Three Teslas burn inside of six weeks

posted at 8:01 pm on November 7, 2013 by Steve Eggleston

Remember the rash of fires in Chevrolet Volts that led to the call-back of essentially the entire production run early last year? It sure seems that a similar fate is in store for the Tesla Model S after the third Tesla invilved in an on-road incident caught fire:

“Our team is on its way to Tennessee to learn more about what happened in the accident,” Tesla spokeswoman Elizabeth Jarvis-Shean said in a statement. “We will provide more information when we’re able to do so.”

The company said the fire was the result of an accident and was not a spontaneous event.

The Tennessee Highway Patrol said the afternoon incident occurred on Interstate 24 in Smyrna when the electric car “ran over a tow hitch” that “hit the undercarriage of the vehicle causing an electrical fire.”

The Model S undercarriage has armor plating that protects the lithium-ion battery pack. Tesla said it did not yet know whether the fire involved the car’s battery.

Tesla’s battery pack is made up of small lithium-ion battery cells that are also used in laptop computers, an approach not used by other automakers. The battery pack stretches across the base of the vehicle. In comparison, General Motors Co uses large-format battery cells in a T-shape in the center of the Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrid car.

The first fire, in Seattle on October 1, happened in a similar manner when a driver of a Tesla ran over debris in the road, which punctured the armor plating. The second happened in Mexico later in the month when the car was driven over a roundabout, through a concrete wall, and into a tree.

Three fires may not seem like much, but two of those were after rather minor incidents that gasoline-powered cars would pretty much shrug off. Moreover, that’s out of less than 20,000 vehicles on the road.

Say, wasn’t the Boeing 787 Dreamliner grounded for a few months due to fires in its lithium-ion battery packs?

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Yeah. They’ll do that.

Bmore on November 7, 2013 at 8:03 PM

Well, really, they’re just plugged-in Pintos.

de rigueur on November 7, 2013 at 8:06 PM

Plugged-in OVERPRICED Pintos.

de rigueur on November 7, 2013 at 8:06 PM

Three Teslas burn inside of six weeks

Well, at least they didn’t burn inside of six GARAGES!

Heh heh…

Ok, going now…

Marcola on November 7, 2013 at 8:07 PM

0 has seen it happen at least twice that I know of.

Bmore on November 7, 2013 at 8:08 PM

Unsafe at any speed!

rbj on November 7, 2013 at 8:08 PM

Three Teslas burn inside of six weeks

Dateline NBC could do a story about this … and they wouldn’t even have to spend money buying their own explosives.

Never happen.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on November 7, 2013 at 8:09 PM

All three of them? There goes the fleet.

blammm on November 7, 2013 at 8:09 PM

Yawn. Call me when they are spontaneously catching fire. Of course there is a fire risk in an accident. The only reason this is a news story is because editors know that people will just read the title and assume that the cars are randomly catching fire.

thphilli on November 7, 2013 at 8:09 PM

Three Teslas burn inside of six weeks

On the bright side, they didn’t brick … so, there’s that!

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on November 7, 2013 at 8:11 PM

Un-safe at any speed.

ama on November 7, 2013 at 8:13 PM

another prediction by Sarah.

bite me haters.

renalin on November 7, 2013 at 8:14 PM

The only reason this is a news story is because editors know that people will just read the title and assume that the cars are randomly catching fire.

thphilli on November 7, 2013 at 8:09 PM

They have the Fister Kharmas for that. Well … with a few rain croplets, so not completely random. Just don’t drive them if there’s more than a 1% of showers and you’re good to go.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on November 7, 2013 at 8:14 PM

On the bright side, they didn’t brick … so, there’s that!

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on November 7, 2013 at 8:11 PM

It’s funny how no one talks about the bricking thing…And how they downplay minor accidents causing ford pinto-esque spontaneous combustion (once is an accident, two is a pattern)…or how the car never seems to actually get the advertised mileage on a single charge…or how, like most things driven by batteries, it’s performance is significantly impacted by cold weather.

It’s basically a battery-powered lotus, and while it is far better designed than most other electric cars, it is still a very flawed bit of technology. Lithium batteries are garbage, and they always will be garbage. Putting garbage in a pretty box is still garbage.

