Nelson Mandela, 1918-2013

posted at 7:51 pm on December 5, 2013 by Mary Katharine Ham

“Our nation has lost its greatest son,” [South African] President Jacob Zuma said in a televised address on Thursday night, adding that Mr. Mandela had died at 8:50 p.m. local time. “His humility, his compassion and his humanity earned him our love.”

The Internet is awash with remembrances of Mandela from people who never knew him. Some will be self-important and tiresome, but most are just the honest, gut feelings of millions—each a testament to the reach of this towering, touching figure of the 20th century. I never knew him, but I knew the power of his inspiration and his example. As a kid, attending majority-black schools in North Carolina less than a generation removed from segregation, my classmates and I knew we were there, together, because of the bravery and leadership of good people who came before us. It was a hard thing to grasp at 7 (likely easier for my black classmates), vague at first. We played hopscotch under the arc of the moral universe, rarely looking skyward to see where it was bending. But there were moments when, in our innocence, we could feel the weight of what happened before we were born— a trip to Woolworth’s in Greensboro just minutes away or the release of Nelson Mandela on the other side of the world.

Greater awareness and hormones intervened, turning middle school into a place of racial tension where old friendships were taboo and anger reigned. Mandela’s example of a man supremely wronged who did not let bitterness overtake him seemed amazing, otherworldly. I’ll always be thankful he was the leader who rose while a bunch of confused teenagers in North Carolina were hurting from wounds old and new. Mandela’s life and death, of course, are not about me or my experiences. But the enormity of what Mandela did gave so many the opportunity to discover the beautiful joys and challenges we experienced alongside all God’s children. And, he gave my friends and me an idea of the giant people and giant sacrifices required to allow us to live in a neighborhood where “little black boys and girls” literally, routinely held hands with “little white boys and girls.” It was a gift and it wasn’t always a given. But it’s easy to take for granted what seems impossible after it’s already been done.

The New York Times makes one succinct paragraph of what’s one of the most improbable turn-arounds in history:

Mr. Mandela spent 27 years in prison after being convicted of treason by the white minority government, only to forge a peaceful end to white rule by negotiating with his captors after his release in 1990. He led the African National Congress, long a banned liberation movement, to a resounding electoral victory in 1994, the first fully democratic election in the country’s history.

It’s hard not to look back at moments like that, like the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War II, the Cold War and marvel at how lucky we are to have had the right leaders in the right places to make things happen. And to marvel at the sheer force of will and skill it took to make them happen. The Washington Post has an interesting read on Mandela, the political animal behind the saintly figure. He needed the soft-spoken, forgiving side and the savvy, harder political side to change his country:

Admirable as they were, those saintly virtues don’t begin to explain his political genius. Mandela was also cunning, iron-willed, bull-headed, contemptuous — and more embittered than he let on. He needed all of his traits — soft and hard — to engineer a political miracle: persuading a sitting government to negotiate its own abdication by yielding power to the very people it had ruthlessly oppressed.

Historic transfers of that magnitude typically occur only at gunpoint. To pull it off peacefully, Mandela knew that he had to tame the racial fears and hatreds that have haunted beautiful South Africa since the first whites settled there four centuries ago. He needed to teach militant blacks that they couldn’t take revenge and frightened whites that they shouldn’t fear retribution.

Mandela didn’t do all that by himself. On both sides of the racial divide, he had the help of legions of sophisticated negotiators determined to find a peaceful path to democracy. His main partner, President Frederik W. de Klerk, was a shrewd Afrikaner who had the foresight to understand that the grotesque apartheid system he once championed was destroying his country, and he had the fortitude to stick with his surrender-without-a-fight strategy through four arduous years of start-and-stop negotiations, even as the deal grew less attractive for the white minority that had put him in power.

Read the whole thing if you have the time. Mandela is not just the man with the halo, and he couldn’t have done what he did if he were.

Mandela’s most famous quotes.

Mandela’s life in pictures.

Thoughts and prayers for his family and his countrymen.

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The existence of a footnote does not actually mean the claim is accurate, footnotes are there for the purpose of people verifying the information. Now, as to Sowell’s book I have not read it. But if he makes the claim that black people did not experience housing and employment discrimination in the North before the Great Migration then I know I don’t have to read it. Because I have read dozens of books which prove that claim 100% false.

