50 years ago: The JFK assassination

posted at 8:41 am on November 22, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, cut down in Dallas in the third year of his term by Lee Harvey Oswald, who like so many other political assassins in history was nothing more than a failed crank, of the communist variety in this case.  Media organizations will offer retrospectives all day long, with replays of their live coverage beginning this afternoon.  This is the relevant part of the CBS News record, in which Walter Cronkite informs the nation (based on confirmation from Dan Rather at the scene) that the President was indeed dead:

To call this a seminal event in American history is a rather large understatement.  The assassination started a turbulent decade of protests and worse, more assassinations — Martin Luther King and Kennedy’s brother Robert among them — and the expansion of what would then be America’s longest war, and its most divisive in a hundred years. One could fill a library of books about the assassination itself, and fill Alcratraz several times over with purported conspirators and ringleaders who supposedly masterminded it.  We could fill another library with books about how the event changed America, mostly for the worse, and what it means today.

I don’t have any recollection of the assassination myself; I was only seven months old when it took place.  I can still understand what people mean when they say that they can always remember exactly where they were when they heard the news.  I have the same connection to the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan 18 years later, which fortunately turned out better for him and for America.  And of course, all of us have that shared sense of memory about 9/11.

Even though I don’t have that connection to today’s event, it is still well worth noting for its cultural and political impact.  Looking at the recollections and the 50-year-old coverage is like looking through a hazy and monochromatic telescope to an America that passed from the scene with the President, if it really existed at all. I’ll miss that coverage as I’ll be doing a show today, but most of it is on YouTube now, and I may watch it this weekend when I have more time.

What do you recall about the assassination? And what do you think it means, 50 years later?

Update: My old friend (and first paying editor!) Ira Stoll has a new book on the subject: JFK, Conservative. Be sure to check it out, on Kindle or audiobook as well.

Update: John Ziegler has an excellent essay on the coverage of the assassination — why it was so good, and what we can learn from it.


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Hillary Clinton was named after JFK in his honor, and Dog Eater will find a way to commemorate this anniversary by mentioning himself 300 times.

Bishop on November 22, 2013 at 8:47 AM

I remember it. In a trunk are the newspapers from that week. Right or left the whole country was in shock. That aside the whole Kennedy in Wonderland narrative the press makes of JFK makes me puke. Inept is about the kindest opinion I have of the man.

Limerick on November 22, 2013 at 8:48 AM

Let’s see:
John Wilkes Boothe was a Democrat.
Leon Czolgosz was an anarchist.
Lee Harvey Oswald was a communist.
Guiteau was simply insane.

Upshot: The Left has always been at war with our Republic. And right now they are in control of the White House and the Senate.

rbj on November 22, 2013 at 8:48 AM

But yeah, Oswald was a stone-cold commie and you lefties can obfuscate all you want, it’s still the truth that one of yours offed a sitting preznit.

Bishop on November 22, 2013 at 8:49 AM

Born in ’68….2 weeks after MLK was assassinated

Only know what I’ve seen on TV

cmsinaz on November 22, 2013 at 8:53 AM

I vivdly remember the day.. in my 4th Grade Class Rolling Fields Elementary School Kettering Ohio, when the principle walked in to say the President had been assassinated

If only we’d live to: “My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.”

We have moved so far from that in just two generations.. sad

theblacksheepwasright on November 22, 2013 at 8:54 AM

I was in my sophomore year of high school, sitting in my English class. We were told of the shooting around 11:15am (our time on the west coast).

The whole Camelot fairy tale continued until the wheels started coming off with Splash. In subsequent years there were other Kennedy family shenanigans that also took some luster off the name.

Today the Democrats will once again try to burnish the image. They may even manage to keep from tripping over their own hypocrisy.

GarandFan on November 22, 2013 at 8:56 AM

I have no interest in participating in the Left’s celebration of their successful assassination of our last Conservative Democrat President.

Dusty on November 22, 2013 at 9:02 AM

I will be so relieved when this is all behind us…

OmahaConservative on November 22, 2013 at 9:04 AM

All I can say is, “SUCK IT Right Wing Death Beasts! YOU killed JFK, you and the Bush Crime Family, and the Mafia, and the FBI and the CIA and LBJ and 4-8 men with rifles, all around the motorcade” I hope you are proud of your MURDER.

JFKY on November 22, 2013 at 9:04 AM

What I find amazing about this man is that his rhetoric
today would be considered “right wing”

ToddPA on November 22, 2013 at 9:07 AM

Breaking: The assassoversy of this mediocre president is boring.

kcewa on November 22, 2013 at 9:08 AM

What do you recall about the assassination? And what do you think it means, 50 years later?

Ok, this is going to cause some vile hatred from some directed towards me, but it’s the truth.

I can answer both questions in one word.

Nothing.