DangerHighVoltage on November 7, 2013 at 8:15 PM

which punctured the armor plating

Huh? ARMOR plating is pretty hard to “puncture”. And ARMOR plating is HEAVY.

GarandFan on November 7, 2013 at 8:17 PM

Planned obsolescence!

ajacksonian on November 7, 2013 at 8:18 PM

The second happened in Mexico later in the month when the car was driven over a roundabout, through a concrete wall, and into a tree.

That might have totaled a gasoline-powered car as well. Watch out for Mexican drivers!

Wonder what would happen to a Tesla if it ran over a deer?

Steve Z on November 7, 2013 at 8:18 PM

Interesting thing: my dad has had a Prius for 10 years without having to do any maintenance on it beyond oil changes. I though the batteries were supposed to need replacing in half that time, but he’s not having any problems with it.

Count to 10 on November 7, 2013 at 8:19 PM

♫ Burn, baby, burn…..
Tesla infernoooooooo…♫

viking01 on November 7, 2013 at 8:21 PM

“Gone In 60 Seconds”

Electrongod on November 7, 2013 at 8:23 PM

It’s funny how no one talks about the bricking thing…

It’s a self-limiting problem. The owners of bricked Teslas can’t get anywhere to complain.

It’s basically a battery-powered lotus, and while it is far better designed than most other electric cars, it is still a very flawed bit of technology. Lithium batteries are garbage, and they always will be garbage. Putting garbage in a pretty box is still garbage.

DangerHighVoltage on November 7, 2013 at 8:15 PM

You know, when I first read this I saw “battery powered totus” … and it still made lots of sense :)

All true. People would be better off with the Tesla as a kit car with a volkswagen engine and chassis. Can’t get half a billion of feral government funding for volkswagen kit-cars, though …

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on November 7, 2013 at 8:24 PM

This can’t be.
Top Gear (USA) just gave Toast-la its blessing!

derit on November 7, 2013 at 8:25 PM

“carbon neutral”

Does each Tesla burn site instantly become an EPA superfund site?

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 8:25 PM

This can’t be.
Top Gear (USA) just gave Toast-la its blessing!

derit on November 7, 2013 at 8:25 PM

The real Top Gear’s “Geoff” was superior in every category.

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 8:26 PM

Tesla–The new kindling.

predator on November 7, 2013 at 8:32 PM

It’s dead, Jim.

Philly on November 7, 2013 at 8:36 PM

Does each Tesla burn site instantly become an EPA superfund site?

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 8:25 PM

I think Lithium batteries are basically just lithium and plastic. Not like a spill of lead and sulfuric acid. I could be wrong, though.

Count to 10 on November 7, 2013 at 8:39 PM

Just recently had lunch with an acquaintance. He had a Tesla. We talked about it. He was warned about puncturing the batteries, also about the bricking. Battery pack is good for 5 to 8 years and costs an estimated $38k to replace. Warranty doesn’t cover them. The car is mostly carbon fiber. Full charge is good for about 250 miles and takes about 6 hours to recharge. He agreed that it’s not a practical car just an expensive toy. Over the years he’s had everything from a DeLorean to a Lamborghini. I don’t look for him to have this thing long.

Oldnuke on November 7, 2013 at 8:45 PM

It’s actually a dishonor to the great Nikola Tesla to have this company carry his name.

Mark1971 on November 7, 2013 at 8:46 PM

It’s actually a dishonor to the great Nikola Tesla to have this company carry his name.

Mark1971 on November 7, 2013 at 8:46 PM

But Tesla, being the closest thing in living history to a comic book mad scientist, was pretty fond of crazy toys (google ‘tesla death ray’) so even though it’s kind of a lousy overpriced toy, he’d still probably like it.

Over the years he’s had everything from a DeLorean to a Lamborghini. I don’t look for him to have this thing long.

Oldnuke on November 7, 2013 at 8:45 PM

If he doesn’t want the DeLorean anymore I’ll take it :)

I think Lithium batteries are basically just lithium and plastic. Not like a spill of lead and sulfuric acid. I could be wrong, though.