No one is saying there was no discrimination prior to the northward immigration. Ever seen “NO IRISH NEED APPLY” signs? But there were also integrated schools, neighborhoods, businesses, factories, etc. Sowell documents this with demographic data. So long as you’re constantly curled up in your little liberal cubbyhole you will continue to come off like a dope. For you to eschew exposure to black intellectuals is odd. Maybe not…

I can cite examples and texts that examine the history of race relations from Portland to Maine. Were there free black towns in the North, and west in particular, of course there were. Did all of the founders of free black towns cite the impossibility of upward advancement in the so-called “free states” as the reason they broke out to form their own towns, absolutely.

Everyone who moved west did so to improve their lives, for any number of reasons. To say that blacks did so only because of “racism” is laughable. And to imply that blacks lived only in such towns is a lie.

If the test is whether I have read Sowell, I have a whole bibliography you need to check out. libfreeordie on December 6, 2013 at 10:12 AM

I see the fruit of your bibliography on a daily basis whenever I watch the news, read a newspaper, analyze 0b00ba…

Akzed on December 6, 2013 at 10:18 AM

History can not be denied. The American right wing opposed the end of apartheid. The receipts are there for the world to see. As are the people on this board denigrating Mandela and freedom fighters who, when no other means was available, used violence to fight for their civil rights. For some lovers of the Founding Fathers, only white men can take up arms for their liberty. Conservatives need to ask themselves why white supremacists like Murphy 9 et al are part of your coalition.

libfreeordie on December 6, 2013 at 9:10 AM

Are people opposed to violence against an apartheid state or militant elements within the movement that attacked civilians and did things that would be considered war crimes? There were also a lot of communist elements within the movement. They could have chosen to take the path that Mugabe took when they came in to power and Mandel steered them away from that and for that he deserves praise. He wasn’t a saint – and didn’t pretend to be – but whenever white historical figures are brought up (like say Columbus) we hear an unending stream of vitriol, hatred and misinformation from lefties.

Why is a supposed white supremacist part of “my” coalition? So now we get to take individuals and make broader assumptions about “coalitions”. Great – I look forward to your defending all the execrable things individual liberals have said and done. What is it about the progressive coalition that attracts so many fascists?

gwelf on December 6, 2013 at 10:20 AM

What term should we use for people who only celebrate armed struggle in the name of freedom when it’s organized by white men?

libfreeordie on December 6, 2013 at 9:16 AM

There’s no way to prove there are such people. You simply assert:

For some lovers of the Founding Fathers, only white men can take up arms for their liberty.

libfreeordie on December 6, 2013 at 9:10 AM

All your question shows is the depths of your prejudiced, stereotyped thinking. Making baseless claims and insisting others prove them wrong is easy. Real dialog, and engagement with others, is difficult. You take the easy way.

Paul-Cincy on December 6, 2013 at 10:20 AM

God, what an ugly, ignorant, blinkered piece of sh*t you are.

lostmotherland on December 6, 2013 at 8:25 AM

And what an ugly, ignorant, RACIST, ideological piece of shit YOU are, lostmommahumper.

Solaratov on December 6, 2013 at 10:20 AM

History can not be denied. The American right wing opposed the end of apartheid. libfreeordie on December 6, 2013 at 9:10 AM

Akzed on December 6, 2013 at 10:30 AM

History can not be denied. The American right wing opposed the end of apartheid. libfreeordie on December 6, 2013 at 9:10 AM

Akzed on December 6, 2013 at 10:32 AM

I weep for their loss of privilege, truly.

libfreeordie on December 6, 2013 at 9:34 AM

This from a flaming queen who enjoys more privilege than most people…thanks to affirmative action and a permanent ‘victim’ status.

Solaratov on December 6, 2013 at 10:32 AM

LFOD’s heroes: Report: Al-Qaeda In Syria Executes Journalist…

After all, they’re “freedom fighters,” so they get carte blanche.

Akzed on December 6, 2013 at 10:36 AM

gryphon202 on December 6, 2013 at 8:08 AM

So you are saying he wasn’t communist. I don’t get your point.