I’m 47. I was born three years afterwards. I was even a bit of a JFK conspiracy theorist in my 20s. But, at this point in my life, I can honestly say that other than ushering in LBJ’s Great Society, the event has no impact whatsoever on my life.

Yes, it’s a sad day in American history and of historical significance.

But it plays no part in my life, how I feel about others, or how I feel about America. If it weren’t for over-the-hill liberals bringing it up every year, I likely wouldn’t even notice the date. How many of you know the date of the attempt on Reagan by heart? Who can tell me the day of Lincoln’s assassination without looking it up?

I’m sure some do know the answers to both of these. I have a vague recollection, but just as I can never remember if Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon on July 20 or July 21 (or maybe it was July 19?), I’d have to look up the others just to be sure.

And I’m 47. I am pretty sure it’s of even less significance to 20somethings and 30somethings.

Chris of Rights on November 22, 2013 at 9:08 AM

I listened to NPR’s coverage this morning, which headlined the Dallas of 1963 as “The City of Hate”, a reputation they are only just now leaving behind. It was all about right-wingers and race for NPR. Nowhere in their report was there a whisper of a hint that JFK was shot by a hardcore leftist. Anyone who didn’t know better would come away believing he was killed by a hate-filled, racist, right-wing fanatic.

Byron on November 22, 2013 at 9:09 AM

..and while Killery was Dodging Sniper fire,
and Barack was listening to the most beautiful sound calling
Muslims to prayer,
this man actually Served his Country.

ToddPA on November 22, 2013 at 9:10 AM

JFK was a man doing his fathers’s dream, not his own.

celtic warrior on November 22, 2013 at 9:10 AM

I’m 36, so obviously I wasn’t around back then. But I watched that Cronkite video for the first time yesterday. Up until then, I’d only seen the 15 second segment where he says it’s official and takes his glasses off. Truly chilling. I can’t even imagine what it must’ve been like for people watching that live in 1963.

Doughboy on November 22, 2013 at 9:10 AM

Way past caring… which is sad, I still remember getting the news from our 5th grade teacher.

All this looney Left revisionism is the last straw for me.

CPT. Charles on November 22, 2013 at 9:11 AM

If you remember JFK’s inaugural words and indeed the thematic essence of his rhetoric, Obama’s were and are the complete antithesis. JFK said “ask not what your country can do for you, etc.” Obama from the beginning basically said, “don’t ask a thing of yourself. That is wrong. Government is entirely a gift program. You are not obigated to anything but the idea that we are the ones who will give you what you want. Look to us to give it you. It is your right to expect it, and noble of us to provide it.”

rrpjr on November 22, 2013 at 9:11 AM

Msdnc kept saying that Dallas had a bunch of right wing extremists that JFK had to deal with

?????? what?

cmsinaz on November 22, 2013 at 9:12 AM

What does it mean 50 years later?

It’s time to let him rest. It’s time for Democrats to stand on their policy and not on myth, fear mongering and blame.

oldroy on November 22, 2013 at 9:15 AM

LBJ was behind it.

mankai on November 22, 2013 at 9:18 AM

[Byron on November 22, 2013 at 9:09 AM]

Yeah, this meme was obviously pushed hard on Journolist amongst the community of hate, culture of hate crowd in the media and politics to distract from the fact that one of theirs killed JFK.

Dusty on November 22, 2013 at 9:18 AM

I was in Kindergarten in the Bronx. The teacher dismissed us early and told us to pray for the President. Imagine that. My sister picked me up and when we walked home I remember everyone was standing outside in little groups silent and not moving. It was like life had stopped. All colors and all ages were grieving together.

We believed deeply then. We have not believed deeply since.

DeweyWins on November 22, 2013 at 9:19 AM

If you’re ever arguing with liberals about Kennedy’s bona fides as a liberal, share this clip of him talking about tax cuts. They’ll splutter and walk off.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEdXrfIMdiU

rrpjr on November 22, 2013 at 9:19 AM

Regardless of one’s politics , on this day I believe everyone owes it to themselves to watch this tribute to Kennedy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MqjLKxbViEY

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on November 22, 2013 at 9:19 AM

What do you recall about the assassination?

I remember my little brother using it as an excuse to stay home from school.
I remember my older brother lecturing me that they can’t just take Oswald out and shoot him because that would be against the law. And then they did.

kcewa on November 22, 2013 at 9:21 AM

For all you spring chickens out there (looking at you, Ed and CMS) –

It was the day of my sixth birthday party. I was in first grade at St. Mary’s Elementary School. Someone came to the door and beckoned Sister Lucille out to the hallway. When she came back in she was crying, and told us to get down on our knees. The fifty of us started praying The Rosary and kept it up until school let out. (That’s right, fifty kids in the class. One nun. Perfect order at all times, with a few notable exceptions.)