Count to 10 on November 7, 2013 at 8:39 PM

Lithium batteries are pretty nasty, actually, depending on the chemistry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_battery#Chemistries

DangerHighVoltage on November 7, 2013 at 8:51 PM

“That’ll buff out…”

Haiku Guy on November 7, 2013 at 8:55 PM

If it keeps puncturing they may want to re-think calling it “armor-plating.”

viking01 on November 7, 2013 at 9:00 PM

Huh? ARMOR plating is pretty hard to “puncture”. And ARMOR plating is HEAVY.

GarandFan on November 7, 2013 at 8:17 PM

It depends on the material used and the definition of “armor”. I suspect it is a thin layer of kevlar.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 9:07 PM

Lithium batteries are pretty nasty, actually, depending on the chemistry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_battery#Chemistries

DangerHighVoltage on November 7, 2013 at 8:51 PM

Looks like it depends a lot on the type.

Count to 10 on November 7, 2013 at 9:08 PM

I think Lithium batteries are basically just lithium and plastic. Not like a spill of lead and sulfuric acid. I could be wrong, though.

Count to 10 on November 7, 2013 at 8:39 PM

While lithium-ion batteries are essentially “dry-cell” batteries, they have had a rather checkered history of flaming up. Long before they became an issue in Chevrolet Volts and Boeing 787s, early-application lithium-ion batteries used in laptops were fire hazards.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 9:10 PM

Those cars are HOT!
Stupid tool greenies. Hope the owners were smart enough to get out in time.

RovesChins on November 7, 2013 at 9:11 PM

This can’t be.
Top Gear (USA) just gave Toast-la its blessing!

derit on November 7, 2013 at 8:25 PM

The real Top Gear’s “Geoff” was superior in every category.

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 8:26 PM

Have to agree … the real Top Gear is British.

Lost in Jersey on November 7, 2013 at 9:12 PM

Two one hundredths of one percent of all Teslas have caught fire.
 
Meh.
 
Four one hundredths of one percent pregnancies are due to rape or incest.
 
Wendy Davis for governor!

rogerb on November 7, 2013 at 9:15 PM

While lithium-ion batteries are essentially “dry-cell” batteries, they have had a rather checkered history of flaming up. Long before they became an issue in Chevrolet Volts and Boeing 787s, early-application lithium-ion batteries used in laptops were fire hazards.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 9:10 PM

Yep. I just haven’t heard of them being extraordinarily toxic when they do it.

Count to 10 on November 7, 2013 at 9:17 PM

This can’t be.
Top Gear (USA) just gave Toast-la its blessing!

derit on November 7, 2013 at 8:25 PM

The real Top Gear’s “Geoff” was superior in every category.

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 8:26 PM
In one of the stories I considered using as the source material (I don’t feel like digging through the browser history for it), the writer noted that the Tesla was deemed one of the safest cars on the planet just a few months ago.

Neither could hold a candle to the Hammerhead Eagle i-Thrust. Of course, that car couldn’t hold its own exhaust pipe, but what do you expect from 2 autotmotive journalists and a TV-friendly presenter?

And yes, the British version is better, even though both the British and American versions are produced by BBC.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 9:18 PM

Have to agree … the real Top Gear is British.

Lost in Jersey on November 7, 2013 at 9:12 PM

Is that the guy that lost a race against a Typhoon?

Count to 10 on November 7, 2013 at 9:18 PM

rogerb on November 7, 2013 at 9:15 PM

The latter stat is quite stable. The former will more than likely surpass the latter.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 9:20 PM

Is that the guy that lost a race against a Typhoon?

Count to 10 on November 7, 2013 at 9:18 PM

Come on – that was probably the only flight that RAF pilot made that month.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 9:21 PM

Yawn. Call me when they are spontaneously catching fire.

thphilli on November 7, 2013 at 8:09 PM

An electric car bursting into flames after running over a tow hitch is rather “spontaneous”.

ddrintn on November 7, 2013 at 9:21 PM

Hot car!