Oil Can on December 6, 2013 at 10:37 AM

Mandela was NOT a saint. True he came out of prison a different man or appeared to be but South Africa was forever changed and in many instances not for the better.
GOD will judge him but for anyone to suggest he was so saintly figure really needs to go back and re read history. Communists were working very hard in South Africa. How are the poor doing today?

Obama is not a Mandela at least not the Mandela post prison.
Obama is at a minimum a socialist and a divider. He is wolf in the proverbial sheep’s clothing. Obama is anti Democracy and anti Constitution. He has no moral compass and his soul is black.

At least, in the end, Mandela saw the evil in his wife and the people in the movement he helped to charter.

May he rest.

Delsa on December 6, 2013 at 10:40 AM

History can not be denied. The American right wing opposed the end of apartheid. libfreeordie on December 6, 2013 at 9:10 AM

You are damn right it was opposed but not for the reasons you think. Treating people of different color equally is and was one thing, but turning white landowners out of their homes, off their land and farms, and handing the property over to people who didn’t have a clue, simply because they were not white, is not how equality is achieved.

I remember those days. Although I was young I paid attention. Today the stories you hear and read about in school just talks about how bad whites were to blacks. Prior to Mandela and his criminal wife, blacks had jobs…Under our great leader Obama blacks are OUT OF WORK and OUT OF LUCK

Delsa on December 6, 2013 at 10:51 AM

0b00ba’s tribute to Mandela.

Suitable for framing.

Akzed on December 6, 2013 at 11:08 AM

libfreeordie, why are you asking us to embrace communism? It ruins the quality of life for all that are forced to live under it.

Why have you allowed yourself to be brainwashed?

blink on December 6, 2013 at 10:05 AM

“The Bell Curve”

Solaratov on December 6, 2013 at 11:09 AM

Read it and weep, MK.

Mandela was a racist, a terrorist, and a Marxist. His adoring fans around the world include self-loathing white-guilt dopes who excuse his Marxist legacy as the well-deserved hatred of a white minority government. South Africa is now a cess pool of crime and murder.

Apartheid had to end; it was an untenable, racist government structure. Mandela has replaced it with another untenable, racist government structure. Meet the new boss — same as the old boss, but stupider.

Jaibones on December 5, 2013 at 11:38 PM

Absolutely CORRECT!!

Delsa on December 6, 2013 at 11:34 AM

What Hath Mandela Wrought?….Well – he wrought This…..

…..and THIS!!…

williamg on December 5, 2013 at 10:32 PM

Centuries of white imperialism, colonialism and racist oppression wrought that.

Sojobo on December 6, 2013 at 11:43 AM

Gotta laugh at trolls. Hey, man, how did you mark the passing of the Great Mandela? You know, dude, like I totally trolled this website, for starters…it was totes epic, bruh!

Christien on December 6, 2013 at 11:49 AM

Gotta laugh at trolls. Hey, man, how did you mark the passing of the Great Mandela? You know, dude, like I totally trolled this website, for starters…it was totes epic, bruh!

Christien on December 6, 2013 at 11:49 AM

Careful! Pasting facts about Mandela will get you labeled a white supremacist…by the black feeblist.

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 11:54 AM

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 11:54 AM

Let ‘em. Whatever gets them through the night.

Christien on December 6, 2013 at 12:07 PM

Reagan, blah, blah, blah…Today, Republicans will cheer on Mandela, but the Republican Party’s historical relationship with South Africa, and Mandela in particular, exposes a sad chapter in the history of the American right.

lostmotherland on December 6, 2013 at 8:54 AM

The ANC was designated as a terrorist group, but there was no ‘Terrorist Watch List, by the United States in 1961…by Democrat John F Kennedy.

The African National Congress, WHICH WAS A TERRORIST GROUP AND COMMITTED MANY ACTS OF TERROR AND CRIME – AS NELSON MANDELA REPEATEDLY ADMITTED. The ANC was strongly associated with the Soviet Union and openly COMMUNIST. This was during the Cold War and the West was attempting to stop Communism and the spread of the Soviet Union’s sphere of influence.