I’m pretty sure the birthday party went on, but only with the neighborhood kids. All the Moms were friends, and they were all crying. The whole world stopped for the next few days and everyone was glued to their televisions. I remember watching Oswald get shot in the stomach live on TV, watching Jackie and Caroline walk up to the casket in the rotunda, lift the flag and kiss the coffin, the whole funeral. It was a terrible time. Also, nobody could stand Lyndon Johnson, he did not fare well in comparison to his predecessor.

Naturally Curly on November 22, 2013 at 9:23 AM

Photo: Half-staff flag above The White House marking the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination – @markknoller
see original on twitter.com
============================

https://twitter.com/markknoller/status/403873258807652353/photo/1/large

canopfor on November 22, 2013 at 9:24 AM

I was 4 – we had just moved from Denver to Chicago and living in a small apartment building in Glen Ellyn. My mom and one of the other ladies in the building stood in the hallway, holding each other crying.

LL

Lady Logician on November 22, 2013 at 9:24 AM

I was 4 years old at the time, and have no direct memory of the assassination. LBJ was the first president I remember.

JFKY on November 22, 2013 at 9:04 AM

I kinda figured that someone would blame Bush. (lol)

Bigfoot on November 22, 2013 at 9:25 AM

Msdnc kept saying that Dallas had a bunch of right wing extremists that JFK had to deal with

?????? what?

cmsinaz on November 22, 2013 at 9:12 AM

cmsinaz:GoodMorning—-:0

MSLSD, will probably say next, that Dallas was the BirthPlace
of Hillarys Vast RightWing Conspiracy Cabal!!!!(sarc)

56m
Photo: Crews raising a commemorative John F. Kennedy banner in Dallas – @gjmccarthy via @RobertWilonsky
see original on twitter.com
===========================

https://twitter.com/RobertWilonsky/status/403877196743180288/photo/1/large

canopfor on November 22, 2013 at 9:28 AM

Thanks NC…..what a birthday party

cmsinaz on November 22, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Morning Canopfor :)

cmsinaz on November 22, 2013 at 9:30 AM

I kinda figured that someone would blame Bush. (lol)

Bigfoot on November 22, 2013 at 9:25 AM

Actually, people have. I kid you not.

Not GWB, but GHWB. See the 10 part series here.

And Twitchy has you covered too.

Chris of Rights on November 22, 2013 at 9:30 AM

All I can say is, “SUCK IT Right Wing Death Beasts! YOU killed JFK, you and the Bush Crime Family, and the Mafia, and the FBI and the CIA and LBJ and 4-8 men with rifles, all around the motorcade” I hope you are proud of your MURDER.

JFKY on November 22, 2013 at 9:04 AM

You left out: the Koch brothers and Hallibuton!

Mitoch55 on November 22, 2013 at 9:30 AM

The guns that killed the presidents: From Lincoln to Kennedy the chilling catalogue of assassins weapons over 148 years

By James Nye

PUBLISHED: 01:24 GMT, 20 November 2013 | UPDATED: 15:14 GMT, 20 November 2013
*************

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2510306/From-Lincoln-JFK–variety-guns-used-assassinate-American-presidents.html

canopfor on November 22, 2013 at 9:31 AM

Morning Canopfor :)

cmsinaz on November 22, 2013 at 9:30 AM

cmsinaz:0

canopfor on November 22, 2013 at 9:32 AM

What it also means is that the legitimate winning candidate of the ’60 election – Richard Nixon, was robbed of the Presidency by voter fraud in Chicago. A fact not even disputed by the left.

oldroy on November 22, 2013 at 9:32 AM

Regardless of one’s politics , on this day I believe everyone owes it to themselves to watch this tribute to Kennedy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MqjLKxbViEY

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on November 22, 2013 at 9:19 AM

That’s good Carlo, though I prefer a tribute to James Finlayson.

rickv404 on November 22, 2013 at 9:35 AM

Reuters Live:

Reuters Live ‏@ReutersLive 1h

Happening Now: JFK remembrance at Arlington National Cemetery http://reut.rs/JFK50
====================

http://live.reuters.com/Event/Remembering_John_F_Kennedys_assassination

canopfor on November 22, 2013 at 9:35 AM

Of all of the wacky conspiracy theories, if there was one that was plausible and make sense is that LBJ did it – He was a ruthless and extremely ambitious character. He lusted for power unmatched by few in his day and he was corrupt through and through. In October of 1963 a Senate Committee that was investigating LBJ ‘s protege Bobby Baker for corruption had turned their attention to the Vice President and his shady dealings. There was rumors in the media that Bobby Kennedy wanted JFK to dump LBJ off the ticket. Reportedly JFK said no but LBJ still felt embarrassed and was greatly concerned about the investigations they could literally send him to jail, in fact on the day of the assassination, some reporters were gathering in NY to discuss what they gathered about Johnson. He was boxed in with no power that he really wanted as a sitting Vice President standing behind a young fellow and his brother who didn’t care much for him and now investigators were turning up stuff about him. That must gave felt that his goose was cooked. He had to get JFK in TX where he and his cronies controlled the powers down there

journeymike on November 22, 2013 at 9:36 AM

JFK – We choose to go to the Moon, full length
**********************************************

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ouRbkBAOGEw

canopfor on November 22, 2013 at 9:38 AM

What do you recall about the assassination? And what do you think it means, 50 years later?