OldEnglish on November 7, 2013 at 9:23 PM

Yawn. Call me when they are spontaneously catching fire.

thphilli on November 7, 2013 at 8:09 PM

You mean like the Volts?

Most gasoline-powered vehicles don’t brew up when they run over something. There are, however, some tragic exceptions.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 9:26 PM

These Hot Wheels must have Obama the Pantzonfyre-in-Chief as their marketing guy.

socalcon on November 7, 2013 at 9:52 PM

Yep. I just haven’t heard of them being extraordinarily toxic when they do it.

Count to 10 on November 7, 2013 at 9:17 PM

They are classified as hazmat when they are shipped via mail. MSDS sheets for small batteries state that you don’t want the contents to get on you (example: http://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg4/cg432/docs/msds/MSDS_LiIon.pdf) so I would imagine that a car-sized lithium battery represents a pretty toxic chemical spill when it catches fire/explodes. Maybe not Chernobyl toxic, but still pretty nasty. I’ll just say I wouldn’t want to clean it up without a chem suit and respirator on.

DangerHighVoltage on November 7, 2013 at 10:11 PM

As for the armor plate, Dad29, one of my dwindling number of Cheddarsphere mates, passed along this item from Autoextremist:

What I’ve found out about the Tesla is this: There is a reason for fires upon impact with the Model S and it has nothing to do with the batteries themselves but how the batteries are – or are not, as the case may be – protected in the vehicle.

We all know Elon is a genius and that Tesla is the miracle of the new automotive world, but the fact remains that the miracle workers at Tesla skipped a step. It’s something that GM – you know, that tired old rust-belt auto company from a bygone era – learned while developing the Volt. The GM engineering team zeroed in on a critical area of concern with the Volt’s batteries when it came to protecting them upon impact, something like, “Gee, if someone were to really crash one of these things there could be a problem with the batteries, so, we better do something about it.” So the GM development team triple-wrapped the Volt battery pack to reduce the chance of “piercing” during accidents.

Tesla, we have a problem.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 10:17 PM

Whoops – left off the most-important paragraph:

And guess what? The “piercing” of the batteries is exactly what caused the two post-crash fires in the Model S. Why? The Tesla development team chose to single-wrap the Tesla batteries, thus leaving the batteries less protected and more exposed during incidents, which is a giant heaping, steaming bowl of Not Good, when it comes right down to it.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 10:21 PM

we all know how HotAir feels about electric cars…

tlynch001 on November 7, 2013 at 10:23 PM

we all know how HotAir feels about electric cars…

tlynch001 on November 7, 2013 at 10:23 PM

Damn straight. I want a nuclear one.

viking01 on November 7, 2013 at 10:36 PM

we all know how HotAir feels about electric cars…

tlynch001 on November 7, 2013 at 10:23 PM

Other than having to set aside 10 hours to get to Chicago from Milwaukee with a non-Tesla electric car (a trip that, depending on rush-hour traffic, takes less than 2 hours in a petroleum-powered vehicle) or a full day to get to Minneapolis in any electric car (which takes less than 5 hours in a petroleum-powered vehicle), and needing to replace thousands of dollars’ worth (or in the case of Tesla, tens of thousands’ of dollars’ worth) of batteries before the rest of the car fails, and sacrificing significant cargo-carrying ability because the battery pack weighs a lot more than the equivalent amount of gasoline,….

I wouldn’t mind a turbine-electric vehicle (no, not a hybrid – a full-on electric motor with a turbine generator providing electric juice when needed).

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 10:44 PM

Neither could hold a candle to the Hammerhead Eagle i-Thrust. Of course, that car couldn’t hold its own exhaust pipe, but what do you expect from 2 autotmotive journalists and a TV-friendly presenter?

And yes, the British version is better, even though both the British and American versions are produced by BBC.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 9:18 PM

Leave it to SteveEgg to get all technical… /

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 10:53 PM

As impractical as an electric car may be today, there was a time when a gasoline powered automobile faced similar problems. There wasn’t exactly a gas station on every corner when automobiles first started out. Tesla has a plan to make recharging the cars convenient and in some cases, free. I’ve yet to see anyone from Detroit, Japan, Korea, or Europe even attempt to make gasoline free.