According to John Kerry, in the 1970s, the U.S. government placed the members and representatives of the ANC, including its leaders like Mandela, Walter Sisulu, and Govan Mbeki – the father of South African President Thabo Mbeki – on the U.S. Terrorist Watch List.

A full-page advertisement appeared in the January 28, 1987 issue of the Washington Times with a picture of Oliver Tambo, leader of the South African Marxist terrorist group known as the African National Congress (ANC), standing next to Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Next to it was a composite photograph of Tambo standing next to U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz. The headlines of the ad, which was sponsored by a coalition of conservative groups, asked: “Which Bothers You More?”

The purpose of the demonstration and the full-page advertisement was to protest against the profoundly significant meeting — held that same day — between George Shultz and Oliver Tambo. Many political observers regarded this meeting as an official Reagan Administration stamp of approval on a Communist terrorist group that not only has the blood of thousands of innocent human beings on its hands but is also bent on violently overthrowing a government friendly to the United States.

It was bad enough that the U.S. Secretary of State would take the unprecedented step of meeting with the leader of a terrorist organization that seeks the overthrow of a legitimate government. Even worse, the Shultz-Tambo meeting exceeded the exchange of official viewpoints and represented an astonishing “meeting of minds” between the two men. This startling fact came to light in the form of a revelation by Oliver Tambo himself.

On January 28, 1987, the same day as the meeting, Tambo made a guest appearance on the television program Nightline. The very first question Ted Koppel asked his guest was: “Dr. Tambo, I get the impression that you said what you were ready to say to Secretary Shultz, and Secretary Shultz said what he was ready to say to you. But in terms of a meeting of minds, that really didn’t happen today, did it?”

Tambo’s response surprised even Ted Koppel: “Well, to some extent it did.” The ANC leader went on to explain that the government of the United States and the Marxist-oriented African National Congress share a common objective or goal for South Africa!

This revelation is of profound significance, for the ANC’s objective for South Africa was long ago spelled out in detail in a document known as the Freedom Charter. This document, written and prepared for the ANC by the South African Communist Party, calls for the confiscation of private property and the establishment of a Soviet-style dictatorship of the proletariat. Tambo himself admitted on July 30, 1986, some six months prior to the meeting with Shultz: “The ANC and the SA Communist Party have common objectives….”

Mandela’s record was cleared in 2008…by Republican George W Bush. Bush signed the bill in time for the Nobel Peace Prize winner’s 90th birthday on 18 July 2008.

Resist We Much on December 6, 2013 at 12:19 PM

The ANC was strongly associated with the Soviet Union and openly COMMUNIST.

Resist We Much on December 6, 2013 at 12:19 PM

and that’s as good a reason as any to support terroristic White Rule

Sojobo on December 6, 2013 at 12:40 PM

and that’s as good a reason as any to support terroristic White Rule

Sojobo on December 6, 2013 at 12:40 PM

Absolutely not, but the ANC wasn’t exactly a group that should have been emulated or supported at that time.

New York Times: Party Led By Mandela Now Owns Up To Atrocities

13 May 1997

South Africa’s governing party admitted today that it used torture, executions, and land mines during its fight against apartheid, opening a new chapter in this country’s efforts to come to terms with its past.

Senior officials of the African National Congress also said they could have done far more to stop the gruesome practice in the black townships of ”necklacing” people suspected of cooperating with the South African security forces. Such people were pinned inside a car tire, doused in gasoline, set on fire and left to die.

Party officials had long resisted appearing before the commission, saying their actions were excusable because they had been fighting a ”just war.” Today’s testimony before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission represented a major step toward holding the winners in the struggle against the white apartheid Government accountable for their share of atrocities.

The testimony came after more than 300 members of the Congress, including most Cabinet ministers and Deputy President Thabo Mbeki, who has been designated by the Congress to succeed Nelson Mandela as President, submitted amnesty applications in time to meet a Saturday midnight deadline.

Last year Archbishop Tutu told President Mandela that he would resign unless A.N.C. members recognized that they had committed gross violations of human rights and needed to apply for amnesty.