Was about a year away from being born in November 1963.

As to what it means, I think that there is merit in the idea that it marks the point when the Demonrats veered left. They had to place blame somewhere for JFK’s death and it couldn’t be a communist that did it! So, we have a muddled mediocre President re-branded into shining light in the progressive movement. The myths about JFK propelled more than our fair share of the Kennedy clan in public office. The real damage and legacy of the Kennedy assassination was LBJ’s ramping up of the entitlement mentality started during JFK’s time in office.

JFK created furthered the welfare state, got America involved in Vietnam, and cemented the Castro regime into power in Cuba. Good job or something. The creation of the mythological Kennedy has left us with a very carefully set of images (many iconic) which come off as a little stale and sterile. What is missing is the real human being behind the carefully-crafted persona.

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 9:38 AM

I was in third grad when one of the office ladies came in and whispered something to the teacher as she stood before the class. She was instantly horrified and, putting her hand to her mouth, said “Oh no!” and the two of them left the room.

It was obvious to us that the worst thing that could possibly happen in a school must have happened: the principal had died. She returned to the classroom to tell us that we were going home early but didn’t tell us why.

During my five minute walk home a friend and I walked past a kid playing in a sand box. “Hey did you hear the president was killed?” he asked. We mocked him. “That was a hundred years ago you dummy! What, did you just hear about it?!” thinking he was talking about Lincoln, making no connection to the previous hour’s events.

When I got home I learned what happened.

Akzed on November 22, 2013 at 9:40 AM

Well, heres an image, were the Obama’s/Clinton/s actually have their hands over there hearts!!
=======================

First lady Michelle Obama, President Barack Obama, former President Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton participate in a wreath laying in honor of assassinated U.S. President John F. Kennedy at Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, November 20, 2013.

REUTERS/Jason Reed
by Margarita Noriega (Reuters) November 20 at 3:40 PM

http://live.reuters.com/Event/Remembering_John_F_Kennedys_assassination

canopfor on November 22, 2013 at 9:41 AM

Was about a year away from being born in November 1963.

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 9:38 AM

I’m older than you by a few months.

ToddPA on November 22, 2013 at 9:41 AM

What is missing is the real human being behind the carefully-crafted persona.

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 9:38 AM

And he was good with the ladies. Some of whom also ended up dead.

oldroy on November 22, 2013 at 9:41 AM

I was 8 years old at the time. Irish Catholic and the son of immigrant parents, so you can believe that Kennedy’s picture was hanging in a place of honor next to the Pope’s in our home.

I was walking back to my parochial school after lunch and the nuns came running out to meet us in front of the school. They were obviously upset and shooed us away, telling all of us to go on home, that the President had been shot.

I don’t think it even began to hit me until I got home a few minutes later. I felt the full impact when I walked into my living room and saw my mother ironing clothes while she watched the news reports, tears pouring down her cheeks. It upsets me just to think about it. I can still see her as she got out her frustration and grief by slamming the iron down onto the board, bawling her eyes out. She and my father were devastated, the country itself was shattered.

My parents owned a delicatessen and we lived in an apartment in the back. Of course, they immediately closed the store and the strongest memories I have of the next few days are of an stream of endless black and white TV pictures of the funeral.

To my mind, that event was a sharp delineation between two Americas. America began to change that day, and not for the better. I guess that, for those who weren’t around then, 9/11 is the obvious choice for how we felt as a country. Lost and confused and angry.

Those young people who don’t feel connected to this event just need to look around. The America we live in now was born that day. I don’t necessarily mourn JFK, but I do mourn the America that we lost in 1963. It wasn’t perfect, but it’s a heck of a lot better than what we have now.