I’ve driven the Tesla S. It’s an amazing car with tremendous acceleration. The car is well designed and flexible enough for many types of customers. I wouldn’t buy one – because I can’t afford one. But it is a sweet ride.

Concerns about cold weather, etc. probably have some validity to them. They will do well in LA, where I did my test drive, but I don’t know how well they’ll sell in upstate NY.

I don’t think the stories about cars in accidents burning will deter anyone from buying them. Remember, the guy in Mexico walked away from a crash that looked pretty serious. So, it was a news story about nothing, really.

Most importantly, I got to drive a Tesla S, and that is an exciting experience.

Know It All on November 7, 2013 at 10:54 PM

The “electric car” serves me so fking well in the 5 block by 5 block chemical plant that I work in. You have to be cautious and not drive it into an explosion prone building. How cool is it to plug it into the wall and recharge it from the abundant southern illinois coal powered electricity grid though.

Totally green transport.

Yeah COAL!

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 11:00 PM

These cars seem as useful as their namesake.

thebrokenrattle on November 7, 2013 at 11:05 PM

As impractical as an electric car may be today, there was a time when a gasoline powered automobile faced similar problems. There wasn’t exactly a gas station on every corner when automobiles first started out. Tesla has a plan to make recharging the cars convenient and in some cases, free. I’ve yet to see anyone from Detroit, Japan, Korea, or Europe even attempt to make gasoline free.

I’ve driven the Tesla S. It’s an amazing car with tremendous acceleration. The car is well designed and flexible enough for many types of customers. I wouldn’t buy one – because I can’t afford one. But it is a sweet ride.

Concerns about cold weather, etc. probably have some validity to them. They will do well in LA, where I did my test drive, but I don’t know how well they’ll sell in upstate NY.

I don’t think the stories about cars in accidents burning will deter anyone from buying them. Remember, the guy in Mexico walked away from a crash that looked pretty serious. So, it was a news story about nothing, really.

Most importantly, I got to drive a Tesla S, and that is an exciting experience.

Know It All on November 7, 2013 at 10:54 PM

It would still take you days to get to San Francisco from LA even with free Tesla charging stations along the way, a trip that would take you about 6 hours in a petroleum-fueled vehicle. After all, it is far more than a charge away.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 11:08 PM

It would still take you days to get to San Francisco from LA even with free Tesla charging stations along the way, a trip that would take you about 6 hours in a petroleum-fueled vehicle. After all, it is far more than a charge away.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 11:08 PM

Why would Tesla charging stations be free?

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 11:14 PM

Leave it to SteveEgg to get all technical… /

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 10:53 PM

Did you say technical?

I have got to get one of those for my Tacoma.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 11:15 PM

Why would Tesla charging stations be free?

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 11:14 PM

Because that’s a dumb business model?

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 11:16 PM

It would still take you days to get to San Francisco from LA even with free Tesla charging stations along the way, a trip that would take you about 6 hours in a petroleum-fueled vehicle. After all, it is far more than a charge away.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 11:08 PM

You beat me to it. The difference is that to “recharge” a gasoline powered car takes a couple minutes. The electric car has to sit overnight. Even in the dark ages of automobile transport, you could still increase your travel range by carrying extra fuel. (and some early cars offered jerrycans as accessories to do just that) But with an electric car where the batteries make up half the weight/volume of the car, you can’t carry more batteries with you.

Unless they one day create an electric car that is able to mimic the “combustion engine experience” and refuel in <15 minutes or so**, they'll never catch on with widespread appeal.

**Sometimes I hear promising things about ultracapacitors, but those, like hidrogen fuel cells and other in my opinion more promising alternative fuel technologies, are always shunted in favor of battery-powered EV's the reason? Papa government loves to pick losers, and that's where the grant money goes. (See also embryonic vs adult stem cell research. One is bad science and pretty freaking unethical, the other potentially miraculous with proven therapies already showwn. Guess what gets the money, because with papa government it's more about being right than practicing good science.)