The Congress appeared before the commission last August, but at that time it made only a formal written submission. This time, the party also submitted another 139 pages of written testimony before answering questions. The testimony includes 33 pages of responses and requests for elaboration by the Truth Commission, including more details on deaths at the Congress’s bases in Angola, the use of land mines in border areas and details about 15 Congress members who were executed for spying and mutiny.

In submitting testimony to the commission, the Congress said it would take responsibility for 500 bombings over 11 years, and perhaps for another 95, but it could not be sure of the precise number.

I will never defend South Africa’s Apartheid state or the atrocities committed by the white government, but I also will not canonise Nelson Mandela. He was a great, but not perfect, man. We must keep history in context. Reagan didn’t support the Apartheid state because he preferred white rule. He was against the ANC because it was strongly-aligned with the Soviet Union. Preventing the spread of communism, especially in Africa, was of manifest importance to the West in the 1970s and 1980s.

Mandela had every reason to be an angry man before, during, and after his imprisonment. He chose reconciliation and to abandon violence, anger, and resentment. He easily could have become another Mugabe and destroyed his country with racial violence and ‘black empowerment’ economic schemes. He didn’t. For all of that, he should be enormously commended.

Resist We Much on December 6, 2013 at 12:45 PM

Centuries of white imperialism, colonialism and racist oppression wrought that.

Sojobo on December 6, 2013 at 11:43 AM

Homogeneously black Africa fared so much better with its boundless liberty and prosperity and peace.

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 12:53 PM

Homogeneously black Africa fared so much better with its boundless liberty and prosperity and peace.

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 12:53 PM

Doesn’t take much to stir up the angry white supremacist loser in you

Sojobo on December 6, 2013 at 1:00 PM

That would be news to all my black relatives.

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 1:06 PM

That would be news to all my black relatives.

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 1:06 PM

It wouldn’t be

Sojobo on December 6, 2013 at 1:16 PM

From Babalú:

Good-bye Nelson Mandela. Gone is Fidel’s greatest admirer.

by Carlos Eire

Mandela’s sainthood falls short of universal acclaim, especially among Cubans. While he dedicated himself to a noble and righteous cause – ending discrimination against black Africans in South Africa – Mandela was not at all opposed to employing violence as a means for his cause. Worse than that, he expressed nothing but admiration for Fidel Castro and his noxiously racist tyranny, and never stopped singing Fidel’s praises.

Fidel used Mandela and all of Africa in a deeply Machiavellian sense: insincerely, as a means of eliciting love and admiration, not because of any ethical principles. Siding with downtrodden Africans made Fidel beloved by the oppressed everywhere and by the liberals and eggheads who control the Western news media and the academic village that produces all journalists. Opposing apartheid in South Africa was a noble cause back in the 70′s and 80′s, perhaps the noblest cause of all in the entire West.

The cause became so noble that the Western World as a whole enforced an embargo on South Africa and forced its leaders to abandon apartheid.

Meanwhile, back in Castrogonia [Cuba], Fidel and his henchmen were neck-deep in racist crimes worse than those in South Africa, controlling a nation through a more insidious sort of apartheid than that of South Africa.

Those who venerated Mandela back then and venerate him still ignore the fact that Mandela never spoke out for an end to apartheid in Castrogonia, or, even worse, that he kept praising Castrogonia until today, his dying day.

And we are a long way from the day when any mainstream media news outlet will focus on those brave Cubans – many of them of African descent – who struggle even more valiantly, and more peacefully than Mandela ever did, to end the racist totalitarian apartheid regime in Castrogonia, which is nothing more than a giant slave plantation.

Nelson Mandela is one of those “icons” of political correctness that make all Cubans writhe in exquisite pain. To us, he is worse than a monstrous kidney stone. He is an icon of our vivisection: a representative of the double standard that so-called intellectuals and self-righteous employ in their approach to repression and human rights.

Mandela is the scalpel with which we are cut open while still alive, without anesthesia, the saw applied to our bones as our limbs are severed. He is the acid splashed in our eyes, the molten lead poured down our throats.