NavyMustang on November 22, 2013 at 9:42 AM

It’s impossible to convey the effect of the constant reference by the media of the time to the Kennedy years as “Camelot.” It was so prevalent that the original reference to the realm of Arthur Pendragon, an English king and legend, was completely ignored in order to refer to the magical dynasty of a Roman Catholic Irish family with both organized crime and high government connections. I’m pretty sure the 1960 Broadway musical helped out a lot, too, keeping the name in the public consciousness for years.
.
I was in sophomore social studies when the announcement came over the loudspeaker. Of course the girls and the female teachers were wailing and weeping the loudest and most obviously. Lots of communities were burned down in anger and rage, especially in Dallas… ok, that last part wasn’t true but it could have been.
.
Then began the LBJ years, with years and years of war and waste ahead, in the Democrat tradition…

ExpressoBold on November 22, 2013 at 9:43 AM

Regardless of one’s politics , on this day I believe everyone owes it to themselves to watch this tribute to Kennedy:

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on November 22, 2013 at 9:19 AM

Why? The tributes are nothing but iterations of the mythological Kennedy that was created after his death. Not the man who stepped down at Love Field 50 years ago this morning. People forget that Kennedy and LBJ were in Dallas together because JFK had to mend fences with Southern Democrats who were not appreciative of the Nazi-like way the Kennedy boys were dealing with desegregation. JFK and LBJ loathed one another but they were there together because JFK couldn’t pull off the charm offensive by himself (even though LBJ and charm are two words seldom used together).

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 9:43 AM

Nixon on the assassination

kcewa on November 22, 2013 at 9:44 AM

What do you recall about the assassination? And what do you think it means, 50 years later?
=======================

Well, i would’ve of been around, four years old!

canopfor on November 22, 2013 at 9:44 AM

What I find amazing about this man is that his rhetoric
today would be considered “right wing”

ToddPA on November 22, 2013 at 9:07 AM

It’s as unlikely current progressives would vote for a JFK as it is unlikely current conservatives would vote for a Ronald Reagan.
You find both truths amazing?
Pedestals are made of myths.

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 9:48 AM

Why? …

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 9:43 AM

.
Didn’t watch it, did you? *** SNORT ***

ExpressoBold on November 22, 2013 at 9:49 AM

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 9:48 AM

Reagan was a Conservative, you blooming idiot.

kingsjester on November 22, 2013 at 9:51 AM

And he was good with the ladies. Some of whom also ended up dead.

oldroy on November 22, 2013 at 9:41 AM

My point exactly! The myth of Kennedy includes touch football games at the family compound, that posed picture during the Cuban Missile Crisis, images of a loving family photos and “candid” photos of their young children playing at the White House. The real human being behind the branding has seldom been seen and much of it has only emerged decades later. As a result, even the image of Jackie Kennedy watching LBJ take the oath of office in that pink suit and matching hat seems stale and sterile after 50 years. We see the nation reacting to the death of a public official and little about the man behind the myth.

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 9:54 AM

Didn’t watch it, did you? *** SNORT ***

ExpressoBold on November 22, 2013 at 9:49 AM

I think I pretty much made it clear that I have no intention of wasting time on gushing Kennedy tributes.

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 9:56 AM

There are many people in the world who really don’t understand, or say they don’t, what is the great issue between the free world and the Communist world. Let them come to Berlin. There are some who say that communism is the wave of the future. Let them come to Berlin. And there are some who say in Europe and elsewhere we can work with the Communists. Let them come to Berlin. And there are even a few who say that it is true that communism is an evil system, but it permits us to make economic progress. Lass’ sie nach Berlin kommen. Let them come to Berlin.

- Kennedy

In the Communist world, we see failure, technological backwardness, declining standards of health, even want of the most basic kind — too little food. Even today, the Soviet Union still cannot feed itself. After these four decades, then, there stands before the entire world one great and inescapable conclusion: Freedom leads to prosperity. Freedom replaces the ancient hatreds among the nations with comity and peace. Freedom is the victor.
General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!

-Reagan

kcewa on November 22, 2013 at 9:56 AM

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 9:48 AM

Reagan was a Conservative, you blooming idiot.

kingsjester on November 22, 2013 at 9:51 AM

I think you two are using different definitions of conservative. Reagan was undoubtedly a conservative- his very own speeches and writings bear that out. But when leftist trolls want to demonize conservatives they are very selective about what litmus test they use to denounce conservatives and conservatism.

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 9:59 AM

It’s as unlikely current progressives would vote for a JFK as it is unlikely current conservatives would vote for a Ronald Reagan. You find both truths amazing? Pedestals are made of myths. verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 9:48 AM

“…both truths…”? Well progressives communists wouldn’t vote for either because of their tax cuts and opposition to abortion. Seems to me that conservatives are still pining for Reagan. So, just keep making zhit up.

Akzed on November 22, 2013 at 9:59 AM

I think I pretty much made it clear that I have no intention of wasting time on gushing Kennedy tributes.

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 9:56 AM

.
LOL Thanks for the laugh! LOL

ExpressoBold on November 22, 2013 at 10:00 AM

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 9:48 AM

Reagan was a Conservative, you blooming idiot.

kingsjester on November 22, 2013 at 9:51 AM

Yep…’conservative’.
A tax raising, deficit tripling, amnesty supporting, government growing conservative.
Gosh…think of all the horrible things Palin, Cruz, et al would say about him.

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 10:01 AM

You left out: the Koch brothers and Hallibuton!

