deep blue state legislatures — surely, they must be enrolling at a better pace, right?

Eh, not really. Maryland’s at 3,758, with the goal of 150,000 far from sight.

Massachusetts is at 1,700, even further from their state goal of 250,000 paid enrollees.

Minnesota has hit 4,478… out of a goal of 67,000. Still trying to hit 10 percent.

Note all of the above states have Democratic governors. The Obamacare fan’s usual dodge or whine that the rollout is impeded by uncooperative Republican governors does not apply in any of those states; the difficulties in these states indicate that the problems with the program do not stem from insufficient enthusiasm from GOP lawmakers.