Mandela opposed a regime that was actually more benign than that of the Castro dynasty and he became the poster boy for a “righteous” boycott/embargo of South Africa. That embargo brought down the system he opposed. Yet, the very same people who hail Mandela as a saint and who backed that embargo often – if not always– fail to denounce his support for the apartheid in Castrogonia or his unending praise of the Castro dynasty. Worse than that, these very same people tend to argue that the embargo against Castrogonia is immoral.

INC on December 6, 2013 at 1:20 PM

Sojobo, can you back up your accusation? All I have done is post information that challenges the conventional wisdom that Mandela was a saint. Thats.it.

But you and the sodomite want to paint me as a racist.

That’s pretty queer.

Too bad you staked your integrity and credibility on such flimsy stuff. :(

have good day

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 1:20 PM

But you and the sodomite want to paint me as a racist.

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 1:20 PM

Why so concerned you might be ‘painted’ as a racist tom Murphy?

That’s pretty odd.

Sojobo on December 6, 2013 at 1:24 PM

its cool darkcharlesintightsjobo.

I like toe socks myself. Seems like your stupid baseless accusation fell flat.

peace!

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 1:26 PM

its cool darkcharlesintightsjobo.

I like toe socks myself. Seems like your stupid baseless accusation fell flat.

peace!

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 1:26 PM

You’ll have to scurry faster reprobate rat

Sojobo on December 6, 2013 at 1:32 PM

Mandela’s record was cleared in 2008…by Republican George W Bush. Bush signed the bill in time for the Nobel Peace Prize winner’s 90th birthday on 18 July 2008.

Resist We Much on December 6, 2013 at 12:11 PM

Yea, some folks eventually came around.

But I think Dick Cheney’s still gritting his teeth over all of it.

verbaluce on December 6, 2013 at 12:39 PM

You know, it’s weird. Bill Clinton was President for 8 years and he never ‘came around.’ He never cleared Nelson Mandela’s record.

Of course, you shouldn’t really be surprised. You see, in the Democratic Party, you can be a Southern Governor like Billy Jeff and never take one act in your 12 years to remove the confederate flag from your capitol and sign Act 985 making the birthdays of Martin Luther King, Jr, the preeminent leader of the civil-rights movement, and Robert E Lee, the general who led the Confederate army, a state holiday – TO BE OBSERVED ON THE SAME DAY – AND STILL GET ELECTED President of the United States of America.

Yes, you can!

Then, as POTUS, you can award the Presidential Medal of Freedom to a staunch segregationist like William J Fullbright.

Yes, you can!

And, you can do all of this and STILL be the putative first black President of the United States of America.

Yes, you can!

Why? Because in the Democratic Party, the Bobby Byrds never cooooommmmmme hoooooommmmme tooooooooo rooooooooossssttttt!

Of course, if you are a Republican, don’t try this at home. ‘Cuz, if you do, that would make you a RAAAAAAAAAAAAACIST!

Resist We Much on December 6, 2013 at 1:41 PM

C.I.A. TIE REPORTED IN MANDELA ARREST

By DAVID JOHNSTON, Special to The New York Times
Published: June 10, 1990
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The Central Intelligence Agency played an important role in the arrest in 1962 of Nelson Mandela, the African National Congress leader who was jailed for nearly 28 years before his release four months ago, a news report says.

The intelligence service, using an agent inside the African National Congress, provided South African security officials with precise information about Mr. Mandela’s activities that enabled the police to arrest him, said the account by the Cox News Service.

The report, scheduled for publication on Sunday, quoted an unidentified retired official who said that a senior C.I.A. officer told him shortly after Mr. Mandela’s arrest: ”We have turned Mandela over to the South African Security branch. We gave them every detail, what he would be wearing, the time of day, just where he would be.”

Mark Mansfield, a spokesman for the agency, declined to comment on the news-service report. ”As a matter of policy, we do not discuss allegations of intelligence activities,” he said.

