I get that some people look at non-traditional ways to inter their loved ones after death and how we remember the deceased is a very personal decision. There has long been a debate between those who choose cremation and families who choose a more traditional burial. Those with enough financial resources can even have their ashes shot into space. But the latest news just sounds a bit creepy to me. Would you like to turn your departed relative into a diamond ring?

It may sound a bit dark, but it’s now possible to transform the ashes of the cremated deceased into a diamond–a jewel truly to remember.

Using “Russian technology,” Algordanza Memorial Diamonds are created in a similar fashion to the way natural diamonds are formed.

Here’s how it works: a diamond is composed of pressurized carbons. Conveniently enough, human bodies are about 18 percent carbon. Using about a pound of ashes, the firm is able to distill out the carbon and use it to form a man-made diamond in a mold under high pressure in about a week. The diamonds created this way are often blue because of certain chemicals in the human body.

Algordanza, headquartered in Switzerland, offers a variety of diamond sizes and cuts that can be placed on a ring or other jewelry pieces. Prices run higher than conventional diamonds, starting from about $3,000 depending on the size and cut.

Maybe I’m overreacting here and this could turn out to be popular? After all, some who have their loved ones cremated keep the ashes in their homes in decorative urns. It’s not as if everyone feels that they body absolutely has to be buried in the ground. But the idea of jamming the remains into a separator to filter out the carbon and then smash them under sufficient pressure to morph their molecular structure into a rock just sounds a little … creepy.

How about it? Would you want to take your spouse or parent or child and convert them to a ring or broach? Would people really wear this type of jewelry to a party and engage the attendees with tales of the dearly departed? Maybe it’s just me, but I’d be trying to wriggle out of that conversation pretty quickly.