Mitoch55 on November 22, 2013 at 9:30 AM

I demand that the media release the excised 47 seconds of the Zapruder tape: the part of the tape that shows Sarah Palin, Ted Cruz, and Glenn Beck arriving in 1963 Dallas in their time machine, shooting Kennedy, framing Oswald, and leaving a message for the Koch brothers and Bush family about which stocks to invest in over the rest of the 20th century.

Oswald was a Teabagger plant! His trip to Russia and attempt on Gen. Walker’s life were just diversions to cover his real right-wing leanings.

JimLennon on November 22, 2013 at 10:08 AM

Those young people who don’t feel connected to this event just need to look around. The America we live in now was born that day. I don’t necessarily mourn JFK, but I do mourn the America that we lost in 1963. It wasn’t perfect, but it’s a heck of a lot better than what we have now.

NavyMustang on November 22, 2013 at 9:42 AM

Amen to that!,

Naturally Curly on November 22, 2013 at 10:08 AM

I was 4 years old. I don’t recall the day he was shot at all. I do remember watching the funeral on television with my mother.

The killing of a president is an unspeakable, hideous calamity. This event really did change the course of this country in many respects, but what also troubles me about all this is the revisionist history that gets heaped on this man anytime his legacy is brought up. It’s stunning how people will take an actual, factually-based event recounting and turn it into a narrative to suit their purposes… it’s almost as disgusting as the murder of President Kennedy itself.

dpduq on November 22, 2013 at 10:11 AM

kcewa on November 22, 2013 at 9:56 AM

Indeed.
They were both very good on this.
Anyone can say what they want about either, but to much of the world they stood as stellar reflections and communicators of the promise of American democracy and human rights. That they both at times aligned with and supported those who didn’t share these principles is less a reflection of their character than an affirmation of the complications inherent in being the leader of the free world.

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 10:12 AM

What I find amazing about this man is that his rhetoric
today would be considered “right wing”

ToddPA on November 22, 2013 at 9:07 AM

It’s as unlikely current progressives would vote for a JFK as it is unlikely current conservatives would vote for a Ronald Reagan.
You find both truths amazing?
Pedestals are made of myths.

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 9:48 AM

I have Kennedy’s speeches, quotes to support my claim.
And you have what exactly, suppporting what I bolded??

BTW, I did not place Kennedy on a “Pedestal”
I simply contrasted him with the Democrat party of today.

ToddPA on November 22, 2013 at 10:16 AM

Whoa whoa whoa…confirmed by Dan Rather on the scene?!

Ummm…given Rather’s credibility problems…someone may want to check and see if Kennedy’s actually…You know…deceased. Dan’s been known to ‘embellish’ a story or two.

…Just sayin’.

a5minmajor on November 22, 2013 at 10:18 AM

Kennedy was in Dallas campaigning because his Internal polling showed he had a good chance of losing reelection in ’64.

If he had lived, he would have been a one term, failed president who was too naive in regards to foreign relations to be useful.

portlandon on November 22, 2013 at 10:18 AM

I was 4 – we had just moved from Denver to Chicago and living in a small apartment building in Glen Ellyn. My mom and one of the other ladies in the building stood in the hallway, holding each other crying.

LL

Lady Logician on November 22, 2013 at 9:24 AM

I was also 4 yrs old.

My very first memory in my life was months earlier when my sister was born and riding home from the hospital with her.

The second memory in my life was my living room being dark and my mother standing and watching TV and crying. I don’t know if this was the day of JFK’s death or in the days that followed.

Eternal rest grand onto him, O Lord, and my perpetual light shine upon him. May his soul and all the souls of the faithful departed rest in peace, Amen.

May God have mercy on his soul.

Elisa on November 22, 2013 at 10:19 AM

The killing of a president is an unspeakable, hideous calamity. This event really did change the course of this country in many respects, but what also troubles me about all this is the revisionist history that gets heaped on this man anytime his legacy is brought up.

dpduq on November 22, 2013 at 10:11 AM

Yeah, the revisionists would have you think that JFK was universally admired and not the Cuban-Americans that showed up at JFK events holding an open umbrella to protest JFK’s lack of providing an air umbrella during the Bay of Pigs fiasco.

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 10:22 AM

Kennedy Got us Into Vietnam.
Johnson entrenched us in Vietnam.
Nixon tried to clean up their mess & finally Ended Vietnam.

portlandon on November 22, 2013 at 10:24 AM

A tax raising,

He signed some tax bills increase dems insisted on, but overall taxes went waaay down due to Reagan. But keep eating your own lies.

deficit tripling,

Congress spends the money dimbulb. Congress promised dollar for dollar cuts for tax increases, but spent $1.75 for each dollar he cut. What would have had him do, shut down the govt?

amnesty supporting,

In exchange for border control and tougher penalties, which the communists reneged on.

government growing conservative. verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 10:01 AM

See above.