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 1:44 PM

John Pilger – Apartheid Did Not Die [1998]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRlh2nUWrzs

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 1:47 PM

Learn your history. For the American right, those who fought for decolonization or against jim crow at home used “Communist” to smear activists even when they were anything but. MLK was called a communist by opponents of integration in the North and South. It’s a tactic for deligitimizing anti-racist causes.

libfreeordie on December 6, 2013 at 9:29 AM

I have done some digging for you. Sometimes hard to find because its not what people want to believe. I am searching for Mandela’s manifesto that I came across a while back. Praise for Lenin, Marx and all the rest. If I find it and can verify it, I will post it. In the meantime, please see the link. Maybe you will learn something.
http://www.rhodesia.nl/goodcom.html

Strike Twice on December 6, 2013 at 1:52 PM

Getting Mandela Wrong: When A Conservative Juiceboxer Attacks.

http://drewmusings.wordpress.com/2013/12/06/getting-mandella-wrong-when-conservative-juiceboxers-attack/

It’s hard to imagine that one could write a piece attacking others for leaving out important details of Mandela’s story while omitting the word “apartheid” in one’s own story.

Swindell includes a video of Mandela singing the ANC anthem which has lyrics that speak of killing white oppressors. Inconveniently, though plan for all to see, is that there are whites with Mandela singing the same words. It’s clear that the song has a specific cultural and political meaning in that context that Swindell either doesn’t understand or simply ignores.

This leads to the most glaring omission in Swindell’s telling of the story…if Nelson Mandela really wanted whites dead he could have had them killed by the tens, if not hundreds, of thousands. If Mandela really was simply a communist thug he would have done what communist thugs have done from day one…have their enemies rounded up and killed. He would have used the anger of his followers (in this case perfectly legitimate) and divided the country to rule unchecked by fear and force.

Like countless post-colonial African despots, Mandela could have bought off his supporters by stealing the resources of those he replaced to enrich himself and his followers. He could have done what almost all men who have nearly unlimited political power have done with it…kept it and ruthlessly used it.

But he didn’t.

In the end the story of Mandela is that he wasn’t like almost all men. He wasn’t perfect and he wasn’t without sin (almost no one in South Africa was). However, he changed and grew. When he lacked the power to change his country he used violent means to attempt to get it. But once he had the power, he eschewed violence. That is not the typical tale of history. He did not crush those who had crushed him and his people. Instead he recognized that no one would benefit from that and more to the point, it was morally reprehensible to him to do so.

Mandela was a complex and imperfect man but when he faced the choice of violence on an awesome scale, a violence he could have turned lose with a single sentence, he said no. He used the moral authority that had been invested in him not simply to sweep away a racist regime but also to control his former comrades, including his own wife, who wanted to change South Africa with blood.

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 1:57 PM

Learn your history. For the American right, those who fought for decolonization or against jim crow at home used “Communist” to smear activists even when they were anything but.

Read the Venona Papers and go to the Soviet archives. Yes, Virginia, Alger Hiss was a Communist spy for the Soviet Union and the Rosenbergs WERE guilty, as their accomplice, Morton Sobell, admitted before he died in 2008.

MLK was called a communist by opponents of integration in the North and South. It’s a tactic for deligitimizing anti-racist causes.

libfreeordie on December 6, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Who knew that Jack and Bobby Kennedy were opposed to integration in the North and South and called MLK a ‘Communist’ to delegitimise him???

Resist We Much on December 6, 2013 at 1:58 PM

I agree, Atty Gen Bobby Kennedy was pretty racist.
whatcat on December 6, 2013 at 9:44 AM

Well since the federal government is inherently anti-black duh. But why are you insistent that the Republican Party was somehow better?
libfreeordie on December 6, 2013 at 9:48 AM

It wasn’t the Republicans who sicced the FBI on MLK for communist leanings, that was all Democrats. The Dems had to be dragged kicking and screaming to accept civil rights:

“June 10, 1964: Democrats filibustered the Civil Rights Act
On this day in 1964, Everett Dirksen (R-IL), the Republican Leader in the U.S. Senate, condemned the Democrats’ 57-day filibuster against the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Leading the Democrats in their opposition to civil rights for African-Americans was Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV). Byrd, who got into politics as a recruiter for the Ku Klux Klan, spoke against the bill for fourteen straight hours. Democrats still call Robert Byrd “the conscience of the Senate.”
In his speech, Senator Dirksen called on the Democrats to end their filibuster and accept racial equality.”
Michael Zak wrote about this in his book Back to Basics for the Republican Party and reminds us that Democrats, the party of Slavery, Secession, Segregation and the KKK… fought against equality.