DangerHighVoltage on November 7, 2013 at 11:18 PM

I have got to get one of those for my Tacoma.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 11:15 PM

I had a Tacoma. Best built American truck on the market. :)

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 11:21 PM

Concerns about cold weather, etc. probably have some validity to them.

Know It All on November 7, 2013 at 10:54 PM

It’s already well known.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/automobiles/stalled-on-the-ev-highway.html?ref=automobiles&_r=1&amp;

Funny thing is this probably wouldn’t have gotten so much attention if the CEO hadn’t thrown a tantrum like a five year old because someone wrote an article that criticized his product.

DangerHighVoltage on November 7, 2013 at 11:24 PM

DangerHighVoltage on November 7, 2013 at 11:18 PM

Supposedly there’s a high-voltage “quick-charge” option, which gives about 10% charge (for Volt/Leaf-ranged vehicles) in 10 minutes. Of course, that’s about 10 miles’ worth of charge, and at a reduced energy capacity. Yes, even lithium-based batteries do not give full output when they’re close to fully discharged, which is another disadvantage compared to petroleum.

I don’t think ultracapacitors are the answer – they’re more of a quick-discharge device, which isn’t exactly useful in an automotive setting. Hydrogen is quite interesting – too bad it was killed on the domestic side when Team SCOAMT took over GM and Chrysler.

Steve Eggleston on November 7, 2013 at 11:25 PM

As impractical as a electric car steam-powered car may be today, there was a time when a gasoline powered automobile faced similar problems….

Know It All on November 7, 2013 at 10:54 PM

Oops.

slickwillie2001 on November 7, 2013 at 11:31 PM

…he11!…we should have more threads like this!
…for real!

KOOLAID2 on November 7, 2013 at 11:32 PM

…he11!…we should have more threads like this!
…for real!

KOOLAID2 on November 7, 2013 at 11:32 PM

It really is just Semtex, with a steering wheel!

Murphy9 on November 7, 2013 at 11:50 PM

The Detroit News Business Section -Thursday, November 7
By Tom Krisher and David Koening…Associated Press
(headline)…Telsa stock drops sharply amid battery shortage.
Electric car maker has a battery problem. It doesn’t have enough of them….blah…blah…blah…
…(continues)…That’s one reason the high-flying company’s shares fell 14.5 per-cent Wednesday, its sharpest drop in almost two years…the CEO blamed the shortage of batteries for trouble …meeting demand…..
ha ha!!
…claims there won’t be any relief until next year!

KOOLAID2 on November 8, 2013 at 2:20 AM

Elon Musk to release blog post blaming everything on earth except the design of the vehicle or the fact that the technology is still about a generation away from mass-market, complete with a wall of statistics about how a regular car is approximate 27,415 times more dangerous than a Tesla in 3… 2… 1…

The Schaef on November 8, 2013 at 9:12 AM

Until someone can design a battery with better than 70% energy transfer in charge, and better than 70% energy delivery to load (getting more than 46% in either case is considered almost miraculous), then running large devices from batteries is a fool’s errand.

The amount of energy which must be generated somewhere else (like a coal-fired powerplant) in order to deliver the inefficiently employed battery power to the car, could be used to produce more efficient forms of output power. The indirect pollution allows the makers of these piles of trash to claim that they are zero-emission. It’s a lie with the thinnest veneer of truth. “Hey look, no exhaust pipe, therefore no pollution!” Not really true, the pollution is simply caused somewhere else. And then there is the unstable lifetime of a battery. One cell failing prematurely can require maintenance on the entire system, depending upon the arrangement. Any problem with the batteries means your car is completely inop until the necessary maintenance is performed. Any leak of a cell is toxic, and must be treated as a HAZMAT event.

No thanks.

Freelancer on November 8, 2013 at 12:57 PM

I don’t really get why this is newsworthy on a mainly political blog. It’s a technology issue. I really don’t like how many conservatives try to lump green technology in with liberalism, and therefore “the enemy”. It’s immature and stupid. Almost every post on this blog that has anything to do with solar power or electric cars etc is negative, while older fuels are only painted positively. There are positives and negatives about both, and I’m in favor of using both for our energy consumption.

Inquizitor on November 8, 2013 at 2:58 PM