A half truth is like a half brick. You can throw it twice as far and it does the same damage.

Back on topic, LHO was a communist like you, sukc it.

Akzed on November 22, 2013 at 10:26 AM

Yes,JFK was conservative compared to Democrats today.

All the Kennedys (as Catholics) were against abortion politically until after JFK died.

The year after JFK died Catholic priests who were University theologians, met with the family to convince them that they could politically allow abortion.

It took several years before Ted Kennedy became politically pro-abortion.

Their mother, Rose, and her daughter, Eunice Shriver, never agreed to this and remained politically pro-life.

Elisa on November 22, 2013 at 10:27 AM

JFK averaged over 70% approval ratings for his three years in office, the highest rating of any post-war president.

At some points he was over 80%: Ratings. Yeah, eighty percent.

However, by September of ’63 he was “down” to about 60% and he needed Texas – which he barely won in 1960 – to secure the election.

Who knows what would have happened had he lived? My guess – and that’s all it is – is that he would have beaten Goldwater. After all it’s hard to defeat an incumbent president when the economy is going good. When he took office the unemployment rate was 6.7% and it had dropped to about 5.5% in 1963.

It would have been interesting to see how he responded to the building changes that were taking place. Civil Rights, the women’s movement, the counterculture and of course: Vietnam.

SteveMG on November 22, 2013 at 10:35 AM

It’s as unlikely current progressives would vote for a JFK as it is unlikely current conservatives would vote for a Ronald Reagan.
You find both truths amazing?
Pedestals are made of myths.

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 9:48 AM

I know it’s not like you, but now you are just making stuff up…

oldroy on November 22, 2013 at 10:35 AM

portlandon on November 22, 2013 at 10:24 AM

Kennedy and Reagan on pedestals built partly with myths.
Nixon’s in the corner with a dunce cap he doesn’t fully deserve.
Go figure.

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 10:36 AM

LBJ was behind it.

mankai on November 22, 2013 at 9:18 AM

Yes, he was. He was in the third car behind Kennedy’s.

rickv404 on November 22, 2013 at 10:40 AM

Kennedy and Reagan on pedestals built partly with myths.
Nixon’s in the corner with a dunce cap he doesn’t fully deserve.
Go figure.

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 10:36 AM

Explain the Reagan myth.

oldroy on November 22, 2013 at 10:41 AM

I know it’s not like you, but now you are just making stuff up…

oldroy on November 22, 2013 at 10:35 AM

Reagan died in 2004.
So indeed we’re all hypothesizing on the theoretical.
But you’re deluded if you think someone with Reagan’s record would get a rousing welcome at CPAC. Maybe if you keep his record but call him, let’s see, Raynold Rogon you could better imagine it.

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 10:43 AM

I love these people who say “LBJ was behind it” or “Dulles was behind it.”

What does that mean? Nothing. LBJ or Dulles had to order someone to shoot JFK. And then blame Oswald. And then coverup that crime. And then coverup the investigation of the coverup.

Layer upon layer upon layer, conspiracy on top of conspiracy on top of conspiracy. All kinds of acts, everything running smoothly, none of it breaking down.

And for fifty years none of this came out. No one talked, no one screwed up, no one discovered it, no lone leaked the evidence.

That’s absurd, just absurd.

SteveMG on November 22, 2013 at 10:44 AM

I think I pretty much made it clear that I have no intention of wasting time on gushing Kennedy tributes.

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 9:56 AM

Except it’s not that kind of Kennedy tribute.

rickv404 on November 22, 2013 at 10:46 AM

If you’ve never been to Dealey Plaza, it’s actually quite surreal – it looks now just as it did then (at least going by pix – I was born 11 years to the day after the assassination happened) with a red “X” marking the spot. I haven’t tuned in but supposedly WBAP began a rebroadcast of their work that day, minute-for-minute, beginning at 9 am (yep, you can listen online for free – it’s the local station that carries Rush). The tour through the book depository is well worth it, including the area Oswald took his shot from being cordoned off.

As for what it means, to Democrats and liberals of all stripes, it means another chance to imply that Conservatives are evil, that Dallas was filled with hate, and that it should be forgotten that Kennedy was down there trying to court support from the very businessmen who were supposedly inculcating said hateful climate.

Whatever – I turned 39 today and this is the only thought I’ll give to the subject.

(Also: Happy Birthday ScarJo!)

King B on November 22, 2013 at 10:49 AM

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 10:43 AM

Does Obamacare cover psychotic episodes? Hopefully only in-patient. C’mon, verbaluce, we’re going for ice cream!

Naturally Curly on November 22, 2013 at 10:50 AM

JFK was a racist and an empty suit. They propped him up and he read his script like a the good meat puppet that he was. He was an actor pretending to be a man of substance. It was his birthright handed down from a family of power hungry degenerate criminals.