whatcat on December 6, 2013 at 2:38 PM

Murphy9 on December 6, 2013 at 1:44 PM

“Other than that, what did you think of the play, Mrs.Lincoln?”

whatcat on December 6, 2013 at 2:43 PM

Mandela? Mandela who?

csdeven on December 6, 2013 at 2:54 PM

Mandela’s Complicated Legacy Difficult to Celebrate for Cuban Exiles

Outside of South Africa, however, Mandela lent his name to a tyrant running his own kind of apartheid system, and the victims and families of Cuban exiles have a duty to their loved ones to speak up before the uncritical eye of the international media.

An avid supporter of Fidel Castro, Mandela visited Havana in 1991 and praised the Cuban Revolution as “a source of inspiration to all freedom-loving people.” Castro responded with praise in kind, as did state-sponsored media for decades to come. “South African and Cuba treasure an inextricable nexus of brotherhood,” gushed the Castro regime’s personal propaganda outlet Granma, “symbolized in the ties of friendship that unite the two exceptional figures in the histories of both nations: Nelson Mandela y Fidel Castro.”

Much is made about the fact that Mandela felt a kinship with Castro over his decision to send up to 10,000 young Cubans to their deaths in Angola. Mandela himself said that few countries could “point to a greater record of selflessness” when describing this purge of Cuban youth. But Mandela did not stop at saying positive things about the regime. He insisted on telling its victims that he was choosing to ignore them.

“Who are they to call for the observance of human rights in Cuba?” he said on his visit there in 1991. “Who are they to teach us about human rights?”

They are the millions, like me, who come from families exiled from their countries because of their beliefs. They are the political prisoners rotting in jail because they believe in social equality, free markets, a solid constitution—the things Mandela gave his people but so callously denied mine. Prisoners who died in captivity, spending even more time there than Mandela himself for opposing Castro’s radical pivot to communism, which he promised his early supporters he would never turn to; prisoners who personally pleaded for Mandela to speak up for them, to fight with them for freedom.

He may have fought for the freedom of oppressed South Africans, but he did not fight for the freedom or equality of my people; instead he actively supported their oppression. By visiting Fidel Castro and praising the revolution, Mandela lent his grand name and hard-earned reputation to the cause of a brutal mass murderer who imprisoned thousands for their politics, forced one million to flee their tiny homeland for the same, and continues to oppress people who have been torn apart family by family, barely recognizing each other across a 90-mile gap.

It is difficult to mourn Mandela uncritically when his answer to the firing squads, the purges, the labor camps both my grandparents spent three years working under to flee to Spain was, essentially, “Who are you for me to care?” If Mandela himself so demonstratively refused to care about the plight of those who are my blood, perhaps he would understand why it takes a Herculean effort to care about his.

INC on December 6, 2013 at 3:08 PM

Nelson Mandela’s perverse misconception of “reconciliation” helped germinate today’s modern age of terrorism. Mandela lobbied tirelessly for “compassionate” release of the Lockerbie bomber who slaughter 270 innocents (189 Americans).

Megrahi is all alone,” Mandela told a packed press conference in the prison’s visitors’ room.He has nobody he can talk to. It is a psychological persecution that a man must stay for the length of his long sentence all alone.”

Clipper Maid of the Seas

blood brothers

Terp Mole on December 9, 2013 at 5:12 PM

Guess who won’t be attending Mandela’s memorial?

Amy Elizabeth Biehl (April 26, 1967 – August 25, 1993) was a white American graduate of Stanford University and an Anti-Apartheid activist in South Africa who was murdered by black Cape Town residents while a black mob shouted racial slurs. The four men convicted of her murder were released as part of Mandela’s obscenely mislabelled “Truth and Reconciliation” process.

“Supporters of the three men accused of murdering [her] … burst out laughing in the public gallery of the Supreme Court today when a witness told how the battered woman groaned in pain.”

Supporters of the three men accused of murdering [her] … burst out laughing in the public gallery of the Supreme Court today when a witness told how the battered woman groaned in pain.

Knockout Game Intn’l

Terp Mole on December 9, 2013 at 5:38 PM

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