Buttercup on November 22, 2013 at 10:51 AM

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 10:43 AM

Liberalism is a metal disease. You prove this every day.

oldroy on November 22, 2013 at 10:51 AM

JFK was a racist and an empty suit. They propped him up and he read his script like a the good meat puppet that he was. He was an actor pretending to be a man of substance. It was his birthright handed down from a family of power hungry degenerate criminals.

Buttercup on November 22, 2013 at 10:51 AM

It was actually his older brother’s birthright. He was the B team.

Naturally Curly on November 22, 2013 at 10:53 AM

And for fifty years none of this came out. No one talked, no one screwed up, no one discovered it, no lone leaked the evidence.

That’s absurd, just absurd.

SteveMG on November 22, 2013 at 10:44 AM

The mafia are notoriously bad record keepers but they are very discrete. ;0

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 10:54 AM

He was an actor pretending to be a man of substance. It was his birthright handed down from a family of power hungry degenerate criminals.

Buttercup on November 22, 2013 at 10:51 AM

Which is why LBJ loathed him. LBJ was supposed to be “the next one” when this upstart junior Senator swooped in and got the nomination for POTUS. There was no love lost between the staffs of JFK and LBJ. In fact, LBJ found out that he was going to be President from the news and not from Kennedy’s people. He had been sitting in the hospital for over 30 minutes without anybody thinking it important enough a development to tell him. LBJ, in turn, demanded that Jackie Kennedy be there for the swearing in (to reinforce the fact that he was President). Which had the Kennedy people seething that Johnson was on “their” plane at all.

I’ve often wondered if this is the kind of relationship Biden has with the lazy stupid Kennedy of another generation.

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 11:01 AM

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 10:43 AM

Liberalism is a metal disease. You prove this every day.

oldroy on November 22, 2013 at 10:51 AM

Sure…only some presidents have been mythologized, right?
Ha.
None of these guys were personal friends of mine or yours (I assume).
No need to take any of it personally.
If you’re gonna get so offended at critiques of the hagiographies…avoid history lessons and stick with talk radio.

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 11:01 AM

The assassination started a turbulent decade of protests and worse, more assassinations — Martin Luther King and Kennedy’s brother Robert among them — and the expansion of what would then be America’s longest war, and its most divisive in a hundred years.

By all means let’s stoke another myth of Camelot, that Saint John would have magically found peace in Vietnam, and followed a different path than Johnson did.

slickwillie2001 on November 22, 2013 at 11:02 AM

I was in my mother’s womb…born about 5 weeks later just after Christmas. Whenever the subject came up my mother would tell her story of how she rushed to pick up 5 of my 6 brothers at school that afternoon. Being a devout Catholic she admired Kennedy even though she and my father were conservative. About 15 years ago when cleaning out our childhood home in preparation for sale, my brothers and I found many Nov. 23, 1963 newspapers she kept.

Brat on November 22, 2013 at 11:05 AM

Since I was born in ’82 the first time I really ever heard about JFK he was a martyr who could do no wrong and was the greatest man to ever live or something. Then I had Oliver Stone’s JFK, which even to a 9 year old didn’t seem accurate haha.

I would say most people my age only know he was assassinated and that he hooked up with Marilyn Monroe, that’s about it.

Also, never really got the big deal when JFK Jr died in the plane crash, but maybe it’s because I grew up long after the whole Camelot thing.

nextgen_repub on November 22, 2013 at 11:10 AM

And for fifty years none of this came out. No one talked, no one screwed up, no one discovered it, no one leaked the evidence.

That’s absurd, just absurd.

SteveMG on November 22, 2013 at 10:44 AM

The mafia are notoriously bad record keepers but they are very discreet. ;0

Happy Nomad on November 22, 2013 at 10:54 AM

Jimmy Hoffa.

slickwillie2001 on November 22, 2013 at 11:10 AM

If you’re gonna get so offended at critiques of the hagiographies…avoid history lessons and stick with talk radio.

verbaluce on November 22, 2013 at 11:01 AM

I’m not offended. Just amused. You poor thing.

Hows business?

oldroy on November 22, 2013 at 11:16 AM

The mafia are notoriously bad record keepers but they are very discrete. ;0

Well, the mob is different that the LBJ did it. And mob people do talk. In return for lesser sentencing, et cetera.

I used to think that they were involved – Ruby shooting Oswald screams of it.

But Ruby was a nothing, they wouldn’t use him for such an act. And if they did then they’d have to shut him up. Wouldn’t he talk?

To his last days Ruby denied shooting Oswald as part of a conspiracy.

And you still have to connect Oswald to the mob. And it’s just not there. Ferrie? That’s a reach. Oswald was pro-Castro and Ferrie anti-Castro. The two don’t mix.

SteveMG on November 22, 2013 at 11:17 AM

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